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Course Profiles
Catholic District School Board Writing Partnership
Course Profile
Communications Technology
Grade 10
Open
 for teachers by teachers
This sample course of study was prepared for teachers to use in meeting local classroom
needs, as appropriate. This is not a mandated approach to the teaching of the course.
It may be used in its entirety, in part, or adapted.
April 2000
Course Profiles are professional development materials designed to help teachers implement the new
Grade 10 secondary school curriculum. These materials were created by writing partnerships of school
boards and subject associations. The development of these resources was funded by the Ontario Ministry
of Education. This document reflects the views of the developers and not necessarily those of the
Ministry. Permission is given to reproduce these materials for any purpose except profit. Teachers are
also encouraged to amend, revise, edit, cut, paste, and otherwise adapt this material for educational
purposes.
Any references in this document to particular commercial resources, learning materials, equipment, or
technology reflect only the opinions of the writers of this sample Course Profile, and do not reflect any
official endorsement by the Ministry of Education or by the Partnership of School Boards that supported
the production of the document.
© Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2000
Acknowledgments
This profile is the result of a collaborative effort between the Simcoe County District School Board and
The Institute for Catholic Education. (ICE)
Catholic School Board Writing Team - Grade 10 Communications Technologies
Lead Board
Toronto Catholic District School Board
Gino Grieco, Project Manager
Course Profile Writing Team - Catholic
Joe Tadman, Toronto Catholic District School Board, Lead Writer
Gary Hebor, Toronto Catholic District School Board
Anne Martin, Toronto Catholic District School Board
Terry Nolan, Toronto Catholic District School Board
Public School Board Writing Team - Grade 10 Communication Technologies
Lead Board
Simcoe County District School Board
Robert Emptage, Laura Featherstone, Project Managers
Course Profile Writing Team - Public
Joe Mandarino, Peel District School Board, Lead Writer
Joanne Durst, Peel District School Board
Errol Fraser, Peel District School Board
Lawrence Marler, Peel District School Board
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 Communications Technology - Open
Course Overview
Communications Technology, Grade 10, Open
Identifying Information
Course Title: Communications Technology
Grade: 10
Course Type: Open
Ministry Course Code: TGJ2O
Secondary Policy Document: The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10, Technological Education,
1999
Credit Value: 1
Department: Technological Education
Course Developer(s)
Joe Tadman, Lead Writer, Cardinal Newman High School, TCDSB
Gary Hebor, Dante Alighieri Academy, TCDSB
Anne Martin, Francis Libermann High School, TCDSB
Terry Nolan, Michael Power/St. Joseph High School, TCDSB
Development Date: October 20, 1999
Revision Date: January 17, 2000
Description/Rationale
This course requires students to complete a range of communications technology projects. These may
include graphic design activities, short audio-video productions, computer-generated animations,
graphical information displays, and image production. Students learn to transfer information using
electronic, live, and graphic communications methods. The knowledge and skills they develop provide a
basis for careers in areas such as publishing, advertising, print production, animation, audio-video
production, photography, and journalism.
How This Course Supports the Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The role of Technological Education in the Catholic faith community is to enable students to develop and
utilize their gifts and talents while creating products that benefit others in a way that models gospel
values. The focus of the curriculum is to enable students to become critical and innovative problemsolvers who question the use of resources and understand the implications of technological innovations.
An emphasis on process as well as results ensures that students create products and provide services that
recognize our God-given responsibility to respect the dignity and value of the individual and the
community.
Unit Titles (Time + Sequence)
Unit 1
Unit 2
Unit 3
Unit 4
Unit 5
Unit 6
Page 3
Graphic Design and Production
Short Audio-Video Productions
Short Animations
Information Displays and Environments
Image Production and Processes
Career Exploration in Communications Technology
22 hours
22 hours
22 hours
22 hours
22 hours
Delivered
concurrently
 Communications Technology - Open
Unit Descriptions
Unit 1: Graphic Design and Production
This unit introduces students to the graphics industry and the technology to communicate graphically
through desktop-publishing systems and software, print production, and specialty printing. Students
continue to expand knowledge of the elements and principles of design and apply these elements and
principles throughout all the stages (design, layout, and production) required to produce a graphic
product. Students produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods. Christian ethics and
gospel values are reflected in the final communicated messages throughout the various activities.
Unit 2: Short Audio-Video Productions
This unit gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of audio-video pre-production,
production, and post-production. Students develop scripts, treatments, and storyboards, utilize basic shot
sizes, camera movements, camera angles, and special effects to create short video projects. Students
demonstrate the safe operation of all equipment used for the construction of sets, the filming, lighting and
editing required to produce a final audio-video production. Co-operative working strategies and video
content reflect the moral and ethical philosophy of the gospel values.
Unit 3: Short Animations
This unit introduces students to the fundamental principles of traditional and computer-generated
animation. Students develop scripts, storyboards, and flipbooks prior to creating computer animation.
Students learn and apply composition and 2-D modelling techniques and discover how image sequences
interact with audio to create animated short films. Critical evaluation and problem solving help students
make decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
Unit 4: Information Displays and Environments
Working in an authoring environment (i.e., multimedia or scripting software), students develop graphical
displays to be used for a specific purpose. Students experiment with different compression schemes to
facilitate real time playing on the Internet. Students continue to expand personal, teamwork, and
management skills throughout the production of graphical displays. Students develop an understanding of
how to analyse, evaluate, and utilize technology to enhance the quality of life for all members of the
community.
Unit 5: Image Production and Processes
This unit enables students to develop a variety of techniques for capturing and manipulating still images.
Traditional black and white, 35 mm, pinhole, and colour digital photography are explored. Students learn
the basic optic principles, technical terminology, lighting techniques, and production processes necessary
to safely create printed images. Students are encouraged to reflect on how relationships between
themselves and their community are reflected in print images.
Unit 6: Career Exploration in Communications Technology
(The delivery of this unit is ongoing and concurrent with the other five units)
Students learn how to plan for participation in the working world of Communications Technology. This
world is increasingly characterized by innovation, project-based teamwork, entrepreneurship, change,
and the challenge of life-long learning. Students learn the intrinsic value of work and discover techniques
to realize their potential for dignity, self-respect, and success.
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Course Notes
This Communications Technology program introduces students to a wide variety of equipment and
technologies; however, it is not only about equipment usage. This program also focusses on the
transmission of images that reflect Christian values. It is expected that all student work contain positive
images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes, acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in
student work is unacceptable.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their school
board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
In addition to the specific skills developed throughout the course, students learn:
 to solve problems through careful analysis, co-operation, and communication. The student-centred,
activity-based mode of delivery encourages the development of the unique potential of each
individual. At the same time, there must be an emphasis on the co-ordination of several individual
talents to affect the successful completion of projects.
 personal and teamwork skills:
 to enhance group effectiveness including: questioning, debating, defending, presenting and
evaluating;
 to show openness for the opinions and ideas of others;
 to demonstrate confidence in the value of their own ideas;
 to demonstrate skill in using a variety of strategies when working in team situations, including
conflict resolution, evaluation of personal effectiveness, and peer mentoring skills.
 time-management skills:
 to demonstrate the ability to design and follow an organizational plan for the completion of a
range of different tasks;
 to show commitment to a task by maintaining a level of effort required to work toward a product;
 to develop the ability to monitor one’s own progress using a variety of record keeping and
tracking procedures, including logs, journals, and work portfolios.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Each unit provides the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for a variety of related professions. A number of teaching/learning strategies
employed in the classroom allow for career orientation, e.g., job shadowing, computer research, field
trips, and guest speakers. Unit 6 provides the outline for this focus on Career Exploration. The delivery
of this unit is ongoing and concurrent with the other five units. Teachers should read through this unit to
become familiar with how it is integrated throughout all activities. The careers unit can be most
effectively delivered by the integration of topics throughout the course. Classroom teachers work closely
with the Guidance department to co-ordinate the planning of the unit. Students have the opportunity to
explore a variety of career options in the Communications Technology field based on the five units set
out in this profile that are appropriate for the range of ability levels within the classroom.
