To understand how your lifestyle choices impact on your work What

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What is the purpose of this task?

To understand how your lifestyle choices impact on your work

What will you learn from this task?

To understand the effect of legal and illegal substances on the body

To understand the need to regulate diet and health to be effective at work

To understand the need for self-management to protect yourself and others at work

You will need

Healthy plate worksheet

Food quiz and answers

Healthy body diagram

Workplace worksheet

Task: Healthy Eating

In groups using the healthy plate worksheet, match the food groups to their place on the plate. The plate shows the proportion of different foods that make up a healthy diet

Compare your answers with the healthy plate answer sheet

Task: Food Quiz

Do the food quiz: Examine some of the common terms relating to food and health

Compare your answers with the answer sheet

FOOD QUIZ

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What does the term BMI stand for?

What does “low fat” mean on product packaging?

What is the daily recommended limit for salt intake?

Why does eating chocolate make you feel positive?

What is a calorie?

What effect does refined sugar have on your body?

Why does your body need green vegetables?

Why does your body need fat?

What is a good fat?

What is a bad fat?

Name a good source of protein if you are a vegetarian?

Eggs are a good source of which vitamin?

What is left in wholemeal flour and taken out in refined flour?

What is the daily recommended calorie intake for a 15 year old?

Why do you need to eat carbohydrates?

How can you encourage your body to burn up more calories?

How much water should you try to drink in a day?

What is the daily recommended amount of fruit and vegetables?

What is tofu?

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FOOD QUIZ: ANSWERS

Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat based on height and weight.

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Foods labelled “low fat” should have less than 3g per 100g of fat – they can still be very high in sugar and salt. The word “light” on foods has no definition in law

Adults should eat no more than 6g of salt per day (around one teaspoon)

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Increased risk of heart disease and strokes

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Chocolate contains more than 500 natural chemical compounds, some of which have been categorized as mood-elevating and pleasure-inducing, including Theobromine, caffeine and Phenylethylamine

It is a unit of energy, often used to indicate the energy potential in foods

It is absorbed quickly into the bloodstream to give you energy but also stimulates the production of insulin. Excessive consumption can contribute to heart disease and diabetes.

They are an excellent source of minerals and vitamins including Iron, Potassium and Vitamin C

Yes, some fats are good sources of Vitamins A and D, and good for joint health

Unsaturated fats like olive oil and fish oil

Saturated fats which are solid at room temperature like lard and margarine

Pulses like beans and peas, tofu, eggs, nuts

B and D

The husk of the wheat germ which contains fibre and is a good source of B vitamins

About 2000 for a woman and 2500 for a man

They are a good source of energy, choose the unrefined types like wholemeal and brown rice

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Take more exercise. The amount you burn depends on your weight, most people will burn around 500 calories in an hour of high impact aerobics and 200 in an hour’s relaxed walk

It varies depending on your size but the Department of Health recommend 1.2 litres or 6-8 glasses a day

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Around a third of your total intake of food should be fruits and vegetables

Task: Healthy Body

Complete the healthy body diagram. Match the symptoms and conditions on the diagram.

Compare your answers to the answer sheet

All the symptoms are linked to things you consume, or a diet related condition that needs to be managed.

HEALTHY BODY: ANSWERS

1. Smoking

1. Type 2 Diabetes

1. Smoking Cannabis

1. Short term alcohol abuse

1. Overdose of paracetamol

1. High fat / high sugar diet

1. Eating disorder

1. Long term alcohol abuse

1. Side effects of antidepressants

Skin and teeth discolouration, coughing, anxiety, smelling of tobacco, thrombosis

Excessive thirst, frequent urination, extreme tiredness, weight loss and muscle wasting (loss of muscle bulk), fainting

Distorted perceptions, impaired coordination, difficulty with thinking and problem solving, and problems with learning and memory

Splitting headaches, sickness, dizziness, dehydration

Sickness, dizziness, loss of appetite, chills, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes)

Excess weight, poor skin condition, bloating, constipation, tiredness, anxiety

Secret eating, eating to excess, purging, not eating for long periods or excessive exercise

Liver damage, kidney damage, psychosis, depression, suicidal tendencies

Sickness, blurred vision, diarrhoea or constipation, dizziness, dry mouth, feeling agitated or shaky, not sleeping well (insomnia) or, alternatively, feeling very sleepy

Task: Lifestyle and work

Now consider the effects of your lifestyle choices on yourself and others at work.

List as many examples as you can of how your behaviour could put yourself and others at risk at work. Use the

Workplace worksheet to help you.

Review

Did you learn anything new from this exercise?

Are all legal substances safe?

How could your lack of self-management affect others at work?

Extension

If you want to spend longer on this topic…..

Spend a week tracking your food intake and compare your average diet to the healthy eating plate.

Plan an exercise campaign for yourself; include at least one new activity you have never tried before.

Cook a meal using at least one new food you have never tried before.

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