Foundations of Social Work Practice I

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University of Arkansas at Little Rock
School of Social Work
Graduate Social Work Program
SOWK 7301.01: Foundations of Social Work Practice I
Course Outline
August 2012
Monday, August 27; 5 to 8 pm; Larson Hall, Room 118
3 Credits
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Social Work Program
Instructor: Dr. Rosalie Otters
Office Hours: Monday afternoon 1 to 4 or by appointment
Contact: Email: [email protected]
Office Phone: 501-569-3012
I. DESCRIPTION OF COURSE
The Foundations of Practice courses, taught in three courses, help students acquire a
basic knowledge of principles, concepts and techniques that characterize a generalist
approach to social work practice. Social work practice from a generalist perspective
embraces work with all client systems at all levels (i.e., individual, family, group,
community and organization) and is concerned with linking clients to resources,
facilitating organizational responsiveness to resource systems, advocating for just social
policies, affirming culturally competent practice, and researching practice activity.
Social work is conceptualized as a profession driven by knowledge, supported by
research, and guided by a formalized set of values and ethical practices. The Foundation
of Practice courses promote practice from an ecosystem and strengths perspective, and
integrate knowledge from the foundation courses of Human Behavior and the Social
Environment, Research, Diversity and Oppression, and Social Welfare Policy. The
ecosystems perspective focuses on assessing and enhancing the dynamic interaction
between people and their environments. The ecosystems, strengths, and empowerment
perspectives underscore the belief that social work seeks to influence changes in the
environment, as well as other systems.
The Foundation of Practice courses build on students’ undergraduate level liberal arts
background that includes the behavioral and social sciences, art, and humanities. The
liberal arts background is a requisite basis for critical thinking.
The Foundations of Social Work Practice I course focuses on social work’s professional
knowledge and value base, the helping process, establishing relationships with client
systems, interviewing, assessment, goal setting, and contracting.
II.
OBJECTIVES OF COURSE
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Course Objectives:
1. Analyze social work practice from the following perspectives: generalist,
ecological, strengths and empowerment as well as cultural diversity (content for
competencies #7, practice behavior 7.1; practice behavior 3.2 for competency #3).
2. Arrive at a professionally appropriate conclusion to the solution of ethical
dilemmas posed in social work practice situations that involve social work
values and ethics, especially the social contract between individual selfdetermination and distributive justice for the common good. Students will
apply the NASW Code of Ethics as well as the Arkansas
Social Work Board Laws and Regulations and other social work principles and
standards, as the International Federation of Social Workers (content for competency #2,
practice behaviors 2.1, 2.2 &, 2.3).
3. Identify and analyze social work practice situations where conflict may exist
between personal and professional values (practice behaviors 1.1, 1.2 for competency
#1).
4. Through the critical analysis of case situations, identify the effects of
race/ethnicity, culture, poverty, classism, gender and sexual orientation,
religion/spirituality, disabilities and age on social work practice and the
empowerment of client systems (practice behaviors 2.1, 2.3 & 3.2 for competencies
2 & 3).
5. Identify and develop the skills that support the elements
of the helping process (i.e., engagement, assessment, contracting/planning,
implementation, evaluation and follow-up (content for competency #10, practice
behaviors 10.1-10.11).
6. Conduct and write a professional assessment of an individual client system
incorporating a generalist ecosystem and strengths perspective; practicing effective
oral and written communication in working with individuals, families, groups,
organizations, communities, and colleagues (practice behavior 3.4 for competency #3;
7.1 for competency #7).
7. Formulate a contract with a client system incorporating goals, roles,
interventions, time, evaluation of progress, contract renegotiation, and
housekeeping items (practice behavior 3.3 for competency #3; content for competency #10,
practice behaviors 10.5-10.1).
III.
UNITS, CONTENT, and REQUIRED READING
ASSIGNMENTS
UNIT I: Introduction to Course
Class 1:
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Objective:
1. Identify as a professional social worker (obj 1)
-- Attending to professional roles and boundaries
Topic: Generalist Social Work Practice
Review of Course Outline/ Getting to Know One Another
Competency-Based Values, Knowledge, and Skills
Social Work Values and Purpose
Ecological Systems Model
Social Work Functions and Roles
Need for Critical Thinking Skills
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapters 1- 2.