The hours allotted to each unit may be adjusted (but must total 110 hours) to reflect existing school
equipment and community focus.
Teaching/Learning Strategies include the following:
Brainstorming – group generation of initial ideas expressed without criticism or analysis
Buddy System – links students for peer/cross-age support
Case Study – investigation of real and simulated issues
Class Discussion – students actively participate by taking turns while discussing current issues
Collaborative/Co-operative Learning – small group learning providing high levels of student engagement
and interdependence
Computer Assisted Learning – learning of new material or review/reinforce material previously learned
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 Communications Technology - Open
Conferencing/Discussion – student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student discussion to encourage
confidence and motivation to success in all learners
Design Process – a problem-solving approach using a prescribed process involving a number of steps
Independent Study – exploration and research of a topic interesting to students
Journal Writing – the practice of expressing ideas, experiences, questions, reflections, personal
understanding, or new learning in written form on regular basis
Mind Map – involves representing physical, demographic, and numerical data through visual formats that
show relationships among ideas
Problem-solving Strategies – helps students work through problems
Problem Solving – model for helping students to identify and work through a problem design process
Report/Presentation – oral, visual, and written presentation of researched topic to class or community
Research – various models of investigation
Socratic Lesson – oral presentation of information by the teacher
Theological Reflection – students examine issues in relation to spiritual understanding as it reflects on
them individually, in their families and in their communities
Assessment/Evaluation
Assessment Techniques
Paper and Pencil Tests
 Ongoing quizzes
 Final evaluation (tests and final exam)
Performance Assessment
 Assigned exercises
 Checklists
 Worksheets
 Log/journal entries
 Presentation
 Finished product checklists
 Career Research Project *
 Portfolios **
Personal Communication
 Conferencing
 Student-teacher
 Teacher-group
 Self/peer assessment
 Daily log/journal
 Ongoing verbal feedback
 Critique
Teacher Observation
Formal/informal
Reflection
 Self/peer assessment
 Log/journal
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* Career Research Project
This is outlined in Unit 6 and occurs concurrently with all other units. Activity 1 from this unit must be
done at the start of the course. Career research data must be compiled throughout all units for use in the
culminating activity outlined in Unit 6, Activities 2 and 3. Refer to appendix 6.1a for guidelines on
collecting career data.
** Portfolio
Students set up a portfolio for their exemplary work as the course progresses. The portfolio, although
evaluated throughout, is examined for completeness at the end of the course. Students should be given
guidelines at the start of the first unit outlining how the Portfolio should be set up (Overview Appendix
I).
Assessment Tools
 Checklists
 Marking schemes
 Quizzes/Tests
 Rubrics/Rating Scales
 Anecdotal comments with suggestions for improvement
Evaluation of Student Achievement Assessment Methods
Diagnostic: occurs at the beginning of a term, a unit of study, or whenever information about prior
learning is useful.
Formative: during learning; ongoing feedback to the teacher and student about the quality of learning
and the effectiveness of instruction.
Summative: usually carried out at the end of a learning process; may include feedback and/or evaluation.
Activities based in this course are, to a large degree, skill oriented. As students develop skills, they are
motivated to acquire related knowledge and develop attitudes, values, and understanding based on
Catholic social teaching. The skills are reflected in the expectations set by the curriculum. It is against
these expectations that student achievement is measured.
Assessment of skill development involves focus on both the process and the product. Checklists are
commonly used to identify the operational steps of the process, whether it be creating a brochure in a
desktop-publishing activity or producing a short video. Significant aspects of the completed product or
service are identified and assessed on a rated scale. Checklists and rating scales are available at the start
of the course; students can use them for self-assessment as they strive for acceptable standards of
competence. These checklists and scales provide both the student and teacher with an up-to-date and
ongoing means of monitoring the level of achievement attained. Through teacher/student discussion,
comparisons of the teacher's and student's assessment of the skill can often clarify the standards that are
expected. The addition of a peer assessment component, especially in group work, also helps to clarify
expectation achievement.
 Self-assessment helps students develop a sense of responsibility for their own learning. It encourages
students to reflect on their growth and learning, giving them a sense of where they have been, where
they are, and where they are going.
 When self-assessment and peer assessment occur with teacher guidance, students are provided with
reactions to their work besides those of the teacher. Through modelling and coaching, teachers can
help students provide constructive and supportive feedback to themselves and to one another.
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The use of performance tests as a method for assessing the achievement of a skill by a student is both
valid and effective.
A variety of assessment techniques should be used in the evaluation process. The vocabulary used in test
questions should reflect that used in the lab situation. The option for oral testing and student
demonstrations of acquired skills should also be used. Although students should be encouraged to write
answers in proper sentence form, questions and answers that involve diagrams are effective assessment
instruments in technological education. The ability to combine skill and knowledge successfully in
practical work tasks are demonstrated by students in their planning and implementation of projects, work
assignments, and problem-solving activities. Daily teacher observation of the student's achievement on
such assignments is a technique for assessing progress in these areas.
How Assessment Strategies Will Be Used to Determine Final Course Mark
Assessment instruments are designed to provide information about student achievement. Learning skills,
effort, punctuality, and recorded absences are reported separately and are not considered in the
determination of the percentage grade. Assessment instruments may be used in more than one
achievement category. The final grade is determined using the weighting below as a guideline to reflect
the student’s most consistent performance level.
Final Course Grade
Final Evaluation
30%
20%
 Formal Exam
10%
 Portfolio
Term Evaluation
Knowledge/Understanding
 Unit/Activity tests
 Quizzes
 Unit Exercises
Thinking/Inquiry
 Assignments/Worksheets
 Unit Projects
 Independent Research (Career)
 Unit Exercises
Communication
 Unit Exercises
 Presentations
Application/Productivity
 Unit Projects
TOTAL
Page 8
70%
15
20
15
20
100%
 Communications Technology - Open
Accommodation
Teachers using this course profile should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their
unique learning characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations for students. By doing
this, teachers are aware of, and can implement, prescribed modifications and exceptionalities.
There is a wide range of teaching/learning strategies that can be used to meet the needs of all students.
Teachers are encouraged to modify and expand teaching strategies to accommodate learning styles.
Accommodations may include:
 Modify approaches to assessment.
 The option for oral testing.
 Student demonstrations of acquired skills.
 Written tests designed to suit the reading and writing levels of the students.
 Conferencing/Discussion.
 Student-to-student and teacher-to-student discussion to encourage confidence and motivation.
 Students work with classroom partners and/or peer tutors.
 Students act as lab assistants.
 Provide a list of terminology (possibly simplified) before an activity begins.
 Small group learning.
 Flexible timelines.
 Adaptation of handouts.
 Modified to incorporate a larger, easy-to-read font.
 Modified (simplified/advanced) in terms of language and content provided.
 Project modification.
 Incorporate task modifications (e.g., fewer/more web sites, sources, informational items).
 Enrichment and extension activities.
Resources
For a complete listing, see unit and activity Resources.
Course Development Resources
The Bible For Catholics. CD-ROM.. Washington: Liguori Publications, 1996. ISBN 0-7648-0065-5
Blueprints: A Resource Tool for Writing Catholic Secondary School Course Profiles. Catholic
Curriculum Cooperative, Central Region
Choices into Action: Guidance and Career Education Program Policy for Ontario Elementary and
Secondary Schools, 1999.
The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 10, Technological Education, 1999.
The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 10, Program Planning and Assessment, 1999.
The Ontario Secondary Schools, Grades 9 – 12, Program and Diploma Requirements, 1999.
