CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY

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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
INFORMATION ON AREA 2: CURRICULUM DESIGN
AND DELIVERY
2.1
Academic Autonomy
Information on Benchmarked Standards
2.1.1
Describe the provisions and practices that ensure the autonomy of the department in
curriculum design and delivery, and in allocation of resources. Provide supporting
documents where appropriate.
MEDIU aims to provide a high standard and quality of service in respect of its programmes
of study, services and facilities, as well as the spirit of enterprise.
With reference to the university’s constitution, Section 20 (3)
A School, Centre, Academy and Institute shall be responsible to the Senate in relation to
arrangement of subjects taught within the jurisdiction of that School, Centre, Academy and
Institute, following whichever relevant, and may exercise any other function given to them by
Statute, rules and regulations.
Article 2 from the Faculties and Institutes Rules states that:
The responsibility of managing the faculty, institute, or academic centre is assigned to:
-
Council of the faculty, institute, or academic centre.
-
Dean of a faculty, institute, or director of an academic centre
Faculties, institutes and centres are given the right and full responsibility to design their
curriculum in accordance with relevant requirements and needs in order to meet their set
targets.
Resources allocation is, usually, based on the following input:
-
Academic staff planning
-
Current and expected number of enrolled students
-
New planed programmes
-
Lecturer-student ratio in the field of study
Required facilities
equipment
that isNetworking
relevant to the field of study.
Bachelor -of Computer
Sciences and
(Hons)
in Computer
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Resource allocation Review Process
The process for reviewing resource allocation may be top-down or bottom-up and
involves decisions made at the following meetings:
The University council
The University Top Management Committee (TMC)
Faculty/Institute/School Management
Recommendations from management audit, quality audit and financial audit are used, as
well, to review the allocations of resources.
2.1.2
Show the relationship between the departmental board and the senate.
The departmental board operates under faculty board, which endorse all its academic
related decisions. The faculty board, then, have to submit all endorsed decisions to the
Senate for approval before they are implemented by the department/faculty.
2.1.3
How does the department ensure that the academic staff have sufficient autonomy
in areas of his expertise?
Academic staff is given the right and responsibility within the jurisdiction of their Faculty,
School, Centre, Academy and Institute to design their curriculum in accordance with their
field of expertise in order to meet their faculty objectives and serve the university targets.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Information on Enhanced Standards
2.1.4
State the departmental policies and practices to address conflict of interest, for
example, staff involvement in private practice, part-time employment and
consultancy services.
MEDIU addresses conflicts of interest according to:
-
Policies of the Employment Guidelines of MEDIU
Staff may be given the permission based on case to case basis and with the
permission of the university administrator MEDIU Work Ethics
-
Letter of Undertaking
-
Oath of Integrity in Public Service
-
2.1.5
What are the HEP’s plans to expand the autonomy of the academic staff? What is
the department’s role and how does it support this?
MEDIU adopts a working style that encourages the academicians to be independent
and self-directed in all academic activities within the area of their expertise. MEDIU are
planning for a full program of training, workshops, and seminars to promote and
expand the autonomy of the academic staff.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.2
Programme Design and Teaching-Learning Methods
Information on Benchmarked Standards
2.2.1
Describe the processes, procedures, and mechanisms for curriculum development.
How are the academic and administrative staff involved in this process?
The curriculum development process can be divided into five main steps:
1) Needs assessment.
2) The planning session.
3) Content development.
4) Pilot delivery and revision
5) Finalising the completed curriculum package.
The steps are managed and supervised by committees that are composed from experts in
the related domain and supported by the administrative officers of the faculty.
These committees present their output to the faculty for further discussion and
endorsement. After getting the approval of the faculty, the draft will be presented to the
Senate committee of curriculum for further deliberation and endorsement of the Senate.
The approved curriculum will then be submitted to MQA for assessment and
recommendation and the approval of the Minister of Higher Education.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.2.2
What are the various teaching and learning methods used in curriculum delivery
to achieve the programme learning outcomes? Describe them.
Teaching and learning will be through a mixture of lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical
classes, projects, supervised individual and group written work, and internship. Much of
the teaching materials will be provided in electronic form, with ALIM (Advanced Learning
and Interactive Management System). The student will progress from being guided
towards the relevant material to become more independent as they progressively adapt
self-learning and achieve the program learning outcomes. Electronic and online
teaching, learning, and assessment will be used where practical and appropriate.
2.2.3
Show evidence that the department have considered market and societal demand
for the programme as well as sufficient resources to run it.
The program is designed to meet the growing demand of the market for graduates with
broad training in both networking and multimedia. This programme offers a blend of
networking and multimedia technologies and introduces the students to a wide range of
interrelated skills in the networking and multimedia fields.
The university has planned sufficient resources at all levels to run the program
professionally and effectively.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.2.4
Explain how the programme promotes critical enquiry, develop problem solving,
decision making, and analytical thinking skills, as well as encourages students to
take active responsibility for their learning, and prepares them for lifelong learning.
The program is structured to promote critical enquiry, develop problem solving, decision
making, and analytical thinking skills, as well as encourages students to take active
responsibility for their learning, and prepares them for lifelong learning via a set of well
designed and dedicated modules throughout the program (e.g. project management, and
Data Structure & Algorithm...), in addition to the adopted teaching, learning, and
assessment methods (2.2.2).
2.2.5
Describe the diverse learning methods and sources, within and outside the
classroom, where students acquire knowledge, mastery of skills, and develop
attitudes and behaviour in preparation for their learning, individual growth, future
work and responsible citizenry (e.g., co-curriculum).
Teaching and learning will be a mixture of lectures, tutorials, and practical sessions
associated with each module within classrooms and laboratories that are equipped with
the appropriate and latest resources, e.g. computers, software, devices and tools...
Outside the classroom, the students will be exposed to a range of skills and concepts
during their external project and internship, supported by the appropriate resources to
effectively gain the planned learning outcomes of the program.
Additionally, the students will have access to the university co-curriculum programs that
will help them to gain valuable personal and professional skills, effective oral and written
communication, decision making, financial management, problem solving, ethics and
tolerance as well as personal and professional balance.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Information on Enhanced Standards
2.2.6
Show how the programme encourages a multi-disciplinary approach and cocurricular activities in enhancing and enriching the personal development of
the learner.
The programme is structured to encourage a multi-disciplinary approach and cocurricular activities in enhancing and enriching the personal development of the
learner, by an array of MQA, University, faculty, core, and elective modules.
Consequently, it is expected that, upon graduating, students will be equipped to
enter the workforce as skilled and knowledgeable graduates in all aspects of
networking and multimedia computing, and undertake their work in an ethical way
within their fields of expertise.
Moreover, the programme with modules as project management, Communication for
the Workplace, and other technical modules will enable the students to confidently
further their career development or their studies by joining Masters, MPhil or, Ph. D.
Programmes.
2.2.7
How are external sources engaged in the needs analysis for this programme?
How are their commentaries utilised to improve the programme?
MEDIU and the faculty have always engaged external sources to seek their views
and opinion on the proposed programmes at the university and the faculty level, in
terms of their marketability, acceptability, and viability. The external sources opinion
and recommendation are sought for in formal or informal manner to be subsequently
incorporated in the process of reviewing the programmes wherever/whenever
relevant.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.2.8
What are the co-curricular activities that enrich student learning experience,
and foster personal development and responsibility?
The university provides the students with opportunities to be involved in professional
societies, student design competitions, and university co-curricular activities, and help
to prepare students for professional practice.
2.3
Curriculum Content and Structure
The department is required to complete Table 1 and 2 to highlight the core subject matter
essential for the understanding of the concepts, principles and methods that support the
programme outcomes, as well as the requirements of the discipline for an award taking into
account the appropriate discipline standards and international best practices for the field.
Information on Benchmarked Standards
2.3.1 Classification of subjects (Provide information where applicable in Table 1):
Table 1: Components of the programme and its value
Subject Classification
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Credit Value
Compulsory modules
21
Core/Major/Concentration:
 Courses/modules
 projects/ thesis /dissertation
Optional / elective courses/modules
Minor courses/modules
Industrial training
Practicum
Others (specify)
86
6
6
6
-
Total Credit Value
17
68
5
5
5
125
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Percentage
100%
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.3.2
List the subjects offered in the programme, and include their classification.
Please arrange by year and semester offered as in Table 2.
Table 2. List of course/module offered in the programme
1
Semester/
Year
Offered
1/1
2
1/1
3
1/1
4
1/1
5
1/1
6
1/1
Digital Systems/
CCPS1573
7
2/1
8
2/1
Communication
for the
Workplace/LENG1
033
Discrete
Mathematics/
CMTH1533
Database
Management
System/
CCPS1553
9
2/1
Name and Code
of
Course/Module
 Bahasa
Kebangsaan
A/B/MPW111
3/MPW1123
 English for
General
Purposes/LEN
G1013
 Basics of
Arabic
language/LAR
B 1233
Islamic Belief/
IAQD1013
English for
Academic
Purposes/
LENG1023
Mathematics for
Computer
Scientists
/CMTH1543
Computer
Programming/
CCPS1543
Classification
(Major/Minor/
Elective/Audit)
MQA/
University
Credit
Value
3
No Change
University
3
No Change
University
3
No Change
Faculty
3
Faculty
3
Name
of
subject has
been
changed
No Change
Faculty
3
University
3
Faculty
3
Faculty
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Remarks
Name(s) of
Lecturer
Semester
offered
change
No Change
No Change
No Change
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
2/1
2/1
2/1
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
2/2
2/2
2/2
2/2
2/2
Object Oriented
Programming/
CCPS1563
Cyber law & Islamic
Ethics/CICT1543
Islamic Studies/
MPW1143
Islamic Civilization
(Hadhari)**/IGNK10
33
Computer &
Information
Security/CSEC2513
Computer
Architecture/
CICT2533
Data Structure &
Algorithm
CCPS2553
Data
Communication &
Telecommunication
Systems/
CNET2523
Malaysian
Studies*/MPW1133
Stories of Prophets
in Islam**/IHIS1053
System Analysis &
Design/
CCPS2563
Probability and
Statistics/ CMTH2504
Operating
System/CCPS2573
Computer Networks
/ CCNT2544
Software
Engineering/
CCPS2583
Faculty
Faculty
3
No Change
Semester
offered
change
No Change
MQA/
University
3
Faculty
3
No Change
Faculty
3
No Change
Faculty
3
No Change
Faculty
3
No Change
MQA/
University
3
No Change
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
major
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
3
3
4
3
4
3
No Change
No Change
No Change
No Change
Semester
offered
change
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
23
1/3
Entrepreneurship
/ BBUS3513
University
3
No Change
24
1/3
major
3
No Change
25
1/3
major
3
Semester
offered change
26
1/3
major
3
27
1/3
major
3
28
1/3
major
3
29
2/3
major
2
30
2/3
major
3
31
2/3
Multimedia
Technology/
CMMD3513
Project
management/
CICT3573
Human-Computer
Interaction
CICT3583
Network
Programming /
CNET3523
Network Routing/
CNET3533
FYP phase 1/
CICT3512
Multimedia
Network /
CCMD3523
Visual
programming /
CCPS3653
Wireless
Networks and
Mobile
Computing/
CNET3543
Network
Management/
CNET3553
Elective
FYP phase 2/
CICT4514
Cryptography and
network security /
CNET4523
E-Commerce
system
CCPS4563
Linux Network
Architecture/
CMMD4543
Elective
major
3
Semester
offered change
major
3
New subject
major
3
New subject
Elective*
major
3
4
major
3
major
3
Semester
offered change
Change from
elective
to
major
New subject
major
3
New subject
Elective*
3
major
6
32
33
2/3
2/3
34
35
2/3
1/4
36
1/4
37
38
39
40
1/4
1/4
1/4
2/4
Industrial
Training/
CCPS4516
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
No Change
No Change
New
subject
offered
Semester
offered change
Semester
offered change
Semester
offered change
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
*Elective Subjects
E1
Data Compression
and Coding
CCPS3643
Elective
3
E2
Multimedia
Innovation
CMMD3533
Elective
3
E3
Advanced Java
Programming /
CNET3563
Elective
E4
Advanced
Database System /
CCPS3663
Elective
3
3
No change
Change
from major
to elective
Change
from major
to elective
New
subject
offered
* Malaysia Students are compulsory to take the MQA Compulsory subjects
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.3.3
Basic information of each course/module (Provide information where applicable in
Table 3.)
Table 3: Summary of information on each course/module
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
15.
Name of Course/Module
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the course/module in the programme
Semester and Year offered
Total Student
Face to Face
Total Guided and
Learning Time
Independent Learning
(SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
O
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
Credit Value
Prerequisite (if any)
Objectives
Learning outcomes
Transferable Skills:
Skills and how they are developed and assessed, Project and practical
experience and Internship
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
Synopsis
Mode of Delivery
Lecture, Tutorial, Workshop, Seminar, etc.
Assessment Methods and Types
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
17.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
18.
19.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
 Main references supporting the course
 Additional references supporting the course
20.
Other additional information
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Note 1: Independent Learning comprises the “Student Self Learning Time” and the “Total Assessment
Time”
Note 2: The Programme Aims and learning outcomes are mapped to the individual courses using a scale
of zero to five were (zero being the least relevant/related and five being the most relevant/ related).
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
1(a)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
English For General Purposes
LENG1013
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
1/1
University
To develop student’s ability in English Language and enable them to develop writing
and speaking skills required for various types of Studies and occupational tasks.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
Objectives:

Introduce students to some Basic English.

Raise students’ level of proficiency in the four language skills.

Improve students’ confidence and ability as language learners.

Serve as a transitional link to higher level English.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of LENG1013, students should be able to:

Listen and speak with some confidence on social matters.

Read with reasonable accuracy for pleasure.

Communicate facts and ideas reasonably accurate through writing.

Develop vocabulary that will enhance their oral and written skills and have sufficient grasp of the language to
communicate what is read.
10.
3
11.
Transferable Skills:
enable students to develop writing and speaking skills required for various types of
Studies and occupational tasks.
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
Class Lectures, Assignment, Interactions through discussion board, closed and open quizzes, Exams
Student learning experiences and assessment activities involve independent and group report writing practices, oral presentations
and peer assessment, where students present their reports to each other and are involved in assessing each other’s work.
assessment activities for this course are that the student:
Writes a:
•
Reports
•
Translations
•
Simple Essays
•
Summarizations
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
13.
Synopsis:
LENG1013 is the first level English language subject, which is especially designed for undergraduates with very little English. The
topics are thematically organized, task-based and student-centered. Structured speaking tasks, incorporating systematic work on
reading and writing, encourage students to express themselves more appropriately. The reading and writing tasks are accompanied
by model language and essential grammar for different situations. The tasks and activities are generally graded in terms of difficulty
and are designed in such a way that students are gradually encouraged to be independent learners.
14.
Mode of Delivery:
Lecture, Tutorial and on-line discussion
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
10%

Assignments
10%

Interactions through discussion
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
50%
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
0
0
0
3
0
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
17.
18.
A6
5
LO8
2
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 1
Reading: Friends

Talking about good friends and bad friends.

Grammar Points: Yes/No questions and Wh-Questions.

Man’s best friend.

Read an interview about an unusual pet and answer questions.

Read a questionnaire about being a good friend.

Grammar Points: Present Perfect.

Informal correspondence.

Write simple social customs to a foreign friend.

Grammar points: Passive voice.

Online Forum.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
6
3
18
Page 15
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
27
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Reading: My Daily Routine

Talking about Daily Routines.

Grammar points: Do- questions.

Reading about Schedules.

Grammar points: Adverbs of time.

Writing a study timetable.

Grammar points: Short forms.

Online Forum.
Reading: Hi, how are you !

Saying hello.

Grammar points : Greeting expressions & Subject Verb agreement.

Meeting and Greeting People.

Grammar points : Farewell expressions.

Writing Greeting Cards.

Grammar points: Greeting card common expressions.

Online Forum.
Reading : Sorry I’m not in right now

Communication over the telephone.

Grammar points: Common phrases used in telephone conversation.

Taking a telephone message.

Grammar points: Direct and Reported Speech.

Leaving a voice message.

Grammar points: Abbreviations in messages.

Online Forum.
Reading: Taking a break

Talking about holidays.

Grammar points: Comparatives and Superlatives.

Reading about holiday get-away.

Grammar Points : Adjectives or adjectival phrases

Writing about holidays

Grammar Points: Common Phrases in postcards

Online Forum
Reading: This way, not that way..

Asking and Giving Directions

Grammar Points: Common phrases for asking

directions

Reading about directions

Grammar Points: Road directions

Written directions

Giving specific and general directions Grammar

Points: Imperatives

Online Forum

Quiz
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Page 16
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
20.
Reading: This way, not that way..

Asking and Giving Directions

Grammar Points: Common phrases for asking directions

Reading about directions

Grammar Points: Road directions

Written directions

Giving specific and general directions Grammar

Points: Imperatives

Online Forum

Quiz
Reading: What’s a good buy?

Talking about bargai.

Grammar Points: Bargaining/ Negotiating expressions.

Reading about Shopping.

Grammar Points: Modals.

Cruising for shopping outlets .

Grammar points: Prepositions.

Online Forum.
Reading/Talking about Pastimes

Grammar points: Gerunds.

Reading the Sports page.

Grammar points: Vocabulary to talk about pastimes.

Going to the movies.

Grammar points: Expressions to write a simple review.

Online Forum.
Reading: Writing at the university

Types of academic essays.

Grammar points: Essay introductions and

Conclusions.

Researching the topic.

Grammar points: Transition words.

Writing the academic essay .

Grammar points: Editing and Proofreading.

Online Forum.
Total
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
6
3
18
27
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course
Mohd Sallehhudin Abd Aziz & Tan Kim Hua (2008) English For General Purposes.
Al Madinah International University (Malaysia)
Additional references supporting the course
1. Hartman Pamela 2007 Quest 2 Reading & Writing. McGraw HillNew York
2. Soars, J and Soars L (1996) Headway : Intermediate, Oxford University Press
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
1 (b)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
14
O
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To acquaint student with basic knowledge in Arabic Language.

To develop student’s ability in Arabic Language

To train student to communicate in basic Arabic Language

To connect the student with knowledge of Islamic Thought.
Learning outcomes:
After the completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

Identify written pictures and sounds of Arabic Letters

Know how structure these letters into words correctly

Know variety of alphabetical shape when written as words

Read correctly simple words and sentences of Arabic texts

Read and understand Islamic Texts, and simple Arabic conversation

Express with simple and short Arabic composition
10.
Basics of Arabic language
LARB1233
University
To develop student’s ability in Arabic Language and connect the student
with knowledge of Islamic Thought. Also enabling students to develop
writing and speaking skills required for various types of Studies and
occupational tasks.
1 /1
Total Guided and Independent Learning
Independent = 84
Total =126
11.
Transferable Skills:
To enable students to develop writing and speaking skills required for various types of Studies and occupational tasks.
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
Lecture, Group Assignment, Interactions through discussion board, closed and open quizzes, Exams
Student learning experiences and assessment activities involve independent and group report writing practices, oral
presentations and peer assessment, where students present their reports to each other and are involved in assessing each
other’s work.
assessment activities for this course are that the student:
Writes a:
•
Simple Essays
•
Translations
•
Summarizations
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
13.
14.
15.
Synopsis:
This subject includes the introduction of Arabic Letters, drills before writing, introducing sounds of written Arabic
letters; it includes reading comprehension and dialogue of simple sentences that are related to the social environment.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures, tutorial sessions and on-Line discussion
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Quizzes

Assignments

Interactions through discussion

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
50 %
100%
16.
17.
10 %
10 %
10 %
20 %
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
5
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
18.
A7
1
A8
1
LO9
0
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
SLT
Indep.
Total
Topic 1
‫مقدمة عن الحروف العربية‬
‫تدريبات ماقبل الكتابة‬


2
1
6
9
Topic 2
.)‫ الثاء‬, ‫ تاء‬, ‫نطق وكتابة (الباء‬
.)‫ الخاء‬, ‫الحاء‬, ‫نطق وكتابة(الجيم‬


2
1
6
9
Topic 3
.) ‫ الذال‬, ‫نطق وكتابة(الدال‬
.)‫ الزاي‬, ‫نطق وكتابة(الراء‬


2
1
6
9
Topic 4
Details
.) ‫ الشين‬, ‫نطق وكتابة(السين‬
.)‫ الضاد‬, ‫نطق وكتابة(الصاد‬


2
1
6
9
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Page 19
‫‪CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(الطاء ‪ ,‬الظاء)‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 5‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(العين ‪ ,‬الغين )‪.‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(الفاء ‪ ,‬القاف)‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 6‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(الكاف ‪ ,‬الالم )‪.‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(الميم النون)‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 7‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫نطق وكتابة(الهاء ‪ ,‬الواو ‪ ,‬الياء )‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 8‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫تعاريف‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 9‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫في عمادة القبول‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 10‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫المسلم اخو المسلم‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 11‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫الى معهد تعليم اللغة العربية‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 12‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫مكة المكرمة‪.‬‬
‫الهجرة‪.‬‬
‫‪Topic 13‬‬
‫‪9‬‬
‫‪6‬‬
‫‪1‬‬
‫‪2‬‬
‫‪‬‬
‫ماذا فعل ياسر؟‬
‫‪Topic 14‬‬
‫‪126‬‬
‫‪84‬‬
‫‪14‬‬
‫‪28‬‬
‫‪Page 20‬‬
‫‪Total‬‬
‫‪Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking‬‬
‫‪Amendment made on 8 October 2010‬‬
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Main references supporting the course
2005 ، Goodword ‫ دروس اللغة العربية لغير الناطقين بها‬، ‫ عبد الرحيم‬.‫ ف‬.‫د‬
UK ،3002 Gateway to Arabic: Book 1, Angloarabicgraphics ،‫دكتور عمران حمزة علوي‬
UK ،3002 Gateway to Arabic: Book 2 , Anglographics، ‫دكتور عمران حمزة علوي‬
.1
.2
.3
Additional references supporting the course
، 1 ‫ مختار الطاهر حسين العربية للناشئين الجزء‬/ ‫ ناصف مصطفى عبد العزيز‬/ ‫ محمود إسماعيل صيني‬.‫د‬
.‫م‬3892- ‫هـ‬1403 ، ‫معهد تعليم اللغة العربية بجامعة الرياض‬
20.
2.
Dr. Hosni Kandil, The Arabic Language for Beginners, Iskanadrai , 2003.
3.
Assad Nimer Busool, Shape and Forms of Arabic Letters ‫ أشكال الحروف العربية‬, IQRA, 2003.
.1
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 21
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(2)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Islamic Belief
IAQD1103
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
1/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To acquaint the student with the importance of the knowledge of the Islamic creed and its being the basis of the
Islamic faith

To expose the student to the three bases on which the Islamic creed is constructed

Student will differentiate between the truth of the Oneness of God and associating other creatures to Him, he
will as well know the truth of belief (iman) and its six articles

Expose the student to issues in Tauhid; like the two witnesses, Oneness of God, respecting the Beautiful Names
of Allah the Almighty, in order to correct his creed.

