HLDONOW13a

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Life Science: June 11, 2014 – 10 days

Home Learning:

1. LAST ISN CHECK – MONDAY JUNE 16 th

– 25 points

2. Mars Google presentation DUE: MONDAY JUNE 16 th

3. Plotting Paths of Spacecraft WS DUE: THUR. JUNE 12 th

– 5 points

4. Objectives for Mars Mission pkt. DUE: FRIDAY JUNE 13 th

– 5 points

DO NOW:

1. Take out Mars: Where to Land? Packet.

Objective:

1. To help students recognize that food is required for energy and building cellular materials. Organisms in an ecosystem have different ways of obtaining food, and some organisms obtain their food directly from other organisms.

Activities:

1. Mars Landing activity

Table of Contents

Name of Assignment

Interest Survey – R1

Pre-Test – R2

Metric System WS (2) – R3

Safety Contract & Sponge Bob WS – R4

STEM Project WS – R5

STEM design drawings & Problem L1-L4

What is Life Science? – R6

Life Science example paragraph L-5

Read Pgs. 9-15, Answer Q’s #1-6 pg.15 L-6

Date

9/4

9/5

9/6

9/9

9/9

9/9

9/11

9/11

9/11

Section 1.1 Vocab “Four Square” L-7&8

Tallest Tower/Airplane “Reflection”Q’s L-9

Characteristics of Living Things List L-10

Chara. Of Living Things Handout R-11

Marty the Martian R-7

9/11

9/13

9/16

9/16

9/16

Table of Contents

Name of Assignment

List of Needs of Living Things L-11

Needs of Living Things handout R-12

Ecosystems PBL Task Statement R-8

Week 1 Activity List R-9

Ecosystems Chart (textbook) R-10

Ecosystems Vocab. Slip R-13

Week #1 Vocab. L-12&13

(use pg. r50 &r51 of textbook for vocab. Strategies)

Q’s #1-5 pg. 477 L-14

Pg. 515 Q’s #1,2,4&5 L-15

Date

9/17

9/17

9/18

9/19

9/19

9/19

9/20

9/23

9/24

“Oh Deer” Q’s WS R-14

“Oh Deer” Data & Graph L-16

Ecosystems Chart (web based) R-15

Pond Lab Investigation Chart L-17

9/20

9/20

9/24

9/24

Table of Contents

Name of Assignment

Ecology Pre-Test (skip #12 & 13) L-18

Date

9/26

Charac. & Needs PPT WS R-16

Quiz Review Activities List 1 R-17

Levels of Organization “Cut & paste” R-18

Activity List Week 2 R-19

Feeding Relationships Notes R-20

Pg. 492 Q’s #2,3 & 5. L-19

Memory Cards Vocab. Column #4 L-20

9/26

9/26

9/26

10/2

10/2

10/2

10/3

Factors Research Chart R-21

Note Taking Toppers L-21

Chapter 14 RSG pkt. R-22

Chapter 15 RSG R-23

Feeding Relationships WS R-24

10/7

10/7

10/4

9/30

10/9

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Owl Pellet Student WS R-25 10/9

Species Characteristics Chart R-26

Ecology vocab. #2 & #3 . L22 & 23

10/10

10/11

Symbiotic Relationships cut&paste R-27

Pg. 525 #1-6 L-24

Threats Chart R-28

Week #2 “Food Chains & webs” Quiz Rev.

R-29

Week #3 Activity List R-30

10/11

10/15

10/16

10/17

10/17

Symbiotic Relationships Class Notes R-31

Feeding Relationships Study Guide with food web WS R-32

Brain Exercise Symbiotic Relationships L-25

Ecology Test Review pkt . R-33

Pg. 503 Q’s 1-8, 11-13 & 15 L-26

10/17

10/18

10/18

10/22

10/22

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Pg. 503 Q’s 1-8, 11-13 & 15 L-26 10/22

Google Slide Show Directions L-27

Google Slide Show Rubric L-28

10/24

10/24

Pg. 202 “Science Notebook” L-31

ES Activity List week #1 R-34

Biodiversity Webquest R-35

ES Patient Chart (Biodiversity 911) R-36

10/31

11/1

11/1

11/4

7.1 RSG R-37 11/4

ES vocabulary & Brain Exercise R-38

Endangered Species Project Brief L-32

Biodiversity Class Notes L-33

Pg. 569 #3 & 4. L-34

7.2 RSG L-35

11/4

11/5

11/5

11/6

11/6

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Dichotomous Key WS L-36 11/6

Alien Dichotomous Key WS L-37

Pg. 209 Q’s #1-5 L-38

11/6

11/14

Pg. 218 Q’s #1-4 L-39

Biodiversity & Classification Quiz Review

R-39

Endangered Species Vocab. Crossword

R-40

11/14

11/14

11/14

Wolf Questions L40 & L41

Q’s #5-14 pg. 231. L-42

Section 6.2 RSG R-41

Section 6.3 RSG R-42

Q’s #1-4 pg. 175 L-43

LOT Study Guide R-43

Blue - Footed Booby Notes R-44

11/15

11/15

11/20

11/20

12/2

12/2

12/2

Name of Assignment

LOT Activity List R-45

Table of Contents

Date

12/3

Blue-Footed Booby Brain Exercise R-46

6.1 RSG R-47

12/3

12/3

Fossilization Notes L-44 & 45

LOT Vocabulary L46 & L47

Virtual Fossil Hunt R-48

12/3

12/3

12/4

History of Life Timeline R-49

6.1 RKC R-50

LOT Key Concepts WS R-51

Evolution Notes R-52

Charles Darwin Brain POP R-53

Adaptations Note Sheet L-48

Darwin & Lamark WS L-49

12/5

12/5

12/6

12/6

12/6

12/9

12/9

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Evidence of Evolution Notes L-50 12/12