Trafford, Larry. Educating the Soul: Writing Curriculum for Catholic Secondary Schools. Toronto:
Institute for Catholic Education, 1998. ISBN 0-9699178-5-6
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Web Sites
Educational Computing Organization of Ontario (ECOO)
http://www.ecoo.org/mainmenu.html
Resources for teachers and links to other educational sites
Educational Network of Ontario (ENO)
http://www.enoreo.on.ca/
Resources for teachers and links to other educational sites
Ontario Curriculum Clearinghouse (OCC)
http://www.curriculum.org
Ministry approved resources, course profiles, and links to other educational sites
Ontario Ministry of Education
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/
Ministry site with up to date information and useful links
School Net
http://www.schoolnet.ca/
Learning resources, programs, and links to other educational sites
TV Ontario (Edulinks)
http:/www2.tvo.org/edulinks/
Resources for teachers and links to other educational sites
TV Ontario (Pdonline)
http://www.tvo.org/pdonline/
Professional development for teachers on line with links to other useful educational sites
TV Ontario (OESS)
http://www2.tvo.org/oess/
Ontario Education Software Service – Ministry licensed educational software
OSS Policy Applications
The Grade 10 Communications Technology Course is designated as a Technological Education program.
All courses offered in Technological Education are open courses, and comprise a set of expectations that
are appropriate for all students. (See The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10, Program Planning and
Assessment, 1999 for a description of the different types of secondary school courses.) Students can use
the course as a compulsory credit (1 credit from Science [Grade 11 or Grade 12] or Technological
Education [Grades 9-12]), or as an optional credit. This course is designed to provide students with a
broad educational base that prepares them for their studies in Grades 11 and 12, and for productive
participation in society.
Students are introduced to practical aspects of communications technology using electronic, live, and
graphic communications methods. The curriculum provides opportunities for students to undertake
hands-on practical activities, as well as to conduct research and analysis. There is a wide range of
teaching/learning strategies and accommodation where the needs of all students are met.
Ontario secondary school graduates are expected to be technologically literate as dictated in Ontario
Secondary Schools, Grades 9 to 12, Program and Diploma Requirements, 1999. This means they should
be able to understand and apply technological concepts, use computers in various applications, and
analyse the implications of a wide range of technologies for individuals and society.
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To ensure that all students in the province have equal opportunity to achieve their full potential, the
education system must be free from discrimination and must provide all students with a safe and secure
environment so that they can participate fully and responsibly in the educational experience. Antidiscrimination education, equity/social justice issues, conflict resolution/violence prevention, community
partnerships and faith development are addressed in the course. These support the Ontario secondary
school board policies as well as the Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations.
Career exploration is a component of all units as outlined in Unit 6, and is aligned with Choices into
Action: Guidance and Career Education Program Policy for Elementary and Secondary Schools, 1999.
Course Evaluation
Teachers may evaluate their course through a variety of methods:
 Teachers may utilize a student PMI (Positive-Minus-Improvement) form administered at the
completion of the course to gather information on how to modify the program.
 Teachers may network with colleagues from other schools, subject associations, and peers at the
local school to determine what modifications or new ideas could be incorporated into course units.
Since every teacher approaches the units in a unique way, there are ample opportunities for
extensions, modifications, and applications.
 The community, both local school and business community, may have input on reviewing/developing
aspects of the Communications Technology course.
The following areas should be assessed:
 Are expectations being met?
 Are the learning styles of all students being met through teaching strategies?
 Does assessment/evaluation measure student expectations in a reliable and accurate manner?
 Are parents informed of student performance on a regular basis?
 Are a variety of assessment/evaluation tools used?
 Are a variety of teaching/learning strategies used?
 Are the special needs of individual students being met?
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Overview Appendix I: Student Manual
(To be given out at the start of the course)
Communications Technology Grade 10: Manual for New Students
Introduction
Welcome to Grade 10 Communications Technology! During this semester you will be provided with the
opportunity to complete a range of communications technology projects. You will learn transferable
skills that you will be able to use in all your courses. Your “job description” as a member of this class is
described below. Follow it closely and you will have the best chance of success!
Secondary Policy Document Course Description
This course requires students to complete a range of communications technology projects. These may
include graphic design activities, short audio-video productions, computer-generated animations,
graphical information displays, and image production. Students learn to transfer information using
electronic, live, and graphic communications methods. The knowledge and skills developed provide a
basis for careers in areas such as publishing, advertising, print production, animation, audio-video
production, photography, and journalism.
Unit Titles
Unit 1
Graphic Design and Production
22 hours
Unit 2
Short Audio-Video Productions
22 hours
Unit 3
Short Animations
22 hours
Unit 4
Information Displays and Environments
22 hours
Unit 5
Image Production and Processes
22 hours
Unit 6
Career Exploration in Communications Technology
Delivered
concurrently
Student Job Description
 Follow all class guidelines and procedures.
 Maintain your notebook following the specified guidelines.
 Maintain your supplementary notes and folders as required:
 Glossary of terms
 Technical Journal
 Portfolio (hard and electronic copy)
 Career Exploration research
 Summary of marks and marked tests, quizzes, and assignments
 Complete all projects for all units.
Student Notebook
As you progress through this course, you will be supplied with a great deal of information on relevant
topics. Much of this information is to be filed in a separate Com Tech notebook. A well-organized and
complete notebook will be a valuable reference and study resource for you. It is recommended that you
use a three-ring binder into which material can be easily inserted.
Notebooks should be organized into the following sections:
 Vinyl Insert (provided by the teacher)
Activity Checklists, Daily Log Sheet, and computer disk should be stored here
 Introductory Course Notes
 Glossary of Technical Terms (see below)
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
Unit 1 Cover Page
 Notes/handouts
 Returned quizzes, worksheets, tests, etc.
 Completed checklists/Daily Logs (when you start the next unit)
 Units 2 – 5
 Same organization as Unit 1 above.
 Portfolio (see below)
 List of where your exemplary work can be found if it is not printable (disks, videotapes, etc.)
 Hard copy of any printable material
 Career Exploration Research (see Appendix 6.1a)
Glossary
Glossaries are like dictionaries and are useful for reference and studying purposes. The glossary for this
course contains terms and expressions relevant to Communications Technology. In the beginning, the
glossary is updated using pen and paper. Later in the course, the glossary is organized and updated
electronically. The glossary should be set up as shown:
Unit #: Title of Unit
Activity #: Title of Activity
Term - Explanation
Example:
 Unit 2: Short Audio-Video Productions
 Activity 1: School Promotional Video
 Grips – A film industry term applied to anything to do with camera supports – from a simple tripod
to a complex camera crane. A grip is a member of a film crew that looks after the support hardware.
A key grip is the head of this department.
 Iris – The opening of a lens through which light passes.
Technical Journal
You are required to maintain a Technical Journal in which you record newly learned procedures. This
serves as a handy personal reference to which you can refer for specific procedures that are often difficult
to memorize. For example, you might begin by listing the steps required to access your computer and
later note the web site that was particularly useful for one of your searches.
Portfolio
Your portfolio contains samples of your exemplary work. This work should be saved electronically: in
your directory on the school file server, on a disk (floppy or zip), or transferred to a videotape or CD. A
paper copy, if possible, should be placed in the portfolio section of the your notebook. The work could be
presented to a potential employer as a demonstration of what you are able to do. Sample work is
collected from most, if not all, the unit activities. As work is filed in your portfolio, you should update
the Portfolio Table of Contents.
Example:
 Unit 1, Activity 1 – Community Newsletters
 Unit 2, Activity 2 – School Visual Essay (see videotape 1)
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Overview Appendix II: Self-Evaluation Chart
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Student Name:
Unit :
Date:
Activity # & Title:
The following evaluation is based on observation of
how frequently you demonstrated the specific
behaviours listed below:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
(50-59%)
(60-69%)
(70-79%)
(80-100%)
Rarely
Sometimes
Often
Always
Attitude
I display originality.
I respect my own work and that of others.
I used my talents with responsibility and care for others.
I used my time wisely.
I completed my projects on time.
I work well with others.
I accepted suggestions and evaluated whether they can
be used.
I am willing to share my ideas and opinions with others.
I took responsibility and care of my working
environment.
Awareness
I am becoming more aware of the world around me.
I am developing awareness of the principles and
elements of design.
I am using the resources in the Communications lab to
search for ideas and opinions from other sources.
I make sure that I fully understand the problem to be
solved.