To clear about things that contradict with Tauhid, (sorcery, showing off, asking rain fall from heavenly bodies) in
order to avoid it
Learning outcomes:
After the completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

Describe the correct creed in view of the three bases and explain it properly

Compare between the reality of the Oneness of Allah and association of other things to him, thus, discovering
its common misconceptions

Student will be instilled with a correct Islamic creed, to which he will be calling his community and spread it to
other people too

Explain the designated issues in Tauhid, such that, he can spread it and call people to it
Identify some things which contradict with Tauhid, in order to avoid it and warn others from it
Transferable Skills:

understand about things that contradict with Tauhid, such as sorcery and showing off in order to avoid them

understand Shari’ah perspective on right & obligations
10.
11.
University
To acquaint the student with the importance of the knowledge of the
Islamic creed and its being the basis of the Islamic faith. Student will be
instilled with a correct Islamic creed, to which he will be calling his
community and spread it to other people too.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 22
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm Exam

Performance (participation, Assessments)

Lecturer Observation
13.
Synopsis:
This subject covers issues relating to Allah as our creator, Islam is our religion, Muhammad peace be upon him is our
Prophet, The Oneness of God is our belief, Association of God with other beings and its types, Belief and its six articles,
to Supplicate for the two Shahada, avoiding associating Allah with other beings, seeking refuse in other beings other
than Allah Prophetic protection of the honor of Tauhid, sorcery, asking rainfall from heavenly bodies, putting trust in
God, showing off, obedience to learned people and the leaders, revering God’s Beautiful Names without joking with
anything in which God’s name or Al-Quran or the Prophet mentioned, an advice to the seeker of knowledge.
14.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50 %
10 %

Quizzes
10 %

Assignments
10 %

Interactions through discussion
20 %

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
50 %
100%
16.
17.
18.
10 %
10 %
10 %
20 %
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
A7
2
LO9
0
A8
0
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
2
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
Page 23
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Topic 1
Allah is our God
•
Allah is our God
•
The language
Islam is our religion
•
Islam is our religion
•
The language
2
1
6
9
3
1.5
9
13.5
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Mohammed is our Prophet
•
Mohammed, may Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him, is our Prophet
•
The language
Monotheism is our belief
•
Monotheism is our belief
•
The language
Polytheism and its types
•
Polytheism and its types
•
The language
Faith and its six elements of faith
•
Faith and its six elements of faith
•
The language
Inviting to the Islamic testimony that there is no God except Allah and Mohammed is his
Messenger.
•
The content of the two testimonies
•
The meaning of saying : Subhan Allah
•
How the invite to Allah suppose to be?
•
The way of inviting to Allah in the Hadith of Muath bin Jabal
•
What we can get from this lesson?
•
The language: Dua’a, evidence, assumption, and the hijab.
•
Exercising and discussions
From Polytheism : Seeking refuge without Allah
•
The meaning of Seeking refuge without Allah in Koran and Sunna.
•
Seeking refuge with pre-Islam time and Islamic seeking of refuge
•
Islamic appeal for help and polytheistic appeal.
•
The language: making complete sentences from “seek refuge with”, altamat
(completed)
•
Discussion: about the meaning of “Seeking refuge with” and “appeal for aid”
and what are related to these two phrases.
The protection of Prophet Mohammed, may Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him to
“jinab altawheed”
•
The meaning of “jinab altawheed” and how Prophet Mohammed, may Allah’s
peace and prayers be upon him protect it.
•
In the shadow of Allah’s saying “There has come unto you a messenger, (one) of
yourselves”
•
The evidence of Prophet Mohammed’s prohibition to take the graves as houses.
•
The evidence of Prophet Mohammed’s prohibition to take his grave as Eid.
•
The morals of visiting the graves.
•
The language: adhere to, supererogatory performance, the feelings, Followers
of the true religion, the lamp, he takes, the heresies.
•
Exercise: Making complete sentences from “Followers of the true religion, the
lamp, he takes”
•
Discussion: about the prohibition of taking the graves as houses and what is
related to that issue.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 24
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Magic
•
•
•
•
•
•
The syntactic and linguistic meaning of Magic.
In the shadow of the Verse (102) in Sura (Albaqara)
The magic is one of great offenses.
The seven serious offenses.
The magician if he did not repent.
Exercise: Making complete sentences from “Followers of the true religion, the
lamp, he takes”
•
Discussion: about the prohibition of taking the graves as houses and what is
related to that issue.
Asking for rain using meteorology
•
The prayers of asking for rain.
•
Asking for rain using meteorology
•
The evidence of the presence of asking for rain using meteorology in the preIslam time.
•
The meaning of the Hadith of Zaid bin khaled Al-jahny
•
So, what are the benefits of the stars?
•
The relationship of the stars and the people and their Rizq.
•
The language: we got rained, to be interpreted, luck, Zodiacs.
•
Exercise: Making complete sentences using: we got rained, to be interpreted,
luck, Zodiacs.
•
Discussion: questions about asking for rain using the stars
Trusting Allah (Tawakul)
•
The meaning of tawakul as a worship.
•
The meaning of Allah, the Almighty, saying “Allah is Sufficient for us! Most
Excellent is He in Whom we trust”
•
The reason of the above mentioned Sura.
•
Laziness is against Altawakul.
•
The Hadith of Abi Huraira, May Allah being satisfied upon him, “the meaning of
the Mu’men’s force”
•
The language: Guarantee, anguish, afraid of them, the threatening,
handicapping, resolution, adhere.
•
Exercise: make complete sentences using the following words; anguish, the
threatening, handicapping.
•
Discussion: different question about the lesson topics.
The Hypocrisy
•
The linguistic and religious meaning of hypocrisy
•
The two conditions to accept the act for Allah.
•
Why hypocrisy is called “hidden polytheism”?
•
The Hadith of Bin Abbas, may Allah being satisfied upon him, which is warning
from the hypocrisy and reputation.
•
The language: to adorn, they manipulate, lazy, he appeals, richer, partners.
•
Discussion: different question about the lesson topics.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
3
1.5
3
2
6
9
9
13.5
1.5
9
13.5
1
6
9
Page 25
Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Loyalty to the knowledgeable persons and princes
•
Who are the knowledgeable persons and princes?
•
What is the term of loyalty to the knowledgeable persons and princes and what
are its conditions?
•
The Hadith of Ady Bin Hatem, may Allah being satisfied upon him, to warn from
the loyalty to the knowledgeable persons and princes against sharia’
•
The Hadith of Bin Omar, may Allah being satisfied upon him, to hear and obey.
•
The evidence from Koran and Sunna that Prophet Mohammed’s Love achieved
by being loyal to him.
•
The explanation of Hadith Aesha may Allah being satisfied upon her, warning
from heresy.
•
The language: you take, denies, Sharia’, you conflict, responsible managers,
better, interpreting, sin.
•
Making complete sentences using the following words: denies, responsible
managers, you conflicted.
•
Discussion: different question about the lesson topics.
The respect of the names of Allah and to change the name for that
•
Reminding of the unity of Allah’s names and adjectives.
•
Some of Muslims violation to the names of Allah.
•
The Hadith of Abi Shariah Hani, about prohibition to use the name (Abu AlHakkam)
•
Use the names; Abdul Rasul, Abdul Nabi, and Abdul Mutalib.
•
The language: respect, delegation, prayers, they came to me, you are not guilty.
•
Exercise: make complete sentences using the following words: respect, and had,
judged.
•
Discussion: different question about the lesson topics.
Who is joking in something containing the name of Allah, or Koran or Prophet
Mohammed, may Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him:•
The linguistic meaning of joking and the meaning of joking if it is related to the
religion.
•
The interpretation of the Hadith of Zaid Bin Aslam about the mockery of some
hypocrites in Ghazwat Tabook of some of the companions. It is the reason of
the verse “The hypocrites fear lest a surah should be revealed concerning them”
(64-66) Sura Almunafiqeen.
•
Do we understand form that story that mocking of religious is KUFUR?
•
Is it reasonable to describe the Prophet companions in this way?
•
The benefits taken from this story.
•
The language: Mockers, Allah divulge the hypocrites, if we forgive,
demonstration, initiative.
•
Discussion: different question about the lesson topics.
Total
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
3
1.5
9
13.5
28
14
84
126
Page 26
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Main references supporting the course:
1. Eris, Suleyman. Islam : belief and practice : a brief guide. NJ : The Light, Inc., 2006.
2. Chaudhry, Muhammad Sharif. Social and moral code of Islam. Batu Caves, Selangor : Masterpiece, 2006
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Utheimeen, Muhammad bin Saleh. Explaning the fundamentals of faith. Trans. Saleh as-Saleh, Middlesex, U.K. :
Salafi Publications, 2005. (http://www.theclearpath.com/viewtopic.php?t=24)
2. Philips, Abu Ameenah Bilal. The Fundamentals of tawheed. Malaysia A.S.Noordeen, 2003.
3. Haneef, Sayed Sikandar Shah. Ethics and fiqh for daily life : an Islamic outline. Kuala Lumpur : Research Centre,
IIUM, 2005.
4. Rippin, Andrew. Muslims : their religious beliefs and practices. New York : Routledge, 2005.
5. Gulen, M. Fethullah. Essentials of the Islamic faith. Trans. Ali Unal. Kuala Lumpur : Saba Islamic Media, 2004.
6. Utheimeen, Muhammad bin Saleh. The Muslim's belief. Riyadh : International Islamic Publishing House, 1992.
7. Afzal-ur-Rahman. Islam : ideology and the way of life. Kuala Lumpur : A. S. Noordeen, repr. 2003, 1995.
20.
‫ دار الكلم الطيب – دمشق‬،‫ أركانها وحقائقها‬:‫ العقيدة اإلسالمية‬،‫مصطفى سعيد الخن‬
.‫م‬3003 ‫ دمشق‬- ‫ دار ابن كثير‬،‫ العقيدة والعبادة والسلوك‬،‫أبو الحسن علي الحسيني الندوي‬
.‫م‬3880 ‫ القاهرة‬- ‫ مكتبة السنة المحمدية‬،‫ عقيدة أهل السنة والجماعة‬،‫محمد بن صالح العثيمين‬
.‫م‬3882 ‫ الخبر‬- ‫ دار السنة‬،‫ المدخل لدراسة العقيدة اإلسالمية على مذهب أهل السنة والجماعة‬،‫إبراهيم محمد عبد هللا البريكان‬
.‫م‬3003 ‫ دمشق‬- ‫ الدار المتحدة‬،‫العقيدة اإلسالمية الميسرة وأثارها في حياة المسلم‬،‫عبد العزيز فتحي السيد ندا‬
.‫م‬3889 ‫ عمان‬- ‫ دار البشير‬،‫ أضواء على العقيدة‬:‫ حقائق اإليمان‬،‫حامد أبو ناصر‬
.‫م‬3002 ‫ عالم الكتب‬،‫القول السديد في بيان حقيقة التوحيد‬،‫عبد العزيز بن باز و محمد صالح العثيمين‬
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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.8
.30
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.33
.32
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Page 27
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(3)
1.
Name of Course
English For Academic Purposes
2.
Course Code
LENG1023
3.
Name(s) of academic staff
4.
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
University
To develop student’s ability in English Language and enable them to
develop writing and speaking skills required for various types of
Academic Studies and occupational tasks.
5.
Semester and Year offered
1/1
6.
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Total Guided and Independent Learning
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
L
T
28
14
P
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
9.
Objectives:
The objectives of this course are to allow students to;

Enhance acquisition of English vocabulary

learn some grammatical elements of the English language

write some reasonably complex sentences

read a cross section of academic materials

learn to pronounce certain English sounds
10.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

use and produce words and idiomatic expressions

use simple grammatical structures accurately

demonstrate the ability to write simple and complex sentences

read and understand different academic texts critically

show improvement in pronunciation of certain English words
Transferable Skills:
11.
Enable students to develop writing and speaking skills required for various types of
Academic Studies and occupational tasks.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 28
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
Class Lectures, Assignment, Interactions through discussion board, closed and open quizzes, Exams
Student learning experiences and assessment activities involve independent and group report writing practices, oral
presentations and peer assessment, where students present their reports to each other and are involved in assessing
each other’s work.
13.
assessment activities for this course are that the student:
Writes a:
•
Reports
•
Translations
•
Simple Essays
•
Summarizations
Synopsis:
14.
This is the second level English language subject. This subject is especially designed for undergraduates with some
knowledge of English. It aims to improve students’ overall language ability. This subject is thematically based and
integrated in approach. Students will also be exposed to new words in English. They will also be exposed to important
reading skills and the ability to read a variety of academic texts. In addition, students will learn some basic sentence
structures with correct tenses. The tasks and activities for this subject are generally graded in terms of difficulty and are
designed in such a way that the students are gradually encouraged to be independent learners.
Mode of Delivery:
15.
Lecture, Tutorial and on-line discussion
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
Quizzes
Assignments
Interactions through discussion
Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
10%
10%
10%
20%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
17.
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
5
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
0
LO2
0
LO3
0
LO4
0
LO5
0
LO6
0
LO7
2
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
LO8
2
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
SLT
L
T
Indep.
Total
Details
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
Reading ; Some Facts About Sharks
Grammar ; The Simple Tenses
Writing ; Writing in the Simple Tenses
Speaking [-s] and [-es]
Word power; Vocabulary Building





Reading ; Giant pandas
Grammar ; Simple past tense and past progressive
Writing ; sentence building
Speaking ; pronouncing words that end with [-ed]
Word power; Vocabulary Building
Topic 3





Reading ; Why do cats leave us
Grammar : Subject Verb Agreement
Writing : writing simple and complex sentences
Speaking ; Pronouncing the sound [r]
Word power: Vocabulary building
2
1
6
9





Reading; Facts of The World
Grammar ; Verb ‘to be’
Writing ; The Mechanics of Writing
Speaking [ea]
Word Power : Vocabulary Building
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
Topic 2
Topic 1





Topic 4
Part 1 Topics on nature and Environment
Reading: Things That We Must Have
Grammar: Adverbs of Manner and Frequency
Writing: Sequence Connectors
Speaking: Contractions
Word Power: Vocabulary Building
Topic 6




Reading; A History Of Tunnels
Writing; Extracting Information
Speaking : Fixed Speech Exchanges
Word power; Vocabulary Building
2
1
6
9





Reading: Men and Inventions
Grammar: Modals
Writing : Sentence Connectors
Speaking : Questions Tag
Word Power; Vocabulary Building
2
1
6
9
Topic 5





Topic 7
Part 2: Topics on academic and Technology
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Part 3: Topics on People and Society
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
19.
20.





Reading ; Ibnu Sina
Grammar: Modals
Writing: Filling in Forms; The Mechanics of Writing
Speaking: Pronouncing [s] & [sh]
Word power; Vocabulary Building





Reading: Philosophers of The Three Worlds
Grammar; Prefixes
Writing: The Mechanics of Writing
Speaking; Making requests
Word Power: Vocabulary Building

Reading ; Job Advertisements

Grammar ; suffixes

Speaking; Speech Exchanges

Word Power; Vocabulary Building
Total hours
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
• Mohd Sallehhudin Abd Aziz & Normala Othman (2008) English For Academic Purposes. Al Madinah
International University (Malaysia)
Additional references supporting the course:
1.
21.
Baker, A 2000. Ship or Sheep / An Intermediate Pronunciation Course . New Edition. Cambridge University
Press
2. Glendinning, E. H. & Holmstrom, B 91992) Study Reading. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
3. Hillman, L, H (1990) Reading at the University. Boston Heinle & Heinle Publishers
4. Hartman Pamela 2007 Quest 2 Reading & Writing. McGraw HillNew York
5. Soars, J and Soars L (1996) Headway : Intermediate, Oxford University Press
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(4)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Mathematics for Computer Scientists
CMTH1543
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
Objectives:
The objectives of this course are to introduce students to;

the terms and concepts of the derivatives

the rules of differentiation and integration

the differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions

the equation of the tangent and normals and extremum problems in differentiation
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

explain the terms and concepts of the derivatives

explain the definition of integration, definite integral and indefinite integral

solve the differentiation and integration problems by using basic rules

solve the differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions

solve the equation of the tangent and normals and extremum problems in differentiation
Transferable Skills:
Identify the nature of formal, symbolic representation of systems and processes by learning important rules of functions,
differentiation and integration
10.
11.
Faculty
A solid mathematical ability at an advanced level is essential for the
understanding of the principles and the application of techniques in
computer science. The aim of the module is to develop the student's
mathematical knowledge and to provide the student with all the necessary
techniques and methods for the analysis and solutions of problems in
computing.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions,

Solving assigned problems in groups and singly

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
13.
14.
15.
Synopsis:
This course provides calculus topics such as differentiation and integration. The topics are completely different from those
of algebra and geometry because in these topics student will learn important rules for finding derivatives and how to use
it to analyze the rate of change of quantity. Integral calculus is concerned with the reverse process of the derivatives.
There is one (1) special topic for function; there are logarithmic functions, exponential functions and trigonometric.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures / tutorial and practical sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%



Final Examination
16.
17.
10%
20%
Quizzes
assignments
Mid-Semester Exam
20%
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
0
0
0
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
4
A8
2
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 1
1)
FUNCTIONS
1.1 Logarithmic Functions
1.2 Exponential Functions
1.3 Trigonometric
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
4
2
12
18
Page 33
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
2) DIFFERENTIAION
Topic 2
2.1 Rules for differentiation
2.2 Product rule
2.3 Quotient rule
2.4 Chain rule
2.5 Power rule
2.6 Derivatives of logarithmic functions
2.7 Derivatives of exponential functions
2.8 Derivatives of trigonometric functions
2.9 Higher order derivatives
2.10 Applications of differentiation
2.10.1 Equations of tangents and normals
2.20.2 Stationary points: Maxima and minima
16
8
8
4
28
14
48
72
24
36
84
126
3) INTEGRATION
Topic 3
3.1 The indefinite integral
3.2 Integration with initial conditions
3.3 The definite integral
3.4 Integration of simple exponential
3.5 Integration using partial fractions
3.7 Area under the curve
Total
20.
21.
Main references supporting the course:
1. Sim O. B., Yong L. K., Siti Eishah Ishak, Fauzi Mohamed Yusof, R. Suzita R. Suleiman, Mathematics for Matriculation
Semester 1:, 1st Edition, Penerbit Fajar Bakti Sdn. Bhd. (2009)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Cheryl M. Rose, Leslie Minton, and Carolyn B. Arline , Uncovering Student Thinking in Mathematics: 25 Formative
Assessment Probes ( 2006)
2. Eng T. C., Sim O. B., Hwa K. B., Soon L. M, Mathematics for Matriculation Semester 2:., 1st Edition, Penerbit Fajar
Bakti Sdn. Bhd.(2009)
3. G. H. Hardy, A Course Of Pure Mathematics - Illustrated (2006)
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(5)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
Computer Programming
CCPS1543
Faculty
The study of programming and the development of programming skills
are central to any undergraduate course in computing. Students must,
therefore, become skilled in the use of programming languages such as C
and C++.
1/1
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:
To give an introduction to basic programming concepts through the use of a high-level programming language such as
C/C++. It covers the basic notions and techniques for algorithm development and the implementation of algorithms in a
high-level programming language
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Identify and apply basic concepts of a high level programming language correctly.

Demonstrate the basic notions and techniques for algorithm development

Implement these algorithms in a high-level programming language correctly and effectively.
Transferable Skills:
Become skilled in the use of programming languages such as C and C++.
10.
11.
12.
3
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions,

Solving assigned problems in groups and singly

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
13.
14.
15.
Synopsis:
This module provides students of computing with an initial competence in the development of software through the
medium of a modern programming language The major areas of study include: Software Development Life Cycle,
Syntactic Structure of a Program, Arrays , File Handling and some Advanced Topics related to the module and
Programming laboratory exercises.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
50%
15%

Quizzes
15%

Project

Mid-Semester Exam
20%
Final Examination
16.
17.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
2
1
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
1
0
0
3
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
L
P
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
2
6
10
4
4
12
20
Topic 2
Topic 1
Introduction to Programming & Programming Languages
Software development life cycle

Top-down design with function system structure

program design steps and programming methodology
Syntactic Structure of a Program

Identifiers

data types

operators

various statements

operator precedence

type conversion

conditional and control structures function

recursive functions.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Page 36
Topic 3
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Arrays
One- and two-dimensional arrays
Topic 6
Topic 7
Topic 8
6
10
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
6
6
18
30
4
4
12
20
6
6
18
30
28
28
84
140
pointers- strings - dynamic memory allocation
Topic 5

2
passing individual elements or whole array to a function -Simple sorting and
searching on arrays
Topic 4

2
Structures and Unions

Structure declaration and definition

accessing structures

array of structures

pointers and structures

Union declaration

enumerated variables
File Handling

Concept of a file

files and streams

standard file handling functions

binary files

random access files.
Advanced Topics

Command line parameters

pointers to functions

creation of header files

stacks

linked lists

bitwise manipulation
Total
Laboratory topics
Laboratory
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Experimental work must include the following
Programming Environment
Simple C programsDefault function parameters-Identifiers - data types – operators – various statements - operator precedence – type
conversion – conditional and control structures - function - recursive functions.
Arrays
One- and two-dimensional arrays – passing Simple sorting and searching on arrays pointers- strings - dynamic
memory allocation.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Structures
Structure declaration and definition – accessing structures - array of structures - pointers and structures – Union
declaration – enumerated variables.
File Handling
Concept of a file and templates - files and streams – standard file handling functions - binary files – random access
files.
Advanced Topics
Command line parametersmanipulation
pointers to functions- creation of header files - stacks - linked lists – bitwise
Case study
(employee payroll program, student database,.)
19.
Main references supporting the course:
1. K. Goyal, The C Programming Language, 2007
2. K. N. King, C Programming: A Modern Approach, 2nd Edition, 2008
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Stephen Kochan, Programming in C (3rd Edition), Developer's Library, 2004
2. Stephen Prata, C Primer Plus (5th Edition), Paperback - Dec 3, 2004
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 38
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(6)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Digital Systems
CCPS1573
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
1/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To familiarise the student with binary and hexadecimal number system.

To familiarise the student with the fundamental operation of digital circuit elements.

To introduce the fundamental concepts of logic design of digital circuits.

To introduce digital circuit design at the combinatorial and simple sequential level.
10.
Learning outcomes:
Faculty
This module provides foundation knowledge which is necessary for the
understanding of other modules such as CCP0102 Computer
Architecture. It is therefore imperative that student of computer related
fields are offered the opportunity to gain experience of design and
implementation of simple circuits and understand the principle of
computer hardware.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
After completing this subject, it is expected that students will able to:

Explain the fundamentals of digital circuit logic elements, various logical operations and design of logic
circuits.

Explain the functionalities of basic building blocks of a microcomputer.

Utilise laboratory equipment and their documented laboratory work to perform exercises in a manner
consistent with good computing practice.

Undertake relevant analysis of simple electronic circuits.
11.
Transferable Skills:

Be aware of the fundamentals of logic design of digital circuits.

Familiarise with binary and hexadecimal number system.

Familiarise with basic analogue and digital electronics and develop circuit analysis skills.

Take a generic, systematic approach to solving system problems
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 39
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
The course introduces for expose student to the field of Digital technology elements such as Logic elements, Counters
and registers and etc.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
15%

Quizzes
15%

assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Exam
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
1
1
1
1
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
3
2
0
0
1
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 2
Topic 1
Introduction
Digital and Analog Systems. Number Systems, Binary/Octal/Hex Number Systems
.Binary Arithmetic. Other Codes: BCD, Excess-3, Gray, ASCII.
Logic Elements
Logic operators. Symbols, Logic Gates, Truth tables, Evaluation of logic circuit output ,
Gate level circuit, TTL, Boolean Algebra Boolean & DeMorgan’s Theorems. NAND and
NOR gates.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
P
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
2
6
10
4
4
12
20
Page 40
Topic 3
Topic 4
Sequential Logic.
Delays & Latches, Clock signal, JK & Flip- flops.D flip –flops, Timing & State,
Asynchronous inputs, Master/slave flip-flop, Flip-flop synchronisation and application.
Monostable and astable multivibrators.
Topic 5
Arithmetic Circuits.
Signed numbers.3’s complement, Addition & subtraction, Multiplications and Division,
BCD Addition, Half & Full Adder, Parallel/Aerial Adder and Carry propation.
Topic 6
MSI Logic circuits
Decoder/Encoder, 7 – Segment drivers, Multiplexer & Demultiplexer, Code Converter
& Comparators and Tristate register.
Topic 7
Counters and Register
Synchronous/Asynchronous counters. Up/down counters, Design counters, Shift
register Parallel & series load). Counter / Shift register ICs
and Counter/Shift applications
IC logic families
TTL/CMOS/ECL Characteristics, Loading & Fan-out, Open Collectors & Open drain and
Tristate TTL
Topic 10 Topic 9
Combination Logic Circuit
Sum-of-Product&Product-of-Sum, Simplification of Logic Circuit .Designing
Combinational Logic. K-Map, Basic characteristics of Digital ICS. XOR and XNOR
circuits, and Parity generator.
Topic 8
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Interfacing with analogue devices
DAC &ADC, Converter circuits and Digital-ramp ADC.
Memory Devices
Memory
Architecture,
Memory
Operations,
ROM/RAM/EPROM And Read/Write Cycle.
CPU-memory
Connection,
Total
4
4
12
20
3
3
9
15
3
3
9
15
3
3
9
15
3
3
9
15
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
28
28
84
140
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Experimental work must include the following
Laboratory

Introduction to basic tools (breadboard, oscilloscope, IC tester, etc.)

Build simple circuits using basic gates

design & implement combinational logic circuits

Implement flip-flops

Design & implement couters and shiftregisters

Design & implement Arithmetic circuits & Arithmetic ICs

Design & implement decoder/encoders

Simple projects
Main references supporting the course:
Thomas L. Floyd, “Digital Fundamentals” 30th Edition, Pearson Education International, 3009.
19.
Additional references supporting the course:
1. M.Moris Mano and Michael D. Ciletti, “Digital Design”, 4th Edition, 2007, Prentice hall.
2. Ronald J. Tocci, Neal S.Wldmer, and Gregory L.Moss, “Digital Systems : Principles and Application”, 10th
Edition, Pearson education International, 2007
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 41
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(7)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Communication for the Workplace
LENG1033
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:
This subject is designed to enable students to:

Familiarize students with various forms of business communication in the workplace

Increase students’ English proficiency by providing ample real –life examples in the workplace.

Respond with some confidence on various issues in the workplace
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Demonstrate the ability to write business documents memos, business letters, cover letters and resumes

Read and understand business material in and for the workplace

Demonstrate the ability to present and communicate effectively in public and during meetings
Transferable Skills:
Respond with some confidence on various issues in the workplace and able to present and communicate effectively in
public and during meetings
10.
11.
12.
13.
University
This module aims to train student to communicate effectively in public
and during meetings and Respond with some confidence on various
issues in the workplace.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
Class Lectures, Assignment, Interactions through discussion board, closed and open quizzes, Exams
Student learning experiences and assessment activities involve independent and group report writing practices, oral
presentations and peer assessment, where students present their reports to each other and are involved in assessing
each other’s work.
assessment activities for this course are that the student:
Writes a:
•
Reports
•
Translations
•
Simple Essays
•
Summarizations
Synopsis:
This English course designed for beginning and intermediate learners. This subject focuses on the workplace as part of
the students’ English language requirements. Topics have been carefully selected from events, themes and activities
that are common in the workplace. Hence, It is designed to acquaint students with the common types of English
communication in the workplace. Since it is also an English language course, the curriculum takes advantage of this by
arranging the syllabus into three major language components. The first part focuses more on the communication that
takes place in various work environments. In the second part, students will learn the techniques of writing
memorandums and letters. The third part provides practice for the students in the component of oral presentation.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
14.
Mode of Delivery:
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
10%

Assignments
10%

Interactions through discussion
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
50%
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
5
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
2
17.
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
General Communication

General Communication for The Workplace

Completing an application

Rules at work

Your medical history

The company chart

The company annual event

Online Forum

Salary and Expenses

Your Payslip

Your Household budget

Buying and Bargaining

Looking or a place to live

Language for the customers

Online Forum

Calendar and Events

Calendar of Events

The Monthly Reports

Personal Weekly Appointment

Daily Events

Can I Take a Message?

Online Forum
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Total
Details
Indep
.
SLT
L
T
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Page 43
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Formal documents

Tables

Charts

Diagrams

Graphs

Online Forum









Memos
Purpose for memos
What does a memo look like/
Language of a memo
Online Forum
Business letters
Types of letters
Good news versus Bad news letters
Online Forum





Cover Letters and Resumes
Format of a cover later
Reply to a cover letter
Body of a cover letter
Online Forum
Oral Communication

Advertisements and Interviews

Advertisements

Job advertisements

The interview

Online Forum

Meetings and Discussions

Language of the agenda

Language at meetings

Language expressions

Online forum








Business Presentations
Planning a presentation
Analyzing the audience
Identifying the intent
Making your message memorable
Designing visual aids
Redefining the non-verbal skills
Online Forum
Total
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Page 44
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
20.
Main references supporting the course:

Mohd Sallehhudin Abd Aziz & Normala Othman. Communication in the Workplace, Al Madinah International
University (Malaysia) (2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Billet, C.D. 2000. Now presenting! Presenting Skills in English for All Needs. Cannes; Media Training
Corporation.
2. Calabrese, M.E 2000. Writing in the workplace Ohio; South-western Educational publishing
3. Johnson, H 2000 Reading in the workplace. Ohio: South-Western Educational Publishing.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
(8)
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
Discrete Mathematics
CMTH1533
Faculty
This module provides the student with the mathematical skills necessary
to support his or her understanding of the material presented in various
other modules on the courses of which it is a part.
The knowledge gained from this course is meant to serve The analytic
skills and conceptual thinking required for competence in areas such as
programming, database analysis, electronic circuit, and digital signal
processing.
1/1
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Credit Value
3
Prerequisite (if any)
CMT0001 Mathematics for Computer Scientists
Objectives:
This subject is designed to enable students to:

To familiarize students with the notations and structures used in discrete mathematics;

To train students in acquiring mathematical competency in the relevant areas of computing;

To build a strong foundation for students who will be taking advanced courses in programming and algorithm
development;

To develop a better understanding of the role of mathematics in good algorithm design.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Formulate expressions in propositional logic and apply the relevant rules used in propositional logic for
mathematical proofs.