3 types of Evidence Notes L-51

6.1 Quiz Review L-52

12/12

12/12

6.2 & 6.3 Fill in the Blank L-53

Pg. 185 #1-5 L-54

Pg. 194 #1-5 L-55

12/12

12/12

12/16

Peppered Moth Lab & Data R-54

Genetics Website L-56

Pg. 141 #1-6 L-57

5.1 RSG R-55

Genetic Screening Intro. R-56

Genetic Disorders Activity List R-57

Genetic Testing Article Q’s L-58

12/16

1/2

1/3

1/6

1/6

1/6

1/6

Name of Assignment

DNA’s Secret Code R-58

Table of Contents

Date

1/7

Genetic Vocab. L-59

Learn Genetics Website R-59

1/7

1/10

Investigation 13 R-60

Pg. 148 #1-6 L-60

DNA, RNA & Proteins Packet R-61

1/13

1/13

1/14

5.2 Challenge & Extension R-62

5.2 RSG R-63

Section 4.1 Vocab. Word triangles L-61

Genetic Terminology Class Notes R-64

4.1 Review pkt. R-65

Pg. 107 #1-6 L-62

Genetic Terminology HW R-66

1/16

1/16

2/11

2/11

2/13

2/24

2/24

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Section 4.2 Vocab. Flash Cards L-63

Punnett Square Practice. L-64

Snowman pkt. L-65

2/25

2/25

2/25

BOTH Sponge Bob WS L-66

Pg. 115 #1-5 L-67

Section 4.2 Review pkt. R-67

2/26

2/26

3/3

Monohybrid Crosses pkt. R-68

Chap. 4 TEST practice L-68

Section 4.3 vocab. Flashcards L-69

Mitosis Diagram R-69

Meiosis Diagram R-70

Review WS 6.2 R-71

Pg. 122 #1,2, 4&6 L-70

3/3

3/3

3/4

3/5

3/5

3/5

3/6

Name of Assignment

Modeling Meiosis L-71

Table of Contents

Date

3/10

Section 4.3 RSG pkt. R-72

Interpreting Visuals WS L-72

3/10

3/11

Pg. 125-127 L-73

Plant & Animal Cell Diagrams R-73

Parts of a Cell Chart R-74

3/13

3/14

3/17

Compound Microscope Notes R-75

Pg. 24 #1-6 L-74

Compound Microscope Diagram R-76

Microscope Brain Exercise L-75

1.2 RSG pkt. R-77

Cell s Brain Exercise L-76

3/19

3/19

3/19

3/19

3/20

3/20

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Microscope Crossword R-78 3/21

Cell Parts Review L-77

Eucaryotic Cell Notes R-79

3/21

3/21

A Busy Factory L-78

Microscope Parts Review R-80

Cytopolis L-79

3/21

3/24

3/29

Section 2.2 Vocab (word triangles) L-80

RSG 2.2 R-81

2.2 Challenge & Extension R-82

Chloroplast & Mitochondria Diagrams L-81

Photo. & Respiration Notes L-82

Photo. & Respiration Diagram L-83

Pg. 54 #1-6 L-84

3/25

3/26

3/26

3/26

3/27

3/27

3/27

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Photo. & Resp. Chart L-85 3/28

Section 2.1 Vocab. L-86

Essential Organic Comp. Chart R-83

3/31

4/1

Organic Compounds Notes L-87

2.1 RSG R-84

2.1 RKC R-85

4/1

4/2

4/2

Pg. 45 #1-6 L-88

Greenhouse Research & Sketchup WS R-86

Section 11.1 Pkt. R-87

Quick Write on plants L-89

Quick Write stomata L-90

Root Notes L-91

Pg. 363 #1-6 L-92

4/4

4/7

4/9

4/10

4/11

4/21

4/21

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

Quick Write Vascular Tissue R-88 4/22

Shoot System Notes R-89

Section 11.3 (pg. 370) word triangles R-90

4/22

5/2

Pg. 375 # 1-6 R-91

Seed vs. Spore Venn Diagram R-92

EXPO Data Table L-93

5/2

5/5

5/7

Control Data Table L-94

11.3 RSG R-93

Formal Lab Report WS R-94

11.3 RKC & Practice QUIZ L-95

11.4 RSG R-94

14.2 RSG R-95

Seed & Flower Dissection L-96

5/8

5/8

5/9

5/12

5/15

5/20

5/20

Table of Contents

Date Name of Assignment

14.2 RSG pkt. R-96

Plant Test Study Guide L-97

Fruit Lab R-97

5/20

5/20

5/21

Pg. 484 # 1-6 L-98

Biosphere 2 Intro. R-98

5/23

5/29

Mars Activity 1 – Concept Intro. L-99

Mars Activity 2 – Planning R-99

Body Systems pkt. L-100

Microgravity 10 Q’s R-100

Where to land on Mars pkt. L-101

Plotting Earth to Mars WS R-101

Mission Objectives pkt. L-102

6/2

6/3

6/5

6/6

6/6

6/9

6/10

Name of Assignment

14.2

Plant

Fruit

Pg.

