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ORIGINS OF THE MODERN WORLD TO 1500
HIST 111-04
M-W 2:10 – 3:25 PM
XV HALL 174
FALL 0228
OFFICE HOURS: M-W 11:00AM-12:00 PM, or by appointment
Instructor: Dr. Hayrettin Yücesoy
Humanities Building, Office # 211
Tel: (314 ) 977-3397
[email protected]
DESCRIPTION
This is a survey of global history tracing the formation of the modern world from the
origins of human societies through the 16th century. This course aims at widening our
knowledge not only historically but also geographically so that we appreciate the globe
not as a series of disconnected structures but as interrelated and interdependent polities
and cultures.
OBJECTIVES AND GOALS
This class has few important broad objectives:
 Appreciate and practice serious scholarship and intellectual activity.
 Inspire community building and leadership qualities.
 Recognize ethical issues in action and decision making
 Find ways to help others either by doing or by not doing something.
 Understanding different cultures as they have developed in history.
 Appreciate an increasingly interdependent and multi-cultural world and think
about the interconnectedness and uniqueness of peoples.
During the semester, we will proceed chronologically, exploring political, religious,
socio-economic and intellectual change over time pointing out how diverse cultures
contributed to the formation of the modern world. We will study early urbanization and
empire; the origin and spread of world religious traditions; the diffusion of knowledge
across diverse cultures and societies. We will follow regional and continental
developments in their global context, emphasizing the encounters, interactions, and
linkages. By comparing and contrasting diverse human experiences, we aim at
formulating new questions, developing fresh perspectives, increase cultural
understanding and greater appreciation of humanity in its diversity and commonality. As
we discuss the human past, we will also consider how historians have dealt with history
over the centuries thus enhancing the skills in historical scholarship.
CLASS REQUIREMENTS
1) Syllabus: You should see this syllabus as an agreement between you and the
instructor. You should bring it with you every time you come to class as I will refer to it
frequently for assignments. It is your responsibility to check your syllabus for current
assignments, deadlines and reading.
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2) Attendance and participation: The purpose of restricting the class to 19 is clear:
discussion and interaction. Attendance and participation in class discussions and projects
is required of all students as examinations will include material covered in class
discussions and projects. If you have any disability that might prevent you from meeting
deadlines, contact the Disabilities Coordinator in Tegeler Hall 310. Absence from class
and examinations will be allowed only if justified by a university-approved excuse. In the
first absence, 1%, second absence 2%, third absence 5%, fourth absence 10%, fifth
absence 20%, and six absence 40% of the grade will be taken out. Two lates count as one
absence.
3) Readings: The reading material will derive from primary and secondary sources.
Required reading assignments for each week are given on the attached schedule. From
time to time hand outs will be distributed for class discussions.
4) Plagiarism: Students are expected to abide by the Policy on Academic Honesty of the
College of Arts and Sciences. The University reserves the right to penalize any student
who violates this policy. Please note that plagiarism, that is utilizing sources without
appropriate acknowledgement, results in automatic failure and appropriate action with the
relevant office.
5) Email. Very Important: Please make sure that you have an active email account with
SLU and have enough space in your mail box as I will be frequently emailing you
assignments, and announcements. Having a clogged inbox or an inactive email address
does not count as an excuse from any assignment.
6) Class Lectures Outline: I will be posting an outline of class sessions on Blackboard
for your further information and benefit. If you have not learned how to use Blackboard
please do so as soon as possible to benefit from this media.
7) Writing Center: I encourage you to take advantage of the Writing Center’s services;
getting feedback benefits writers at all skill levels. The Center helps with writing
projects, multimedia projects, and oral presentations. They offer one-on-one consultations
that address everything from brainstorming and developing ideas to crafting strong
sentences and documenting sources. For more information, call 977-2930 or visit
http://www.slu.edu/x13305.xml.
8) Books: (available for purchase in the bookstore).
1) Jerry Bentley and Herb Ziegler, Traditions and Encounters: A Brief Global
History, Volume I (New York: McGraw Hill, 2008). ISBN: 9780073207025. We will
organize our weekly lectures around the themes of this book. For additional material
and study help please visit the following web site: www.mhhe.com/bentley3.
2) Frances Wood, The Silk Road.
3) F. E. Peters, The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam.
4) Handouts as required.
9) Examinations and Papers:
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1) Exams: Midterm (25%); Final Examination (25%).
2) Quizzes: Weekly Quizzes based on class lectures/discussions and Bentley, et al.
(15%).
3) One Short Paper: One short paper (1000 word) on assigned topic (25 %).
4) Participation in class activities: 10 % of your grade will be based on your
performance in class activities.
10) Grading (for the purpose of calculating your exams and papers):
100-95:
A
74-70:
C+
94-90:
A69-65:
C
89-85:
B+
64-60:
C84-80:
B
59-55:
D
79-75:
B54-0:
F
11) Paper Criteria: Please refer to the History department’s web page for department’s
style guide at http://www.slu.edu/Documents/arts_sciences/history/Style_Sheet.pdf
Your paper will be evaluated according to the style sheet recommendations.
PAPER ASSESSMENT CRITERIA-RUBRIC
Grade:
F
D
C
B
A
1. The paper is dishonest
2. The paper completely ignores the questions set.
3. The paper is incomprehensible due to errors in language or usage.
4. The paper contains very serious factual errors.
5. The paper simply lists, narrates, or describes historical data, and includes several factual
errors
6. The paper correctly lists, narrates, or describes historical data but makes little or not
attempt to frame an argument or thesis.