Identity, apply and communicate the different data structure i.e. sets sequences, rattle-bags etc. in problem
analysis.

Apply probabilistic reasoning in solving non-deterministic random processes in computer science.

Formulate Boolean expressions for circuit design.

Map, state, and analyze problems in computer science into mathematical graph analysis.
Transferable Skills:
Develop proficiency in the use of the necessary fundamental mathematical concepts and an ability to absorb further
specific knowledge where this is required for particular special areas.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 46
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions,

Solving assigned problems in groups and singly

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (participation, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
Programming is a mathematical activity. This subject is essentially a mathematical course meant specifically for
students of computing and software engineering. The subject covers a specific area of discrete mathematics, which
encompasses logic, set theory, relations, graph theory, etc. the course will highlight a variety of topics such as
mathematical induction, inductive hypothesis, mathematical logix (equivalence, implications, modus ponens,
tautologies etc). Mathematical proofs, relations functions, mappings, graphs and abstract algebra (binary operation,
commutative and associative operations etc). the knowledge gained from this course is meant to serve as a sound basis
in understanding the fundamental concepts in programming, typically used in algorithm development and subsequently
in building information systems.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures / tutorial and practical sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
15%

Quizzes
15%

assignments

Mid-Semester Exam
20%
Final Examination
16.
17.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
0
0
0
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
4
A8
2
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
L
T
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Logic: proposition, truth table, implication and equivalence, tautology.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Consistency and contradiction, quantifiers, nested quantifiers.
Introduction to proofs
direct proofs indirect proofs, proof by contradiction, proof by contra positive, proof by
cases, existence and uniqueness proofs , constructive proofs, unconstructive proofs, rules
of inference, proof methods and strategies
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Sets:
review of set theory, set operations, functions, sequences and summations
Algorithm and integers:
algorithms, the growth of functions, the integers and division, primes and greatest
common divisors
Induction and recursion:
principle of mathematical induction, strong induction
Counting:
basic counting techniques, the pigeonhole principle, permutations and combinations,
binomial coefficients
Relations:
Relations and their properties, representing relations equivalence relations
Graphs:
graphs and graphs models graphs terminology
Trees:
graphs and graphs models.
Graphs terminology.
Boolean functions representing Boolean functions logic gates.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Topic 13
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Legal and ethical aspects
Total
19
20
2
1
6
28
14
84
9
126
Main references supporting the course:

David J. Hunter, Essentials of Discrete Mathematics, Jones & Bartlett,2008
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Rosen, H.K , Discrete mathematics and its application (6th ed). New York: McGraw Co. Inc,2006
2. Johnsonbaugh, R. Discrete mathematics (6th ed). Upper saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.2004
3. Kolman, B, Busby, R.C & Ross, S.C. Discrete mathematical structures (4th ed). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.2003
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(9)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
28 14
O= Others
Database Management System
CCP1553
Faculty
Efficient storage and retrieval of data is central to the functioning of
modern information systems. This module is devoted to the
understanding of such information systems, and the environment in
which they operate, design, construction and use of databases.
Emphasis will be given on solving problems encountered when designing
a database and the use of database system. The main topics of this
course include the DBMS, E-R model, SQL and etc. Students are expected
to carry out a simple project on database.
2/1
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
Objectives:
The objectives of the subject are to introduce students to the:

Concepts of database management systems

query optimization and its impact on programming

database management systems integrity, recovery, concurrency, security and transaction management
mechanisms
Learning outcomes:
After completing this subject, the student should be able to:

explain the basic concept of database systems development apply the normalization of database tables

construct the database design

create the database and tables structures

develop the transactional management and concurrency control

Able to apply DBMS concepts using standard DBMS software.
Transferable Skills:

Seek out the Understanding of the architecture and capabilities of a modern Relational Database
Management System (DBMS) and other database models which are essential in workplaces.

Be proficient in the use of SQL for Creating databases and tables structures

Be proficient in the use of designing a database and Solving encountered problems.
10.
11.
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 50
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

tutorials sessions

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course covers the aspect of the theory, design and management of databases. Emphasis will be given on solving
problems encountered when designing a database and the use of database system. The main topics of this course
include the DBMS, E-R model, SQL and etc. Students are expected to carry out a project on database.
This course also covers the usage of a generic DBMS system that are platform independent (in terms of O/Ses), very low
TOC, esy embedded deployment, easily integrated with leading development systems, support for JDBC, advanced
security systems, web and client based applications development.
14.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Laboratory sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
15%

Quizzes
15%

Project
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Exam
16.
17.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
0
2
1
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
2
1
0
3
1
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
1
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction to Database Management

Database Characteristics

Features of Database Management Systems
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Week 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 51
Week 8
Week 7
Week 6
Week 5
Week 4
Week 3
Week 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Introduction to Database Management

Evolution of Database Technology

Architectures of Database Management Systems
The Relational Database Model

A Logical View of Data

Keys

Integrity Rules



Entity Relationship (E-R) Modeling

Basic Modeling Concepts

Data Model (The Conceptual Model, The Internal Model, The External Model
And The Physical Model

The Entity Relationship Model (E-R) Model. (Entities, Attributes, Relationships,
Connectivity And Cardinality, Relationship Strength, Composite Entities, Entity
Supertypes and Subtypes)
Normalization of Database Tables

The Need For Normalization

Conversion To First Normal Form

Conversion To Second Normal Form

Conversion To Third Normal Form

The Boyce-Codd Normal Form(BCNF)

Higher-Level Normal Form
Database Design

Changing Data Into Information

The Information System
Week 9


The Systems Development Life Cycle (Planning, Analysis, Detailed Systems
Design, Implementation, Maintenance).
The Database Life Cycle (The Database Initial Study, Database Design,
Implementation and Loading, Testing And Evaluation, Operation, Maintenance
And Evolution
Week 11
Structured Query Language (SQL)

Creating the database and tables structures

Data Entry




Saving, Listing, Restoring And Deleting Tables contents
Advanced Data Management commands
More complex queries and SQL Functions
Procedural SQL
Week 12
Week 10
Relational Database Operators
The Data Dictionary and System Catalog
Relationships Within The Relational Database




Transaction Management and Concurrency Control
What is a Transaction
Concurrency Control
Concurrency Control with Locking Methods
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
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Week 14
Week 13
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Transaction Management and Concurrency Control

Concurrency Control with Time Stamping Methods

Concurrency Control with Optimistic Methods
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Database Recovery Management
Total
19.
2
Main references supporting the course:
1. Hector Garcia-Molina, Jeffrey D. Ullman, and Jennifer Widom, Database Systems: The Complete Book (2nd Edition)
(2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
2. Ramez Elmasri and Shamkant B. Navathe, Fundamentals of Database Systems (5th Edition) ( 2006).
1. Clare Churcher, Beginning Database Design: From Novice to Professional (2007)
2. Toby J. Teorey, Database Modeling and Design: Logical Design, 4th Edition (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data
Management Systems) (2005)
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(10)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Object Oriented Programming
CCPS1563
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
2/2
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CCP0001 Computer Programming
Objectives:
The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the key features of object-oriented technology as well as an
industry standard methodology (UML) for Object-Oriented Analysis and Design. Students will be expected to analyze
and design an Object-Oriented system in UML and implement it using C++
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Apply the key features of object-oriented technology as well as standard methodology (UML) for ObjectOriented Analysis and Design.

Demonstrate the basic notions and techniques for algorithm development

Implement algorithms using C++ correctly and effectively.
Transferable Skills:

Appreciate the importance of OOP principles.

Adopt a methodical approach to the creation and implementation of software development.

Be proficient in analyzing and designing an Object-Oriented system in UML and implement it using C++
10.
11.
Faculty
The study of Object-oriented programming and the development of
programming skills are central to any undergraduate course in
computing.
Object-oriented programming (OOP) is claimed to give more flexibility,
easing changes to programs, and is widely popular in large scale software
engineering. OOP is easier to learn for those new to computer
programming than previous approaches.
Object-oriented programming builds upon the fundamental skills
acquired in the module CCP0001 Computer Programming. This module is
necessary for students to proceed to other modules in the program.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 54
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment ( project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
The major areas of study include: Basic Concepts of Object Oriented Technology, State, Behaviour, and Identity of
Objects, Principles in Object-Oriented Programming, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design, Programming in C++ as
Object-Oriented Language, and Case Studies
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
15%

Quizzes and assignments
15%

Project
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Exam
16.
17.
. 50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
2
1
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
1
0
0
3
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Overview of the subject

Historical background

Classes and Objects,

Abstraction

Encapsulation
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
2
P
2
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
6
10
Page 55
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Introduction to Object-Orientation

Inheritance,

Polymorphism

Message Passing

OOAD Methodologies

Introduction to UML
Object-Oriented Analysis

Syntax and Semantic

examples of Use Case Diagrams,
Object-Oriented Analysis

Package Diagrams

Class Diagrams

Collaboration Diagrams

Sequence Diagrams

State Diagrams

Activity Diagrams
Object-Oriented Design

Syntax and Semantic

Deployment Diagrams.

Implementation in an Object-Oriented Language
Case Studies
Analyzing, Designing a Business Information System using UML and
Implementing it Using C++ or Java.
Total
Laboratory Details
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
6
6
18
30
4
4
12
24
8
8
24
40
28
28
84
140
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Experimental work must include the following









19.
20.
Introduction to java environment.
Classes ,Objects and Abstraction.
Syntax and Semantic
Message Passing
Implementation in an Object-Oriented Language (C++, Java)
Utility Classes (C++, Java)
develop basic programs which contain a set of GUI components
Assignments involve the modeling of simple real-world systems using UML diagrams.
Designing a Business Information System using UML and implementing it Using C++ or Java.
Main references supporting the course:

Joyce Farrell, Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ ( 2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, and Ivar Jacobson, Unified Modeling Language User Guide, The (2nd Edition)
(Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series) ( 2005)
2. John W. Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson, and Stephen D. Burd, Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with the Unified
Process ( 2004)
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(11)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Islamic Civilization (Hadhari)
IGNK1033
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To acquaint the student with: the Islamic world (geographically, its political, economic and social status) and
modern day Islamic issues from different continents

To study about the formation of many organizations by countries and its effect on the Islamic world

To know how the development of Muslims occurred in the past and the means that helped in preventing
danger effecting them.
10.
Learning outcomes:
After the completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

Describe the Islamic geography in terms of politics, economics and others, and to explain main issues in
various countries.

Name numerous current organisations, their roles, why they were established, and their relationship with the
Islamic world.

Explain the means of development and advancement of the Muslim Ummah, and to strive to perform dawah
towards it in the student’s private and public lives.
Transferable Skills:

Explain the means of development and advancement of the Muslim Ummah, and to strive to perform dawah
towards it in the student’s private and public lives.

Understand and explain to others the principles of the Malaysian project (Civilized Islam) as a leading country
in the Islamic world.
11.
University
To acquaint the student with the importance knowledge of the Islamic
Civilization. Student will gain knowledge of the Islamic world
(geographically, its political, economic and social status) and modern day
Islamic issues. Understand The principles of the Malaysian project
(Civilized Islam) as a leading country in the Islamic world.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm Exam

Assessments

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This subject identify the importance of the Islamic world in terms of the geographical location, as well as economically
and socially, emerging issues in the five continents; The challenge facing the Islamic nations and the role played by
Saudi Arabia in the present-day Islamic world
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
10%

Assignments
10%

Interactions through discussion
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Exam
. 50% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
17.
18.
A7
2
LO9
0
A8
0
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
3
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
The political, natural, and economical geography of the Islamic world
The importance of the Islamic world.

The transformation from the Islamic nation’s glorious pat to its lower
present, because of being away from the Islamic Aqida (belief) and Islamic
instructions.

The ideological reality of Islamic world.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 58
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
The social reality of Islamic world.

The range of religion adherence in the society.

The social and domestic relationships.

The moral status in the Islamic society.
The political reality of Islamic Ummah.
•
The consequences of the absence of Islamic khilafa.
•
The national and international circumstances of the Islamic countries.

The States and Statelets that are established in the Islamic world, and their
effect on its present situation.
Political subordination appearance
•
The economic reality of the Islamic world
•
Affection of foreign economy, and its consequences on the present Islamic life.
Introduction about Asia and the spread of Islam there
Some of the Islamic contemporary issues in Asia.
•
Palestine
•
Lebanon
•
Indonesia
•
India
•
Philippine
•
Afghanistan
•
The Republic of China
•
The danger of Christianization in these two countries.
Some of the Islamic contemporary issues in the middle Africa and the spread of Islam
there
•
The African corn
•
Western Africa
•
Nigeria
•
The Middle of Africa
•
South of the Sudan
Some of the Islamic contemporary issues in Europe
•
Introduction about the Continent and the spread of Islam there.
•
Eastern Europe
•
Cyprus
Muslims in the two American continents.
Muslims in Australia
The international coalitions and their impact in the Islamic world
•
United Nations
•
NATO
•
WARSO
•
African States Organization
•
Arabic League. Islamic Conference Organization
•
Cooperation Council of Golf Arab Countries
•
Non-Alignment
•
Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
•
European Market
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
Page 59
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
They way of upgrading Muslims and the ways to confront the countries that
encounter them
•
The direction of adherence to Islam.
•
Seeking for the unity of Islamic efforts and the Islamic solidarity
•
Realizing the dangers that threatening the Islamic world if Muslims do not
adhere to Islam.
•
Remind that Koran is well kept among Muslims as Allah Promised, and the
efforts of the right denomination that carrying the reality until the change
come in from Allah’s.
Some of the special Islamic countries and their role in the progress of Islamic
contemporary world (a brief concise)
•
The kingdom of Saudi Arabia and its role in the Islamic world.
The economical, geographic and strategic position of the kingdom of
Saudi Arabia.
The role of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia in achieving Islamic unity and
to progress the Islamic world in educational, social, economy, and
religious fields.
•
Egypt and its role in the progress of Islamic world.
•
Malaysia and its role in the progress of contemporary Islamic world.
The technological advancement and its impact in the contemporary
Islamic world.
•
Pakistan and its role in the progress of contemporary Islamic world.
The principles of the Malaysian project (Civilized Islam)
•
Iman and Taqwa (Faith and God-fearingness)
•
Secure and justice government.
•
Free independent people.
•
Knowledge and science
•
Balanced and comprehensive economy development.
•
High living standards
•
Give the right for the woman and the minorities
•
Keep the morals and traditions
•
Keep the environment
•
Support the defense force
Total
2
1
6
9
4
3
12
18
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
1.
2.
3.
Kamaruzaman, Kamar Oniah. Understanding Islam : contemporary discourse . Kuala Lumpur Saba Islamic
Media, 2007.
Endress, Gerhard. Islam : an historical introduction. Trans. Carole Hillenbrand. New Delhi: New Age Books,
2006.
Karsh, Efraim. Islamic imperialism : a history. New Haven : Yale University Press, c2006.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Additional references supporting the course:
.‫م‬3000 ‫ مجموعة النيل العربية‬،‫ حاضر العالم اإلسالمي وقضاياه المعاصرة‬.‫جميل عبد هللا محمد المصري‬
.‫م‬3001 ‫ دار األندلس‬،‫ حاضر العالم اإلسالمي‬،‫زيد محمد خضر‬
.‫م‬3000 ‫ دار الوفاء للطباعة والنشر‬،‫ الغزو الفكري والتيارات المعادية لإلسالم‬،‫عبد الستار فتح هللا سعيد‬
.1
.2
.3
4.
5.
Khan, A. S. Islamic fundamentalism and modernity. Jaipur : Aavishkar Publisher, Distributors, 2005
Zakariyya, Fouad. Myth and reality in the contemporary Islamist movement. Trans. Ibrahim M. Abu-Rab'i.
London : Pluto Press, 2005
6. Abdalla, zaki M., and Muhammad Mahmud. Islam from a contemporary perspective. Cairo : Publishing House
for Universities, 2001
7. Hofman, Wilfried. Religion on the rise : Islam in the third millennium. Beltsville, MD : Amana Publications,
2001.
8. Tsugitaka , Sato. Muslim societies : historical and comparative aspects. London : Routledge Curzon, 2004.
9. Abedin, Syed Z., and Ziauddin Sardar. Muslim minorities in the west . London : Gray Seal Books, 1995
10. Saeed, Abdullah. Islam in Australia. Crows Nest, NSW : Allen & Unwin, 2003.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(12)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Cyber Law & Islamic Ethics
CICT1543
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/1
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
9.
Objectives:
This subject is designed to enable students to:

Introduce the concept of ethics, morals, values and attitudes from the western and Islamic perspective as the
basis for the codes of practice in the society of the information age.

Familiarize the students with the laws that govern information technology.

Discuss the legal and ethical problems that are commonly encountered in dealing with information
technology.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:
 Explain the various legal issues related to information technology
 Describe the laws govern information technology
 Compare between the western and Islamic perspective on issues
 Apply principles of cyber law in daily situations
 Evaluate situations commonly encountered in dealing with information technology from the legal perspective
Transferable Skills:

Indentifying the issues and problems created from the application of the internet.

Communicate effectively about various legal issues related to information technology.

Analyze the legality of different operations in organization and life.

Understand about things that contradict with Shari’ah, and Shari’ah perspective on rights & obligations.
10.
11.
Faculty
Computer-related professionals need to be aware of a wider range of
issues that goes beyond the mere technical knowledge necessary to
practice their chosen discipline. They should have knowledge of
legislation affecting their work, responsibility to the profession, the
community and the environment. This module is designed to make
future computer related professionals aware issues and problems
created from the application of the internet. The foundational and ethical
context in cyber laws are also a case of concern in Shari’ah.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
84
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 62
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm Exam

Performance (projects, Assessments)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course would emphasize on indentifying the issues and problems created from the application of the internet
which suggest that the earlier legal infrastructure and norms that have been developed to accommodate the needs of
the digital age. The foundational and ethical context in cyber laws are also a case of concern in Shari’ah.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
40%
10%
 assignments
10%
 Project
20%
 Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 60% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
1
0
0
2
2
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
2
1
0
2
0
1
1
1
18.
A7
2
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
3
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 1
Introduction

Emergence of cyber laws in malaysia

Islamic legal history
Ethical standard in information technology

Common law ethical principles

Shari’ah ethical standard
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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1
6
al
T
Tot
L
Indep.
SLT
Details
9
Page 63
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
SOURCE OF CYBER LAWS
Source of cyber laws in malaysia

Written law
i.
Constitution
ii.
Legislation
iii.
Subsidiary legislation

Unwritten law
i.
Foreign law
ii.
Judicial precedent
Source of islamic law affecting cyberspace

Primary sources
i.
Al-Quran
ii.
Al-Sunnah

Secondary sources
i.
Al-ijma’
ii.
Al-qiyas
iii.
Masaleh mursalah
iv.
Miscellaneous
Regulatory frameworks governing cyberspace

Regulatory authorities

Regulatory instruments
RIGHT AND PRIVACY

Right of communication & Privacy

Classes of right and privacy

Problems arise in online communication

Online privacy and law
Shari’ah perspective on right (Al-Hudud) & obligations (Al-Hurriyyah)

Al-hudud

Al-hurriyah

Right of privacy
Data protection

Data protection principles

Registration formalities for data protection

Shariah perspective on data protection
Content regulation: censorship

Forms of expression should be prohibited

The implication of the malausia government bill og guarantess

Shari’ah perspective on censorship
Telemedicine

Confidentiality of data

Qualification of practitioners

Rights of medical pratitioners

Shari’ah perspective on the practice of telemedecine
Intellectual property in cyberspace

Protection of vomputer sogtware and multimedia

Trademarks and domain names

Shari’ah rulings on the protection of intellectual property
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Page 64
Topic 14
Topic 13
Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Computer crimes and penalties

The categories of crimes in cyberspace

Unauthorised access to computer materials (hacking)

Unauthorised access with intent to commit or facilitate caommission of
further offence

Unauthorised modifications of contens of any computers

Wrongful communication

Doctrine of al-jenayah affecting cyberspace
Civil liabilities in tort

Examples of torts in cyberspace

Online defamation

Trespass to chattel

Negligence

Shari’ah ruling
Encryption and digital signature

Legal issues on digital signature

Rights and duties of subscriber, certification authority, controller
andrepository

Offences against unauthorised use of keys

Shari’ah perspective on digital signature
E-commerce: legal and policy framework

Features of electronic commerce

Legal obstacles to electroni commerce

Financial issues; electronic payment system, tax issues
Cyberspace contracting

Legal issues in cyberspace contracting

The essential elements of a valid contract

Developing for cyber contract
Shari’ah perspective on e-commerce

E-commerce and the principles of jurisprudence (usul fiqh)

E-commerce and the islamic law of contract

Prohibition of riba, masyir and gharar
E-commerce and consumer protection

Online selling buying

Rights of consumer

Shari’ah perspective on online selling & buying
Electronic communication and the law of evidence

Computer output and the law of evidence

The hearsay evidence

Best evidence eule

Islamic law of evidence.
Total
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
12
6
Page 65
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Main references supporting the course:
 Chris Reed and John Angel, Computer Law: The Law and Regulation of Information Technology (2007)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Peter B. Maggs, John T. Soma, and James A. Sprowl Internet and Computer Law, Second Edition (American
Casebook Series) by ( 2005)
2. Keith B. Darrell, Issues in Internet Law: Society, Technology, and the Law, 2008 edition ( 2007)
3. Ibrahim, A. & Joned, A. (1987). The Malaysian legal system. Kuala Lumpur : dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.
4. Al-Zuhayly, W. (1984). Al-fiqh al Islami wa’adillatuh (vol:4). Beirut: Dar al-Fikr.
5. Audah, A. Q. (1977). Al-tashri’ al-jenai al-Islam (Vol:1). Cairo: Dar al- Turath.
6. Edward, L., & Waelde, C. (2000). Law and the internet: a framework for electronic commerce (2nd Ed.).
Oxford: Hart Publishing.
7. Miller, R. L., & Cross, F.B. (2002). The legal and e-commerce environment today (3rd Ed.). USA:
West/Thomson Learning.
8. Kamali, M.H. (1999). Principle of Islamic jurisprudence (2nd ed.) Kuala Lumpur: Ilmiah Publishers.
9. Reed, C., & Angel, J. (2000) computer Law (4th ed.). London: Blackstone Press LTD.
10. Azmil, S., (1997). Crimes on the electromic frontier- some thoughts on the Computer Crimes Act
1997.Malaysian Law Journal, 3.
11. Suri, R.K., & Diwan, P. (2001). Laws relating to e-cyber
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(13)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
Computer & Information Security
CSEC2513
Faculty
The need for education in computer security and related topics has
grown dramatically. It is essential for anyone studying Computer Science
or Computer Engineering to enable students use the major tools and
techniques available for improving Computer & Information Security.
1/2
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To introduce student to different security threats in computing environment and the solutions.

To introduce student to the concepts related to computer security and the importance of the security
problem.

To enable students use the major tools and techniques available (symmetric and public key security, network
security, digital certificates, digital signatures, etc) for improving the security.

To enable students to handle the security problem of internet

To enable students to design and build secure intelligent computer systems and to design a suitable and
effective security policy.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to

Identify and describe common security vulnerabilities in network and database computing environment.

Describe and interpret the Fundamentals of Telecommunication and Networking Security.

Identify the legal understanding issues on Computer Security,

Compare the performance of various cryptographic schemes
Transferable Skills:

Recommend security tools and procedures for specific attacks.

Develop appropriate security policies and guidelines.

Effectively communicate in a written (reports) or a verbal way in modern security markets
10.
11.
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 67
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course is essential for anyone studying Computer. it aims to enable students use the major tools and techniques
available for improving Computer & Information Security. The major area of this course includes: Potential threats such
as Viruses, Worms, Basics of cryptography, encryption algorithms, Network security, database security and legal issues.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%
 Quizzes
10%
 Assignments
10%
 Interactions through discussion
20%
 Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
0
0
2
2
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
3
1
0
2
0
1
1
1
17.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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2
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
3
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Basic issues of Computer Security
 Security technologies and principles
 Cryptography
 Authentication

access control
 security measures
 Hardware and Software Security Control
 privacy and Ethics,
 Risk Analysis in computer security,
 Threats and security,
 physical protection (natural disaster, Physical
Designing and Developing secure computer systems
 The Secure Application Development Problem – the Holistic Approach to
Security
 Common Practices for Improving Security

External Security Measures,

Security Models
o Specification and Verification,
o Clark-Wilson Model,
o Bell and LaPadulla Model,
o Goguen-Meseguar,
o TCSED

Discretionary Access and Information Flow Control,

Auditing and Intrusion Detection,

Damage Control and Assessment, Microcomputer Security
Telecommunication and Network Security

Distributed System Security,

The Trusted Network Interpretation,

TNI Security Services,
Internet Security

The Internet Security Problem:

Available Technologies for Internet Security

the use Firewalls

the main defence
o the Applications Layer
o The Use appropriate transfer protocols
o The Use appropriate tools / techniques
o The use of Encryption (symmetric, asymmetric)
o The use of Digital Signatures
o The use of Digital Certificates, PKI
o The use of End-to-End Encryption
o the Transport Layer
o The Use of Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
o the Physical layer
o ΤCP/IP layer security
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
4
2
12
18
6
3
18
27
6
3
18
27
Page 69
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Applications of Secret Key Encryption
Applications of Public Key Encryption

Safe transmission of messages

Safe distribution of the secret key

Digital certificates

Public key certification

Ddigital Signatures
Database Security

Designing the Security,

Methods of Protection,

Security of Multilevel Database
Computer Security and Legal Issues

Computer Crime,

Software Violation,

Privacy Considerations

Managerial Issues

Government – based Security Standards
Security policies and guidelines

Development of an appropriate Internet Security Policy

Acceptable Security Approaches

Acceptable Security Methods

Acceptable Technical Measures
Total
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:

Stalling, W.& Brown, L. computer security: principle and practice. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. (2008).
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Chuck Easttom, “Computer Security Fundamentals”, Prentice Hall Security Series (3005),
2. Conklin, W.A, White, G.B., Cothren, C., Williams, D.,& Davis, R.L.(2005). Principles of computer security:
security + and beyond. Singapore: McGraw Hill.
3. Merkow, M., & Breithaupt, J. (2006). Information security principles and practices. New Jersey:Pearson
Prentice Hall.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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(14)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
Computer Architecture
CICT2533
Faculty
The module has been designed to provide students with a firm
understanding of the theories and principles associated with digital
computers and their architectures. It will provide students with a
detailed understanding of Computer Systems in general and the
importance of their role in the modern IT world. It will present students
with the opportunity to understand the evolutionary development of
hardware and software and appreciate the underlying technology.
It has been designed on the premise that understanding how the
machine works is a prerequisite
For other modules in the program such as CCP0105 Operating System.
1/2
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CCP0003 Digital Systems
Objectives: To introduce students to

The knowledge related to a typical component of a system and their function.

the architectural features of a modern computer system in general and the related component of the CSO.