Biosphere

Mars

Mars

Body

Microgravity

Where to

Plotting

Objectives

Table of Contents

Date

6/2

6/3

6/5

6/6

6/6

6/9

6/10

5/20

5/21

5/23

5/29

Seed & Flower Dissection

(L-96)

Draw and label the 3 parts of a seed: Seed coat, Embryo & stored nutrients ( pg. 371)

Flower intro Q’s (pg. 382)

1,a,b,c,d & 7

Flower Conclusion Q’s

1a, b, c & 2

Date

EXPO Data Table

L-93

Length of longest stem(cm)

TOTAL # of leaves in cup

Date

EXPO Data Table Control

L-94

Length of longest stem(cm)

TOTAL # of leaves in cup

Quick Write Vascular Tissue

(R-88)

5 lines

Skip Lines

How are the root system and the shoot system connected by vascular tissue?

(HINT) What are the two types of vascular tissue?

(HINT)What materials travel up from the roots and down from the leaves?

Answer

The root system and shoot system are connected by xylem and phloem. Xylem carries water & nutrients up to the leaves where the water can be used for photosynthesis. The phloem brings glucose, made during photosynthesis, back down to the stems & roots for storage.

Practice Quiz

1. Which of the following is NOT part of the shoot system.

A.

leaves B. flowers C. stems D. roots

2. The main function of leaves is to_______________________.

A. open & close stomata B. absorb oxygen C. release water

D. perform photosynthesis

3. What part of the leaf opens and closes for gas exchange?

A. stomata B. chloroplast C. cell membrane D. cell wall

4. The process by which plants lose water into the atmosphere is____________________.

A. photosynthesis B. respiration C. transpiration D. evaporation

Prac. Quiz Cont.

9) A carrot is an example of a

_________________________ root.

10) ______________________ are soft, green & flexible.

11) Roots anchor the plant, absorb water and nutrients, and __________________ materials.

12) The main function of _________________________ is to perform photosynthesis.

Shoot System Notes

(R-89)

I. Parts of the Shoot System a. Stems b. Leaves c.

Flowers

II. Functions of Stems a. Support b. Hold up leaves c. Transport: water, minerals, & glucose.

d. Storage

Shoot System cont.

III. Types of Stems a. Herbaceous: Soft, green & flexible b. Woody: Rigid & strong

IV. Leaves

A. Functions: 1)Capture light 2) Make glucose through photosynthesis 3) Exchange gasses (CO2 & O2)

V. Flowers:

A. Reproductive organs of a plant

B. Produce fruits with seeds that contain the embryo

Root System Notes

I. Root Functions a. Support & Anchor the plant b. Absorb water & minerals c. Store glucose

II. Root Structure a. Epidermis – outer layer b. Cambium – cells divide to make new xylem & phloem c.

Root hairs – absorb water & minerals

Root System cont.

III – Root Types a. Fibrous – branch out in all directions ex. Grass,onion b. Taproot – grows straight down and deep.

Stores glucose. Ex. Carrot c. Aboveground – found mostly in rainforests and absorb water & nutrients from the air

Quick Write - Stomata

5 lines

Skip Lines

Use your textbook pg. 360 to describe a

STOMATA and then explain how they are involved in photosynthesis & respiration.

(be sure to use CO2, O2 & water)

Answer - Stomata

Stomata are tiny openings on the bottom of leaves. They are used to control gas exchange.

During photosynthesis CO2 comes in through the stomata and is used with water to create glucose and O2. The O2 then travels out of the stomata into the air. When the plant respires the exact opposite gas exchange occurs.

While the stomata are open for gas exchange water vapor also escapes.

Plants Quick Write

L-89

5 lines

Skip Lines

What 3 things do plants need for photosynthesis? How do plants get those 3 things into their cells?

(use xylem, phloem, transpiration, shoot system, root system)

Answer

Plants need: CO2, water & light energy. They use the root system to absorb water and then move that water up to the leaves using xylem . The leaves absorb CO2 through their stomata and then use the light energy with the water to create glucose & O2. Leaves and stems are major parts of the shoot system . The O2 is release through the leaves and the glucose travels to the stems and roots through phloem . Most water a plant absorbs is lost through its leaves by transpiration .

Organic Compounds Notes

(L-87)

What are Organic Compounds?

They MUST contain the element CARBON (C)

They must be found in living things

They provide all the energy, structure and information for cells.

The 4 major Organic Compounds:

1. Carbohydrates

2. Lipids(fats,oils & waxes)

3. Proteins

4. Nucleic Acids (DNA & RNA)

OC Notes (cont.)

Carbohydrates

The bodies main ENERGY source

There are two types: Simple & Complex

Simple Carbs.: sugars

Complex Carbs.: Starches – Long chains of sugars linked together.

High Carb foods: bread, cereal, rice, pasta, potatoes and fruits.

OC notes cont.

Lipids-(energy STORAGE) are used for energy when carbohydrates are not available.

Fats & Oils

Foods: Butter, olive oil, animal fats.

Proteins – Used to build & repair cell structures.

Every living part of your body contains protein ex.

Blood, muscle, brain tissue.

Foods: fish, beef, soy, nuts, beans

OC Cont.

Nucleic Acids – information Molecule. Provide all the information for a cell to function.

Ex. DNA & RNA

Reactants

Products

Performed by

Organelle

Photo. Vs. Resp.