NASW Code of Ethics
http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/codenew/code.asp
UNIT II:
Social Work Practice Perspectives
Objective:
1. Identify as a professional social worker (obj 1)
-- Practicing personal reflection and self-correction
-- Attending to professional roles and boundaries
2. Making ethical decisions (obj 2)
-- Applying NASW Code of Ethics
-- Tolerating ambiguity
-- Applying strategies of ethical reasoning
3. Apply critical thinking (obj 3)
-- Analyze models of assessment and intervention through the
problem solving vs. strength's perspective
-- Come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions
4. Apply HBSE (obj 4)
-- Utilize theories and models of practice as guidance of practice
behaviors
Class 2:
Topic: Direct Practice/ Social Work Values and Ethics
Steps in Generalist Social Work
Personal and Professional Ethics
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NASW Code of Ethics
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapter 3
Reamer, F. G. (2003). Boundary issues in social work: Managing dual
relationships. Social Work. 48 (1), 121-133.
Reamer, F. G. (2005) Ethical and legal standards in social work: Consistency and
conflict. Families in Society 86 (2), 163-169.
Reading assignment to be completed prior to Class.
Class 3:
Topic: Social Work Values and Ethics
Theory and Practice of Ethics
Personal and Professional Values
Modeling Ethical Decision Making
Ethical Dilemmas
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapter 4.
http://www.arkansas.gov/swlb/laws_regs.html
work regulations)
(when you get to website, click social
Strom-Gottfried, K. (2003). Understanding adjudication: Origins, targets and
outcomes of ethics complaints. Social Work, 48 (1), 85 - 94.
Reading assignments to be completed prior to class:
Class 4:
Topic: Diversity, Multiculturalism, & Competence in a Multicultural
World
Ethnocentrism
Diversity Variables (race/ethnicity, class, gender, age,
religion, ableism [disability], etc.)
Norms
Social Control
Culture and Society
Multiculturalism in a Globalized World
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Reading:
International Federation of Social Workers http://www.ifsw.org (look at site)
Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics http://socialworker.com/jswve/ (look at site)
NASW Evidence Based Social Work (2009)
http://www.socialworkers.org/research/naswResearch/0108EvidenceBased/default.asp
NASW Standards of Practice for Cultural Competence
http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/NASWCulturalStandards.pdf
(see power points for multiculturalism; see chapter 1 Hepworth for social work
competencies)
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
Class 5 - 6:
Topic: Strengths Perspective
Strengths or Problems?: Two Approaches
Assumptions about Power
Learning from Clients
Strengths and the Ecological Framework
Applications
Reading:
Saleebey, D. (2009). Introduction: Power in the people. In Saleebey, D. (ed.), The
strengths perspective in social work practice. (pp. 1-23). Boston, MA: Pearson
Education, Inc.
Blundo, R. (2009). The challenge of seeing anew the world we think we know:
Learning strengths-based practice. In Saleebey, D. (ed.), The strengths
perspective in social work practice (pp.24-46). Boston, MA: Pearson Education,
Inc.
Sullivan, W. P. & Rapp, C.A. (2009). Honoring philosophical traditions: The
strengths model and the social environment. In Saleebey, D. (ed.), The
strengths perspective in social work practice (pp. 220- 239). Boston, MA: Pearson
Education, Inc. .
Nelson-Becker, H., Chapin, R. & Fast, B.(2009). The strengths model with older adults:
Critical practice components. In Saleebey, D. (ed.), The strengths perspective
in social work practice (pp. 161-180). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc
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Reading assignment to be read prior to class.
UNIT III: Developing Engagement through Active Listening and
Assessing
Objective
1. Identify as a Professional Social Worker (obj 1)
-- Practice personal reflection and self-correction
-- Attend to professional roles and boundaries
2. Apply HBSE (obj. 4)
-- Utilize theories and models of practice to guide the processes
of problem identification and assessment
2. Engage with individuals (obj 5a)
-- Use empathy and other interpersonal skills
-- Develop a mutually agreed-on focus and desired outcomes
3. Assess with individuals (obj 5b)
-- Collect, organize and interpret client data
-- Assess client strengths and needs
4. Apply critical thinking (obj 3)
-- Demonstrate effective written communication in working
with individuals
Class 7:
Topic: Exploring
Development of Rapport
Purpose of Interview
Respect
Empathy
Confidentiality
Informed Consent
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapter 5.
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
Class 8:
Topic: Verbal Following, Exploring, and Focusing Skills
Nonverbal/ Verbal Communication
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Paraphrasing and Summarizing
Responding to Thoughts and Feelings
Empathy
Reading:
De Jong, P. and Miller, S. D. (1995). How to interview for client strengths. Social Work,
40 (6), 729-736.
De Jong, P. & Berg, I.K. (2001). Co-constructing cooperation with mandated
clients. Social Work, 46, (4), 361-374.
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapters 6 - 7.