The features provided by typical operating systems and explain how these features facilitate program
executions.
Learning outcomes: Upon completion of CCP0102, students should be able to:

Identify what’s related to a typical component of a system and their function.

Describe features provided by a typical operating system and explain how these features facilitate program
execution.

Explain the computer system architecture in general and the related component of the CSO.
Transferable Skills:

Identify and describe the architectural features of a modern computer system for a variety of purposes.

Develop skills of interfacing a computer system with the external world.

Skilled in tracing the influences of important computing developments (such as compiler technology,
networking, the web, multimedia, safety, security.) on the architecture of computer systems
10.
11.
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course introduces students to the principles of Computer System and Organisation. Upon completion of the course,
students should be able to explain and understand the basic component of system organisation, methods,
computational systems, different computer architecture.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
1
0
1
1
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
3
2
0
0
2
1
1
1
18.
A7
2
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Overview of a Computer System

Introduction

Definition of Computer and Computer System

Functional Capabilities of a Computer System

Conceptual Components of a Computer

Computer System Components

Classes of Computer Systems
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 72
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Hardware Interface

Introduction

The Buses

The Interface (Ports)

Parallel and Serial Transmissions

The Parallel Interface

The Serial Interface

The IEEE-488 Interface.
CPU and Memory

Introduction

The Components of CPU

The Instruction Cycle

Register Organization

Memory
Storage Devices

Introduction

Storage Structure

Disk Structure

Caching
Input and Outpun Technologies

Introduction

I/O Structure and Hardware

Application I/O Subsystem Services
4
2
4
4
2
12
18
1
6
9
2
12
18
2
12
18
2
12
18
2
12
18
Topic 7
Topic 6
File

Introduction

File Concept

File Access

File Organization

File Organization and Type

File Management

Protection

Consistency Sematics

Performance and Efficiency

Recovery
Operating System

Introduction

Virtual Machine

Concurrency

Virtual Memory

Process Management

Interrupt

Spooling

Time Sharing

Time Slicing
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Topic 8
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Security and Access Control

Security

Domain Protection

Program and System Thrats

Encryption

Computer Security Classifications
Total
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
1. Irv Englander, The Architecture of Computer Hardware, Systems Software, & Networking: An Information
Technology Approach, Fourth Edition,2009
Additional references supporting the course:
1. William Stallings ,Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance, 8th Edition, 2009
2. Sajjan G. Shiva , Computer Organization, Design, and Architecture, Fourth Edition. 2007,
3. John L. Hennessy , David A. Patterson, Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Fourth Edition, The
Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design, 2006.
4. Joseph D. Dumas,Computer Architecture: Fundamentals and Principles of Computer Design.2005
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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(15)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
Data Structure & Algorithm
CCPS2553
Faculty
Data structures and algorithms lie at the heart of Computer Science as
they are the basis for the efficient solution of programming tasks.
Students of computing are required to be aware of the large number of
ways in which data is represented and manipulated by the machine.
Previous study of programming have developed the concept of data type
- primitive types, integers and floating point numbers, characters - as well
as simple, static, structures such as arrays, strings and records. This
module will extend this understanding. It will examine the process of
creating, and exploiting more flexible data memory structures such as,
linked lists, stacks, queues and trees.
1/2
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CCP0100 Object Oriented Programming
Objectives:

To promote a good understanding of different forms of data structure representation.

Students, during this course, are trained to deal with Abstract Data Types (ADT) and to implement different data
structures using different methods.
10.
Learning outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the skills to deal with ADT and implement data structures
using different methods. Students :

Should be able to know basic terms associated with data structures, and the main principles that each deal by such
as Stacks, Queues, Lists and Strings.

Should be able to choose suitable data structure that use for any applications at hand.

Should be able to deal with Searching and Sorting Algorithms.

Should be able to use and create data structure by C++ language.
Transferable Skills:
Know terms associated with data structures and choose suitable data structure that use for different applications.
11.
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (mini-project, Assigned exercises, Presentation and final project)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
Students of computing are required to be aware of the large number of ways in which data is represented and
manipulated by the machine. The aim of this course is to provide students with the theoretical background and
practical experience relating to the design and implementation of several types of data structures.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Laboratory sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
0
0
0
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
4
A8
2
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
 Course Introduction
 C++ Revision ( Classes, inheritance, overloading)
 Introduction Data Structure and types
Introduction to Stack
o Advantages
o Disadvantages
o Algorithm
o Implementation
o Examples
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
Page 76
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Introduction to Queue and Simulation
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Linked Stack
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Linked Queue.
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Recursion.
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Lists
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Strings
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Introduction to Trees.
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o implementation
o Examples
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
Page 77
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Searching and Sorting Algorithms
o Sequential search
o Binary search
o Insertion sort
o selection sort
o shell sort
o quick sort
o merge sort
o Radix sort
o Hashing
Note: For each Searching and Sorting Algorithms explain
o advantages
o disadvantages
o Algorithm
o Implementation
o Examples
Total
8
8
24
40
28
28
84
140
Laboratory Details
Laboratory
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Experiment work must include the following
19.
20.












C++ Revision ( Classes, inheritance, overloading)
Data Structure types
Stack Implementation
Queue Implementation
Linked Stack Implementation
Linked Queue Implementation
Recursion Implementation
Lists Implementation
Strings Implementation
Trees Implementation
Sorting Algorithms Implementation
Min-projects
Main references supporting the course:
1. Augenstein & Tenenbaum Langsam, Data Structure Using C & C++, 2nd Ed (Paperback - 2007)
2. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, and Susan Anderson-Freed, Fundamentals of Data Structures in C ( 2007)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Larry Nyhoff, ADTs, Data Structures and Problem Solving with C++, 2nd Ed. , Printice Hall, 2005.
2. Malik, Data Structures using C++, Thomson , 2003.
3. Clifford Shaffer, A practical Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis, 2nd Ed. , Prentice Hall,
2001.
4. Frank M. Carrano, Data Abstraction & Problem Solving with C++ (5th Edition) ( 2006)
5. Frank M. Carrano, Data Abstraction and Problem Solving with C++: Walls and Mirrors (4th Edition) by ( 2004)
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(16)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Data Communication & Telecommunication Systems
CNET2523
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
42 14
O= Others
1/2
7.
Credit Value
4
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:
The main objectives of the course to acquaint students with

The fundamental concepts, principles and terminology of data communications;

The concepts, and related technologies, associated with data transmission;

The fundamentals of Communication Architecture, Protocols and Local Area Networks.

The various types of network in terms of the technologies, hardware, and usage.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Demonstrate the requirements of different types of computer data communication

Identify and explain the transmission techniques and protocols.

Explain the basic building blocks of a Local Area Network.
Transferable Skills:

analyze the operation of a range of commonly used data communications techniques;

Communicate effectively about computer communications systems, with specialists and non-specialists.
10.
11.
12.
Faculty
This module is one of the core subjects in computer science. It is
important that students have a strong foundation in the principles of
digital communication. This module is designed to provide the student
with a fundamental knowledge and understanding of the data
communications and networking techniques and their components.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 112
Total =168
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 79
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Synopsis:
The course will expose the students to the overall understanding and knowledge in basic data communication and
telecommunication systems. The major area of studies include physical interface, transmission medium, data integrity
and security, data compression, improving data communication efficiency, data encoding and modulation, architecture
and protocol, LAN, internetworking and digital switching system.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 3
Data Transmission
Transmission Terminology. Frequency, Spectrum and Bandwidth. Transmission
Impairments. Nyquist’s and Shannon’s Law.
Transmission Media
Guided and Unguided. Twisted pair. Coaxial cable. Fibre optic. Microwave. Cellular.
Satellite.
Data Encoding and Modulation
Digital to Digital: NRZ-L, NRZ-I, Bipolar-AMI, Pseudoternary, Manchester,
Differential Manchester. Modulation Rate. Digital to Analog: Amplitude Shift keying
(ASK), Frequency Shift keying (ASK), Phase Shift keying (PSK). Analog to Digital:
PCM. Analog to Analog: Amplitude Modulation, Frequency Modulation, Phase
Modulation.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Introduction
Data Communications. Data Communication Networking. Protocols and Protocol
Architecture (TCP/IP and OSI). Compare TCP/IP architecture and OSI model.
Standards Organizations.
Topic 4
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
3
1
8
12
3
1
8
12
3
1
8
12
6
2
16
24
Page 80
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Data Communication Interface
Synchronous and Asynchronous Transmission. Line Configurations: Simplex, Half-duplex,
Full duplex. EIA-232 Interface Standard. DTE and DCE. Null Modem.
Data Link Control
Flow Control: Stop-and Wait, Sliding Window. Error Detection: Parity Check, CRC
Methods. HDLC: Characteristics, Frame Structure, and Operation. Data Compression:
Huffman Coding and Dynamic Huffman Coding.
Multiplexing
Frequency Division Multiplexing: Characteristics. Synchronous Time Division.
Multiplexing: Characteristics, Link Control, Digital Carrier Systems, Statistical Time
Division Multiplexing: Characteristics. ADSL and HDSL Line
Circuit Switching and Packet Switching
Introduction: Switching Networks, Circuit Switching Networks, Circuit Switching
Concepts. Routing in Circuit Switching Networks. Introduction to Control Signalling: SS7.
Packet Switching: Technique, Packet Size, Compare Circuit Switching and Packet
Switching. Routing: Characteristics, Routing Strategies: Fixed Routing, Flooding, Random
Routing, Adaptive Routing
LAN Technology
LAN Applications. LAN Architecture: Protocol Architecture, Topologies, MAC, LLC. Bus
LAN: Characteristics, Media, Use of Repeater in extension of BUS. Ring LAN:
Characteristics Star LAN: Characteristics, Use of Hubs and Switches. Wireless LAN:
Applications, Requirements, and Technology. Bridge: Function of a Bridge, Protocol
Architecture.
LAN Systems
Ethernet (CSMA/CD): IEEE 802.3 MAC, IEEE 802.3 10 Mbps Specifications (10Base5,
10Base2, 10Base-T, 10Base-F). IEEE 802.3 100 Mbps Specifications: Introduction to Fast
Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet. Token ring .IEEE 802.5 MAC, Physical Layer specifications.
FDDI: MAC, Physical Layer specifications. Wireless LAN Standard: IEEE 802.11 Physical
Layer Specifications and MAC.
Total
3
1
8
12
3
1
8
12
3
1
8
12
6
2
16
24
6
2
16
24
6
2
16
24
42
14
112
168
Main references supporting the course:
1. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking (McGraw-Hill Forouzan Networking) ( 2007)
2. Chris Reed and John Angel, Computer Law: The Law and Regulation of Information Technology (2007)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. William J Beyda, Data Communications: From Basics to Broadband (4th Edition) by ( 2004)
2. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications Networking ( 2006)
3. William A. Shay, Understanding Data Communications and Networks, Third Edition ( 2003)
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(17)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Stories of Prophets in Islam
IHIS1053
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
1/2
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

The student will learn many lessons from the history or biography of prophets:

Adam, Nuh, Ibrahim and Yusuf (peace be upon them).

The student will observe that the preaching of all prophets were related directly to Aqidah and Tauhid.

Learn how Allah is always become the savior to his messengers (peace be upon them), and his support to them
with miracles due to their patience.

Assist a student understand the reality of prophetic biography and to look it as a living Islamic reality.

To be able to follow historical development of the prophetic biography, with its great events, from birth to
death.
Learning outcomes:
After the completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

Able to give examples from the history of prophets (messengers) and deduce the learning outcome from their
biography.

Give respect to every prophet by following their way and method in upholding Da’wah to Allah.

Follow the right attitude of the prophets (Peace be upon them) uphold patience in facing challenges in his daily
life.

Explain the stages of the prescribed stages of Prophetic biography and derive from it experiences and behaviors

Struggle to always adopt Prophet behaviors, which were a reflection of holy Quran and follows the foot- steps
of the Prophet peace upon be him, in fulfilling obligations of calling people to the right path
10.
11.
University
Gains more Islamic knowledge and learn the right attitude in daily life
following Prophet Mohammed, “May Allah’s peace and prayers be upon
him” practices.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Transferable Skills:
Gains more Islamic knowledge and learn the right attitude in daily life following Prophet Mohammed, “May Allah’s
peace and prayers be upon him” practices.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm Exam

Performance (participation, Assessments)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This subject covers Ba’du Adaam, the Prophet, the preaching of Nuh, Do’a of Nuh, and Ba’da al-tufaan. The Idol seller,
who is my lord, to Mecca and Jerusalem, Ro’ya Ajibah, Yusof fil Bi’r, min al-Bi’r Ila al-Qasr, Ta’wil al-Ru’ya, Ru’ya alMalik, the resources of the Earth, the brethren of Yosuf, Husnul ‘Aqibah. The Arabian peninsula, before revelation, the
revelation, the first pilgrimage, Hamza and Omar’s conversion to Islam, Jihad in the way of Allah, the battles of Badr,
Uhud, Hudaibiya, the conquest of Mecca. Fare well pilgrimage, the death of the Prophet peace be upon him.
14.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50 %
10 %

Quizzes
10 %

Assignments
10 %

Interactions through discussion board
20 %

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
50 %
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
3
0
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
17.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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A7
2
LO9
0
A8
0
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
3
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
After Adam

The anger of Allah

The envy of devil

The cunning of devil

Good people pictures

From pictures to the statuses

From statuses to the idols

The anger of Allah
The passenger - The invitation of Noah

The passenger

A human being or Angel?

The passenger Noah

What the people have replied him?

Between Noah and his people.

The lowest followed you.

The allegation of the rich people.

Noah’s invitation.
Noah’s Invitation - After the flood

Noah’s invitation

The ship

The flood

Noah’s son

He is not from your family

After the flood
The seller of idols - Cold fire

The seller of idols

Azar’s son

The advice of Ibraheem

Ibraheem is betaking the idols

Who did that?

Cold fire
Who is my God? - The invitation for the father

Who is my God

Allah is my God

Ibraheem’s invitation

In front of the king

The invitation to the father
To Mecca - Bait Al Maqdis

To Mecca

Zam Zam’s well

Ibraheems dream

Al Ka’ba

Bait Al Maqdis
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Content
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Page 84
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
A wonderful dream - Yousuf in the well

A wonderful dream

The envy of his brothers

A delegation to Jacob

To the forest

In front of Jacob

Yousuf in the well
From the well to the palace - The interpretation of the dream

From the well to the palace

The loyalty

The advice in the prison

Yousuf’s wisdom

The advice of monotheism

The interpretation of the dream
The dream of the king - The earth treasures

The dream of the king

The king send a messenger to Yousuf

Yousuf ask for inspection

Responsible of the earth treasures
Brothers of Yousuf - Good conclusion

Yousuf’s brothers have came

Between Yousuf and his brothers

Between Jacob and his sons

Binyamin

To Jacob

The secret divulged

Yousuf sent a messenger to Jacob

Jacob with Yousuf

The good end
The status of Arab Island during pre-Islam era

Arab island

Arab

The social and political status for Arab

Economy status

The religious status

Questions and discussion
The life
Islam







of Prophet Mohammed, May Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him, before
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
His born, name, and family
The death of his mother and the guaranty of his grandfather
Terminologies
The guaranty of his uncle Abu Talib and the first trip to Asham
His marriage to Khadija
Terminologies
Questions and discussion
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Topic 7
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
The Message (The Mission)

Stages of the invitation

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
Immigration to Habasha

The first immigration to Habasha

The second immigration to Habasha

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
The Islam of Omar and Hamzza

The Islam of Hamzza Bin Abdul Muttalib, May Allah

be pleased with him,

The Islam of Omar Bin Al Khattab, May Allah be

pleased with him

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Topic 10
Topic 9
The departure of the Prophet Mohammed, May Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him,
to Ta’ef.

Isra and Mi'raaj

The invitation for the tribes during Hajj

Questions and discussion
Al Aqaba homage

The first aqaba homage

The second aqaba homage

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
The Immigration to Madinah Munawara

The conspiracy of Dar Al Nadwa

The arrival of the Prophet Mohammed may Allah’s peace and prayers be upon
him to Madinah

After the immigration

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
The arrangement of Madinah society

The fraternization between the immigrants and

the supporters

Treaty with Jews

The hypocrites

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
The stage of Jihad

The most important companies and invasions

The purposes of the companies and the invasions

Questions and discussion
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Topic 11
Topic 10
Ghazwat Bader (Bader Invasion)

The reason of the invasion

The news of the caravan

Being ready to fight

The beginning of the battle

The consequences of the battle

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
Ghazwat Auhud (Auhud Invasion)

The reason of the invasion

The Muslims going out from Madinah

The beginning of the battle

Some of the battle events

The lessons taken from the battle

Questions and discussion
2
1
6
9
Topic 12
Al Hudaibiya agreement

The circumstances of Al Hudaibiya agreement

The conditions of Al Hudaibiya agreement

The consequences of Al Hudaibiya agreement

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
The attitude of The Prophet Mohammed, May Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him
of Jews

The treason of Bani Qainuqa’

The treason of Bani Al Nadheir

The treason of Bani Quraidha

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
2
1
6
9
Topic 13
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Mecca Conquest

The reason of Mecca Conquest

The Muslims going out to Mecca

Abu Sufyan’s going out and his entering to Islam

The Muslims entering into Mecca

After the conquest

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
2
1
6
9
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
20.
The last Hajj of The Prophet Mohammed, May Allah’s

peace and prayers be upon him

Going out of the Prophet Mohammed may Allah’s

peace and prayers be upon him

Hajj acts

Questions and discussion
The death of The Prophet Mohammed, May Allah’s peace and prayers be upon
him

The beginning of his illness

The Prophet Mohammed may Allah’s peace andprayers be upon him
managing the Muslims issues during his illness.

The Prophet Mohammed may Allah’s peace and prayers be upon him in
Aesha’s house

Abu Baker leading Muslims in the prayers

Abu Baker attitude

Terminologies

Questions and discussion
Total
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course

Ahmed, M. Mukarram, and Muzaffar Husain Syed. Prophethood and prophecies [compilation and
coordination]. New Delhi : Anmol Publications, 2006.
Additional references supporting the course
1. Ibn Kathir, Imam Abi al-Fidaa Isma'il, and Ash Shaikh Khalil al-Mays. Stories of the prophets = Qissasul anbiya.
Trans. Duraid and Faiz Fatoohi. New Delhi : Adam Publishers and Distributors, 2005
2. Azimabadi, Badr. Stories of the holy prophets : qissasul anbiya. Kuala Lumpur : Synergy Books international,
2001.
3. Rauf, Abdul. Stories from Prophet’s life : illustrated biography of the Holy Prophet for children. Lahore :
Ferozsons, 1990
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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(18)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
System Analysis & Design
CCPS2563
Faculty
In large information technology environments the complexity of the
systems that are to be developed and/or maintained is equally large. An
ad hoc approach to systems development in such an environment is
likely to lead to inappropriate products. Formal systems analysis and
design methodologies are the accepted solution to this problem. Any IT
graduate undertaking IT employment must be aware of, and possess
skills in, systems analysis and design in order to usefully contribute to
systems development and maintenance. This module provides an
opportunity to consider and evaluate the strategies available for analysis
and design,The course will prepare the students to solve system
development problems in organizations.
2/2
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CCP0101 Database Management System
Objectives:

To equip students with an awareness of and understanding of systems analysis and design, covering major
steps of a complete system development life cycle.

To enable students to select and apply a variety of systems analysis techniques and be aware of the different
information they convey.

To develop thought processes for the purpose of investigating and developing large information systems.
10.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:






11.
3
distinguish between various systems analysis and design methodologies;
Choose the correct methodology to develop different types of systems.
apply systems analysis techniques to gain knowledge of an information system’s requirements, and create a
corresponding design;
Distinguish and differentiate the stages of System Development Life Cycle.
Plan, analyse, design and develop a new system from scratch.
Handle the software development tools like CASE and RAD
Transferable Skills:

Be proficient in developing different types of systems

Use personal initiative and communication skills throughout the process.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course develops a systematic understanding on the concepts and practicalities of systems development process,
The latest analysis requirements and design specification methods are given detailed coverage. The course will prepare
the students to solve information system development problems in organizations.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
2
0
2
1
1
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
1
0
1
1
3
0
1
3
18.
A7
2
LO9
3
A8
1
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
L
T
Indep.
Total
SLT
Details
4
2
12
18
Topic 1
Course Introduction






Introduction to System Analysis
The system development environment
Systems Development Life Cycle
Strategy and planning, systems
analysis, logical design, physical design
Implementation and maintenance.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
19.
20.
System Development Techniques and Methodologies

Process modelling, function

decomposition diagramming,

Entity-Relationship diagramming,

data flow diagramming

Procedure modelling.
Design and layout of:
12
6
36
54
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
Rapid Application Development (RAD) tool

To enhance and visualize the delivered concepts and techniques.

It is recommended that RAD tools such as Power Builder, Power Objects,
Visual Basic, IntraBuilder, or C++ Builder be used for this purpose.
4
2
12
18
Total
28
14
84
126

Forms,

screens,

dialogues,

report
Integrated Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool

A standard development environment to support the entire system
development life cycle.

It is recommended that Oracle Designer/2000 be used for this purpose
Main references supporting the course:
Jeffrey A. Hoffer, Joey F George, and Joseph S Valacich, Modern Systems Analysis and Design (5th Edition) ( 2007)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Dennis, A., Wixom, B.H., & Roth, R.M. (2006). Systems Analysis & Design (3rd ed.). USA: John Wiley & Sons,
Inc.
2. Dennis, A., Wixom, B.H., & Tegarden, D. (2005). Systems Analysis & Design with UML Version 2.0 (2nd ed.).
USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
3. Kendall, K.E., & Kendall, J.E. (2005). Systems Analysis and Design (6th ed.). Upper-Saddle River, NJ: PrenticeHall.
21.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(19)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Probability and Statistics
CMTH2504
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
42 14
O= Others
2/2
7.
Credit Value
4
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CMT0101 Discrete Mathematics
Objectives:

Provide an introduction to probability;

Provide an introduction to the analysis of data and statistical modelling;

Provide an introduction to the use of a statistical computing package. Such as SPSS and SAS.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:
10.
Faculty
This module provides fundamental tools in probability and statistics
which are necessary for the understanding of other modules in the
program.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126



11.
Handle of random variables and be familiar with common distributions.
Identify fallacious reasoning in statistical reports.
Apply mathematical tools in the analysis of problems in probability or statistics and to carry out an analysis of
a data set using exploratory and formal methods.

Apply the concepts of estimation and testing of hypothesis.

Apply the concepts of regression analysis in other scientific disciplines.

Apply the concepts of ANOVA techniques and its applications
Transferable Skills:

construct probabilistic models appropriate to a problem described in words

Explain in words the results of probabilistic or statistical analysis having regard to the situation being
modelled.
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Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Assigned exercises,

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This module provides fundamental tools in probability and statistics. The module aims to enable the students to carry
out an analysis of a data set using exploratory and formal methods, and to calculate probabilities and handle random
variables. The major areas of study include: discrete/continuous random variables and probability distributions, random
samples, estimation, tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance and regression and correlation.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and tutorials sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Quizzes
15%

assignments
15%

Mid-Semester Exam
20%
Final Examination
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
0
0
0
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
4
A8
2
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
PROBABILITY.
Sample Spaces and Events. Axioms, Interpretations, and Properties of Probability.
Counting Techniques. Conditional Probability. Independence.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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T
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
3
1
6
10
Page 93
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
DISCRETE RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS.
Random Variables. Probability Distributions for Discrete Random Variables. Expected
Values of Discrete Random Variables. The Binomial Probability Distribution.
Hypergeometric and Negative Binomial Distributions. The Poisson Probability
Distribution
CONTINUOUS RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS.
Continuous Random Variables and Probability Density Functions. Cumulative
Distribution Functions and Expected Values. The Normal Distribution. The Exponential
and Gamma Distribution. Other Continuous Distributions. Probability Plots.
JOINT PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS AND RANDOM SAMPLES.
Jointly Distributed Random Variables. Expected Values, Covariance, and Correlation.
Statistics and Their Distributions. The Distribution of the Sample Mean. The Distribution
of a Linear Combination.
Estimation
Point Estimation: Bias and unbiased estimator; principle of minimum variance
unbiased estimation; Method of moment; Maximum Likelihood estimation.
STATISTICAL INTERVALS BASED ON A SINGLE SAMPLE.
Basic Properties of Confidence Intervals. Large-Sample Confidence Intervals for a
Population Mean and Proportion. Intervals Based on a Normal Population Distribution.
Confidence Intervals for the Variance and Standard Deviation of a Normal Population.
9
3
18
30
6
2
12
20
6
2
12
20
3
1
6
10
3
1
6
10
6
2
12
20
TESTS OF HYPOTHESES BASED ON A SINGLE SAMPLE.
Hypothesis and Test Procedures. Tests About a Population Mean. Tests Concerning a
Population Proportion. P-Values. Some Comments on Selecting a Test.
INFERENCES BASED ON TWO SAMPLES.
z Tests and Confidence Intervals for a Difference Between Two Population Means. The
Two-Sample t Test and Confidence Interval. Analysis of Paired Data. Inferences
Concerning a Difference Between Population Proportions. Inferences Concerning Two
Population Variances.
THE ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE.
Single-Factor ANOVA. Multiple Comparisons in ANOVA. More on Single-Factor ANOVA.
MULTIFACTOR ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE.
Two-Factor ANOVA with Kij = 1. Two-Factor ANOVA with Kij > 1. Three-Factor ANOVA.
2p Factorial Experiments.
SIMPLE LINEAR REGRESSION AND CORRELATION.
The Simple Linear Regression Model. Estimating Model Parameters. Inferences About
the Slope Parameter â1. Inferences Concerning µY-x* and the Prediction of Future Y
Values. Correlation.
NONLINEAR AND MULTIPLE REGRESSION.
Aptness of the Model and Model Checking. Regression with Transformed Variables.
Polynomial Regression. Multiple Regression Analysis. Other Issues in Multiple
Regression.
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Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 94
19.
20.
Topic 8
GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS AND CATEGORICAL DATA ANALYSIS.
Goodness-of-Fit Tests When Category Probabilities are Completely Specified.
Goodness of Fit for Composite Hypotheses. Two-Way Contingency Tables.
3
1
6
10
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
DISTRIBUTION-FREE PROCEDURES.
The Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test. The Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test. Distribution-Free
Confidence Intervals. Distribution-Free ANOVA.
3
1
6
10
Total contact hours
42
14
84
140
Main references supporting the course:

Jay L. Devore . Probability and statistics for engineering and the sciences, 7th Edition. Duxbury Pr. 2008
Additional references supporting the course:

John J. Kinney. A Probability and Statistics Companion. John Wiley and Sons Ltd, July 2009,

Larsen, R.J. and Marx, M.L. An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and its Applications, 4th Edition.
Prentice Hall, 2006
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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(20)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Operating System
CCPS2573
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/2
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any
CCP0102 /Computer Architecture
Objectives: This subject is designed to introduce students to:

The main components of a typical operating system and the services

Processes, inter-process communication, concurrent programming, scheduling, memory management, file
systems, and introduction to protection and security in general.