(L-85)

Photosynthesis Respiration

CO2, H20, & light

Glucose, Oxygen

Plants

Chloroplast

Glucose, O2

Carbon Dioxide, Water &

Energy

Plants & Animals

Mitochondria

Exit Question

What is the ratio of chromosomes from parent to the two (2) daughter cells in MITOSIS?

What is the ratio of chromosomes from parent to the four (4) daughter cells in MEIOSIS?

DNA to Protein Cards

Each table will be given 8 Index Cards.

On the BLANK side of each card write one of the following terms: DNA, RNA, Gene, Transcription,

Translation, Amino Acid, Protein & Trait.

On the LINED side write a brief description of each word and a PICTURE.

Put all the cards in the middle of the table on mix them up.

As a team place them in the correct order.

1. Characteristic

2. Decrease

3. Herbivore

4. Response

5. Web

6. Commensalism

7. Sun

8. C

9. A

10. D

11. B

12. X

Ecology Pre-Test answers

13. X

14. D

15. C

16. A

17. B

18. B

19. B

20. A

21. Oak

 cardinal

Fox

Eagle

22. Producer,primary cons., secondary cons., tertiary cons.

Need

FOOD

WATER

GAS EXCHANGE

LIVING SPACE

TEMPERATURE

Pond Lab Investigation

Organism

1. Turtle

2. Sparrow

1. Algae

2. Pine Tree

1. Turtle

2. Lilly

1. Spider

2. Duck weed

1. Fish

Explanation

Turtles eat algae

Sparrows eat insects & seeds

Algae absorb water from pond

Roots absorb water from soil

Turtles need oxygen from air

Absorb CO2 from air

Spider needs to weave a web

Anchors its roots to the bottom

Hibernate in the winter

2. Grass Dies in the winter

Reflection Questions

1. What was the major design FLAW (problem) with your tower / plane?

2. What was the BEST feature of the winning tower / plane?

3. What ONE change would you make to your tower / plane?

Test review

Decide whether each statement is OSMOSIS or DIFFUSION.

Smelling perfume

Water being absorbed by a sponge

Carrot shriveling up after being in salt water

Slug being killed by salt

Quiz Review Leaves

1. Capture sunlight, perform photosynthesis, exchange gasses.

2. CO2, light, & water

3. O2 & glucose

4. Chloroplast

5. Mitochondria

6. Controls O2, CO2 & water vapor.

Quiz Review Stems

1. Part of the cell cycle when the nucleus divides

2. Stems & Leaves

3. Transport materials (xylem&phloem), support leaves, performs mitosis & stores glucose.

4. Roots, stems, leaves

5. Herbaceous – cactus woody – oak tree

6. Move water & nutrients UP from the ROOTS to the LEAVES.

Quiz Review Roots

1. Anchor, absorb, store food

2. Roots

3. Taproot – beet, carrot branching – scallion

4. Branches out in all directions.

5. Diffusion – movement of a substance form high to low concentration.

Osmosis – movement of WATER from high to low concentration.

Diffusion Observations

Set up the left hand side of your ISN to make 3 observations of your beaker at 30 sec. intervals:

Time: Observations:

30 sec.

1 min.

1 min. 30 sec.

Complete a type II writing:

5 lines, skip lines

– Explain your observations using the terms: diffusion, water molecules, food dye molecules, high concentration, & low concentration

Diffusion Answer

When the food dye molecules were added to the beaker the food dye molecules move from high conc ., the drop, to low conc ., the beaker.

This movement of molecules from high to low represents diffusion . The water molecules also moving from high conc., the beaker, to are low conc., the drop. That is why we observed swirling in the beaker.

Food Journal

Breakfast:

Bagel– Carbs

Cream Cheese – fats & protein

Cake – Carbs

Banana - Carbs

Lunch:

Pork Chop – protein & fat

Pasta– Carbs

Dinner

Pasta - Carbs

Meatballs – Protein & Fat

Type II

6 lines

SKIP LINES

LEFT SIDE of your ISN

How are PHOTOSYNTHESIS & RESPIRATION similar? How are they different?

Be sure to use the following words: energy, CO

2, water, oxygen, & glucose

Type II Answer

They are opposite, but equal reactions because photosynthesis uses Energy, carbon dioxide & water to produce glucose & oxygen , while respiration uses glucose & oxygen to produce Energy, water & carbon dioxide.

Date

4/14

4/16

4/17

4/18

4/19

Data (Plant growth in cm)

Control

0

1.4 cm

2 cm

2.2

2.8 cm

Variable

0

1 cm

2 cm

2 cm

1.4 cm

Genetic Disorders

1. Get a list of Genetic Disorders pkt. From the overhead. DO NOT WRITE IN THE PKT.!

2. Go through the packet and pick 4 different disorders you may be interested in researching.

3. Use the websites listed and write down 3 research facts for each disorder on THE LEFT

SIDE of your ISN.

4. Choose 1 Disorder and tell Mr. Ross your choice.

5. Return the packet to the overhead.

Conclusion

State whether it was supported or not.

Summarize data: What is the difference in height between first day and last day

Explanation of results. Did your experiment effect the roots, shoots (xylem or phloem) or leaves (photosynthesis).

Were you able to control the ALL variables?

What did you learn?

If I did this experiment over I would….

Implications for real life? Could your experiment help farmers grow more food? Could you use your substance as a natural weed killer? Could growing more plants help control global climate change?

Hypothesis

If a pinch of grass seeds are placed into a 9oz plastic cup filled with 7oz of potting soil with 2 tablespoons (10 ml) of a solution of 200mg caffeine tablet & 500ml of water every 3 rd day for two weeks; then the plant will not grow.