I am aware of my responsibility as a communicator of
ideas.
Process
I regard unsuccessful attempts as a learning experience.
I am willing to take creative risks and try new
techniques.
I am capable of accepting mistakes as a positive aspect
of my own work.
I strive for a higher level of achievement.
I show initiative in finding and implementing ideas.
I work through ideas and reflect regularly in my daily
log/journal.
Product
I produce a project which is of a quality equal to my
best attempt.
I made use of the skills that I have been taught.
I can discuss my work in an honest and objective way.
I appreciated the work of others and give them positive
reinforcement.
I participated in all group and class discussions.
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Overview Appendix III: Peer Evaluation Rubric
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
- demonstrates
Knowledge/
limited knowledge
Understanding

The student demonstrated
knowledge and
understanding of the
facts, technical
terminology, procedures,
and standards required by
the project.
Thinking/Inquiry
 The student used
inquiry/design skills by
identifying the problem
and providing a solution.
Communication

The student has
communicated a solution
for the problem using
appropriate technical
language.
Application

The student can make
connections between
project work and the
world outside the school.
OCSGD

The student presents
information and ideas
clearly and honestly and
with sensitivity to others.
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates
some knowledge
and
understanding of
the facts,
technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
required by the
project
- applies some
of the skills
involved in an
inquiry/design
process
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge and
understanding of
the facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards required
by the project
- communicates a
solution to the
problem with
limited clarity
- communicates
a solution to the
problem with
moderate clarity
- communicates a
solution to the
problem with
considerable clarity
- uses technical
language with
limited accuracy
and effectiveness
- uses technical
language with
some accuracy
and
effectiveness
- makes
moderate
connections
between the
project solution
and the world
outside the
school
- uses technical
language with
considerable
accuracy and
effectiveness
- makes
considerable
connections
between the project
solution and the
world outside the
school
- presents
information with
moderate
clarity, honesty,
and sensitivity
- presents
information with
considerable
clarity, honesty,
and sensitivity
- demonstrates
thorough
knowledge and
understanding of
the facts,
technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
required by the
project
- applies all or
almost all of the
skills involved
in an
inquiry/design
process
- communicates
a solution to the
problem with a
high degree of
clarity and with
confidence
- uses technical
language with a
high degree of
accuracy and
effectiveness
- makes
effective and
accurate
connections
between the
project solution
and the world
outside the
school
- presents
information with
a high degree of
clarity, honesty,
and sensitivity
and understanding
of the facts,
technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards required
by the project
- applies few of the
skills involved in
an inquiry/design
process
- makes limited
connections
between the project
solution and the
world outside the
school
- presents
information with
limited clarity,
honesty, and
sensitivity
- applies most of
the skills involved
in an
inquiry/design
process
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Page 15
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix IV: Group Work Observation Checklist/Rubric
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
Active
- high degree of
participation in
participation at all
group
times
Share and express - share and
- share and
- share and
- share and
ideas in a coexpress ideas with express ideas with express ideas with express ideas with
operative manner
limited comoderate coconsiderable coa high degree of
in group
operation
operation
operation
co-operation
Respects other’s
- respects other’s
- respects other’s
- respects other’s
- respects other’s
opinions in group opinions rarely
opinions
opinions most of
opinions
occasionally
the time
effectively all of
the time
Stays on task in
- stays on task
- stays on task
- stays on task
- stays on task
group
with limited
with some
with considerable with a high degree
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
of effectiveness
Listens actively in - rarely listens
- listens actively
- listens actively
- listens actively
group
actively
some of the time
most of the time
all of the time
Helps to establish - helps to establish - helps to establish - helps to establish - always actively
group goals
group goals in a
some group goals most group goals
involved in
limited way
establishing group
goals
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Page 16
Level 1
(50-59%)
- limited
participation
Level 2
(60-69%)
- some
participation
Level 3
(70-79%)
- considerable
participation
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix V: Project Presentation (Oral) Rubric
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Preparedness
- some project
resources and
equipment assembled
and functioning
Presentation
Skills
 delivery,
style, voice,
body
language
- demonstrates
limited awareness of
presentation skills
- limited audience
involvement
- most project
resources and
equipment
assembled and
functioning
- demonstrates some
awareness of
presentation skills
- some audience
involvement in the
process and/or
content
- some effective use
of media and
technology
- opening and/or
closing are
somewhat effective
- some coherence in
sequencing of ideas
- all project
resources and
equipment are
assembled and
functioning
- demonstrates
control of
presentation skills
- audience
involvement in
process and content
- considerable
integration of project
resources and
equipment
demonstrated
- demonstrates
sophisticated
presentation skills
- thoughtful audience
involvement in
process and content
- effective integration
of media and
technology
- effective opening
and closing
- skillful integration
of media and
technology
- masterful opening
and closing
- coherent
sequencing of ideas
- thorough
sequencing of ideas
- communicates
some understanding
of the activity
problem
- teaches some
significant and/or
thought-provoking
information and
ideas
- provokes some
audience response
- communicates a
thorough
understanding of the
activity problem
- teaches significant
and thoughtprovoking
information and
ideas
- provokes some
thoughtful audience
response
- answers concrete
and abstract
questions and/or uses
audience responses
effectively
- communicates an
insightful
understanding of the
activity problem
- teaches a wealth of
significant, thoughtprovoking
information and
ideas
- provokes
thoughtful audience
response
- answers all or
almost all questions
and/or extends
audience responses
very effectively
Organization
Quality of
Information and
Ideas
- limited effectiveness
in use of media and
technology
- very limited
opening and/or
closing
- coherent sequence
of ideas is not clearly
evident
- communicates
limited understanding
of the activity
problem
- teaches limited
significant and/or
thought-provoking
information and ideas
- provokes limited
audience response
- answers questions in
a limited manner
- answers concrete
questions and/or
replies to audience
responses with some
effectiveness
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
(Adapted from the Halton District School Board –Nanci Wakeman-Jones)
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Page 17
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix VI: Rubric for Journal/Log Entries
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Criteria
Content
Self-Evaluation
Work Habits
Level 1
(50-59%)
Undeveloped
- limited evidence
of thoughtful
reflection – tells
only what
happened or what
she/he did
- journal notes
show limited
insight into own
strengths and
needs as a learner
Level 3
(70-79%)
Competent
- responses
supported by a
few specific
examples
Level 4
(80-100%)
Powerful
- responses
supported by
specific examples
and personal
reflection
- clearly identifies
strengths and
needs as a learner,
and attempts to
solve own
problems
- has developed a
repertoire of
strategies for
solving own
difficulties as
learner and sets
own goals for
improvement and
future learning
- completes more
than the required
number of entries
- occasionally
- independently
needs to update
completes the
journal/log; most
required number
entries are
of entries on time
completed on time
Organization
- journal/log
- journal/log
- journal/log
- journal/log
shows limited
shows moderate
shows the
shows a high
planning and
planning and
required planning degree of planning
organization
organization
and organization
and organization
Time
- journal/log
- journal/log
- journal/log
- journal/log
Management
entries show class entries show class entries show class entries show class
time was used
time was used
time was used
time was used
with limited
with moderate
with considerable with a high degree
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
of effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Page 18
- requires
prompting to
complete
journal/log entries
Level 2
(60-69%)
Partial
- expresses
personal
preferences only –
minimal
explanation
offered
- aware of
personal needs
and strengths as a
learner, but makes
limited attempts
to solve own
problems
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix VII: Assessment/Evaluation of Personal and Christian
Development
(To be completed at the end of each activity)
Criteria
Level 1
Level 2
(50-59%)
(60-69%)
- demonstrates limited - demonstrates some
Discerning
ability to integrate
ability to integrate
Believer
faith
with
life
faith with life
CGE1i
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates a
thorough ability to
integrate faith with
life
- demonstrates
insightful
understanding of how
to present information
and ideas clearly,
honestly, and with
sensitivity
- shows a thorough
and insightful ability
to think reflectively
and creatively to
evaluate situations
and solve problems
- shows effective
communication,
decision-making,
problem-solving,
time, and resource
management skills
- demonstrates a
thorough and
insightful ability to
work effectively as an
interdependent team
member
- demonstrates a
thorough and
insightful ability to
minister to the family,
school, parish, and
wider community
through service
- demonstrates a
thorough and
insightful
accountability for
one’s own actions
Effective
Communicator
CGE2c
- demonstrates limited
understanding of how
to present information
and ideas clearly,
honestly, and with
sensitivity
- demonstrates some
understanding of how
to present information
and ideas clearly,
honestly, and with
sensitivity
Reflective and
Creative Thinker
CGE3c
- shows limited ability
to think reflectively
and creatively to
evaluate situations
and solve problems
Self-Directed,
Responsible,
Life Long
Learner
CGE4f
- shows limited
communication,