7. The paper states an argument or thesis, but one that does not address the question set.
8. The paper states an argument or thesis, but supporting subtheses and factual evidence
are:
a. Missing
b. Incorrect or anachronistic
c. Irrelevant
d. Not sufficiently specific
e. All or partly obscured by errors in language or usage
9. The paper states an argument on the appropriate topic, clearly supported by relevant
subtheses and specific factual evidence, but counterarguments and counterexamples
are not mentioned or answered.
10. The paper contains an argument, relevant subtheses, and specific evidence;
counterarguments and counterexamples are mentioned by not adequately answered:
A. Factual evidence incorrect or missing or not specific
B. Linking sub-theses either unclear or missing
C. Counterarguments and counterexamples not clearly stated; “strawman”
11. The paper adequately states and defends an argument, and answers all
counterarguments and counterexamples suggested by lectures and textbook.
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CLASS SCHEDULE
THE FOUNDATIONS OF COMPLEX SOCIETIES
WEEK 1
AUGUST 25-27
Early Humanity
M: What is (and Why) History?
W: Transition to Agriculture. Traditions, 1.
WEEK 2
SEPTEMBER 3 (1 Labor Day)
Formation of Sophisticated Societies and Cultural Traditions
W: Traditions, 2
THE FORMATION OF CLASSICAL SOCIETIES
WEEK 3
SEPTEMBER 8-10
Classical Societies in Persia and India
M: Traditions, 5
W: Traditions, 7.
WEEK 4
SEPTEMBER 15-17
Mediterranean under the Greeks and Romans
M: Traditions, 8.
W: Traditions, 8.
THE POST-CLASSICAL ERA, 500 TO 1000 C.E.
WEEK 5
SEPTEMBER 22-24
Byzantium
M: Traditions, 10
W: Traditions, 10
WEEK 6
SEPTEMBER 29 OCTOBER 1
The Worlds of Islam
M: Traditions, 11.
W: Traditions, 11.
WEEK 7
OCTOBER 6-8
The Silk Road
PAPER ASSIGNED
M: Book Discussion and Traditions, 12.
W: Book Discussion.
(Please note that each student MUST bring at least 3 written questions/comments for M
and W sessions).
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WEEK 8
OCTOBER 13-15
MIDTERM REVIEW AND MIDTERM EXAMINATION.
WEEK 9
OCTOBER 22 (20 Fall Break)
Empires of China and India
W: Traditions, 12.
WEEK 10
OCTOBER 27-29
Christendom in Europe.
M: Traditions, 13.
W: Traditions, 13.
WEEK 11
NOVEMBER 3-5
Monotheistic Religious Traditions and their Role in History
M: Book Discussion
M: Book Discussion.
(Please note that each student MUST bring at least 3 written questions/comments for M
and W sessions).
CROSS CULTURAL INTERACTIONS 1000 TO 1500 C.E.
WEEK 12
NOVEMBER 10-12
Nomadic Empires and European Integration
States and Societies of Sub-Saharan Africa
M: Traditions, 15.
W: Traditions, 16.
WEEK 13
NOVEMBER 17-19
Europe and High Middle Ages
M: Traditions, 17.
W: Traditions, 17.
PAPER DUE—NO EXTENSIONS
WEEK 14
NOVEMBER 24 (26 Thanksgiving)
Final Review
WEEK 15
DECEMBER 1-3
Cross Cultural Interactions
M: Traditions, 19.
W: Traditions, 19.
WEEK 16
DECEMBER 8
M: The Meaning of History
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SAMPLE MIDTERM AND FINAL QUESTIONS
PLEASE RESPOND TO TWO OF THE FOLLOWING FOUR QUESTIONS
1) What can the passage from Zarathustra on page 176 tell us about the influence of
Zoroastrianism on later religions? In what ways did Zoroastrianism influence
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?
2) Look at the illustration on page 193 of the terra-cotta army surrounding the tomb
of Qin Shihuangdi. What could this picture tell us about the splendor of the First
Emperor's reign? Can this picture also give us an insight into the workings of Qin
Shihuangdi's mind?
3) Examine the most important city-states that are shown on the map on page 234.
How did geography influence the political structure of ancient Greece? Why
didn't the Greeks ever unify? What brought them together? What tore them apart?
4) Examine the moral and ethical teachings of Jesus of Nazareth on page 281.
Compare his religious thought to other thinkers, whom we have studied in the
class.
Basic components of correct answer:
Q.Discuss both the power and the limitations of the Christian church in Europe from 300
to 1200.
A. After the fall of Rome, the Christian church was the one institution capable of
countering European social stratification and political and economic fragmentation. By
claiming spiritual jurisdiction and the loyalty of the European people, the church often
dominated the legal, political, social, and economic life of Europe. There were challenges
to church power, however. Differences in doctrine created schisms within the church,
dividing its power among factions and regions. Challenges from other religions,
particularly Islam, were very strong. Canon and secular law often collided, particularly
after the rebirth of Roman law. Struggles between secular and church power were most
notable during the reigns of strong-willed kings. Control of clerical appointments became
an important issue. The church never entirely dominated European civilization, and the
division of church and state distinguished western Europe from the Byzantine Empire and
eastern Muslim states.
Sample Quiz question
1. The largest empire of all time was created by the
A.
Romans.
B.
Chinese.
C.
Mongols.
D.
Incas.
E
Indians
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