Independent

Caffeine

Music

Vinegar (acid)

Variables

Dependent

Grass growth

Controlled

Soil

Water

Air

Light

Seeds

Temperature

Cup size

Materials

9oz plastic cup X 2

3.63 kg bag of potting soil

Grass seeds

500 ml of water

500 ml Beaker

Metric ruler

100ml Graduated Cylinder

Grow Racks

Scissors

Procedure

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Gather materials

Label each cup with name and period using sharpie

Fill 9 oz cup with 7oz of soil

Add pinch of millet seeds

Add 10 ml of water

6.

7.

8.

Place on grow racks in back of room 136

Observe seeds for one week adding 10 ml of water every 3rd day.

Trim plants across the top of the cup.

9.

Take plants home.

10. Begin adding solution to cup A on April 12th

11. Place both cups in exact same location

12. Add 10 ml of 500ml solution of 200mg caffeine tablet and water to cup a every

3rd day for 2 weeks

13. Add 10 ml of water to cup B every 3rd day for two weeks.

14. Record data every day for 2 weeks

Question

How does adding 10 ml of a 500ml solution of a 200mg caffeine capsule with 500ml of water every 3rd day for 2 weeks affect the growth of grass plants?

Scenario

A laptop was taken from room 136. Mr. Ilaria sees the crime on the video camera and chases the robber. The robber is wearing a ski mask. As Mr. Ilaria chases the robber down the street he throws the laptop into the bushes and tears off his mask. The mask is later found in a garbage can by the train station . What types of evidence can Mr. Ilaria use to solve the crime? Please list 3

DNA Fingerprint Answers

1. Describe the process of DNA fingerprinting

.

Basically the DNA must extracted from the cells and then an x-ray picture is taken. The bands in the x-ray show the chemicals of DNA.

2. In what ways is it like actual fingerprinting and in what ways is it different?

-

Actual fingerprints and DNA fingerprints can both be used to place a person at the scene of the crime. However, DNA fingerprints are chemical based while actual fingerprints are physical.

3. How conclusive is the evidence of DNA fingerprinting?

- It is completely conclusive if the sample has not been contaminated.

4. Where is there possibility for error?

- Errors can be made when the sample are collected .

Chap. 4 Practice TEST

1.

A. 12

A diploid cell of a chimpanzee contains 48 chromosomes. How many chromosomes are in a gamete cell of a chimpanzee?

B. 24 C. 48 D.96

2.

A. 2

B. 3

C. 4

D. 6

How many gametes are formed at the end of Meiosis?

3. How many divisions occur in meiosis?

A. 1

B. 2

C. 3

D. 4

Chap. 4 Review (cont.)

4. ____________ is used to determine the probability of a genetic

cross.

5. ____________ used pea plants to help develop patterns of heredity.

6. Relates to the chance that an event will occur. Always written as a

percent.

7. The various forms of the same gene are called

___________________.

8. Eggs and sperm are examples of ______________________.

9.

Which letter (A,B, or C) represents a body cell and which letter represents gametes?

10. How many chromosomes are there in the 2n cells?___________ and how many chromosomes are in the 1n cells?___________

11. What would “C” be called if this were a male?_____________. How about if this were a female?________________

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

1.

2.

3.

B. 24

C. 4

B. 2

Punnett Square

Mendel

Probability

Alleles

Gametes

9.

A, C

10. 4, 2

11. Sperm, eggs

Answer Key

Table of Contents (cont.)2

Name of Assignment

Chap. 4 TEST *Practice* (RIGHT)

Genetic Worksheet (RIGHT)

Mitosis Drawing (RIGHT)

Section 3.1 & 3.2 packet (RIGHT)

Q’s #1-3 pg. 85 (LEFT)

Meiosis Drawing (RIGHT)

Mitosis/Meiosis side by side (RIGHT)

Model of Meiosis Lab (RIGHT)

Section 4.3 vocab. “word triangles” (LEFT)

Review WS 6.2 (RIGHT)

Section 4.3 RSG pkt. (RIGHT)

Mitosis vs. Meiosis video Q’s (LEFT)

Pg. 125 #7-19 (LEFT)

Date

1/23

1/24

1/29

1/31

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/4

2/5

2/5

2/6

2/6

2/6

Table of Contents (cont.)3

Name of Assignment

Section 4.1 & 4.2 practice quiz (RIGHT)

Pg. 122 #1-6 (LEFT)

4.3 Word Triangles (LEFT)

DNA Fingerprinting Q’s (LEFT)

Genetics webquest (RIGHT)

Date

2/6

2/7

2/8

2/13

2/14

Pg. 85 #1-3

1. Two main parts are interphase division.

and cell

2. Just before mitosis begins a cell will be twice its normal size and have two complete sets of

DNA.

3. A daughter cell is IDENTICAL cell to the parent

Flower Breeding

r

R

RR (Red)

Rr (Red) r r

R

Rr (Red)

Rr (Red)

R

Rr (Red)

Rr (Red) r

Rr (Red)

rr (White)

R

Parent

Generation

First

Generation

Second

Generation

4.1 &4.2 Review

1. A gene is a unit of?

Heredity, adaptation or variation

2. XY chromosomes would result in a?

girl or boy

3. This allele would always be expressed

Recessive, dominant, pure bred or hybrid

4. Relates to the chance of something happening. Always written as percent.

Probability, ratio or possibility

4.1 & 4.2 Review

5. If a hybrid mom for brown eyes and a hybrid dad for brown eyes have a child, what is the probability they will have a blue eyed child?