decision-making,
problem-solving,
time, and resource
management skills
- demonstrates limited
ability to work
effectively as an
interdependent team
member
- shows moderate
ability to think
reflectively and
creatively to evaluate
situations and solve
problems
- shows moderate
communication,
decision-making,
problem-solving,
time, and resource
management skills
- demonstrates some
ability to work
effectively as an
interdependent team
member
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
integrate faith with
life
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of how
to present information
and ideas clearly,
honestly, and with
sensitivity
- shows considerable
ability to think
reflectively and
creatively to evaluate
situations and solve
problems
- shows considerable
communication,
decision-making,
problem-solving,
time, and resource
management skills
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
work effectively as an
interdependent team
member
Caring Family
Member
CGE6e
- demonstrates limited
ability to minister to
the family, school,
parish, and wider
community through
service
- demonstrates some
ability to minister to
the family, school,
parish, and wider
community through
service
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
minister to the family,
school, parish, and
wider community
through service
Responsible
Citizen
CGE7b
- demonstrates limited
accountability for
one’s own actions
- demonstrates some
accountability for
one’s own actions
- demonstrates
considerable
accountability for
one’s own actions
Collaborative
Contributor
CGE5a
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Page 19
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix VIII
Coded Expectations, Communications Technology, TGJ2O
Theory and Foundation
Overall Expectations
TFV.01G
– identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.02G
– identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.03G
– identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04G
– demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01G
– explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02G
– identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03G
– describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04G
– describe printing and finishing processes;
TF1.05G
– describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06G
– outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07G
– outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.08G
– identify the types and uses of still photography;
TF1.09G
– identify various cameras and accessories and describe how to test the component parts;
TF1.10G
– explain the process of developing and printing photographic images;
TF1.11G
– identify the elements of lighting and staging.
Skills and Processes
Overall Expectations
SPV.01G
– prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.02G
– produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03G
– compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04G
– use computer graphics software competently.
Page 20
 Communications Technology - Open
Overview Appendix VIII (Continued)
Specific Expectations
SP1.01G
– produce technical drawings and illustrations for printing;
SP1.02G
– apply composition and typographic principles to produce camera-ready artwork for print
production;
SP1.03G
– produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04G
– apply finishing operations to printed products;
SP1.05G
– create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.06G
– use basic lighting techniques and props competently to accentuate audio-video productions;
SP1.07G
– create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08G
– edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1.09G
– create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.10G
– process and obtain prints from film and/or digital input;
SP1.11G
– enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays.
Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
ICV.01G
– explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02G
– observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03G
– identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
IC1.01G
– identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02G
– operate equipment safely;
IC1.03G
– apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04G
– identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05G
– demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Page 21
 Communications Technology - Open
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1a
-illustrates a basic understanding of the saving story of our Christian faith;
CGE1b
-participates in the sacramental life of the church and demonstrates an understanding of the
centrality of the Eucharist to our Catholic story;
CGE1c
-actively reflects on God’s Word as communicated through the Hebrew and Christian
scriptures;
CGE1d
-develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity and the common good;
CGE1e
-speaks the language of life... “recognizing that life is an unearned gift and that a person
entrusted with life does not own it but that one is called to protect and cherish it.” (Witnesses
to Faith)
CGE1f
-seeks intimacy with God and celebrates communion with God, others and creation through
prayer and worship;
CGE1g
-understands that one’s purpose or call in life comes from God and strives to discern and live
out this call throughout life’s journey;
CGE1h
-respects the faith traditions, world religions and the life-journeys of all people of good will;
CGE1i
-integrates faith with life;
CGE1j
-recognizes that “sin, human weakness, conflict and forgiveness are part of the human
journey” and that the cross, the ultimate sign of forgiveness is at the heart of redemption.
(Witnesses to Faith)
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a
-listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b
-reads, understands and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c
-presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d
-writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages;
CGE2e
-uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
Page 22
 Communications Technology - Open
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3a
-recognizes there is more grace in our world than sin and that hope is essential in facing all
challenges;
CGE3b
-creates, adapts, evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c
-thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d
-makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e
-adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience;
CGE3f
-examines, evaluates and applies knowledge of interdependent systems (physical, political,
ethical, socio-economic and ecological) for the development of a just and compassionate
society.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a
-demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b
-demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4c
-takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4d
-responds to, manages and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4e
-sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work and personal life;
CGE4f
-applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time and resource
management skills;
CGE4g
-examines and reflects on one’s personal values, abilities and aspirations influencing life’s
choices and opportunities;
CGE4h
-participates in leisure and fitness activities for a balanced and healthy lifestyle.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a
-works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5b
-thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5c
-develops one’s God-given potential and makes a meaningful contribution to society;
CGE5d
-finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment and vocation in work which contributes to the common
good;
Page 23
 Communications Technology - Open
CGE5e
-respects the rights, responsibilities and contributions of self and others;
CGE5f
-exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g
-achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities
in the work of others;
CGE5h
-applies skills for employability, self-employment and entrepreneurship relative to Christian
vocation.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6a
-relates to family members in a loving, compassionate and respectful manner;
CGE6b
-recognizes human intimacy and sexuality as God given gifts, to be used as the creator
intended;
CGE6c
-values and honours the important role of the family in society;
CGE6d
-values and nurtures opportunities for family prayer;
CGE6e
-ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7a
-acts morally and legally as a person formed in Catholic traditions;
CGE7b
-accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7c
-seeks and grants forgiveness;
CGE7d
-promotes the sacredness of life;
CGE7e
-witnesses Catholic social teaching by promoting equality, democracy, and solidarity for a
just, peaceful and compassionate society;
CGE7f
-respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures;
CGE7g
-respects and understands the history, cultural heritage and pluralism of today’s contemporary
society;
CGE7h
-exercises the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship;
CGE7i
-respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j
-contributes to the common good
Page 24
 Communications Technology - Open
Unit 1: Graphic Design and Production
Time: 22 hours
Unit Description
This unit introduces students to the graphics industry and the technology to communicate graphically
through desktop-publishing systems and software, print production, and specialty printing. Students
continue to expand knowledge of the elements and principles of design and apply these elements and
principles throughout all the stages (design, layout, and production) required to produce a graphic
product. Students produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods. Christian ethics and
gospel values are reflected in all communicated messages throughout the various activities.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d, i; CGE2a, b, c, d, e; CGE3b, c, d, e;
CGE4a, b, c, d, e, f; CGE5a, b, c, d, e, g, h; CGE6e; CGE7a, b, d, e, i, j.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.01, TFV.03, TFV.04, SPV.01, SPV.03, SPV.04, ICV.01, ICV.02,
ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: TF1.01, TF1.02, TF1.03, TF1.04, SP1.01, SP1.02, SP1.03, SP1.04, IC1.01,
IC1.02, IC1.03, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Personal Stationery
Community Newsletter
Package Design – Videocassette Case
Specialty Printing Processes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
Prior Knowledge Required
A basic understanding of computer operations would be beneficial, but is not necessary for the
completion of activities.
Unit Planning Notes








It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
Teachers should outline basic course expectations, policies, and procedures to the students at the
start of the course. Provide students with the format for log/journal entries notebook organization.