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
Class 9 - 10:
Topic: Assessment
Multidimensionality
Assessment vs Diagnosis
Bio-psycho-social-spiritual
Strengths and Cultural Competence
Problem Solving or Solution Focused
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried and Larsen (2010) Direct social work
Practice (8th edition). Chapters 8 - 9
Arkansas Child Maltreatment Act
Arkansas Child Protective Services/Mandated Reporting
Arkansas Elder Abuse/Mandated Reporting
Suicide Packet
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
UNIT IV: Developing Goals, Formulating a Contract and Change
Implementation
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Objectives:
1. Apply HBSE (obj 4)
-- Utilize theories and models of practice to guide intervention
development and deployment
2. Apply critical thinking (obj 3)
-- Come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, implement plan of
action
-- Demonstrate effective written communication in working with
individuals
3. Intervene with individuals (obj 5c)
-- Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives
-- Select appropriate intervention strategies
-- Implement appropriate prevention and intervention strategies
-- Help client resolve problems; re-evaluate and refine goals
-- Negotiate and advocate for clients
-- Critically analyze interventions
Class 11 - 12:
Topic: Goal Planning and Implementation
Definition of a Goal
Goals with Minors; Elders
Measurement and Evaluation
Planning, Implementation, Contracts
Practice Models
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapters 12 - 13.
Lawton, M.P. & Brody, E.M. (1969). Assessment of older people: Self-maintaining and
instrumental activities of daily living. Gerontologist. 9: 179 - 186. See IADL form.
Wallace, M. & Shelkey, M. (2008). Katz index of independence in activities of daily
living.
http://www.assistedlivingconsult.com/issues/04-02/alc34-Index%20ADL-403.pdf
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
Class 13:
Topic: Case Management
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Definitions
As Basic to Generalist Social Work
Dimension of Strengths Perspective
Reading
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried & Larsen (2010). Direct social work
practice. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Brooks/Cole (8th ed.) Chapters 14 (pp.449 453).
Kirst-Ashman, K.K. & Hull, G.H., Jr. (2009). Brokering and case management,
Chapter 15, in Understanding generalist practice (pp. 505 - 529). Belmont, CA:
Brooks/Cole (5th ed.).
Weick, A., Kreider, J. and Chamberlain, R. (2006). Key dimensions of the
strengths perspective in case management, clinical practice, and community
practice. In Saleebey, D. (ed.), The strengths perspective in social work practice
(pp. 108-121). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc (5th ed.).
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
UNIT V.
Objectives:
1. Evaluate with individuals (obj 5c,d)
-- Facilitate transitions and endings
-- Critically evaluate interventions
2. Apply critical thinking (obj 3)
-- Review plan of action and reflect upon result
-- Demonstrate effective written communication in working with
individuals
Class 14: Evaluation and Termination
Topic:
Feedback
Evaluation
Follow-up
Termination
Reading:
Hepworth, Rooney, Rooney, Strom-Gottfried and Larsen (2010), Direct social work
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practice (8th ed.). Chapter 19
Reading assignment to be completed prior to class.
Class 15
Review for Take Home Final
Evaluation
Take Home Final (Last part of Individual Assessment)
Note: There are power points for all Hepworth chapters; also for Multiculturalism (week
4). Articles will be emailed. For websites:copy/paste onto your browser.
IV. TECHNIQUES OF INSTRUCTION
All students are required to have access to a personal computer. If you do not own a
computer, computers are available for your use throughout the UALR campus (Cyber
Café, Donaghey Student Union, Student Lounge, School of Social Work, Computing
Services Lab, Ottenheimer Library).
There will be a variety of teaching methods that will be utilized including: both instructor
and student-lead lectures and discussions; self-reflection and ethical dilemma papers,
video based discussions, written dialogues and role plays; written reports (group and
family assessments; contracting/ goals and objectives), a possible field trip and/or
speaker
We will use Blackboard for all e-mail communication, power points and journal articles.
Plan to check your Blackboard several times a week for postings. Assignments should
be submitted on time through Blackboard. Class work and quizzes CANNOT be
made up without an authorized excuse (as from ULAR, a doctor’s note, the court, etc.). In
extraordinary circumstances it is up to the discretion of the instructor to allow other
arrangements for assignments.
.
V. REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS
Required:
Hepworth, D.H., Rooney, R.H., Rooney, G.D., Strom-Gottfried, K., Larsen, J. (2010).
Direct social work practice: Theory and skills. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole (8th
ed.).
Saleebey, D. (2009). The strengths perspective in social work practice. Boston, MA:
Pearson Education, Inc. (5th ed.).
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Recommended:
Hepworth, ….Direct Social Work Practice Website (2010):
www.cengage.com/social_work/Hepworth
Additional learning tools (glossary terms, chapter outlines, relevant Web link,
chapter practice quizzes).