Draw a punnett Square

6. If Tall (T) is dominant over (t) short, what would be the result of breeding a pure bred tall with a pure bred short?

Heredity Type II

LEFT HAND SIDE

Type II writing

5 lines

Skip Lines

What is the difference between GENOTYPE and

PHENOTYPE?

(provide and example of each!)

Heredity Type II answer

The difference between genotype and phenotype is that a genotype represents certain genes (alleles) that are inside cells.

They CANNOT be seen. An example would be using -Bbfor eye color. A phenotype is the characteristic that is actually seen in the organism. An example would be a person’s brown eyes.

Flip Out pg. 2

1)If you flipped a coin 20 times how many heads would you get?__________

How many tails?_________

What % heads________

What % tails_______

2)Now test your prediction and toss the coin 20 times. Use tick marks to record how many heads & tails

Heads_______________________

Tails_________________________

3)Were your predictions correct?

4)Now tally the results for the entire class and see if the class results are closer to your prediction. Why or why not were the classes results better?

Hypothesis

A – If dominant traits are always expressed

(seen) when present; then they will be MORE common in the class data

B -If dominant traits are always expressed

(seen) when present; then they will be LESS common in the class data

l k j i

E

F g h

A

B

C

D

Trait 1 Number

straight

Tongue Rolling dimples

Right handed freckles

Curly hair

Cleft chin widows

Left over right

Red & green male

18

7

11

4

20

21

4

6

9

22

10

Trait 2 Number

hitchhikers

No roll

No dimples

Left handed

No freckles

Straight hair smooth

No widows

Right over left

Color blind female

4

15

11

18

2

1

18

16

13

0

12

Gregor Mendel Web research

Use the Library/Media center web page ONLY (no google) to answer the following questions .

Who:

What:

Why:

Where:

When:

Gregor Mendel

Who: Austrian Monk/priest (religious person)/ teacher who studied plants and mathematics.

What: Conducted experiments with pea plants and discovered patterns of inheritance. He found that “traits” or “factors” are passed from parents to offspring and factors can “dominate” or “cover” other factors.

Why: He went to university to study science and math for two years before he went back to the monastery. Was very interested in plants.

Where: Austria

When: mid 1800’s

Pg. 218 # 1-4

1. Uses genus & species of an organism.

2. Kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species.

3. Each question only has 2 choices. Eventually you get to one answer.

4. He developed a system for both naming and classifying organims.

7.2 Need to Know

1. Linnaeus developed the modern system of taxonomy.

2. Binomial Nomenclature uses the genus and then the species. (Ex. Homo Sapien)

3. The level of Kingdom organisms.

contains the most

4. Linnaeus mostly used physical evidence classify organisms.

to

7.1 Need to Know

1. Taxonomy is the science of naming organisms.

2. Classification is a process of organizing living things into groups.

3. The invention of Microscopes revolutionized science.

in the 1600

4. Physical & Genetic evidence are the two major types used by taxonomists.

5. Taxonomists compare DNA of two organisms to see how closely they are related.

Type II

How are taxonomy & classification SIMILAR and how are they DIFFERENT?

4 lines skip lines

Taxonomy Type II

Taxonomy and classification are similar because they both deal with organizing living things. Taxonomy is the science of NAMING living things while classification is the process of ORGANIZING living things

Kingdom

Phylum

Class

Order

Family

Genus

Species

7 Levels of Taxonomy

Types of Evidence

Main Idea: Scientists use

Detail: Fossil Evidence

Show how species evolved different evidence to

Detail: Physical Evidence

Traits help tell species apart classify organisms

Detail: Genetic Evidence

DNA supports physical evidence

Extinct

Endangered

Classification

Adaptation

ES Vocab

D: permanent disappearance of a species

S: The dinosaurs are extinct.

D: In danger of becoming extinct

S: The elephant is an endangered species

D: The systematic grouping of different types of organisms by their shared characteristics.

S: Humans can be classified as mammals.

D:A characteristic, a behavior, or any inherited trait that makes a species able to survive and reproduce in a particular environment.

S: Our thumb is an example of an adaptation

Poaching

Threatened

Range

Conservation

ES Vocab. (cont.)

D: The illegal hunting of an animal.

S: Poachers kill elephants for their tusks.

D: In danger of becoming endangered.

S: While not yet endangered, polar bear population are decreasing making them threatened.

D: The geographical location that an organism can be found.

S: The range of the Gila Monster is the south western United States and northern

Mexico.

D: The act of trying to preserve or protect a particular ecosystem or organism.

S:The conservation efforts of the US government helped bring the Bald Eagle back from being endangered.

Endangered Species List

Tropical Forest:

Tundra:

Taiga:

Grasslands:

Aquatic:

Temperate Forest:

Desert:

Section 6.3 Practice Quiz

1. Small unused back legs of a whale are an example of?

2. Similar Structures are an example of what type of evidence?

3. What is the developing form of a baby called?

4. What is the definition of “ANCESTOR”

6.2 Practice Quiz

1. What was the name of Darwin’s ship?

2. No two people have the exact same hair color. This is an example of ______________ which is the natural differences between members of the same species.