The concept and structure of operating systems.

Contemporary system software.

The security mechanisms of operating system.
10.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

demonstrate an understanding of the design of operating system

Explain the functions of contemporary operating systems;

Explain about the functionalities of the various components of an operating system.

Design a suitable and effective security policy.
11.
Transferable Skills:

Familiarity with contemporary system software.

Evaluate operating system platforms and systems software.
Faculty
The operating system is a central component in any general-purpose
computer system. Understanding and optimising operating system
performance is an essential requirement for computing students.
Software developers, system support administrators, network and
database administrators all require a good understanding of operating
system concepts in order to function effectively and economically.
By taking this module students will have an understanding of factors that
need to be considered in selecting, deploying, configuring, optimising and
securing an operating system.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (mini-project, Assigned exercises, Presentation and final project)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
The aim of this Subject is to provide students with a solid background in the principles that underlie the design and
function of modern operating systems with reference to some currently available operating systems. The Subject deals
with the important aspects of a computer operating system, including processes, scheduling algorithms, and memory
management. Concepts such as deadlocks, memory management, and file management are detailed
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
1
0
1
1
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
3
2
0
0
2
1
1
1
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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A7
2
LO9
0
A8
1
LO10
0
A9
0
LO11
1
Page 97
LO12
0
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
INTRODUCTION

Historical Development of Operating Systems

Program loading and Bootstrapping

Single stream batch processing

Multiprogramming

Spooling

Process, Memory, File and I/O Management

Real-time Systems

Virtual machines
Contemporary Operating Systems

Comparison of Linux and Microsoft's Windows

Operating system command language

Batch files

POSIX standard

APIs

System Calls

Monolithic and Microkernel designs
STRUCTURES

I/O Structure.

Storage Structure

Hardware Protection and General Systems.

System Components, Operating – Systems Services.

System Call, System Programs, Systems Structure.

Virtual Machines, System Design and Implementation and System
Generation.
PROCESSES

Process Concept, Process Scheduling,

Operation on a Process, Cooperating Processes.

Threads and Inter-process Communication
CPU SCHEDULING

Basic Concepts, Scheduling Criteria.

Scheduling Algorithms, Multiple–Processor Scheduling.

Real–Time Scheduling and Algorithm.

Evaluation
DEADLOCKS

System Model, Deadlock Characterization,

Methods for Handling Deadlocks .

Prevention, Avoidance, Detection, Recovery and the Combined Approach.

Prevention, Avoidance, Detection, Recovery and the Combined Approach.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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T
Total
Topic 7
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
Page 98
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
MEMORY MANAGEMENT

Address Space, Swapping , Contiguous allocation,

Paging, segmentation and Paged Segmentation.

Paging, segmentation and Paged Segmentation.

Demand Paging, Page Replacement, Page replacement Algorithms
VIRTUAL MEMORY

Frame Allocation and Thrashing
FILE SYSTEMS

Free Space Management, Directory.

Implementation, efficiency and Performance and Recovery.
Security Issues

Directory and File Permissions

Disaster Prevention

Data Compression
Network and distributed operating systems

Advantages of distributed systems over centralized systems

File servers and workstations

Client/Server configurations
Total
19.
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Greg Gagne, and Peter Baer Galvin, Operating System Concepts 8th Edition Binder
Ready Version (2008)
2. Richard Schlesinger and Jose Garrido, Principles of Modern Operating Systems ( 2007)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. William Stallings,” Operating systems”’5th Edition, Prentice Hall, 2005.
2. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems (3rd Edition) (GOAL Series) by ( 2007)
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(21)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
42
28
Computer Networks
CCNT2544
Faculty
This module is one of the core subjects in computer science. It is
important that students have a strong foundation in the principles of
digital communication between computer systems in general and in the
context of local area, wide area networks and Internet.
2/2
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 112
Total =168
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
CNT0001 Data Communication & Telecommunication System
Objectives:

introduce students to the importance of data networks and the Internet in supporting business

communications and everyday activities

introduce students to the devices and services that are used to support communications across an
Internetworking

introduce students to the network protocol models and the layers of communications in data networks

introduce students to the role of protocols in data networks
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of
network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes.

Apply the concept of networking to facilitate the organizations.

Identify the current networking technology in industry

Help the organization to develop networking infrastructure that is of high quality and consistent with
organizational business goals.
Transferable Skills:

Analyze the operation of a range of commonly used network technologies.

Communicate effectively about computer communications systems, with specialists and non-specialists.
10.
11.
4
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other
computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services
at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the
fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum.
Labs use a “model Internet” to allow students to analyze real data without affecting production networks. Packet Tracer
(PT) activities help students analyze protocol and network operation and build small networks in a simulated
environment
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Fundamental Concepts

Communicating in a Network-Centric World

Communication – An Essential Part of Our Lives

The Network as a Platform

The Architecture of the Internet

Trends in Networking
Communications Over the Networks

The Platform for Communications

LANs, WANs and Internetworks

Protocols

Using Layered Models

Networking Addressing
OSI Application Layer Functionality

Applications – The Interface Between the Networks

Making Provisions for Applications and Services

Application Layer Protocols and Services Examples
OSI Transport Layer / Network Layer

Roles of the Transport Layer

The TCP Protocol – Communicating with Reliability

Managing TCP Sessions

The UDP Protocol – Communicating with Low Overhead

IPv4

Networks – Dividing Devices into Groups

Routing – How Our Data Packets are Handled

Routing Processes: How Routes are Learned
Addressing the Network – IPv4

IPv4 Addresses

Addresses for Different

Purposes Assigning Addresses

Is It On My Network?

Calculating Addresses Testing the Network Layer
Data Link Layer

Data Link Layer – Accessing the media

Media Access Control Techniques

Media Access Control Addressing and Framing Data

Putting it All Together
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
P
Total
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
6
4
16
26
6
4
16
26
6
4
16
26
6
4
16
26
6
4
16
26
6
4
16
26
Page 102
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Topic 7
19.
OSI Physical Layer

The Physical Layer - Communication Signals

Physical Signaling and Encoding: Representing

Physical Media – Connecting Communication
Ethernet

Overview of Ethernet

Ethernet - Communication through the LAN

The Ethernet Frame

Ethernet Media Access Control
Total
6
4
16
26
42
28
112
182
Laboratory
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture.
Experimental work must include the following

Introduce networking tool and devices e.g. cables, hup, bridge and router

Introducing IXP1200 network processors

Introduction to Protocol Analyzer/tcpdump

Counting, Filtering and Forwarding Packet.

General IOS Commands.

Multiplexer

Client-server simulation

Routers simulation

Simple Router configuration commands.

General routing techniques and commands.

Building simple LAN and VLANs.
Main references supporting the course:
20.

James F. Kurose, Keith W. Ross, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach (5th Edition), Addison Wesley,
2009
Additional references supporting the course:
1. W.Stalling, Data and Computer Communication, 6th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2000
2. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, 2nd Ed. Mc Graw Hill, 2001
3. Cisco Networking Academy Program. First Year Companion Guide. Cisco Press,2001
4. Fred Halsall, Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open System, 4th Ed., Addison Wesley, 1997.
5. William A. Shay, Understanding Data Communication and Networks, 2nd Ed., ITP, 1999.
6. Gerd Keiser, Local Area Networks, 2nd Ed, McGraw Hill, 2002
21.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(22)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Software Engineering
CCPS2583
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
2/2
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
CCP0103 Data Structure
9.
Objectives:
To provide an appreciation of the difficulties inherent in the construction of large scale software systems, and an
understanding of how the basic principles of software engineering can help to overcome these difficulties in practice.
Learning outcomes:
On completion of the module a student will be expected to be able to:

analyze the problems inherent in the design of large scale software systems, and Evaluate the available
options to select the most suitable technology for use in each stage of the software lifecycle

Describe the different phases in the software lifecycle, and discuss the pros and cons of different models of
software construction

Discuss the major methodologies techniques and tools that are appropriate to each of the phases of the
software lifecycle, and be able to distinguish the contexts in which they can be suitably applied.

Manage and coordinate a team working on a software development project.

Provide a user document describing how the package would work, and deliver an effective oral presentation.
Transferable Skills:

Evaluate the available options to select the most suitable technology for use in each stage of the software
lifecycle

Propose appropriate actions for managing and coordinating a software development team.

Communicate, organize and work as a productive member of a cohesive software development team

Consider the quality assurance and legal requirements for developing a software package.
10.
11.
Major
To introduce student to the principles and techniques involved in
working as part of a team, planning, specifying, designing, testing and
documenting a software package by means of different engineering
approach. The student is expected to realise the problems involved in
designing and building significant computer systems; understand the
need to design systems that fully meet the requirements of the intended
users.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 104
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This module aims to equip students with the main principles of software engineering, including subjects in software
requirements, Role of Software Engineering and Engineer, Software Engineering Paradigms, Software Project
Management, Project Planning object-oriented analysis and design, software validation and testing, and software
maintenance and evolution.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

quizzes and assignments
10%
15%

Project
25%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
2
1
0
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
2
0
0
1
3
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction
Role of software engineering & engineer. Software Engineering Paradigms. Software
Engineering & Models. Software engineering principles.
Project Management
Metrics. Estimation Model. Decomposition Technique & planning tools. Software
Project Planning & Control: Gantt Chart, PERT/CPM & Others, Work Breakdown
Structure (WBS).
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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T
Total
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
6
3
18
27
Page 105
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Requirement Analysis & Design
Principles. Prototyping. Specification & Tools. Data Flow Oriented. Transform Flow.
Transaction Analysis. Data Structure Oriented. Logical Construction of system.
Object-Oriented Design.
6
3
18
27
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
Computer Aided Software Engineering
CASE tools - analysis tools, project management tools, configuration management
tools, editors, linkers, code generators, debuggers, testing tools & user-interface
management tools. Integrated CASE Environments. CASE Workbenches.
2
1
6
9
Total
28
14
84
126
Software Specifications
Classification of specification. Operational specifications: data flow diagram, state
transition diagrams. Description specification: ER diagram, logic specification and
algebraic specification.
Software Quality
Verification and validation. Test cases & design. Approaches to verification &
testing. Debugging. Factors affecting quality. Review Techniques. Quality Metrics.
Reliability & Performance. Quality Standards - ISO 9000 & Capability Maturity Model
(CMM).
Software Maintenance & Control
Maintainability. Software Configuration Management. Monitoring & Controlling
Projects Problems in maintenance & control. Evaluation.
Main references supporting the course:
1. Hans van Vliet ,Software Engineering: Principles and Practice ( 2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Ian Sommerville, Software Engineering: (Update) (8th Edition) (International Computer Science Series) (2006)
2. Stephen R. Schach, Object-oriented and Classical Software Engineering ( 2006)
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(23)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Entrepreneurship
BBUS3513
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
1/3
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:
This subject is designed to introduce students to:

the concept and theory on entrepreneurship as well as the skills and qualities of an entrepreneur;

the mechanisms of business creation;

the advantages and disadvantages of entrepreneurship as a career choice;

the skills necessary to start and operate a business;

development process of business plan;

marketing and management strategies for the entrepreneur
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Explain the concept and theory on entrepreneurship as well as the skills and qualities of an entrepreneur;

Identify and describe the mechanisms of business creation;

Examine the advantages and disadvantages of entrepreneurship as a career choice;

Evaluate the skills necessary to start and operate a business;

Develop a business plan;

Analyze strategic marketing and management for the entrepreneur.
Transferable Skills:

Communicate, organize and work as a productive member for the entrepreneur

skills necessary to start and operate a business;

analyze strategic marketing and management for the entrepreneur

Cultivation of innovative mind and development of entrepreneurial skills
10.
11.
University
Rapid changes in technology, political structures and life-styles are
creating new products, new markets and many more opportunities for
new venture creation than ever before. If a student is to be effective in
this increasingly competitive employment market for graduates there is a
need to increase his/her level of understanding of entrepreneurship and
to develop in his/her attitudes and behaviors as well as competencies in
applying entrepreneurship in enterprise development. The aims of this
module is to help students develop the particular skills needed for
entrepreneurial activities, whether they are working for themselves or
for someone else.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 107
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This subject will help students develop the particular skills needed for entrepreneurial activities, whether they are
working for themselves or for someone else. They will learn the characteristics of entrepreneurs and the people who
work for them, the benefits and challenges of an entrepreneurial organization, how to create a business plan, how to
develop financial documents, and how to succeed in the business endeavor.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons.

Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
0
0
4
0
3
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
4
0
0
3
2
17.
18.
A7
3
LO9
4
A8
0
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
3
LO12
2
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
ENTREPRENEURSHIP: A FIELD AND AN ACTIVITY

Nature and Roots

A Process Perspective

Sources of Knowledge About Entrepreneurship
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 108
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
UNCOVERING OPPORTUNITIES & COGNITIVE FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Sources of Opportunities

Forms of Opportunity

Opportunities and New Firms

The Raw Materials for Creativity and Opportunity Recognition

Creativity

Opportunity Recognition
UNCOVERING OPPORTUNITIES & COGNITIVE FOUNDATIONS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP



The Raw Materials for Creativity and Opportunity Recognition
Creativity
Opportunity Recognition
ACQUIRING ESSENTIAL INFORMATION
 Market Information
 Government Policies and Regulations
 Interpreting Information
 Group Polarization
 Ignoring Unshared Information
 Improving Group Decisions.
ASSEMBLING THE TEAM

Choosing Cofounders

Utilizing the New Venture’s Human Resources

Expanding the New Venture’s Human Resources
FINANCING NEW VENTURES

Difficulty in Raising Money

Uncertainty and Information Asymmetry

Amount and Sources of Capital

The Structure of Venture Finance

Social Capital and the Behavioral Side of Venture Finance
WRITING AN EFFECTIVE BUSINESS PLAN

Business Plan

Components of a Business Plan

Making an Effective Business Plan Presentation
WRITING AN EFFECTIVE BUSINESS PLAN

Making an Effective Business Plan Presentation
LEARNING FROM OTHERS EXPERIENCES

Success Stories

Horror Stories

Essential Skills for Entrepreneurs
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
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Topic 14
Topic 13
Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
CYBERPRENEURSHIP


Understanding Electronic Entrepreneurship
Technology as Enabler
2
1
6
9
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Capturing the Profits from New Products and Services

Legal forms of Intellectual Property Protection

Nonlegal forms of Intellectual Property Protection
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
RUNNING THE BUSINESS

Building the New Venture’s Human Resources

Recruiting

Motivating Employees

Retraining High Performing Employees
HARVESTING THE REWARDS

Exit Strategies

Negotiation
ENTREPRENEURSHIP FROM ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE
Total contact hours
19.
Main references supporting the course:

Peggy A. Lambing and Charles R. Kuehl.(2007). Entrepreneurship, 4/E, Prentice Hall.
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Robert A. Baron and Scott A. Shane. (2005). Entrepreneurship: A Process Perspective, Thomson SouthWestern.
2. Thomas W Zimmerer, Norman M Scarborough and Doug Wilson, (2008). Essentials of Entrepreneurship and
Small Business Management, 5/E, Prentice Hall.
3. Bruce R. Barringer. (2009). Preparing Effective Business Plans: An Entrepreneurial Approach, Prentice Hall.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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(24)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Multimedia Technology
CMMD3513
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
1/3
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives: To introduce and familiarize students with

multimedia concepts, its usages and the importance of multimedia in society;

main hardware in a multimedia computer system and how the features of the system are used;

main components of interactive multimedia system namely text, graphics, animation, audio and video.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Define multimedia concepts, its usages and the importance of multimedia in society;

Identify main hardware in a multimedia computer system and how the features of the system are used; and

Describe the main components of interactive multimedia system namely text, graphics, animation, audio and
video.
10.
11.
Major
Multimedia becomes popular medium that transform the way people
learn, work, socialize and think This module is offered to students as
introductory of multimedia knowledge and the fundamental technical
issues in multimedia that are necessary for a thorough understanding of
the tools and techniques required for multimedia development. This
module also serves as introductory for other nodules offered in the
program
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Transferable Skills:

In depth knowledge of a range of tools used for the construction of interactive multimedia solutions

In depth knowledge of common multimedia elements and data formats.

Knowledge of multimedia data integration and authoring.

effectively prepare and deliver presentations and written reports
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course is offered to students as introductory of multimedia knowledge. Multimedia becomes popular medium that
transform the way people learn, work, socialize and think. The course content includes an Introduction to Multimedia
Technology, Multimedia Application Technology, Multimedia Hardware and Main Components of Multimedia namely
text, graphics, animation, audio and video.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
15%

Quizzes and Assignments
15%

Project
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
1
1
1
1
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
2
3
1
2
1
1
2
18.
A7
2
LO9
2
A8
4
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction to Multimedia Technology

Definition of Multimedia

History and Concept of Multimedia

Multimedia Features

Types of Media
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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T
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Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 112
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Multimedia Technology Applications

Application of Multimedia Technology

Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC)

Application for MSC Status

Main Applications of MSC
Multimedia Hardware

Standard of Multimedia Computer System

Basic Hardware of Multimedia Computer System

Input and Output Devices

Input Devices

Output Devices

Storage

Guide to choose Multimedia Computer
Development and Future of Multimedia Technology

Development of Multimedia Technology

Challenges and Future of Multimedia Technology
Text

Definition and the importance of Text

Text as Multimedia Elements

Typeface and Fonts

Categories and Size of Text

Guideline of Using Text in Multimedia Application

Multimedia Application Intensive Text

Hypertext

Text Authoring Software
Graphics

Definition and the importance of Graphics

History of Graphics

Graphics Computer Application

Graphics Usage in Multimedia

Categories of Graphics

Graphic Cards

Format of Graphic Files

Graphic Resources

Graphics Software
Introduction to Animation

Definition

Prinsiples of Animation

The Importances of Animation in Multimedia

Computerised Application Techologies

Animation Techniques

Traditional Animation
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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6
9
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1
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9
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6
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2
12
18
2
1
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Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Computerised Animation

Computerised Animation

Keyframes and Tweening

Categories of Computerised Animation

Two-dimensional Animation (2D)

Three-dimensional Animation (3D)

Processes of 3D Animation Production

Special Effects in Animation

Format of Animation Files

Hardware for Animation

Software for Animation
Audio in Multimedia

Audio

Sound Card

Sound Format

Audio Role in Multimedia

Factors to be considered for audio creation

Advantages and Disadvantages of Audio in Multimedia

Format of Audio Files

Audio Software

Sound Processing with Sound Forge
Video in Multimedia

Video

Analog Video

Digital Video

Video Production Process

Capturing Video

Advantages of Digital Video

Problems with Digital Video

Size of File for Digital Video

Video Compression

The Role of Video in Multimedia

Advantages and Disadvantages of Video in Multimedia

Format of Video Files

Video Software (Adobe Premiere)

Guide to use Adobe Premiere
Total hours
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:

Vaughan, Tay.”Multimedia Making It Work” Student Edition. California: Osborne/McGraw-Hill. 2007
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Chapman, Nigel & Jenny. 2008. Digital Multimedia. England: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
2. Dastbaz, Mohammad. 2002. Designing Interactive Multimedia Systems. Berkshire: McGraw-Hill Education
3. Hofstetter, Fred T. 2001. Multimedia Literacy. 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(25)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
Project Management
CICT3573
Faculty
The reason of inclusion of the course is to help students to critically
evaluate and use appropriate project management techniques to
complete a non-trivial planning task on time and to the required
standard, and present the results both in writing and verbally..
1/3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
84
7.
8.
9.
Credit Value
3
Prerequisite (if any)
none
Objectives:
This course is designed to expose students to steps and techniques of project management for Information Technology.
The contents of the course will cover aspects of project scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications
and risks. It is also aimed at giving students a hands-on experience of using a project management CASE tool.
10.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:
1. Select and apply a variety of tools and techniques in project management.
2. Coordinate and work in a team to design, build and demonstrate a working IT project.
3. Produce essential management documents for a project including;

Project scope management plan

Project schedules, Gantt Charts, Network diagrams and PERT charts

Project cost estimate and budget

Project quality assessment plan using Pareto analysis, statistical sampling, six sigma and quality control
charts

Project organizational chart, responsibility management matrix and resource histogram

Project communications plan and stakeholder communications analysis

Risk Register
Transferable Skills:

skills that are fundamental to a successful career by working in a team to design, build and demonstrate a
working IT project.

Demonstrate and present the project in writing and verbally.
11.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons: Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This course introduces students to the complete project management lifecycle, practice on project management
techniques and CASE tools. The contents of the course includes:
1. Introduction to Project Management
2. The Project Management and Information Technology Context
3. The Project Management Process Groups
4. Project Integration Management
5. Project Scope Management
6. Project Time Management
7. Project Cost Management
8. Project Quality Management
9. Project Human Resource Management and Project Procurement Management
10. Project Communications Management and Project Risk Management
Mode of Delivery:
Classroom lessons: and Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Quizzes
10%

Project and assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
20%
Final Examination
16.
17.
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
0
1
3
4
1
3
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
0
0
0
4
2
1
2
3
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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A7
2
LO9
2
A8
1
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
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18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
SLT
The Project Management Process Groups

Project Management process groups

Developing an IT Project Management Methodology
Project Integration Management

Project Integration Management

Strategic Planning and project selection

Preliminary scope statements

Project Management plans

Project executions

Monitoring and controlling project work

Integrated change control

closing project
Project Scope Management

Definition of Project Scope Management

Scope Planning

Scope Definition and Project Scope Statement

Creating the work breakdown Structure

Scope verification

Scope control
Project Time Management

Importance of project schedules

Activity definition

Activity sequencing

Activity resource estimating

Activity duration estimating

Schedule development

Schedule control
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
T
Total
Introduction to Project Management

Definition of a project

Definition of Project management

Role of a Project Manager

History of Project management

The Project Management Profession
The Project Management and Information Technology Context

A systems view of Project Management

Understanding organizations Stakeholder Management

Project phases and life cycle

The context of IT projects
L
Indep.
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Details
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
Page 117
Topic 14
Topic 13
Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Project Cost Management

Importance of Project Cost Management

Basic Principles of Cost Management

Cost Estimating

Cost Budgeting

Cost Control
Project Quality Management

Project Quality Management

Quality Planning

Quality Assurance

Quality Control

Tools and Techniques for Quality Control

Modern Quality Management

Improving Information Technology Project Quality
Project Human Resource Management

Project Resource Management

Keys to Managing People

Human Resource Planning



Acquiring the Project Team
Developing the Project Team
Managing the Project Team
Project Communications Management

Project Communications Management

Communications Planning

Information Distribution

Performance Reporting

Managing Stakeholders
Project Risk Management

Managing Stakeholders

Managing Stakeholders

Common Sources of Risk on IT Projects

Risk Identification

Risk Response Planning

Risk Monitoring and Control
Project Procurement Management

Project Procurement Management

Planning Purchases and Acquisitions

Planning Contracting




Requesting Seller Responses
Selecting Sellers
Administering the Contract
Closing the Contract
Total
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
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19.
Main references supporting the course:
1. Jack T. Marchewka, Information Technology Project Management, third edition, Wiley, 2009
2. Kathy Schwalbe, Information Technology Project Management, sixth Edition, Course Technology, 2009
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Cynthia Snyder and Frank Parth, Introduction to IT Project Management, Management Concepts Inc., 2007.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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1.
Name of Course
Human-Computer Interaction
2.
Course Code
CICT3583
3.
Name(s) of academic staff
4.
Rationale for the inclusion of the
Major
This module will introduce the concepts and principles of HumanComputer Interaction to guide the development of modern, high quality
user interfaces. Additionally, students will encounter advanced
interaction issues which are at or close to the research edge of the
subject. This will enable them to appreciate current and future directions
in the subject, and to critically reflect on HCI processes and products.
1/3
course/module in the programme
5.
Semester and Year offered
6.
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Total Guided and Independent Learning
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
T = Tutorial
28
14
P
O
Independent =70
Total =112
P = Practical
O= Others
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
9.
10.
Objectives:
The aims of this module are to

Introduce the principles of visual information communication and fundamentals of human-computer
interaction (HCI) theory and research.