In this unit, students begin to add their best work to their portfolio (see Overview Appendix IV). The
portfolio, although evaluated throughout, is examined for completeness at the end of the course. It
would be useful to provide students with a portfolio checklist to help them keep track of their work.
The teacher collects and provides examples created by other students to be used for discussion.
The activities depend on available equipment. In order to ensure that activities are authentic, the
contents of this unit should be adapted to the technology that is available locally.
The teacher must provide a safe work environment for all students and must stress the correct and
safe use of all equipment and materials.
Unit 1 - Page 1
 Communications Technology - Open





The teacher should investigate the software that is accessible and available at the school site or
available through the board system.
The activities explore a variety of graphic reproduction methods including desktop publishing, CAD
programs, computer graphics, and, where available, offset and specialty printing processes.
Teachers should investigate potential cross-curricular connections with other subject areas and
community links.
Teachers should refer to Unit 6, Activity 1, which should be completed at the start of this unit.
Unit 6 can be most effectively delivered by the integration of topics throughout the unit.
 Classroom teachers work closely with the Student Services department to co-ordinate the
planning of the unit.
 Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of career options in the Communications
Technology field.
 Students should be introduced at the start of this unit to the format for career research that must
be included in their Student Manuals (see Overview Appendix I). This content is used for their
career presentation at the end of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Each activity provides the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and
provides insights into the skills required for related professions. Teaching/learning strategies that
allow for career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research,
field trips, and guest speakers).
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout the activities, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promotes
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Graphic design and production combines a variety of academic and applied learning strategies,
including independent and group work, problem solving, co-operation, communication, time
management, brainstorming new ideas, presenting, and report writing. The student-centred, activitybased mode of delivery provides opportunities to develop individual and group skills.
Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment and evaluation are based on testing, product development, and product delivery using a
variety of media, and includes diagnostic, formative, and summative methods.
Assessment is an ongoing daily process that includes: log/journal entries, portfolios, regular practical
and theory tests and/or quizzes, activity worksheets and exercises, project evaluation criteria,
student/group presentations, conferences, self and peer critiques, checklists, and rubrics.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Unit 1 - Page 2
 Communications Technology - Open
Various samples of: printed stationery, community/marketing newsletters, packages/videocassette cases,
and T-shirts.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Canada: Nelson Canada, 1990.
ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Braidwood, Barbara and Richard Cropp. Writing Magazine and Newspaper Articles. USA: Self Council
Press, 1999. ISBN 1-5518-0193-0
Broekhuizen, Richard. Graphic Communications. USA: Glencoe Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, 1995.
ISBN 0-0267-6305-2
Chambers, Karen. Print’s Best Letterheads & Business Cards. USA: RC Publications, Incorporated,
1998. ISBN 1-8839-1505-8
Guptill, W. Packaging Design. USA: Watson-Guptil Publications, Inc., 1996. ISBN 0-8230-6502-2
Ingram, Roy and Steve Kennedy. The News. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1989.
ISBN 0-7730-4973-8
Johnson, Charles. Communication Systems. USA: Goodheart-Wilcox Co., Inc., 1992.
ISBN 0-8700-6961-6
Karsnitz, John. Graphic Arts Technology. USA: Delmar Publishers Inc., 1984. ISBN 0-8273-1828-6
Mayers, H., and M. Lublliner. The Marketer's Guide to Successful Package Design. USA:
NTC/Contemporary Publishing Company, 1998. ISBN 0-8442-3438-9
McCain, Ted. Designing for Communication: The Key to Successful Desktop Publishing. Eugene,
Oregon: ISTE Publications, 1992. ISBN 1-5648-4012-3
Parsons, Bill. Pagemaker: Graphic Design with Pagemaker Version 5.0. USA: Delmar Publishers Inc.,
1994. ISBN 0-8273-6451-2
Porozny, George H.J. Desktop Publishing: Design Basics and Applications. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman
Ltd., 1993. ISBN 0-7730-5218-6
Purst, Zeke. Graphic Communication: The Printed Image. USA: Goodheart-Wilcox Co., Inc., 1989.
ISBN 0-8700-6961-6
Sanders, Mark. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. Mission Hills, California, USA:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991. ISBN 0-0267-7111-X
Sandmann, Kathy. T-shirt Designs. USA: Sewing Productions, Incorporated, 1994. ISBN 0-9376-7901-1
Simone, Luisa. Publisher by Design. Redmond Washington, USA: Microsoft Press, 1994.
ISBN 0-9805-2639-9
Swann, Alan. How to Understand and Use Design and Layout. Cincinnati, Ohio: North Light Books,
1999. ISBN 0-8913-4358-X
Taylor, Carol. The Great T-shirt Book & Kit: Make Your Own Spectacular, One of A Kind Designs.
USA: Sterling Publishing Company, 1992. ISBN 0-8069-8798-0
Woodward, Cheryl. Starting and Running a Successful Newsletter or Magazine. USA: Nolo Press, 1998.
ISBN 0-8733-7461-4
Videos
Step-by-Step Video. "Graphic Design: 1& 2." Step-by-Step Video, 1989. 45 min.
Step-by-Step Video. "Paste-Up: 1& 2." Step-by-Step Video, 1988. 45 min.
Web Sites
CAD Software
http://www.cadsoftware.comInternet tutorials
Unit 1 - Page 3
 Communications Technology - Open
Canadian Catholic Organization
http://www.devp.org/
Canadian Catholic Organization for the development of peace
Company Newsletters
http://www.companynewsletters.com/newsread.htm
Newsletter publishing tips
Corel Corporation
http://www.corel.com/index.htm
Contains information about CorelDRAW™.
Desktop Publishing
http://www.desktoppublishing.com/linkus.html
Site contains helpful links to graphic utilities.
Glory Graphics
http://www.Glorygraphics.com
Christian T-shirt Designs
Graphic Arts Technical Foundation
http://www.gatf.org
Site contains educational information on the graphic arts.
Haines
http://www.haines2u.com
T-shirt Design
Managers Guide to Newsletters
http://www.Managersguide.com/Chap1.htm
Newsletter publishing information
Mirror Image
http://www.mirrorimage.com
T-shirt Designs and Screen Printing
Newsletter Publishing
http://www.NewsletterOnline.com
Newsletter publishing information.
Shirt Studio
http://www.t-shirtstudio.com
T-shirt Designs
Shirt Shopper
http://www.t-shirtshopper.com
T-shirt Designs
Silent Voice
http://www.silentvoice.ca
Service for deaf children, adults, and families.
Street Haven
http://www.streethaven.com/main.htm
Drop-in centre for women
St. Agustine’s Seminary
http://www.stagustines.on.ca
Seminary for training men for the priesthood
Unit 1 - Page 4
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Activity 1: Personal Stationery
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students use the design, composition, and typographical principles to produce personal stationery
products. They learn to prepare camera-ready art for print production using hand and computer graphics
techniques. Using a variety of print reproduction methods, students safely achieve the desired finish of
their designed work. A variety of print related careers are identified and explored during the many phases
of project completion.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2e – uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems.
Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7a – acts morally and legally as a person formed in Catholic traditions;
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7e – witnesses Catholic social teaching by promoting equality, democracy, and solidarity for a just,
peaceful, and compassionate society;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.01 – identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 - explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
Unit 1 - Page 5
 Communications Technology - Open
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
SP1.01 – produce technical drawings and illustrations for printing;
SP1.02 – apply composition and typographic principles to produce camera-ready artwork for print
production;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day.
 This activity combines computer graphics knowledge and the technical procedures that are performed
to produce printed products.
 Teachers acquire and present a good selection of personal stationery items, such as business cards,
letterhead, labels, envelopes, greeting cards, etc., to demonstrate the appeal and wide spread use of
these items in everyday situations.
 An introduction and overview of how drawings and layouts are generated (both by hand and
computerized methods) using the principles of composition and typography offers a good practical
beginning.
 Teachers should develop design criteria based on available equipment and resources.