3. What TWO things have to happen for a new species to occur

4. Who suggested that giraffes got long necks by stretching them for leaves?

Word Triangles

Use word triangles to define (pg. 188):

ANCESTOR

VESTGIAL ORGAN

GENE

ANCESTOR

Picture of fossil bone

Humans & primates share a common ancestor

An earlier form of an organism from which later forms develop

Type II – 4 parts of Natural Selection

Type II writing

6 Lines

Skip Lines

What are the parts of Natural Selection and describe each part? (pg. 182)

5 lines

Skip Lines

Type II - Evidence

What are the three (3) types of EVIDENCE for

EVOLUTION and give an example of each (use pg. 189)

Type II – Evidence for Evolution

The three types of EVIDENCE for EVOLUTION are: Fossil, Biological & Genetic . An example of fossil evidence are the bone imprints of ancient ancestors for modern animals. An example of biological evidence is the similar structures found in all mammals and an example of genetic evidence are the similarities in genes (DNA) between two closely related organisms

Pg. 185

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Lamarck believed that aquired traits could be passed on by individuals but could not support his theory. Darwin showed how traits could be passed on by natural selection

Darwin noted that the finches beaks were adapted to their particular environments which meant they had evolved differently but shared a common ancestor

Isolation stops populations from interbreeding so new species evolve.

The third species most likely evolved from one of the two other species. Being isolated by the mountains new traits were being selected to fit the new environment.

White fur, it will help the hare blend in so it will not be seen by predators.

Isolation/Speciation

On the left side of your ISN draw a new species of

Chichlid. Focus on the characteristics of eye size, color, teeth, and fin shape.

Consider the effect of the environment for each characteristic.

Environment A: Shallow water near the shoreline, sandy bottom, only water plants available for food, many bird and land animal predators.

Environment B: Deep water in the middle of the lake, rocky bottom, many smaller fish for food, no predators.

Snow Shoe Hare Flow Chart

Variation: Fur Color; Choose one: light or dark

Adaptation: How does the color increase its chances of survival?

Selection: Who will mate and what will their offspring look like?

Snow Shoe Hare Flow Chart

Variation: Fur Color (light vs. dark)

Light color

Adaptation:

Blends in with environment

Selection:

Less likely to be seen by predators so they survive at higher rates, mate more often, their offspring have light colored fur.

Natural Selection pg. 182

Overproduction:

Variation:

Adaptation:

Selection:

Natural Selection pg. 182

Overproduction: Produce more offspring than could ever survive. Only a few make it to adulthood and reproduce

Variation: Organisms within a population have different characteristics

Adaptation: Any inherited trait that gives an organism an advantage in its environment

Selection: Certain adaptations help an organism survive better in certain environments. This allows them to reproduce and pass their traits to the next generation.

Theory Of Evolution pg. 178-179

Who:

What:

Where:

Why:

When:

Theory Of Evolution

Who: Charles Darwin

What: Came up with the complete theory of Evolution.

Where: Galapagos Islands

Why: He was a Naturalist who studied plants and animals

When: 1836

Darwin Questions

1. Where did Darwin’s voyage begin? pg. 178

2. What was the path of his voyage? (be specific) pg.178

3. Who was the first scientist to propose a theory of Evolution? pg. 178

4. What two organism did Darwin observe to propose his theory?

Pg. 180

5. How does the woodpecker finch differ from the vegetarian finch?

Pg. 180

6. Of the two finches, which beak is more suitable for eating seeds & berries? pg. 180

Darwin Answers

1. England

2. England, South America, Galapagos Islands, New

Zealand, Australia, Africa, South America,

England

3. Jean Baptitse de Lamarck

4. Tortoises & finches

5. Woodpecker finch’s beak is longer & more pointed

6. Vegetarian Finch.

Symbiotic Relationships (answer the questions below on the BACK of your TEST)

Based on the descriptions below; classify each one as either Mutualism, Commensalism, or Parasitism:

1. Egret eats insects off a cows back.

2. Bacteria inside a humans digestion system

3. Flowers & Bees

4. Barnacle on a whale’s skin.

5. Cowbird removes a sparrows eggs and lays their own inside the nest. The sparrow incubates and raises the cowbird chicks .

Symbiotic Relationships Answers

Egret/Cow – Commensalism: Egret gets food, cow not harmed or helped

Bacteria/human – Mutualism: bacteria get food, human gets nutrients from bacteria’s waste

Bee/flower – Mutualism: Bee polinates flowers, bee get nectar(food)

Barnacle/whale – Commensalism: Barnacle gets a home, whale not harmed or helped.

Cowbird/sparrow – Parasitism: sparrow loses offspring, cowbird gets more offspring

Pg. 524 Questions

1. What are the parasites shown in the image?

2. In the commensal relationships shown, which species benefits? Which species are unaffected?

3. What might be another example of mutualism one might find in this environment? (hint: think pollination)

Pg. 524 answers

1. Mistletoe & ticks

2. Lichens & mice benefit; trees & humans are unaffected.

3. Bees feed on nectar and help pollinate the flowers.

Prey Found Vole

Totals 31

Owl Pellet Class Data

Mole

3

Shrew

5

Mouse

4

Other

Total # of prey items found___43________

Total # of pellets dissected_____12_______

Average # of prey items per pellet___3.6___

Owl Pellet Questions

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Undigested remains of an owl’s prey.

Prey is swallowed whole. Soft parts are sent to the stomach while the hard parts are stored in the PROVENTRICULUS (2 nd stomach) and then expelled out of the mouth.

No. So do hawks, falcons and eagles.

Predator prey relationship. Roles in a food chain. Some basic anatomy.