Ritter, J.A., Vakalahi, H.F.O. & Kieernan-Stern, M. (2009). 101 careers in social work.
N.Y. Springer Publishing Co.
Szuchman, L.T. & Thomlison, B. (2008). Writing with style: APA style for social work
(3rd ed.). U.S.A.: Thomson, Brooks/Cole.
Online Writing Resources:
Guide to Grammar and Writing http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/
Purdue Owl (Purdue Online Writing Lab) owlapa.com
VI. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
In General
A critical component of your professional development is learning to express yourself
clearly in all written and verbal communication. Written assignments are expected to be
coherent, adhere to writing conventions and demonstrate accuracy in spelling. Writing
coherence, clarity and organization as well as adherence to writing conventions and
accuracy in spelling will constitute part of your grade in all written assignments. If
you feel you need help developing your writing skills, please speak to me and/or take
advantage of the Writing Center on campus. Also review the online site, as well as the
book on APA Style for Social Work. Both are listed above. NOTE: YOU WILL BE
GIVEN BOTH A WRITING AND A CONTENT GRADE FOR ALL WRITTEN
WORK!
Writing grade (20%): Spelling, grammar, sentence composition, clarity)
Content (80%): Explanations/descriptions, critical thinking (conceptual thinking,
understanding theories and perspectives), following directions, organization).
All written assignments must be submitted by the time they are due, preferably through
Blackboard. Late assignments: see grading section. The professor will review drafts for
students up until a week before the date an assignment is due. The use of non-sexist/non-
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biased language is requested in written assignments and class discussions. Guidelines
regarding non-sexist, non-biased language are in the Publication Manual of the American
Psychological Association (6th rd.). Available in the UALR Bookstore or Ottenheimer
Library.
Note:
Work handed in after due date: Discretion of Professor if ANY credit to be given.
Specific Written and Oral Assignments
1. Short Assignments
a) Self - Reflective Short Paper
Personal values and ethics and how they interact with social work values and ethics.
What happens when your personal values and professional social work values conflict?
b) Dialogues and/or Role Plays
Written dialogues and in-class role plays between the social work intern and client will be
developed from scenarios given out. .
c) Discussion Leader
Each class member will take one research or theoretical reading, summarize it in a one
page handout and lead the class discussion.
2. Ethical Dilemma Paper
Using Elaine Congress' ETHIC model, students will take a given scenario and analyze
the ethical dilemma from a variety of both inter-personal and environmental perspectives
at the micro, mezzo and macro structural levels. What are the main ethical issues
according to the NASW Code of Ethics and the Arkansas Social Work Board: Laws and
Regulations? What possible hypotheses could be developed to resolve this dilemma?
Who is the most vulnerable and most likely to benefit from each hypothesis? Finally,
what are the avenues for consultation as part of the resolution process?
3. Individual Assessment
You will be asked to write an individual assessment of a client, preferably from your
Foundation Year internship. The format is included in Foundation Year Field Manual. If
you are NOT in an internship please let the instructor know as soon as possible.
5. Take Home Final (Last Part of Individual Assessment: Contract, Goals and
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Objectives)
You will be asked, as a generalist social worker, to formulate the goals and objectives
for a specific case with the emphasis on the case management of that case at the
micro, mezzo and macro structural levels. Because this is Foundations I, the emphasis
will be on the micro level and how the other two structural levels (mezzo and macro)
relate to the individual client.
VII. METHOD OF EVALUATION
Students are accountable for all assigned readings. Please submit papers through
Blackboard.
Late work is not accepted unless you have PREVIOUSLY made an arrangement with the
instructor and ONLY with approved documentation
Excessive lateness to class will be included in the calculation of absences.
Students who are absent must inform the instructor of the absence, preferably
BEFORE the class time. After discussion with the student the instructor will
determine whether the absence will be excused. Only students who miss an exam or
assignment due to an emergency, illness or very extenuating circumstance will be
allowed to make them up. There is no credit for class or group assignments which are
missed in any part.
VIII. GRADING SCALE
This class will be based on a point system, where 600 points = 100%.
Grading:
Points
Short Assignments
Quizzes
Ethical Dilemma
Assessment.
Case Management
150
100
50
200
100
_____
600
Percentage
25%
17%
8%
33 %
17 %
_____
100 %
GRADING SCALE BASED ON POINTS AND PERCENTAGES
Points
Percentages
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600 - 552
551 - 492
491 - 432
< 432
100 - 92 = A
91 - 82 = B
81 - 72 = C
71 or below = F
Points needed for each grade: (out of 600 points = 100%). Check your points periodically on
Blackboard.