 Schools without offset printing capability may print using laser and/or colour printers.
 Schools with pre-press, press, and finishing equipment convert camera-ready copy to printing
masters and produce printed copies using offset presses.
 Some designs may require the purchase of pre-printed stationery packages for specific printers (e.g.,
business cards) to attain the desired finished effect.
 Safety sheets and step-by-step instructions for operating industrial equipment need to be available to
ensure students know and apply the safe operation techniques.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for speakers whose careers are in the Print technology area to share
their education and career paths with students.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Unit 1 - Page 6
 Communications Technology - Open
Prior Knowledge Required
 An understanding of computer operations and the software programs needed to produce their project
is preferred, but not required.
 Students should be able to use drafting instruments to produce manual layouts and should have
mastered text entry and manipulation of images in the appropriate software.
 Students must be aware of general classroom safety and the safety precautions required when using
all equipment.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Teachers introduce samples of personal stationery and discuss how they were designed and finished.
Through the examples, teachers should help students develop ideas of potential stationery designs.
 Design teams could be formed (e.g., one team designs personal business cards, another designs
greeting cards, etc.). Each design team then generates the design criteria and specifications for their
item.
 Students, through discussion with team members, make final design decisions in light of gospel
values with an informed moral conscience.
 Teachers introduce and discuss with students the basic layout procedures involved in graphic
production, including:
 the initial series of thumbnail sketches;
 a rough sketch to size developed from one thumbnail sketch;
 the comprehensive layout showing the finished design;
 the camera-ready mechanical or paste-up.
 Establish design review group sessions aimed at creating a positive environment for sharing ideas
and concepts. Students should be encouraged to critique each other's work. The aim of each session
is to gather a variety of views on how to enhance the material being produced, to proof read work to
avoid errors, and to ensure that ethical standards and policies of communications technology, as well
as gospel values, are met.
 Determine the reproduction method to be used (colour desktop printer or offset printing).
 For desktop reproduction outline the correct page set-up, layout, and colour that might be used by the
student.
 For offset reproduction (if available), outline the pre-press operations required to convert cameraready copy to film, stripping the masking sheet, and plate-making. Describe the printing press set-up
(press paper set-up, mounting the plate, operating the press to produce a print, making adjustments to
print position and quality), emphasize the safety procedures for every operation from pre-press to
finishing.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Students demonstrate proper use of computers and software effectively:
 Teacher observation – formal and informal;
 Personal communication – student-teacher conferencing.
Unit 1 - Page 7
 Communications Technology - Open
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The proposal is in correct format and includes design brief, plus the knowledge and skills students
are expected to learn:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises.
Students produce a minimum of four different ideas in thumbnail sketches. All thumbnails meet the
criteria and agree with proposal.
Students' critiques should demonstrate careful thought and offer positive and constructive direction:
 Personal communication through teacher critique.
Rough sketch should demonstrate a resemblance to the most promising thumbnail sketch;
comprehensive layout should reflect the exact form, style, and size of type and the shape and position
of all other printing elements:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises.
Students assemble a project portfolio for submission containing the layout sheets (thumbnail
sketches, rough sketch(s), comprehensive layout, and mechanical. In schools with pre-press
capabilities, the portfolio should also contain the film or stripped masking sheet and a copy of the
finished product:
 Performance assessment of portfolio and assigned exercises.
A written technical report outlining the production overview of printed communications and a listing
of career opportunities concludes this activity:
 Performance assessment of research project and finished project.
Students using the desktop reproduction are evaluated on their correct choice and use of layout
design, typography, colour, graphics, and design principles:
 Performance assessment of research project and finished project (see Appendices 1.1a and 1.1b).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Special needs students are accommodated by using design templates found in most computer
graphics programs. Those students requiring assistance in handling materials and sensitive equipment
may benefit from peer assistance.
 All students should be encouraged to share knowledge and skills as peer mentors for software
programs, and to guide other students during complex technical procedures.
 Layout stages may be omitted or expanded to accommodate different learners.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of printed stationery.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Canada: Nelson Canada, 1990.
ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Broekhuizen, Richard. Graphic Communications. USA: Glencoe Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, 1995.
ISBN 0-0267-6305-2
Unit 1 - Page 8
 Communications Technology - Open
Chambers, Karen. Print’s Best Letterheads & Business Cards. USA: RC Publications, Incorporated,
1998. ISBN 1-8839-1505-8
Johnson, Charles. Communication Systems. USA: Goodheart-Wilcox Co., Inc., 1992.
ISBN 0-8700-6961-6
Karsnitz, John. Graphic Arts Technology. USA: Delmar Publishers Inc., 1984. ISBN 0-8273-1828-6
Porozny, George H.J. Desktop Publishing: Design Basics and Applications. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman
Ltd., 1993. ISBN 0-7730-5218-6
Purst, Zeke. Graphic Communication, The Printed Image. USA: Goodheart-Wilcox Co., Inc., 1989.
ISBN 0-8700-6961-6
Swann, Alan. How to Understand and Use Design and Layout. Cincinnati, Ohio: North Light Books,
1999. ISBN 0-8913-4358-X
Videos
Step-by-Step Video. "Graphic Design: 1& 2." Step-by-Step Video, 1989. 45 min.
Step-by-Step Video. "Paste-Up: 1& 2." Step-by-Step Video, 1988. 45 min.
Web Sites
Corel Corporation
http://www.corel.com/index.htm
Contains information about CorelDRAW™.
Desktop Publishing
http://www.desktoppublishing.com/linkus.html
Contains helpful links to graphic utilities.
Graphic Arts Technical Foundation
http://www.gatf.org
Contains educational information on the graphic arts.
Activity 2: Community Newsletter
Time: 330 minutes
Description
As an introduction to graphic design and production, students use a design process to create a newsletter
promoting a social justice issue important to their school community. Using layout procedures
(thumbnail and rough sketches), students demonstrate an understanding of design principles in the
manipulation of graphic and text objects, typography, and colour. Using image editing, drawing, and
page layout applications in the production process, students develop familiarity with computer hardware
and peripherals as well as how computers process text and image files. Research for this project involves
organizations supported by ShareLife.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
Unit 1 - Page 9
 Communications Technology - Open
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4c – takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4e – sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5c – develops one’s God-given potential and makes a meaningful contribution to society;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.01 – identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
SP1.01 – produce technical drawings and illustrations for printing;
SP1.02 – apply composition and typographic principles to produce camera-ready artwork;
Unit 1 - Page 10
 Communications Technology - Open
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently for print production;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day.
 Teachers should have samples of various types of typography, digital images, and clipart.
 Teachers should have samples of different types of newsletters to illustrate the difference between a
marketing and community newsletter.
 Students should have an understanding of the design process and layout procedures (thumbnail/rough
sketches, etc.).
 Cross-curricular connections include Religion, Social Science, and English.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to this Community
Newsletter activity to share their education and career paths with students.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 An understanding of computer operations and the software programs required for the production of a
newsletter is preferred, but not essential.
 An understanding of the principles of design and how they may be applied to the project.
Teaching and Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Teachers direct students to research sources when more information is required and review project
expectations.
 Students use a case study approach to research the various types of newsletters that are available.
 Students discuss the issues to be included in their newsletter. They may get involved in a small group
to decide what might be included in the production.
 Students conference with the teacher during the development of the project.
Unit 1 - Page 11
 Communications Technology - Open
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Teachers review the principles of design that would be appropriate for the project (refer to Appendix
4.2a for reference). Students apply problem solving and the design process to make appropriate
decisions on their projects.
Teachers relate the proper use of handling text and graphics. Students work independently to explore
and research the topics they are interested in investigating. They should examine issues of spiritual
understanding as it relates to them individually, in their families, and in their communities.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Each student is evaluated on thumbnail sketches and rough work:
 Personal communication through student-teacher conferencing, ongoing verbal feedback;
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises.
 The selection of appropriate material is evaluated:
 Personal communication through student-teacher conferencing;
 Performance assessment of finished project.