Vole, mole

Yes. Owls do not eat ALL kinds of mammals. They mostly eat rodents.

Over 1000!

690.

DO NOT DO #9. Complete Feeding Relationships HW instead.

Species Chara. Chart

Species: Great White Shark

CHARACTERISTICS:

Cellular Organization

Obtains/Uses Energy

Grows & Develops

Reproduces

Responds to Stimuli

Adapted to Environment

NEEDS:

Energy (food)

Water

Gas Exchange

Living space

Temperature

Cells create: Gills, teeth, skin

Carnivore: eats,fish, marine mammals (seals, sea lions, dolphins

Slow growing, late maturity & long lived

Only reproduce once every 2-3 years. 3-10 pups per litter

React to electrical impulses and blood & urine

Sharp razor like teeth

Fish & marine mammals

Is able to drink salt water

Gills remove oxygen from the water

Found in every ocean in the world

Can maintain a stable body temp. even in very cold water

Web based Ecosystem Research summit.k12.nj.us/~jross

2.

3.

Ecosystem A

1.

2.

3.

Ecosystem B

1.

Pg. 492

1. Producers – make their own food using sun, air and water. Consumers – must eat to get food energy. Decomposers – break down dead organism into soil.

2. Food webs show all the different feeding relationships in an ecosystem. Much more realistic.

3. As you move UP the food chain from producers to consumers the energy goes DOWN.

Food Web

1. The mudsnails, oysters and mummichug population would increase. There would be more food for clapper rail, bluefish and osprey. The herring gull would lose its only food source.

2. A)producer, B) consumer, C) decomposer

Food Chain

Classifying Organism

Classify each of the following local organisms as PRODUCER,

CONSUMER or DECOMPOSER:

Deer

Grass

Fox

Squirrel

Blue Jay

Fly larva

Bacteria

Oak Tree/acorns

Now create a simple food chain using four (4) of the organisms listed above. You must have a producer, 2 consumers and a decomposer

Classifying Organism

Classify each of the following local organisms as PRODUCER,

CONSUMER or DECOMPOSER:

Deer –cons.

Grass – prod.

Fox – cons.

Squirrel – cons.

Blue Jay – cons.

Fly larva – decom.

Bacteria – decom.

Oak Tree/acorns- prod. ---

Squirrel ---

Fox ---

Larva

Now create a simple food chain using four (4) of the organisms listed above. You must have a producer, 2 consumers and a decomposer

Type II

6 lines

SKIP LINES

Type II - Deer/wolf

Why, when the wolf is a deer’s natural predator, should the population decrease?

Deer/wolf

Both deer and wolves have to find enough

FOOD, WATER, and LIVING SPACE to survive and reproduce. The reason the deer population eventually goes down after the wolves are removed is that the deer population becomes too large and they end up destroying the ecosystem. Therefore there is not enough food, water & living space for them to reproduce.

Type II – Quick Write 9/10

5 lines

Skip Lines

What are the 3 most important things to remember when building your tower & why are they important?

Type II – Living vs. nonliving 9/20

6 lines

Skip lines

Why is a bacteria living, but a car not? (

Be sure to mention 2 needs and 1 characteristic

)

Living vs. nonliving

A bacteria is living because bacteria need food and water. A bacteria must take in food and use it to produce energy for the cell to function. A bacteria needs water for it to absorb its food and digest it. Bacteria have the characteristic of reproduction because they can create huge populations in very short times. Cars cannot reproduce nor do they need water or food in order exist.

4

5

6

2

3

Year

1

Oh Deer Data

(L-16)

8

16

8

# of Deer

3

6

10

Oh Deer Q’s #1-6

1.

2.

Sun Energy, Air, Food, Water & Living Space

Food, water & living space

3.

4.

Wildlife populations tend to change (our graph goes up and down)

Nature

is in balance

in that the ecosystem controls the deer population and the deer population controls the ecosystem.

5. a.- not enough of 1 limiting factor b. – not enough of 2 c. – not enough of 1 limiting factors limiting factor.

d. – Plenty of food, water, & living space.

6. The graph that goes up and down because natural populations always go up and down like our graph.

Needs of Living Things

(L-11)

Sun Energy

Food Energy

Water

Air

Living Space

4 Characteristics of Life

Organization – Cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organism

Grow & Develop

Respond to the Environment

Reproduce

Pond Study:

Directions- Go to the pond courtyard and observe all the living things that live there. Choose

ONE living thing and draw a picture of it in the chart below. Then write in each of the boxes how that living thing MEETS each of the five needs listed.

Food Energy: Sun Energy:

Water:

Living Space:

Air/gas exchange:

Picture of your living thing:

Unicellular

Definition:

Organisms made up of a single cell.

Characteristics:

Microscopic – cannot be seen with the naked eye.

Reproduce, grow, organized, respond

Examples:

Bacteria, paramecium, plankton.

Nonexamples:

Humans, fish, plants

Definition:

Organisms made up of multiple, specialized cells.

Examples:

Humans, fish, plants

Multicellular

Characteristics:

Can usually be seen with the naked eye.

Reproduce, respond, grow & organization

Nonexamples:

Bacteria, paramecium, plankton

Cell Theory

1. Every living thing is made up of one or more cells.

2. Cells carry out all the functions needed to support life.

3. Cells come only from other living cells.

Biotic vs. Abiotic

(

Left side)

Pond BIOTIC factors (living) Pond ABIOTIC factors (nonliving)

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