Introduce the major issues and techniques in the area of human-computer interaction and how it fits into the
software lifecycle

To expand the students awareness of the development in this area of computing and provide an
understanding of its problems.
Learning outcomes:
11.
On successfully completing this module you will be able to

Describe and explain the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and empirical findings in psychology in
human factors theory and research.

Evaluate the impact of system design on users’ attitudes and behaviors.

Apply design and usability guidelines in the development of user interfaces.

Evaluate interfaces against an accepted set of industry norms.
Transferable Skills:




Be aware of future developments and potential problem areas related to HCI and the importance of future
research in HCI.
Develop conceptual awareness of techniques and the skills to apply current approaches to interface
production and evaluation.
Evaluate interfaces against an accepted set of industry norms.
ability to evaluate interfaces against an accepted set of industry norms.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
13.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
14.
This module will introduce the concepts and principles of Human-Computer Interaction to guide the development of
modern, high quality user interfaces. Additionally, students will encounter advanced interaction issues which are at or
close to the research edge of the subject. This will enable them to appreciate current and future directions in the
subject, and to critically reflect on HCI processes and products. Advanced HCI issues will also be introduced in this
module.
Mode of Delivery:
15.

Classroom lessons

Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Quizzes and Assignments

Project

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50%
100%
15%
15%
20%
.
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
17.
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
0
2
1
2
3
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
2
LO2
0
LO3
0
LO4
1
LO5
4
LO6
0
LO7
1
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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2
A7
2
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
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18.
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 1
Psychological Factors
effects of interface to users. Usability and Usability Specifications, aspects of the
user, affective aspects, expressive interface, user frustration, virtual characters, The
user's conceptual model, Hierarchical Task Analysis and Use Cases, Cognition
process, framework for cognition, mental model Human Cognition and User
Psychology
Topic 11
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Introduction
Human information processing limitations, human decision
making. good and poor design, interaction design, goals of interaction design.
Principles guiding well-designed human-system interaction.
Topic 2
L
T
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
5
8
4
2
10
16
8
4
20
32
8
4
20
32
2
1
5
8
HCI and The internet.
Hypermedia and the WWW , Internet Browser Architecture , The Document Object
Model (DOM) , Event Management , Authoring (JavaScript and XML), Social
networks – MySpace, Blogs, tagging, wikis, etc.
2
1
5
8
Advanced issues in HCI
intelligent user interface, virtual reality interaction, biometrics in HCI, ubiquitous
computing and HCI, Multi-modal interaction, speech and gesture interaction,
assistive technology,
2
1
5
8
Total
28
14
70
112
HCI design 1
Interface metaphors, interaction paradigms, Interaction design activities and
process, ways to test and observe users, identify user needs and requirements, Nonstandard users, non-standard inputs, prototyping based on user centered
approaches to interaction design. Lifecycle models for interactive design and HCI,
task description and analysis, interaction methods (menu, command, voice,
graphical etc). Evaluation framework, paradigm and techniques.
HCI design 2
Testing and modelling users (user testing, experiments, and predictive models).
Designing for collaboration and communication Social mechanism in communication
and collaboration, CSCW (email, bulletin board, video conferences, virtual
collaborative environment), Groupware (time/space matrix, shared applications,
synchronous and asynchronous groupware), designing collaborative technologies.
Computers, Human Error, and Safety
Attention management, Human error identification, The “swiss cheese” model of
human error
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19.
Main references supporting the course:

Helen Sharp, Yvonne Rogers,and Jenny Preece, Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction (
2007)
Additional references supporting the course:

20.
Ben Shneiderman, Catherine Plaisant, Maxine Cohen, Steven Jacobs, Designing the User Interface: Strategies
for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (5th Edition), Published by Addison-Wesley,2009
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(27)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
Network Programming
CNET3523
Major
The client server model of communication has become a dominant
paradigm, and continues to evolve with the increased exploitation by
organizations and individuals of networks, and the development of the
Internet.
The module is designed to provide students with the technical skills and
knowledge required for the development of efficient and secured
networked applications. Most programming will be undertaken in the
Java language.
1/3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
7.
8.
Credit Value
Prerequisite (if any)
3
CNT0101 Computer Networks
9.
Objectives:

To introduce the concepts of internet and network programming;

To introduce the cutting edge of internet and network technologies.

To develop practice skills for network programming using java.
10.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to

critically analyze and explain the main issues related to internet and network computing.

demonstrate advanced knowledge of programming for network communications

develop practice skills associated with network programming and have a firm basis in TCP/IP programming in
java;

Differentiate and demonstrate knowledge of protocols used in Web and multimedia delivery.

analyse the requirements and problems that arise when a distributed system is designed and implemented.

Enable students to select and employ suitable techniques in the creation of client server applications.
11.
Transferable Skills:

acquire knowledge and practical skills in network programming

Critically evaluate requirements and problems that arise when a distributed system is designed.

Demonstrate advanced knowledge of programming for network communications and Communicate
effectively about networking with specialists and non-specialists.
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12.
13.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This subject provides students with the technical skills and knowledge required for the development of efficient and
secured networked applications. Most programming will be undertaken in the Java language.
14.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and Assignments
20%

Mid-semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
4
2
1
2
3
1
2
17.
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 1
L
P
2
2
6
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
Introduction
Networks &The Layers of a Network, IP, TCP, UDP and DNS, The Internet, The
Client/Server Model, Internet Standards, URIs , HTML, SGML, and XML , HTTP , MIME
Media Types ,Server Side Programs
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Topic 2
Multithreading and Multiplexing
Threads & Thread Class, Running Threads , Returning Information from a Thread ,
Multithreaded Servers, Synchronization , Deadlock , Thread Scheduling , Thread Pools ,
Non-Blocking Servers
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
2
2
6
10
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
28
28
84
140
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Internet Addresses & URL
The InetAddress Class , Inet4Address and Inet6Address , The Network Interface Class, The
URL Class, The URL Encoder and URL Decoder Classes, The URI Class , Proxies
,Communicating with Server-Side Programs Through GET , Accessing Password-Protected
Sites
Sockets
Overview of Socket
TCP socket
Clients and servers sockets: The Server Socket Class, The Clients Socket Class, Socket
Exceptions, Socket Addresses, Protocols with Telnet,
Secure Sockets: Secure Communications, Creating Secure Client Sockets, Methods of the
SSL Socket Class, Creating Secure Server Sockets ,Methods of the SSL Server Socket Class
Non-Blocking I/O


Buffers
Channels
UDP Datagram’s and Sockets:
The UDP Protocol , The Datagram Packet Class, The Datagram Socket Class, Applications ,
Datagram Channel
Multicast Sockets:
Overview of Multicast Socket, Working with Multicast Sockets
The URL Connection Class
Opening URL Connections, Reading Data from a Server, Reading the Header, Configuring
the Connection, Configuring the Client Request MIME Header, Writing Data to a Server,
Content Handlers, The Object Methods, Security Considerations for URL Connections,
Guessing MIME Types, HttpURLConnection, Caches, JarURLConnection
Protocol Handlers
The URLStreamHandler Class, Writing a Protocol Handler, The URLStreamHandlerFactory
Interface
Content Handlers
The ContentHandler Class, The ContentHandlerFactory Interface.
Remote Method Invocation RMI
The Basic RMI Process , Implementation , Compilation and Execution , Using RMI
Meaningfully , RMI Security
Total hours
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
20.
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Experiment work must include the following

Introducing Network Programming in Java

basis in TCP/IP programming

the use of sockets

Multithreading

File Handling

Remote Method Invocation (RMI)

CORBA

Java Database Connectivity (JDBC)

Servlets

JavaServer Pages (JSPs)
 JavaBeans and Applets
Main references supporting the course:

Jan Graba ,An Introduction to Network Programming with Java, 2nd edition, Springer, 2006
Additional references supporting the course:

Crichlow, J., The Essence of Distributed Systems, Prentice Hall, 2000

Elliotte Harold , Elliotte Rusty Harold , Java Network Programming, 3rd Edition, O'Reilly Media, 2004
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(28)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Network Routing
CNET3533
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
/
1/3
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
Computer Networks CNET3513
9.
Objectives:
Studying the network routing algorithms, protocols, and architectures, is very timely. The course provides an
introduction to network routing in a wide variety of types of networks. It includes extensive coverage of the evolution
of routing over time. Particularly appealing is its in-depth coverage across a spectrum of algorithmic, technical,
experiential, and practical issues.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Recognize Routing Algorithms, specifically the Shortest Path and Widest Path

Recognize the Framework and Principles related to Routing Protocols

Identify the traffic engineering approaches

describe the basic background of IP routing and protocols for Internet that falls into the distance vector
protocol family

Analyze the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and the integrated Intermediate system to intermediate system
(IS-IS) protocols

Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of routing in the public switched telephone network (PSTN)

demonstrate an in-depth understanding of routing in this hybrid IP-PSTN environment
10.
11.
major
Remarkable advances in traditional telephony have been observed. The
underlying telecommunication system has changed from analog to digital
and has incorporated the latest advances in optical technologies and,
more recently, voice over IP. Throughout these revolutionary changes,
routing has continued to play a significant role. Modern computer and
telecommunication networks are able to react to randomly fluctuating
demands and failures by rerouting traffic and by reallocating resources.
This is done so well that, in many respects, large scale networks appear
as coherent, almost intelligent, organisms. The design and control of such
networks require an understanding of a variety of fundamental issues.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =126
84
Transferable Skills:

Analyze the Framework and Principles related to Routing Protocols

Critical thinking and problem solving skills

Technical writing and presentation skills

Oral/Written Communication skills

IT skills
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorials

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

Solving assigned problems in groups and individually

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, participation, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
The course covers the basic foundations of routing from algorithms to protocols, along with network flow modelling.
Furthermore, the IP network routing is discussed from standardized protocols for both intra- and inter-domain routing,
to IP traffic engineering and Internet routing architectures. The PSTN routing is also covered, from hierarchical routing
to dynamic routing, and from addressing to traffic engineering, including the role of signalling in routing, along with the
impact of number portability in routing, in addition to VoIP Routing.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework

Quizzes and Assignments

Project

Midterm test
Final Examination
16.
60%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
4
17.
40%
10%
10%
20%
4
4
1
5
A6
A7
A8
A9
1
1
2
0
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
18.
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
LO9
LO10
LO11
LO12
2
1
0
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Networking and Network Routing: An Introduction

Network Routing: An Overview

Service Architecture

Protocol Stack Architecture

Router Architecture

Public Switched Telephone Network

Standards Committees
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
T
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 129
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Routing Algorithms: Shortest Path andWidest Path

Bellman–Ford Algorithm and the Distance Vector Approach

Dijkstra’s Algorithm

Comparison of the Bellman–Ford Algorithm and Dijkstra’s Algorithm

Shortest Path Computation with Candidate Path Caching

Widest Path Computation with Candidate Path Caching

Widest Path Algorithm

K-Shortest Paths Algorithm
Routing Protocols: Framework and Principles

Routing Protocol, Routing Algorithm, and Routing Table

Routing Information Representation and Protocol Messages

Distance Vector Routing Protocol

Link State Routing Protocol

Path Vector Routing Protocol

Link Cos
Network Flow Modeling

Single-Commodity Network Flow

Multicommodity Network Flow: Three-Node Example

Multicommodity Network Flow Problem: General Formulation

Multicommodity Network Flow Problem: Non-Splittable Flow
IP Routing and Distance Vector Protocol Family

Routers, Networks, and Routing Information: Some Basics

Routing Information Protocol, Version 1 (RIPv1)

Routing Information Protocol, Version 2 (RIPv2)

Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP)

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)

Route Redistribution
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and Integrated IS-IS

From a Protocol Family to an Instance of a Protocol

OSPF: Protocol Features

OSPF Packet Format

Examples of Router LSAs and Network LSAs

Integrated IS-IS

Similarities and Differences Between IS-IS and OSPF
IP Traffic Engineering

Traffic, Stochasticity, Delay, and Utilization

Traffic Engineering: An Architectural Framework

Traffic Engineering: A Four-Node Illustration

Link Weight Determination Problem:

Link Weight Determination: Large Networks
Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)

BGP Operations

BGP Configuration Initialization

Two Faces of BGP: External BGP and Internal BGP

Path Attributes

BGP Decision Process

Internal BGP Scalability

Route Flap Dampening

BGP Additional Features

Finite State Machine of a BGP Connection

Protocol Message Format
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Amendment made on 8 October 2010
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
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Topic 12
Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Internet Routing Architectures

Internet Routing Evolution

Policy-Based Routing

Point of Presence

Traffic Engineering Implications

Internet Routing Instability
Hierarchical and Dynamic Call Routing in the Telephone Network

Hierarchical Routing

Dynamic Nonhierarchical Routing

Dynamically Controlled Routing

Dynamic Alternate Routing

Real-Time Network Routing

Classification of Dynamic Call Routing Schemes
Traffic Engineering in the Voice Telephone Network
o Traffic Load and Blocking
o Grade-of-Service and Trunk Occupancy

Signaling Network for Telephony

Public Switched Telephone Network: Architecture and Routing

Global Telephone Addressing
VoIP Routing: Interoperability Through IP and PSTN

PSTN Call Routing Using the Internet

PSTN Call Routing: Managed IP Approach

IP-PSTN Interworking for VoIP

IP Multimedia Subsystem

All-IP Environment of VoIP Services

Addressing Revisited
Total SLT
19.
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
1.
Deepankar Medhi and Karthikeyan Ramasamy, “Network Routing: Algorithms, Protocols, and Architectures”.
Morgan Kaufmann, 2007
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Rich Seifert, James Edwards. “The All-New Switch Book: The Complete Guide to LAN Switching Technology”,
Wiley, 2008.
2. Radia Perlman. “Interconnections: Bridges, Routers, Switches, and Internetworking Protocols”. AddisonWesley Professional, 1999.
3. Charles M. Kozierok. “The TCP/IP Guide: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Internet Protocols Reference”, No
Starch Press, 2005.
4. Douglas E. Comer. “Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol 1 (5th Edition)”, Prentice Hall, 2005.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(29)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
7.
Credit Value
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
Objectives:
Final Year Project (FYP)
CICT3512
Major
Students are required to undertake a project during the final year of the
course. Within the project, the student integrates and applies material
presented throughout the other modules.
The module is designed to direct students to develop a set of practical
skills that will serve them well throughout their professional career.
2 / 3 and 1/4
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Guided and Independent Learning for phase (1)=85
Guided and Independent Learning for phase (2)=165
Total =250
phase (1) 2 Credit hours
phase (2) 4 Credit hours
Total =6 Credit hours
Completed 70 credit hours (excluding Art & Humanities subjects)
This subject is designed to enable students:




10.
To direct the student to the skills necessary to carry out a project (from conception, through development
and implementation, to completion).
To give the student an opportunity to carry out a significant investigation in the subject area of the project.
To fully specify the requirements / formulate the problem to be addressed by the proposed project and
devise design architecture, implementation and conduct testing of software produced.
To provide the student with the experience of carrying out a major programme of work in computing within
the framework of a strict management schedule.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Propose aims, objectives and a program of work for selected project topic.

Conduct and present in writing an in-depth analysis of the project topic.

Analyze project requirements and assemble a detailed requirements specification.

Devise an initial system design, project approach or prototype and Justify the basis on which the selected
project topic is to be investigated and developed.

Implement a system based on the project requirements and design specification

Conduct testing to identify defects and to assess system behaviour against the original specification.

Evaluate, criticise and defend the work accomplished in the project.

Prepare a formal written report on the work undertaken in the project module and formally presented his/her
work in writing, visually and orally
11.
Transferable Skills:

Develop researching skills.

Develop a set of practical skills that will serve them well throughout their professional career

Become proficient in and the use of appropriate applications and programming languages in the design and
implementation of different types of systems.

Become proficient in presenting work in writing, visually and orally

Communicate In a professional manner about system development processes with specialists and nonspecialists. Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Bachelor of Computer
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy

Students will be given a list of projects suggested either by members of staff or by local industry and are
encouraged to discuss project topics with potential supervisors. (Faculty may allow students to suggest
their own projects)

Students are asked to express their preferences from the available project titles and allocations are made
accordingly.
Over both semesters, students will be expected to meet with their supervisor at regular intervals.

Phase (1)

Week (1): Interacting with supervisor and registration.

Week (2): project proposal.

Week (13): Interim Report + prototype code

Week (14): Demo presentation

End of phase (1): Interim report is submitted, addressing issues such as: project aims, objectives and plan;
investigation, literature review and assessment of the problem; requirements analysis and specification; initial
design approach / proposed implementation strategy.
Phase (2)
13.
14.



Week 1 : Interacting with Supervisor and registration
Week 12 : final report + code
Week 14 : Demo – presentation + final evaluation

End of phase (2): Final Report is submitted, addressing issues such as: the delivered software, project
documentation, software demonstration, oral examination, and supervisor's comments.
Synopsis:
The course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of the academic discipline for information systems
planning. In this module, the student is given an opportunity to investigate the subject area of the project and is
directed to sources of information for project preparation, management and delivery. The student will engage in the
implementation, testing and evaluation of a substantial software-related task and will formally present the results.
Mode of Delivery:
Project base
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework Assignments: 100%
Phase (1) 30%



General effort from the supervisor 10%
Presentation 10%
Interim Report 10%
The sources of evidence for assessing these skills will include: Interim Report, oral examination and supervisor's
comments.
Phase (2) 70%

General effort from the Supervisor 20%

Presentation 20%

Final Report 20%

Business Plan/Research 10%
The sources of evidence for assessing these skills will include: the delivered software, project documentation, software
demonstration, oral examination, and supervisor's comments.
16.
17.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
5
4
4
4
4
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
5
4
4
4
3
4
3
18.
A7
4
LO9
4
A8
3
LO10
3
A9
0
LO11
2
LO12
3
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Details
The Project will be in two phases:
Phase 1:

Project formulation including initial reading/ study, discussion with supervisor to decided about the project

Prototype design and implementation

Demonstration and presentation during the second trimester (grading)
Phase 2



Full implementation of the Approved projection phase 1
Presentation and Demonstration
Top few projects (may be five) should be selected as the best final year project by the faculty.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Main references supporting the course:
Additional references supporting the course:
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(30)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Multimedia Networking
CCMD3523
Major
The rapid expansion in computer networking and multimedia
communications has led to a huge increase in job opportunities in
multimedia networking industries. This course is designed to give
students the skills and experience in demand in this key developing field.
This subject covers the key aspects and principles of digital multimedia
network technologies, infrastructures and services. It emphasizes on the
engineering principles and applications of broadband and broadcasting
networks.
2 /3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Credit Value
3
Prerequisite (if any)
CNT0101 Computer Networks
Objectives: To introduce student to

The concepts and principles of multimedia networking.

Different Media compression technologies.

the technology enablers of multimedia networking

The various types of multimedia network in terms of technologies, challenges and usage.

Multimedia Networking Services/Applications.

the cutting edge of wireless Multimedia technologies
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to

Design multimedia systems and select a range of technologies available.

have a firm basis in the concepts and principles of multimedia communications

Differentiate between different Media Transport Protocols

Differentiate between different Media format, coding and compression

Explain particular issues of operating multimedia systems within a networked environment.

Describe how multimedia works over Wireless broadband and the limits of current and emerging multimedia
systems

Explain how multimedia networks technologies have been set in an economic, social, and business context.

Investigate Digital rights, policies and security issues of multimedia network.
Transferable Skills:

Life skills in learning cutting edge technology and analyzing the operation of a range of commonly used
techniques;

Knowledge and skills important for a career in the multimedia and networking industries.

Communicate effectively about multimedia network with specialists and non-specialists.
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12..
13..
14.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions:

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This subject looks at some of the underlying technologies in Multimedia Networked Systems in order to enable a better
understanding of the capabilities of multimedia devices and the limits of current and emerging multimedia systems. The
major areas of study include: components of multimedia networking, Media Transport Protocols, data coding and
compression, multimedia broadcasting, Multimedia quality of service, Networking Services/Applications, Multimedia
over wireless broadband
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons.

Tutorial sessions:
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
40%
5%

Quizzes
15%

assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 60% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
17.
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
4
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction to multimedia networking

Major components of multimedia networking

Paradigm shift of digital media delivery

Multimedia Perceptual Quality

Challenges of multimedia networking

Framerate, Delay, Jitter, Loss
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1
6
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Topic 4
Topic 3
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Media Transport Protocols

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)

RealTime Transport Protocol (RTP)

Session Description Protocol (SDP)

Other Media Transport Protocols
Digital speech coding

LPC modeling and vocoder

Regular pulse excitation with long-term prediction
Digital audio coding

MPEG-1 audio layers

MPEG-2 Advanced Audio Coding (AAC)

MPEG-4 AAC (HE-AAC)

Dolby AC3 audio codec
Digital image coding

Basics of information theory for image compression

Entropy coding

Lossy image compression

Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG)

JPEG2000
Digital video coding

Evolution of digital video coding

H.263 and H.263 video coding

MPEG-1 , MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 video coding

Window Media Video (WMV-9)
Digital multimedia broadcasting

DVB-T

DVB-H

T-DMB multimedia broadcasting for portable devices

ATSC for North America terrestrial video broadcasting

ISDB digital broadcasting
Multimedia quality of service of IP networks

IP quality of service

QoS mechanisms

IP multicast and application-level multicast (ALM)
Quality of service issues in streaming architectures

QoS mechanisms for multimedia streaming

Windows Media streaming technology

Internet protocol TV (IPTV)
Multimedia Networking Services/Applications

MultiMedia Instant Messaging (MMIM)

PushToTalk (PTT)

Presence

Video Over IP

FixedMobile Convergence (FMC)

Virtual Reality

Video Conferencing(H.323, SDTV,HDTV)
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Topic 8
Wireless broadband

Evolution of 3G technologies

Wi-Fi wireless LAN (802.11)

Worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX)
Multimedia over wireless broadband

End-to-end transport error control

Error resilience and power control at the source coding layer

Multimedia over wireless mesh

Wireless VoIP and scalable video
4
2
12
18
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Digital rights management of multimedia

A generic DRM architecture

Encryption

Digital watermarking

MPEG-21
2
1
6
9
Total contact hours
28
14
84
126
19.
Main references supporting the course:

Jenq-Neng Hwang. Multimedia Networking: From Theory to Practice. Cambridge University Press .2009
Additional references supporting the course:

Fred Halsall, Multimedia Communications, Addison Wesley, 2001

Crowcroft, J. et al, Internetworking Multimedia, UCL Press, 1999.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Visual programming
CCPS3653
Major
The number of interactive GUI systems, and people using them,
continues to grow rapidly. This module will introduce the concepts and
principles of Visual Programming to guide the development of modern,
high quality applications with Graphical User Interfaces.
In addition, students will be given the opportunity to learn how to write
graphical “front-ends” for complex database applications and how to
integrate these with other applications.
2/3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
Credit Value
3
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:

To develop an understanding of the theory and basic concepts of visual programming.

To develop the ability to design graphical user interfaces for representative applications.

To provide the student with the expertise to integrate a Windows graphical user interface with application
programs such as databases and spreadsheets.
Learning outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of this module a student should be able to

Explain the Integrated Development Environment (IDE).

Design moderately complex graphical user interfaces.

Integrate databases with an interface developed in a Visual programming language.

Integrate database and spreadsheet applications with a Windows user interface.

develop computer applications using visual programming language such as Visual basic and Visual C++, Visual
Java.
Transferable Skills:

Develop skills and confidence in developing computer applications using visual programming language
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
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13.
Synopsis:
This module will introduce the concepts and principles of Visual Programming to guide the development of modern,
high quality applications with Graphical User Interfaces. In addition, students will be given the opportunity to learn
how to write graphical “front-ends” for complex database applications and how to run programs written in other
languages.
14.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
60%
20%

Quizzes and Assignments
20%

Project
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 40% .
100%
15.
16.
17.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
2
1
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
1
0
0
3
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
4
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
P
Indep.
Topic 1
Introduction
Basic concepts and issues in the GUIs development processes, event driven
programming, Different paradigms of programming, comparison among the
paradigms, windows programming fundamentals, applications.
Integrated development environment
2
2
6
10
Visual Basic
Basic concepts: Data Types, Widgets, Event Management. File Handling, Designing
GUIs Connectivity, Databases and External Devices TCP/IP.
Simple Graphical Programming. Using Graphics Library Routines.
Visual
Presentation of Data. Application to Data Acquisition and Presentation. Building
database applications using RAD features and use the 2008 LINQ feature to query
data
8
8
24
40
Details
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VISUAL C++
Visual C++ components, classes, controls, message handling, document architecture,
dialog based applications, mouse and keyboard events, Dynamic Data Exchange,
creation of dynamic linking libraries, open database connectivity, linking with other
applications, Object linking and embedding and applications - ActiveX controls
JAVA APPLETS AND WEB PROGRAMMING
Visual J++ Applet wizard, handling events, multithreading, animation techniques,
animating images, HTML pages, Applets and HTML,
Java script, combining scripts and Applets, Applets over webs
Total hours
8
8
24
40
10
10
30
50
28
28
84
140
Laboratory Details
Laboratory
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Laboratory work must include the following
19.
Developing basic application using Visual Basic

Simple GUI Applications.

Database Applications.

Web and TCP/IP Applications.
Developing basic applications using VISUAL C++

Web and TCP/IP Applications.
 Graphics Applications.
Developing basic applications using J++

Web and TCP/IP Applications.

Database Applications.
 Graphics Applications..
Main references supporting the course:

Anne Boehm, Murach's Visual Basic 2008, Mike Murach & Associates, 2008

Lars Powers, Mike Snell, Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 Unleashed,1st Ed., sams, 2008

Deitel & Deitel, “Java How to Program, 7th Edition, 2007.
Additional references supporting the course:

Don Gosselin, Microsoft Visual C++ .NET, 2002.
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
/
Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing
CNET3543
Recent years have witnessed tremendous growth in the population of
mobile users demanding high performance, reliability and quality-ofservice (QoS). Wireless networks are undergoing rapid developments and
dramatic changes in the underlying technologies, in order to cope with the
technology this course is dedicated to introduce the students to Mobile
and Wireless Communication Networks technologies and its applications,
important developments, new strategies for performance modelling,
analysis and enhancement of wireless networks and discuss recent stateof-the-art research in this field.
2/3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =126
84
7.
Credit Value
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
9.
Objectives:

To introduce the students to Mobile and Wireless Communication Networks technologies

To familiarise the student with The Wireless Application Standards & Protocols

To elaborate on the components and important developments in Wireless Communication Networks

To expose the student to strategies for performance modelling, analysis and enhancement of wireless
networks

To encourage students to undertake relevant issues and explore recent state-of-the-art research in the field of
Mobile and Wireless Communication
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:


Explain the concepts of wireless computing as compared to the conventional wire-based computing.