YOU NEED THE POINTS TO GET THE GRADE! GRADES ARE
GIVEN IN RELATIONSHIP TO POINTS, NOT PERCENTAGES!!
IX. CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY
Learning in a professional program is based in large part on the interaction that occurs
between the instructor and students in the classroom. Regular attendance at class is an
expected professional responsibility of the student. See instructor regarding absences
BEFORE you are absent. Absences of greater than 20 percent of the total class time
may constitute grounds for course failure.
CELL PHONE POLICY
Please turn-off all cell phones or place your phone on vibrate before entering class.
While we understand the necessity for some students to rely on cell phones, it is a
distraction and annoyance when it unexpectedly rings during a class session.
X.
HONOR CODE
All students registered for courses in the School of Social Work are expected to adhere to
the rights, responsibilities, and behavior as articulated in both the UALR Student
Handbook and the NASW (National Association of Social Workers) Code of Ethics. An
essential feature of these codes is a commitment to maintaining intellectual integrity and
academic honesty. This commitment insures that a student of the School of Social
Work will neither knowingly give nor receive any inappropriate assistance in
academic work, thereby affirming personal honor and integrity.
All students registered for courses in the School of Social Work are expected to adhere to
the rights, responsibilities, and behavior as articulated in the UALR Student Handbook
and the NASW Code of Ethics. An essential feature of these codes is a commitment to
maintaining intellectual integrity and academic honesty. This commitment insures that a
student of the School of Social Work will neither knowingly give nor receive any
inappropriate assistance in academic work, thereby affirming personal honor and
integrity.
Students are required to cite the use of any materials written by others in all written
assignments. Plagiarism is the presentation of someone else's ideas or work as one's
own. This includes using ideas, words, or phrases without proper attribution.
Students found plagiarizing are subject to the penalties outlined in the Student
Handbook, which may include a failing grade for the work in question or for the
entire course.
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For more information on plagiarism and proper citation see the web sites listed below.
You are expected to read and review these cites and make sure that you know how to
properly annotate the ideas or work of others. If you need help please see me or obtain
assistance from the Writing Center.
http://www.ualr.edu/copyright/articles/?ID=5
http://www.ualr.edu/copyright/articles/?ID=4
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml#plagiarized
http://www.ualr.edu/copyright/?ID=2
http://www.lib.unc.edu/instruct/infoethics/index.html
XI.
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES
Students with Disabilities:
Your success in this class is important to me, and it is the policy and
practice of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to create inclusive
learning environments consistent with federal and state law. If you have a
documented disability (or need to have a disability documented), and need
an accommodation, please contact me privately as soon as possible, so that
we can discuss with the Disability Resource Center (DRC) how to meet
your specific needs and the requirements of the course. The DRC offers
resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with
disabilities. Reasonable accommodations are established through an
interactive process among you, your instructor(s) and the DRC. Thus, if
you have a disability, please contact me and/or the DRC, at 501-569-3143
(V/TTY) or 501-683-7629 (VP). For more information, please visit the
DRC website at www.ualr.edu/disability.
(continue on to next page)
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DUE DATES
SOWK Foundations 1
Fall 2012 Otters
(There are also short assignment due dates, which will be given in class)
NOTE: You will be graded on both CONTENT and WRITING for all written work. There may be
updates to this Course Outline.
Discussion Leadership will take place throughout the semester. Each student will
have one article to summarize, lead the discussion
Week
Date
Assignment Due
1
August 29
2
Sept.
5
3
12
4
19
Ethical Dilemma
5
26
Just the Facts Ma'am (short assignment)
6
Oct.
3
Quiz 1 (weeks 1 -5)
7
10
8
17
9
24
Dialogue 2 (short assignment)
10
31
Quiz 2 (weeks 6 - 10)
11
7
Assignment Draft (Part 1)
12
14
Assessment Draft (Part 2)
13
21
FINAL Assessment (Parts 1 & 2)
14
28
Quiz 3 (weeks 11 - 14)
15
Nov.
Dialogue 1 (short assignment)
Dec.
5
See last page for student contract.
Case Management Report
(Assessment Part 3)
NO LATE REPORTS!
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Foundations I
SOWK 7301
Fall 2012
Instructor: _______________________
Student Name________________________
Alternate name? ___________
Best way to reach you: E-mail Address__________________
Phone________________________
Address_____________________________________________
Experience in helping professions:
What you hope to learn in this class:
What you can offer this class
I have read/understand the Course Outline for this class and agree to abide by its
requirements.
Please hand in class with a hard copy no later than the second week of class.
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