Explain and identify the various standards and protocols in wireless communications.

Recognize the Framework and Principles related to wireless communications

Analyze the operation of a range of commonly used wireless communication technologies.

Describe and interpret the fundamentals of wireless Network Security.

Compare the performance of various wireless technologies.

Identify the current wireless networking technology in industry.

Propose wireless application, tools and procedures for specific tasks.
Transferable Skills:

Analyze the operation of a range of commonly used wireless network technologies.

Recommend wireless application, tools and procedures for specific tasks.

Develop appropriate security policies and guidelines for wireless applications.

Help the organization to develop networking infrastructure that is of high quality and consistent with
organizational business goals.

Communicate effectively about wireless communication systems, with specialists and non-specialists.
10.
11.
3
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12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorials

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
This course is essential for anyone studying networking, This subject deals with the important aspects of wireless and
mobile computing including wireless LAN, wireless WAN and cellular networks. Wireless technology protocols, standards
and Security are also studied.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Quizzes

Project and Assignments

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
4
17.
10%
20%
20%
4
4
1
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
5
1
1
2
0
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
18.
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
LO9
LO10
LO11
LO12
2
1
0
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction to Wireless Computing

Wireless Evolution overview,

Fundamentals of Wireless Communications

Emerging of Wireless Technologies

Theory of Radio Communication
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6
9
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Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Wireless Networking and Communication Technologies

Wireless Access Technologies

Wireless LAN technologies.

Wireless WANs technologies

Types of Wireless WANs

Mobile and Remote access

Wireless messaging

Mobile Devices.
Wireless Technology

The Wireless Application Standards & Protocols

IEEE 802.11 Standards for Wireless Networks.

IEEE 802.11a Supplement to 802.11 Standards.

IEEE 802.11 Security.

IEEE 802.15 WPAN Standards.

IEEE 802.16 WMAN Standards.

Bluetooth technology

HomeRF

WAP(Wireless Application Protocol)

HiperLAN2

Mobile Cellular Technologies

Mobile ad hoc Networks (MANET)

IP on Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

B3G
Mobile Applications

Mobile Application Frameworks

Mobile Application Design

Integration and Implementation in Wireless Networks
Wireless Networks:

Performance

Modelling,

Analysis

Enhancement

Quality of Service in Wireless Local Area Networks

Efficient Bandwidth Detection for Wireless Links

Propagation Effects and Handoff Performance

Capacity and Delay Analysis for Ad Hoc Networks
Cellular Networks

1G – 5G networks

3G Mobile Cellular Technologies

CDMA2000.

WCDMA.

TD-SCDMA.

Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)

GPRS
Security in Wireless communication

wireless network security,

cellular network security,

Mobile Client Security,

monitoring and controlling wireless network,
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Advanced topics in Wireless Networks

Next Generation Wireless Systems and Networks

4G

all-IP wireless networking,

power-efficient and bandwidth-efficient

air-link technologies,

multi-user signal processing in B3G wireless

E-UTRAN

Wireless Networks Plan Issues.

Managing wireless networks.
Total SLT
19.
2
12
18
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
1.
2.
20.
4
Stallings , Wireless Communication & Networks 2nd Ed (- 2008)
Geyong Ming, Yi Pan, and Pingzhi Fan, Advances in Wireless Networks: Performance Modelling, Analysis and
Enhancement (Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing) ( 2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Amjad Umar, “Mobile Computing and Wireless Communications”, NGE Solutions, Publication, 3001
2. Steve Mann, Scott Sbihli, “The Wireless Application Protocol”, John Wiley &Sons,Inc, 3003.
3. Deital, “Wireless Internet & Mobile Business”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2002,1st Ed.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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21.
22.
23.
24.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Network Management
CNET3553
25.
26.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
/
2/3
27.
Credit Value
3
28.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
29.
Objectives:
The module is to introduce the students to the business implications of network management by examining different
management reference models, such as Fault, Configuration, Accounting, Performance, and Security (FCAPS). The
module explains the nature and purposes of building blocks of network management. The implications and impact of
management technologies are assessed and placed in perspective.
30.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Recognize the importance of the network management.

Demonstrate an understanding of the functions, tools, and activities that are associated with network
management.

Make use of network management tools.

Demonstrate an understanding of network management reference models.

Recognize and appropriately use management protocols, and management communication patterns.

Demonstrate an understanding of management integration and service-level management.
31.
Transferable Skills:

Technical writing and presentation skills

Oral/Written Communication skills

analyse building blocks of network management

problem solving and decision-making skills

Teamwork skills
major
Keeping the business running depends on keeping the networking
services running, as companies become increasingly reliant on networks.
However, to successfully operate a network, an effective network
management is critical factor. The Network Management course provides
the learner with an accessible overview of network management
covering management not just of networks themselves but also of
services running over those networks.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =126
84
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32.
33.
34.
35.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorials

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

Solving assigned problems in groups and individually

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, class participation, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
The module begins with an overview of what network management is about and why it is relevant. Subsequently, the
module examines network management from several different angles, concluding in a discussion of how these aspects
are combined into management reference models. Management protocols, management organization, and
management communication patterns are also covered. Furthermore management integration and service-level
management are discussed.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework

Midterm test

Quizzes and Assignments

Project
Final Examination
36.
37.
38.
40%
20%
10%
10%
60%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
2
3
3
4
1
3
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
2
3
4
5
2
1
2
3
A7
2
LO9
2
A8
1
LO10
2
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
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Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Network Management: An Overview

Defining Network Management

The Importance of Network Management

Network Management Users

Network Management Providers

Network Management Complexities

Technical Challenges

Organization and Operations Challenges

Business Challenges
Network Manager job description

Network Manager tasks
- for a Global Service Provider
- for a Medium-Size Business
- for an Internet Data Center

Management Tools
The Basic Ingredients of Network Management

The Management System

The Management Network

The Management Support Organization: NOC, NOC, Who’s There?
The Dimensions of Management

Charting the Course Along Network Management Dimensions

Management Interoperability

Management Subject

Management Life Cycle
- Planning
- Deployment
- Operations
- Decommissioning

Management Layer
- Element Management
- Network Management
- Service Management
- Business Management
- Network Element

Management Function

Management Process and Organization
Management Functions and Reference Models

Of Pyramids and Layered Cakes

The ABCs of Management (FCAPS)

OAM&P: The Other FCAPS

FAB and eTOM

Using the Network Management ABCs
Management Information

Common Terminology Between Manager and Agent

MIBs

MIB Definitions

Anatomy of a MIB

Modeling Management Information
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
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Topic 11
Topic 10
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Management Communication Patterns

Layers of Management Interactions

Manager-Initiated Interactions—Request and Response

Agent-Initiated Interactions: Events and Event-Based Management
Common Management Protocols: Languages of Management

SNMP: Classic and Perennial Favorite

CLI: Management Protocol of Broken Dreams

syslog: The CLI Notification Sidekick

Netconf: A Management Protocol for a New Generation

Netflow and IPFIX
Management Organization: Dividing the Labor

Scaling Network Management
-Management Complexity
- Management Hierarchies
- Management Styles

Management Mediation
Management Integration

The Need for Management Integration

Management Integration Challenges

Approaches to Management Integration

Containing Complexity of the Managed Domain
Service Level Management

The Motivation for Service Level Agreements

Identification of Service Level Parameters

Defining a Service Level Agreement

Managing for a Service Level
Total SLT
39.
2
1
6
9
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Main references supporting the course:
2.
Alexander Clemm, “Network Management Fundamentals”. Cisco Press, 2007
Additional references supporting the course:
5. Benoit Claise, Ralf Wolter. “Network Management: Accounting and Performance Strategies”, Cisco Press,
2007.
6. J. Richard Burke. “Network Management: Concepts and Practice, A Hands-On Approach”. Prentice Hall, 2004.
7. Keith Lockyer, James Gordon. “Project Management and Project Network Techniques, 7/E”, Prentice Hall,
2005.
40.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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1.
Name of Course
Cryptography and network security
2.
3.
4.
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
CNET4523
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Major
The Great use of local networks and public networks particularly the
Internet has raised concerns over security since large volumes of
personal, sensitive data and information are now frequently transferred.
This module is intended to provide the student With a good
understanding of range of network security issues and the methods
available to reduce their effects. This module is essential in the
preparation of students for future professional career or further study.
1/4
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =126
Credit Value
3
Prerequisite (if any)
Computer network CNET3513
Objectives:

To provide solid foundation of the principal of Cryptographic algorithms including secret key cryptography,
hashes and message digests, and public key algorithm.

To provide an awareness of network security issues involving stand alone computers, locally networked
computers and remotely networked computers;

To encourage investigation into what factors are likely to result in successful network security

To provide foundations of the basic system security testing for vulnerabilities and procedures of backup and
recovery;
Learning outcomes:
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

Identify common network security vulnerabilities/attacks

explain the foundations of Cryptography and network security

Critically evaluate the risks and threats to networked computers.

Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the role of encryption to protect data.

Analyze security issues arising from the use of certain types of technologies.

Identify the appropriate procedures required to secure networks.

Identify the appropriate procedures required for system security testing and procedures of Backup and
recovery.
Transferable Skills:

Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the role of encryption to protect data.

Exercise judgments on the selection of security processes.

Demonstrate a good knowledge of the procedures used to secure networks.

Professionally communicate about Cryptography and network security with others.
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12.
13.
14.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This module provides ranges of network security issues and the methods available to reduce their effects. It will explore
many aspects of network security, including Common network security vulnerabilities/attacks, Types of Cryptographic
Functions, Authentication Systems, security standards, firewalls and Network management security.
Mode of Delivery:
Classroom lessons and Tutorial sessions
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 50% .
100%
16
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
3
2
1
2
5
1
2
17.
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
INTRODUCTION

The History of Information Security, Classical encryption techniques ,
Internet Crime and computer security threats, Identify attacks as opposed
to valid traffic, Common network security vulnerabilities/attacks, Viruses,
Worms, Trojan Horses.. Threats from portable code (Plug-ins, Active X,
Visual Basic, Java, JavaScript, Flash, Shockwave), Legal Issues. The Multilevel Model of Security,
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1
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9
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CRYPTOGRAPHY
Introduction to Cryptography, Types of Cryptographic Functions.
Secret Key Cryptography

Generic Block Encryption. Data Encryption Standard (DES). International
Data Encryption Algorithm (IDEA). Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).
Topic 2
Modes of Operation.

Encrypting a Large Message. Generating MACs. Multiple Encryption DES.
CBC Outside vs. Inside.
Hashes and Message Digests.

Introduction. Nifty Things to Do with a Hash. MD2. MD4. MD5. SHA-1.
HMAC.
6
3
18
27
4
2
12
18
Topic 3
Public Key Algorithms.

Introduction. Modular Arithmetic. RSA. Diffie-Hellman. Digital Signature
Standard (DSS). How Secure Are RSA and Diffie-Hellman? Elliptic Curve
Cryptography (ECC). Zero Knowledge Proof Systems.
Number Theory.

Introduction. Modular Arithmetic. Primes. Euclid's Algorithm. Chinese
Remainder Theorem. Zn. Euler's Totient Function. Euler's Theorem.
AUTHENTICATION

Overview of Authentication Systems. Password-Based Authentication.
Address-Based Authentication. Cryptographic Authentication Protocols.
Who Is Being Authenticated? Passwords as Cryptographic Keys.
Eavesdropping and Server Database Reading. Trusted Intermediaries.
Session Key Establishment. Delegation
Security Handshake Pitfalls.

Login Only. Mutual Authentication. Integrity/Encryption for Data.
Mediated Authentication (with KDC). Nonce Types.
Strong Password Protocols.

Introduction. Lamport's Hash. Strong Password Protocols. Strong
Password Credentials. Strong Password Credentials Download Protocols
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STANDARDS
Kerberos V4.
Tickets and Ticket-Granting Tickets. Configuration. Logging Into the Network.
Replicated KDC's. Realms. Interrealm Authentication. Key Version Numbers.
Kerberos V5.
ASN.1. Names. Delegation of Rights. Ticket Lifetimes. Key Versions.. Cryptographic
Algorithms. Hierarchy of Realms. Evading Password-Guessing Attacks. Double TGT
Authentication. Kerberos V5 Messages.
Topic 4
PKI (Public Key Infrastructure).
Terminology. PKI Trust Models. Revocation. Directories and PKI. PKIX and X.509.
X.509 and PKIX Certificates. Authorization Futures.
Real-time Communication Security.
Session Key Establishment. Perfect Forward Secrecy. PFS-Foilage. Denial-ofService/Clogging Protection. Endpoint Identifier Hiding. Live Partner Reassurance.
Session Resumption. Plausible Deniability
6
3
18
27
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
IPsec: AH and ESP.
Overview of Ipsec. IP and Ipv6. AH (Authentication Header). ESP (Encapsulating
Security Payload). Comparison of Encodings.
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
IPsec: IKE.
Photuris. SKIP. History of IKE. IKE Phases. Phase 1 IKE. Phase - 2 IKE: Setting up
Ipsec Sas. ISAKMP/IKE Encoding.
SSL/TLS.
Introduction. Using TCP, SSL/TLS Basic Protocol. Session Resumption. Client
Authentication. PKI as Deployed by SSL. Version Numbers. Negotiating Cipher
Suites. Negotiating Compression Method. Attacks Fixed in v3. Exportability.
Encoding.
Electronic Mail Security
Distribution Lists. Store and Forward. Security Services for Electronic Mail.
Establishing Keys. Privacy. Authentication of the Source. Message Integrity. NonRepudiation. Message Flow Confidentiality. Anonymity. Containment. Annoying
Text Format Issues. Names and Addresses.

PEM & S/MIME.

PGP (Pretty Good Privacy).
FIREWALLS
Packet Filters. Application Level Gateway. Encrypted Tunnels. Comparisons. Why
Firewalls Don't Work. Denial-of-Service Attacks.
Other Security Systems
NetWare V3. NetWare V4. KryptoKnight. DASS/SPX. Lotus Notes Security. DCE
Security. Microsoft Windows Security. Network Denial of Service. Clipper.
Network management security
Basic Concepts of SNMP, SNMPv1 Community Facility, SNMPv3.
Testing for system security vulnerabilities;
Backup and recovery procedures;
The OSI Security Architecture
Total hours
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19.
20.
Main references supporting the course:

William Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security: International Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008.

William Stallings, Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards: International Edition, Prentice
Hall, 2008.
Additional references supporting the course:

Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman, Mike Speciner, Network Security: Private Communication in a Public World,
Prentice Hall, 2002
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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(37)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
0
E-Commerce system
CCPS4563
major
E-commerce is among the most important technological and market trends
of the 21st century. Many new e-commerce applications are significantly
benefit from emerging data communication and mobile networks.
Advances in e-commerce have resulted in significant progress towards
strategies, requirements, and development of e-commerce applications.
This module is devoted to introduce students to e-commerce and train
them to strategize and create E-commerce and mobile commerce
applications. It focuses upon the development of software application using
fourth generation languages, address networking requirements, discuss
support from wireless carriers, and present some open research problems.
1/4
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =126
0
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
9.
Objectives:
This subject is designed to introduce the students to:

the main concepts related to E-Commerce and Mobile Commerce

the e-commerce technology and infrastructure;

the major EC software packages and EC application suites

the major steps in developing e-commerce and Mobile Commerce applications

methods for connecting E-Commerce and Mobile Commerce to back-end systems and databases
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Describe the main concepts related to E-Commerce and Mobile Commerce.

Describe the major EC applications and their major functionalities

Discuss the major EC software packages , infrastructure and application suites

address the networking requirements for supporting E-Commerce and Mobile Commerce

Describe the major steps in developing e-commerce and Mobile Commerce applications.

Describe various methods for connecting E-Commerce and Mobile Commerce to back-end systems and
databases

Discuss the security issues involved in conducting business transactions on the internet.

Develop a prototype of an e-commerce and Mobile Commerce application
Transferable Skills:

explain the process of introducing e-commerce applications into an organization;

Discuss the practical implementation of a e-commerce application and help the organization to develop a high
quality system consistent with organizational business goals.

Develop appropriate security policies and guidelines for e-commerce systems.

Communicate effectively about database systems, with specialists and non-specialists.
10.
11.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
This module is devoted to introduce students to e-commerce and train them to strategize and create E-commerce and
mobile commerce applications. It focuses upon the development of software application using fourth generation
languages, address networking requirements, discuss support from wireless carriers, and present some open research
problems.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework

Midterm test

Project

quizzes and Assignments
Final Examination
16.
3
3
1
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
3
2
1
3
0
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
3
18.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
3
17.
50%
20%
20%
10%
3
4
1
4
2
1
LO8
LO9
LO10
LO11
LO12
3
3
1
1
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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Details
Indep.
SLT
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1


Course Introduction.
Introduction to e-commerce

E-commerce and its various categories

The ‘automate’ imperative – the ‘informate’ imperative –

the emergence of new ‘socio-economic’ systems (e.g. ecommerce as a new
form of catalogue shopping)

The economic impact of EC to organizations, consumers, and society.

limitations of EC

Early Developments in e-commerce

major types of EC transactions

Competition in the digital economy.

E-commerce in various business settings
‘Pure Systems Vs Hybrid Systems’ – Kiosks – e-commerce in
Banking/Finance, Manufacturing, and Retailing

EC business models

Business-to-Consumer (B2C) e-Commerce

Business-to-Business (B2B) e-Commerce

Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C) e-Commerce:

The supply-chain

E-Supply Chains, Collaborative Commerce, Intrabusiness EC, and Corporate
Portals
E-commerce processes:

The nine essential e-commerce processes

Access control and security

Profiling and personalizing

Search management

Content management

Catalog management

Payment

Workflow management

Event notification

Collaboration and trading
E-Marketplaces:

Structures, Mechanisms, Economics and Impacts
E-commerce and M-commerce Technologies

Technologies that are necessary for electronic commerce include:

Information technologies

Telecommunications technologies

Internet technologies

E-commerce and M-commerce toolkits

Major software packages and application suites.

Microsoft

Adobe

Open Source
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Building E-Commerce Applications and Infrastructure
Topic 9
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5


e-commerce infrastructure and networking requirements
Major EC application development options and their benefits and
limitations.

Various EC application outsourcing options including the use of an
application service provider (ASP), Wireless application service provider
(WASP) and utility computing.

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) and its relationship to EC.

Planning and designing an e-commerce application

Building an e-commerce web site

Network reengineering to support e-commerce application

Methods for connecting an e-commerce application to back-end systems
and databases.

Integrating Security and payment methods

System performance analysis

System Maintenance and management

e-commerce systems merging

Introduction to WebSphere Commerce. (by IBM)
Mobile Commerce and Pervasive Computing

mobile commerce applications

Mobile Commerce opportunities and challenges

Designing and development considerations of M-Commerce

Architecture and Protocols

Mobile Commerce: Framework and Networking Support

the mobile computing environment

major types of wireless telecommunications networks and wireless carriers
supporting Mobile Commerce

mobile transaction network

configuring Mobile Commerce portals

The key characteristics and current uses of pervasive computing.
E-Commerce and M-Commerce Security

the basic elements of EC security

the trends in computer and network security attacks

the common security practices of businesses of all sizes

common mistakes that organizations make in managing security

The major technologies for securing EC communications.

the major technologies for securing EC networks components

agent based secure E-payment

The types of fraud on the Internet and how to protect against them.

Secure Socket Layer (SSL)

Digital Wallet

Secure Electronic Transaction (SET)
Electronic Payment Systems

Electronic payments processes

Technology Requirements for Processing Credit Cards online.

various online alternatives to credit card payments

smart cards

The processes and parties involved in e-checking.
6
3
18
27
4
2
12
18
4
2
12
18
2
1
6
9
2
1
6
9
28
14
84
126
Selected Topics in E-Commerce and M-Commerce
•
Introduction to WebSphere Commerce.

Case studies: On-line Commerce systems (successes and failures)

Present some open research problems
Total SLT
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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19.
20.
Main references supporting the course:
1. Kenneth Laudon and Carol Guercio Traver, Electronic Commerce: A Managerial Perspective 2010 (6th Edition)
(Prentice Hall), 2009
2. Dave Chaffey, E-Business and E-Commerce Management: Strategy, Implementation and Practice (4th Edition)
(Prentice Hall),2010
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Norman Sadeh , M-Commerce Technologies, Services, and Business Models, (John Wiley & Sons, Inc), 2002
2. Janice Reynolds, The Complete E-Commerce Book: Design, Build & Maintain a Successful Web-based Business,
(CMP Books), 2004
3. Lynie Arden ,Start Your Own E-Business, (2nd Ed. ) (Entrepreneur Press),2009
4. Peter Swithinbank, Charles Ackeifi, Jennifer Allan, planning and Managing the Deployment of WebSphere
Commerce (1st ed.),(IBM redbooks), 2008.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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(38)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28 14
/
Linux Network Architecture
CMMD4543
Major
The Internet is recognized as a network that is fundamentally changing
social, political, and economic structures, and in many ways obviating
geographic boundaries. The design and control of such a network require
an understanding of how networking behaviour and protocols can be
implemented within the operating system. The module provides an
overview of the implementation of networking protocols in the Linux
kernel.
1/4
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =126
84
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
9.
Objectives:
The module is designed to provide the students with the basics required to implement network functionality in the Linux
kernel. The module enables the students to deepen their understanding of network specific processes in an operating
system. The module introduces the key components and mechanisms of the Linux kernel and the designs of
communication systems.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Recognize the components of the Linux kernel that are important for the Linux network architecture.

Recognize the general architecture of communication systems and the functionality of protocols and protocol
instances.

Demonstrate Various ways of viewing the kernel—as an enhanced machine, a resource manager, and a library

Demonstrate how to represent and manage network packets in the Linux kernel

Demonstrate How the kernel deals with networks and implements TCP/IP

Demonstrate technical knowledge on SLIP, PPP, and PPP-over-Ethernet protocols and how the ATM and
Bluetooth network technologies are supported in Linux.
Transferable Skills:

Implement network functionality in the Linux kernel.

Network Analysis and problem solving skills

Technical writing skills

Oral/Written Communication skills

Teamwork skills
10.
11.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorials

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
The module provides an overview of the implementation of networking protocols in the Linux kernel and how
networking behavior and protocols can be implemented within the Linux operating system. It begins with the kernel's
network device drivers, continuing with link-layer protocols such as PPP, then and finally giving a description of all core
protocols of the TCP/IP protocol family. In this context, the module will cover Additional supplementary protocols such
as RSVP.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework

Midterm test

Quizzes and Assignments

Project
Final Examination
16.
17.
40%
15%
10%
15%
60%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
4
4
1
5
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
3
2
1
2
4
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction

The Linux Operating System

Why Use Linux
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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T
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
1
6
9
Page 162
2
12
18
6
3
18
27
2
1
6
9
Topic 5
The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)

Overview

PPP Configuration in Linux

PPP Implementation in the Linux Kernel

Implementing the PPP Daemon

PPP over Ethernet
4
2
12
18
Topic 6
Asynchronous Transfer Mode—ATM

Introduction

Implementing ATM in Linux

Configuration
4
2
12
18
Bluetooth in Linux

Host Controller Interface (HCI)

L2CAP

Other Protocols
2
1
6
9
Network Layer Overview
- The Internet Protocol V4
- Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

IP Routing

IP Multicast for Group Communication

Using Traffic Control to Support Quality of Service (QoS)
12
18
84
126
Topic 4
Topic 3
4
Topic 7
The Kernel Structure

Monolithic Architectures and Microkernels

Activities in the Linux Kernel

Locking—Atomic Operations

Kernel Modules

Device Drivers

Memory Management in the Kernel

Timing in the Linux Kernel

The Proc File System

Versioning
Architecture of Network Implementation

The Architecture of Communication Systems

Managing Network Packets in the Kernel

Network Devices
Topic 8
Topic 2
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
The Serial-Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)

Overview

Slip Implementation in the Linux Kernel
Total SLT
19.
20.
4
28
2
14
Main references supporting the course:
1. Wolfgang Mauerer, “Professional Linux Kernel Architecture”. Wrox, 3009
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Klaus Wehrle, Frank Pahlke, Hartmut Ritter, Daniel Muller, Marc Bechler, “Linux Network Architecture”.
Prentice Hall, 2005
2. Christian Benvenuti. “Understanding Linux Network Internals”, O'Reilly Media, 2005.
3. Charles M. Kozierok. “The TCP/IP Guide: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Internet Protocols Reference”, No Starch
Press, 2005.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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(40)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
Industrial Training
CCPS4516
All academic staff
Major
Students benefit enormously from the Industrial Training experience that
gives them the opportunity to apply the skills they have already acquired
to real tasks and projects in professional employment, this practice will
enhance their personal development.
The regular contacts of academic supervisors with students on placement
provide ideal opportunity to obtain views of the course from the
industrial perspective. The links with industry, which placement
promotes, also help the course committee to keep abreast of changing
industrial requirements and often lead to other joint ventures such as
custom-built training courses, teaching company schemes and other
collaborative research.
2/4
for 4 months
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
The duration for Industrial Training is 4 months
Total SLT =252
Credit Value
6
Prerequisite (if any)
Completed 70 credit hours excluding Art & Humanities subjects
Objectives:
This subject is designed to enable students:

To provide appropriate work in a well organised computing environment, ideally with advice and assistance
available from experienced staff.

To provide appropriate and structured training, formal and/or informal, in relevant aspects of computing so
they can relate and reinforce what has been taught at the university.

To provide an opportunity for the student to develop towards professional competence;

To give the students experience of the demands of the workplace;

To foster cooperation and to develop synergetic collaboration between industry and the university in
promoting a knowledgeable society.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
10.
Learning outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of this module a student should able to

11.
12.
Recognise the Health and Safety issues involved in the operation of computing equipment within an industrial
context.

Relate professional, legal, moral and ethical issues to the organised computing environment

Work as member of a team, recognising the different roles within a team and the different ways of organising
teams.

Manage and develop time management and organisational skills.

Appreciate the need for continuing professional development in recognition of the requirement for life long
learning.

relate and reinforce their knowledge in the following scopes:

System feasibility study

System requirement and functional analysis

System analysis and design

Testing and implementation

Maintenance and installation

Security and recovery

Data collection and processing

Communication skills

Documentation
Transferable Skills:

Communicate effectively using various media and with a variety of audiences while on Placement and as part
of the reporting of placement.

Develop towards professional competence.

Develop key skills needed in the graduate labour market

Knowledge and understanding of Professional issues in CS

Recognising the different roles of working with a team and the different ways of organising teams.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
During placement each student is supervised by an industrial supervisor from the employing company and an academic
supervisor from the Faculty. Initially students are given close supervision and guidance but are progressively given more
personal responsibility as the placement proceeds. Successful completion of the industrial placement is recognised by
the award of the Diploma in Industrial Studies.
Assessment of placement is on the basis of three elements

Student Report
Each student maintains a log of the placement experience and submits this together with an end of
placement report.

Academic Supervisor’s Report
Each academic supervisor submits reports on student performance based on interviews with both the student
and the industrial supervisor during visits to the place of work.

Assessment by the Industrial Supervisor
Towards the end of the placement the employer completes a report pro forma covering the student’s
performance on placement.
13.
Synopsis:
Industrial Training refers to the time period Students spend in relevant Industrial and supervised employment. The first
three years of the course are designed to provide the students with the fundamental knowledge and expertise they will
need to begin placement in a computing or IT environment. Students benefit enormously from the placement
experience that gives them the opportunity to apply the skills they have already acquired to real tasks and projects in
professional employment, and through this to enhance their personal development.
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14.
Mode of Delivery:
Industrial Training
15.
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Company Assessment
30
%
University Assessment:
70
%

Supervisor Assessment
40 %

Report & Presentation Assessment
30 %
Total
16.
17.
18.
19.
100
%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
5
4
4
4
4
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
5
4
4
4
3
4
3
A7
4
LO9
4
A8
3
LO10
4
A9
5
LO11
2
LO12
3
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Main references supporting the course:
Additional references supporting the course:
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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Elective Subjects
1.
(E 1)
Name of Course
Data Compression and Coding
2.
Course Code
CCPS3643
3.
Name(s) of academic staff
4.
Rationale for the inclusion of the
Elective
The amount of data is an important issue to be considered. Since Data
coding and compression aims to reduce the amount of data being stored
and transmitted it is an important topic for CS students.
The aim of this module is to provide detailed concepts and methods of
data compression and their effectiveness and give an informative and
balanced introduction to different approaches, for module students will
be expected to do a fair amount of reading on their own.
1/4
course/module in the programme
5.
Semester and Year offered
6.
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Total Guided and Independent Learning
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
T = Tutorial
28
14
P
O
Independent= 84
Total= 126
P = Practical
O= Others
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
9.
Objectives:


10.
To provide students with contemporary knowledge in Data Compression and Coding.
To equip students with skills to analyze and evaluate different Data Compression and Coding methods.
Learning outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Explain the evolution and fundamental concepts of Data Compression and Coding techniques.

Analyze the operation of a range of commonly used Coding and Compression techniques

Identify the basic software and hardware tools used for data compression.

Identify what new trends and what new possibilities of data compression are available.
11.
Transferable Skills:



Distinguish between different text, image, video, and audio file formats
Analyze the operation of a range of commonly used Coding and Compression techniques.
Communicate effectively about Data Compression and Coding techniques, with specialists and non-specialists.
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12.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
13.
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Tutorial sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (Participation, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
14.
This module provides detailed concepts and methods of data compression / coding and their effectiveness. It also
provides an informative and balanced introduction to different methods such as Intuitive, Statistical and Dictionary
Methods for different types of data text, image, audio and video.
Mode of Delivery:
15.
Classroom lessons / Tutorial sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
40%
10%

Quizzes
10%

Assignments
20%

Mid-Semester Exam
Final Examination
. 60% .
100%
16.
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
17.
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
3
1
3
2
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
3
LO2
3
18.
LO3
2
A7
1
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
LO9
1
3
1
1
2
2
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
A8
3
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
1
LO12
0
Topic 1
L
T
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
Introduction
Definitions, Historical background,, Applications, Taxonomy,
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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2
1
6
9
Page 168
2
1
6
9
Topic 3
Statistical Methods
Information Theory Concepts, Variable-Size Codes, Prefix Codes, Golomb Codes,
The Kraft-MacMillan Inequality, The Counting Argument, Shannon-Fano Coding,
Huffman Coding, Adaptive Huffman Coding, MNP5, MNP7, Arithmetic coding,
Adaptive Arithmetic Coding, QM Coder, Text Compression, Context-Tree Weighting
4
2
12
18
Topic 4
Dictionary Methods
String Compression, Simple Dictionary Compression,LZ77 (Sliding Window), LZSS,
Repetition Times, QIC-122, LZX, File Differencing: VCDIFF, LZ78, LZFG, LZRW1,LZRW
4, LZW, LZMW, LZAP, LZY, LZP, Repetition Finder, UNIX Compression, The V.42bis
Protocol, XML Compression: XMill, EXE Compressors, CRC, Data Compression
Patents
4
2
12
18
Topic 5
Image Compression
Approaches to Image Compression; Image Transforms, Orthogonal Transforms. The
Discrete Cosine Transform
JPEG, JPEG-LS. Progressive Image Compression, JBIG, JBIG2, Simple Images: EIDAC,
Vector Quantization, Adaptive Vector Quantization, Block Matching, Block
Truncation Coding, Context-Based Methods, FELICS, Progressive FELICS, Differential
Lossless Compression,
4
2
12
18
Topic 6
Wavelet Methods
Fourier Transform, The Frequency Domain, Fourier Image, Compression,
Multiresolution Decomposition, The Laplacian Pyramid, SPIHT, CREW. EZW, DjVu,
JPEG 2000
4
2
12
18
Topic 7
Video Compression
Analog Video , Composite and Components Video , Digital Video , Video
Compression , MPEG , MPEG-4 , H.261
2
1
6
9
Topic 8
Audio Compression
Sound, Digital Audio , The Human Auditory System , μ-Law and A-Law Companding ,
ADPCM Audio Compression , MLP Audio , Speech Compression , Shorten
MPEG-1 Audio Layers
2
1
6
9
Other Methods and application
Zip and Gzip, PNG, The Burrows-Wheeler Method ,Symbol Ranking, ACB , SortBased Context Similarity , Sparse Strings , Word-Based Text Compression , Textual
Image Compression, Dynamic Markov Coding , FHM Curve Compression , Sequitur ,
Triangle Mesh Compression: Unicode Compression
4
2
6
12
Total
28
14
78
120
Topic 2
Intuitive Compression.
Run-Length Encoding, RLE Text Compression, RLE Image Compression, Move-toFront Coding, Scalar Quantization
Topic 9
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
19.
Main references supporting the course:

David Salomon , A Concise Introduction to Data Compression, 1st edition, Springer, 2008.
Additional references supporting the course:


20
David Salomon, G. Motta, D. Bryan, Data Compression: The Complete Reference, 4nd edition, Springer(2006)
D.C. Hankerson, Greg A. Harris , Peter D. Johnson Jr, Introduction to Information Theory and Data
Compression, Second Edition, Chapman & Hall/CRC; 2 edition 2003
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
(E2)
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Multimedia Innovation
CCMD3533
Elective
It will provide students with the multimedia authoring / scripting skills
necessary and train students for a productive role in commerce and
industry wherever computer-based interaction systems are present.
Practical and coursework assessment elements will develop and assess
the students’ ability to work as part of a team.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
1/4
7.
8.
Credit Value
Prerequisite (if any)
3
None
9.
Objectives:
 To introduce to the students the characteristics and design methodologies of Multimedia systems.
 To provide students with the multimedia authoring / scripting skills necessary for implementing design
concepts using multimedia technologies.
 To encourage a dynamic approach to authoring interactive applications.
 To expand the student's awareness of the social implications of developing multimedia applications through
authoring practices.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Identify and apply an appropriate approach to the design and implementation of interactive multimedia
systems.

Demonstrate an understanding of multimedia authoring systems and how to employ them.

Develop applications using interactive multimedia tools such as Macromedia director and scripting language
(lingo).

Author and deliver multimedia over the Internet.

Appreciate the importance of good HCI design principles.
10.
11.
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
84
Transferable Skills:
 Be aware of recent advances in multimedia related technology.
 Adopt a methodical approach to the creation and implementation of interactive multimedia presentations.
 Experience with the Use of some multimedia tools such as Macromedia director, flash, Illustrator and some
image , audio and video editing tools.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

student-Lecturer discussion

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (project, Assigned exercises, Presentation and final project)

Lecturer Observation
Synopsis:
This module examines the design of multimedia systems. It introduces students to the fundamental technical issues in
multimedia that are necessary for a thorough understanding of the tools and techniques required for multimedia
authoring. In addition it introduces students to the multimedia applications and therefore provides the practical skills
required to solve design problems using the available technologies.
Mode of Delivery:
Class Lectures and Laboratory sessions
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%

Mid-Semester Exam
20%

Quizzes and assignments
10%

group project
20%
Final Examination
16.
17.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
3
1
2
1
1
2
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
3
1
1
1
2
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
2
A8
3
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Introduction

Interactive multimedia Components and Its Applications.

Fundamental of multimedia application Design and development.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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L
P
Total
Topic 1
Details
Indep.
SLT
2
2
6
10
Page 172
Topic 2
4
4
12
20
Audio fundamentals:

sampling, A/D converters; audio compression, audio file formats;
Audio Capture & Manipulation

Record and Playback

Basic Editing and Processing Audio
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
2
2
6
10
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
28
28
84
140
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 5
Topic 4
Image fundamentals ;

Colour; Image Data types; Image file formats; Colour Models
Still Image Capture & Manipulation

Still Image Capture

Using tools and palettes

Modifying images

Retouching images

Creating type

Preparing images for the Web
Topic 3
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Video fundamentals:

Color Models in Video. Types of video signals. Video File Formats (QuickTime,
MPEG).
Video Capture & Manipulation

Video Capture

Editing Techniques

Adding Transitions

Adding Audio

Adding Motion
Approaches To Design & Implementation Of Interactive Multimedia Systems

Fundamental Design Problems in Multimedia.

Production Techniques
o Gathering.
o Prototyping.
o Storyboarding.
o Instructional Design.
o Evaluation of Multimedia Designs
Media Constraints

Limits to multimedia system functionality.

Constraints on expression and interactivity of different media.

Constraints on authoring multimedia for Internet delivery.
Multimedia Authoring Systems

Characteristics of multimedia authoring packages.

How to utilise a proprietary industry standard multimedia authoring package
e.g. Macromedia Director to develop interactive multimedia solutions.

How to utilise an interactive multimedia scripting language such as
Macromedia’a Lingo to develop interactive multimedia solutions.
Authoring for the Internet

streaming audio and video;

Web media creation,

HTML Authoring - Macromedia Dreamweaver

Introduction to Multimedia on the Internet ( Macromedia Flash)
Total
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19.
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. Exercise exercises on Macromedia Director
must include the following
Macromedia Director: introductory examples
Director Movie:

The Cast, The Stage and The Score

Event Handlers

Shockwave
lingo: basic commands
adding interactivity
Still Image Capture & Manipulation

Still Image Capture

Using tools and palettes

Modifying images

Retouching images
Audio Capture & Manipulation

Record and Playback

Basic Editing and Processing Audio
Video Capture & Manipulation

Video Capture

Adding Transitions

Adding Audio

Adding Motion
Create simple director movies
Create a director movie to be delivered over the Internet
Main references supporting the course:

T. M. Savage , K.E. Vogel ,An Introduction to Digital Multimedia,1st ed, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2008
Additional references supporting the course:
Ze-Nian Li, Mark S. Drew “Fundamentals of Multimedia” Prentice Hall, 3006
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(E3)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
Advanced Java Programming
CNET3563
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
28
2/3
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
9.
Prerequisite (if any)
None
Objectives:
Object Oriented Programming has become the predominant technique for writing software in the past decade. Many
other important software development techniques (e.g. modern distributed systems and component technology) are
based upon the fundamental ideas captured by object-oriented programming. This course will introduce various
programming paradigms, programming methodology and show students how to write well-structured object oriented
programs using Java.
Learning outcomes:
By the end of the subject, students should be able to:

Develop and apply algorithms for various programming paradigm and methodology.

Demonstrate the implementation of object oriented programming concepts and design using a high-level
programming language, like Java correctly and effectively.
Transferable Skills:

Become skilled in the use of java programming languages and set up threads that work without errors.

Describe the pros and cons of the Java programming language.

Write well-structured object oriented programs using Java.
10.
11.
12.
Elective
This module develops problem-solving and programming skills essential
in professional programming using the Java language. By taking this
module students will learn how to write well-structured object oriented
programs using Java. It also introduce various programming paradigms,
and programming methodology
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent = 84
Total =140
84
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming;

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions,

Solving assigned problems in groups and singly

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Ongoing quizzes

Midterm tests

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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13.
14.
15.
Synopsis:
This module develops problem-solving and programming skills essential in professional programming using the Java
language. The major areas of study include: Comparison of procedure oriented, structure oriented and object oriented
programming paradigms, Top-down design, algorithm development, Fundamentals of object-oriented design, Classes,
Attributes and Behaviour, Java fundamentals, Data members and member functions, Dynamic memory allocation,
Concept of inheritance and polymorphism, Advanced Java concepts and applications
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework
50%
10%

Quizzes
20%

Project and assignments

Mid-Semester Exam
20%
Final Examination
16.
17.
. 50% .
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
4
2
2
1
3
1
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
2
2
0
3
0
1
2
18.
A7
1
LO9
0
A8
2
LO10
1
A9
0
LO11
0
LO12
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Topic 4
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
Introduction to Java
Object-Oriented Programming, Java terminology, Programming Concepts &
Structures, Introducing, Type conversions, fundamental of object oriented design identifying classes - attributes and behaviour - features of object oriented
programming
Java Fundamentals
Standard I/O streams - function prototypes – JAVA enhancements to C++ – Default
function parameters - inline functions – overloaded functions - reference variables
comparison between pointers and references.
Classes
Creating new data type in JAVA- class declaration - members - constructors and
destructors - access functions constant objects - member objects - static members friend classes - arrays of class objects.
Dynamic Memory Allocation
Free store - new and delete operators - class with pointer members - this pointer
assignment - initialization - copy constructor - passing and returning objects advanced free store techniques – exception handling.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
L
P
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
Page 176
6
6
18
30
Topic 6
Advanced JAVA concepts an applications
File handling - templates - container classes – class library - stack, queue and linked
list applications - simple database applications.
4
4
12
20
JavaScript
Placing JavaScript code in HTML pages
Using comments
2
2
6
10
Total hours
28
28
84
140
Laboratory
19.
Inheritance and Polymorphism
Operator overloading - handling related types in JAVA- derived class – conversion
between base and derived classes – virtual functions - dynamic binding - pure virtual
functions - protected members – public and private base classes - new, delete
operators overloading - inheritance applications.
Topic 7
Topic 5
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. programming work must include the following

Type conversions, attributes and behaviour

identifying classes

Default function, inline functions, overloaded functions, reference variables, pointers and
references.

Class declaration, member objects - static members - friend classes - arrays of class objects.

constructors and destructors

Dynamic Memory Allocation, Free store, new and delete operators, class with pointer members

copy constructor, passing and returning objects

exception handling

virtual functions

dynamic binding

pure virtual functions - protected members – public and private base classes - new, delete operators
overloading - inheritance applications.

I/O

File handling - templates - container classes – class library - stack, queue and linked list applications simple database applications.
Main references supporting the course:
Y. Daniel Liang, Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive Version (7th Edition) (2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. David J. Barnes and Michael Kolling, Objects First With Java: A Practical Introduction Using BlueJ (4th Edition)
(Paperback - Sep 1, 2008)
2. Herbert Schildt, Java: The Complete Reference, Seventh Edition (Complete Reference Series) ( 2006)
3. Cay S. Horstmann, Big Java (2007)
20.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
(E 4)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Course
Course Code
Name(s) of academic staff
Rationale for the inclusion of the
course/module in the programme
5.
6.
Semester and Year offered
Total Student Learning
Face to Face
Time (SLT)
L = Lecture
L
T
P
T = Tutorial
P = Practical
O= Others
28
0
28
Advanced Database System
CCPS3663
Elective
Efficient storage and retrieval of data is central to the functioning of
modern information systems. This module is devoted to the
understanding of such information systems, and the environment in which
they operate, design, construction and use of databases. This course
provides an insight into different aspects of database programming. It
exposes the students to user friendly software tools, which are used by IT
professionals to storage, manage and access information, the way that
suits to their decision making needs. The course focuses upon the
development of software application using fourth generation languages.
2/3
Total Guided and Independent Learning
O
Independent study=84 hours
Total =140
0
7.
Credit Value
3
8.
Prerequisite (if any)
none
9.
Objectives:
This subject is designed to enable students:

To discuss the behaviors and applications of SQL commands in generating information from a database.

To discuss the practical implementation of a database in an organization.

To emphasize the different types of SQL commands and the rules associated to each type.

To provide an information to PL/SQL commands.
Learning outcomes:
Upon completion of this subject, students should be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge in using SQL language to generate information from a database.

Apply and use commercial database software to create and support organizational database operations.

Work as part of a team to design a physical data model, construct and present a database from a given case
study.

Differentiate the behaviors and rules pertaining to Data Definition Language (DLL), Data

Manipulation Language (DML) and Data Control Language (DCL) statements.

Demonstrate knowledge in using basic PL/SQL commands to create database scripts.
Transferable Skills:

Discuss the practical implementation of a database and help the organization to develop a high quality
database consistent with organizational business goals.

Recommend database tools and procedures for specific tasks.

Develop appropriate security policies and guidelines for database systems.

Communicate effectively about database systems, with specialists and non-specialists.
10.
11.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
12.
13.
14.
15.
Teaching-learning and assessment strategy
A variety of teaching and learning strategies are used throughout the course, including:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Power Point presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises

brainstorming

Lecturer-led problem-solving sessions

collaborative and co-operative learning;

Independent study.
Assessment strategies include the following:

Performance Assessment (Project, Assigned exercises)

Lecturer Observation

Quizzes, tests, and examinations
Synopsis:
This course emphasizes on learning advance database methodologies and technologies. The course provides an insight
into different aspects of database programming. It exposes the students to user friendly software tools, which are used
by IT professionals to storage, manage and access information, the way that suits to their decision making needs. The
course focuses upon the development of software application using fourth generation languages. Students will learn how
to access and manipulate information from database using fourth generation language (4GL), which may include query
language and report generators.
Mode of Delivery:

Classroom lessons. Lectures and Presentations

Laboratory sessions: Practice exercises
Assessment Methods and Types:
The assessment for this course will be based on the following:
Coursework

Midterm test

Group Project

quizzes and Assignments
Final Examination
16.
0
2
1
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
3
1
1
1
0
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Learning Outcomes
LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4
LO5
LO6
LO7
LO8
4
18.
50%
100%
Mapping of the course/module to the Programme Aims
A1
A2
A3
A4
3
17.
50%
20%
20%
10%
2
1
0
3
1
1
2
LO9
LO10
LO11
LO12
2
1
1
0
Content outline of the course/module and the SLT per topic
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
L
P
Total
Details
Indep.
SLT
Page 179




Database Objects.
User Access.
Data Dictionary.
Dynamic SQL Scripts (Variables)





Set Operators.
Data-Time Functions.
Hierarchical Retrieval.
SQL Optimization.
Intro to PL/SQL.








Writing Executable Statements.
Interacting with Oracle Server.
Control Structures
Composite Data Types.
Cursors
Handling Exceptions
Creating Procedures
Transaction, Concurrency.


Recovery and Security Issues.
Current Trends in Database Systems: Distributed Database Management
Systems,
data warehousing and data mining concepts
Topic 8
Topic 7
Topic 6
Topic 4
Course Introduction.

Data Modeling: The Conceptual Model, Internal Model, External Model
and Physical Model,

Process of Database Design

advance database methodologies

Introduction to Oracle9i Review.

Structured Query Language (SQL): Review

DML Features in SQL,

DDL

Updates in SQL,

Views in SQL

Embedded SQL,

Query-by-Example (QBE).

Advance SQL statements

Subqueries.

Advanced Subqueries.

Manipulating Data.

Creating & Managing Tables using Oracle

Readable Output.

Constraints & Views.
Topic 5
Topic 3
Topic 2
Topic 1
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU

Total SLT
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
4
4
12
20
2
2
6
10
2
2
6
10
84
140
28
28
Page 180
CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
Laboratory Details
Exercises based on topics covered in each lecture. programming work must include the following:

Introduction to Oracle9i Review. introductory examples

SQL Subqueries.

Manipulating Data.

Creating & Managing Tables using Oracle

Readable Output.

Constraints & Views

User Access.

Data Dictionary

Data-Time Functions.

Hierarchical Retrieval.

SQL Optimization.

Handling Exceptions

Creating Procedures

Recovery and Security
19.
20.
Main references supporting the course:
3. Michael McLaughlin, Oracle Database 11g PL/SQL Programming (Oracle Press) (2008)
4. Benjamin Rosenzweig and Elena Silvestrova Rakhimov, Oracle PL/SQL by Example (4th Edition) (Prentice Hall
PTR Oracle Series) ( 2008)
Additional references supporting the course:
1. Preece, L. L. (2004). Oracle SQL and Introductory PL/SQL. Singapore: McGraw-Hill/Osborne.
2. Hector Garcia-Molina, Jeffrey D. Ullman, and Jennifer Widom, Database Systems: The Complete Book (2nd
Edition) (2008)
3. Morris-Murphy, L. L. (2003). Oracle9i: SQL with an introduction to PL/SQL. Boston, MA: Thomson Course
Technology.
Other additional information
All materials will be available to the students online.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.3.4
What are the department’s plan to periodically review the
programme to keep abreast with scientific, technological and
knowledge development of the discipline, and with the needs
of society?
The faculty will constantly and consistently review the programme
by seeking opinions of the experts in the area of concern internally
and externally, formally and informally to keep abreast with
scientific, technological and knowledge development of the
discipline, and with the needs of society.
Information on Enhanced Standards
2.3.5
Support Materials
and Documents:
2.4.1
2.1 Study and
Examination Rules
and Regulations for
the
Bachelor’s
Degree, Diploma
(Equivalent to a
Two-Year Degree)
and
the
PreUniversity
Foundation Level
Show evidence that the department has the mechanism in
place to access to the latest development in the field of
study.
For the time being the faculty relies on academic consultants and
industrial partners to access to the latest development in the field
of study.
2.4
Management of the Programme
Information on Benchmarked Standards
2.4.1
Provide a sample of the Student Study Guide, Student
Handbook and Student Project Handbook, where applicable.
Refer to the attachment – 2.1
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.4.2
State the manner in which the academic management of the programme is
carried out, including those pertaining to curriculum development, programme
management and student feedback.
Academic management of the programme is carried out by the Senate that acts as the
highest academic body of the University, and the University Curriculum Committee, and
the Faculty Curriculum Committee; and the Dean to ensure that academic rules and
regulations are followed.
Furthermore, the Head of Department/Programme Coordinator is responsible for
ensuring that the courses are conducted by lecturers with the right expertise and
competencies, and that lectures are conducted according to course outlines. The Head
of Department/Programme Coordinator make sure that the students receive the course
outline that specify the LOs, assessment methods, and course materials.
2.4.3
State the designation, responsibility and authority of the main academic officer
and committee responsible for the programme. Do they have adequate
resources? Show evidence.
The main academic officer responsible for the programme will be the dean of the faculty
or the head of department.
His responsibilities will include forming the curriculum
committee:

To design the curriculum

To review the curriculum

To monitor the delivery of the programme so as to ensure that it follows the
designed curriculum
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.4.4
Describe the review and evaluation process for the programme and the utilisation
of the results.
The review and the evaluation process will be done by the curriculum committee that
will evaluate the programme by gathering the feedbacks from various stakeholders.
The result of the review and evaluation process will be used to re-develop or further
improve the programme in term of its curriculum, delivery of the curriculum and the
adequacy of the resources.
2.4.5
Show
how
the
learning
environment
nurtures
scholarly
and
creative
achievements.
Since the potential student will be monitored by this/her lecturers and advised by his/her
academic advisor, the potential student is expected to utilise the expertise and the
experiences of the lecturers, advisors, and counsellors. They are expected to have
constant and continuous consultations.
This process will enable the academic
community to nurture the scholarly environment for the student.
Information on Enhanced Standards
2.4.6
Describe the department’s initiative to encourage innovations to teachinglearning.
The university with its Academic Quality assurance Department will organize and
conduct courses and training programmes focusing on teaching and learning
effectiveness, and seeks teaching evaluation by students as well as laboratory services
evaluation. Furthermore, the university will encourage R&D in teaching and learning
under the faculty of education.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.5.1
Show how the department engages external expertise in the review and evaluation
of the programme.
The department will seek the opinion and advise of the experts in the area of concern
within the department or from outside the department. This will be done by engaging
them through formal or informal discussions such as brain-storming sessions and
meetings. The feedbacks gathered through the discussions and meetings will be used
wherever relevant in the process of reviewing and evaluating the programme.
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CURRICULUM DESIGN AND DELIVERY MEDIU
2.5
Linkages with External Stakeholders
Information on Benchmarked Standards
2.5.2
Describe the links that exist between the department and its external
stakeholders for the purpose of curriculum improvement.
The links will be through the brain-storming sessions and meetings to be organised
from time to time between the departments and external stakeholders.
Information on Enhanced Standards
2.5.3
State the existing mechanism to obtain and utilise feedback from employers for
the improvement of the curriculum, training and workplace exposure.
Since the HEP is newly established with no student that who has completed his/her
study, as such we have yet to get any feedback from employers for the improvement
of the curriculum, training and workplace exposure. However, we have in plan to do
tracer study and survey of employers opinion of our graduates.
2.5.4
What opportunities are available to students to have linkages with external
stakeholders?
In the process of doing their modules’ projects, final project, and internship, the
students will be linked with the external stakeholders through the process of data
collection, consultations with the relevant expertise and authorities.
Bachelor of Computer Sciences (Hons) in Computer Networking
Amendment made on 8 October 2010
Page 186
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