 Correct grammar and spelling are checked and evaluated:
 Performance assessment of finished project.
 The final product is evaluated in terms of how well the student was able to accomplish their
newsletter design. Correct use of layout design, colour, typography, and graphics layout is evaluated
in terms of the principles of design:
 Performance assessment of finished project.
 How well the student conveys the message of the newsletters is examined:
 Performance assessment of finished project (see Appendix 1.2).
 Students evaluate the newsletter and reflect in a journal the positive and negative experiences they
had designing the project:
 Personal communication – journal, teacher critique (see Overview Appendix VI);
 Reflection – self/peer and group assessment (see Overview Appendices II, III, and VI).
 Students are given anecdotal comments with suggestions for improving their newsletter:
 Personal communication through student-teacher conferencing, ongoing verbal feedback, and
teacher critique.
 Skills students learned working on the computer and software are evaluated:
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes.
 Formative assessment of each student’s ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess contributions of individual group members by completing daily log sheets;
 Personal communication through self and peer assessment.
 Self, peer, and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project:
 Reflection – self/peer assessment (see Overview Appendices II, III, and VI).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students can use the auto-content wizards to help them produce the newsletter.
 Students are given an opportunity to rewrite their newsletter after being checked by the teacher.
 Peer tutoring is provided for students who request extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing occur throughout the project.
 Flexible timelines are given to those who require them.
 Students with specific needs are allowed to use more graphics in their projects.
Unit 1 - Page 12
 Communications Technology - Open
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of community and marketing newsletters.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Braidwood, Barbara and Richard Cropp. Writing Magazine and Newspaper Articles. USA: Self Council
Press, 1999. ISBN 1-5518-0193-0
Ingram, Roy and Steve Kennedy. The News. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1989.
ISBN 0-7730-4973-8
McCain, Ted. Designing for Communication: The Key to Successful Desktop Publishing. Eugene,
Oregon: ISTE Publications, 1992. ISBN 1-5648-4012-3
Parsons, Bill. Pagemaker: Graphic Design with Pagemaker Version 5.0. USA: Delmar Publishers Inc.,
1994. ISBN 0-8273-6451-2
Porozny, George H.J. Desktop Publishing: Design Basics and Applications. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman
Ltd., 1993. ISBN 0-7730-5218-6
Sanders, Mark. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. Mission Hills, California, USA:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991. ISBN 0-0267-7111-X
Simone, Luisa. Publisher by Design. Redmond Washington, USA: Microsoft Press, 1994.
ISBN 0-9805-2639-9
Swann, Alan. How to Understand and Use Design and Layout. Cincinnati, Ohio: North Light Books,
1999. ISBN 0-8913-4358-X
Woodward, Cheryl. Starting and Running a Successful Newsletter or Magazine. USA: Nolo Press, 1998.
ISBN 0-8733-7461-4
Web Sites
Canadian Catholic Organization
http://www.devp.org/
Canadian Catholic Organization for the development and peace
Company Newsletter
http://www.companynewslettere.com/newsread.htm
Newsletter publishing tips
Managers Guide to Newsletters
http://www.Managersguide.com/Chap1.htm
Newsletter publishing information
Newsletter Publishing
http://www.NewsletterOnline.com
Newsletter publishing information
Silent Voice
http://www.silentvoice.ca
Service for deaf children, adults, and families.
Street Haven
http://www.streethaven.com/main.htm
Drop-in centre for women
Unit 1 - Page 13
 Communications Technology - Open
St. Agustine’s Seminary
http://www.stagustines.on.ca
Seminary for training men for the priesthood
Activity 3: Package Design – Videocassette Case
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students investigate the components of package design and fabrication. They apply computer and manual
drafting techniques to design and draft a videocassette case complete with folds and tabs. They develop
an understanding of drafting techniques including orthographic projection and drawing to scale. Students
design appropriate graphics for all sides of the case using computer graphics software.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4c – takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5c – develops one’s God-given potential and makes a meaningful contribution to society;
CGE5f – exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Unit 1 - Page 14
 Communications Technology - Open
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
SP1.01 – produce technical drawings and illustrations for printing;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Teachers should prepare quick reference sheets for CorelDRAW™ and design software.
 Teachers need to prepare review handouts on manual technical drawing (how to use the instruments,
object and construction lines, scale, etc.).
 The best way to organize the activity is to start with manual drafting review and techniques (pencil,
scale or ruler, paper) and progress to computer aided drafting (design software) and computer
graphics (CorelDRAW™).
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Package
Design Industry to share their education and career paths with students.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Drafting to scale – students should be able to draft to scale using pencil and ruler.
 Computer – students should have a basic knowledge of computer-assisted drafting and computer
graphic software from previous activities in Integrated Technology.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Teachers should introduce samples of package designs and discuss how they were designed and
assembled. Sample packages are taken apart to show folds, tabs, and glue seams.
 Show samples of videocassette covers and outline the process of their development.
 Introduce the concepts of establishing shape, size, and proportions for package design. Teachers
should discuss and review the elements of technical drawing and of development drawings for
packaging.
 Review software use for drafting and computer graphics.
Unit 1 - Page 15
 Communications Technology - Open





The teacher introduces the criteria for this activity.
Students work through packaging exercises and design their videocassette package.
 Students bring packages into the classroom and try to draw them with all tabs and folds without
taking them apart. Packages are then taken apart to see how accurately they were sketched. If not,
students re-draw the package.
 Students take two other three-dimensional objects and draw the development drawing of the
object (scale 1:1) on cardboard, adding any tabs and glue seams required, and put them together.
Upon completion of the packaging exercises, students design, draft (by hand or on computer), and
fabricate a videocassette case complete with graphics on all sides.
The teacher meets with students throughout to deal with questions and/or problems that may arise.
Students are encouraged to share their ideas with others. Teacher-student conferencing leads to final
approval of package design.
Students layout their design, add computer graphics, and assemble their package design.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Software tutorial exercises are assessed:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets.
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil tests.
 Each student is evaluated on thumbnail sketches and technical drawings developed for the design of
the videocassette cover:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises.
 Students are assessed on their ability to make decisions in light of gospel values with an informed
conscience:
 Personal communication through student-teacher conferencing;
 Reflection – self/peer assessment – log/journal entries.
 Roving conferencing:
 Personal communication through student-teacher conferencing.
 Formative assessment of each student’s ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess contributions of individual group members by completing daily log sheets;
 Personal communication – self/peer assessment.
 Self, peer, and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project:
 Reflection – self/peer and group assessment, log/journal entries (see Overview Appendices II, III,
IV, and VI).
 The final product will be evaluated in terms of the correct use the principles of design, layout, colour,
typography and graphics:
 Performance assessment of finished project (see Appendix 1.3b).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students may be grouped or allowed to work alone.
 Project requirements can be modified. Students may: manually draft packages, hand draw graphics,
and/or use prefabricated cassette covers to add graphics.
 Students should be encouraged to develop more detailed cassette covers with tabs, lock, added
computer graphics (such as GIFs that they designed as backgrounds and as part of an animation or
video project).
Unit 1 - Page 16
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



Students should be encouraged to develop other packages and act as peer mentors for software
programs
Students with special needs can be provided appropriate timelines for completion.
Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
Students act as peer tutors for those students who need extra help.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of packaging designs.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Guptill, W. Packaging Design. USA: Watson-Guptil Publications, Inc., 1996. ISBN 0-8230-6502-2
Mayers, H. and M. Lublliner. The Marketer's Guide to Successful Package Design. USA:
NTC/Contemporary Publishing Company, 1998. ISBN 0-8442-3438-9
Porozny, George. Desktop Publishing: Design Basics and Applications. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman
Ltd., 1993. ISBN 0-7730-5218-6
Sanders, M. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. Mission Hills, California:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991. ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Web Sites
CAD Software
http://www.cadsoftware.com
Internet tutorials
Activity 4: Specialty Printing Processes
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students design and print garments using the photo-direct heat transfer method of screen-printing. They
apply typography and design principles to generate designs using hand and computer techniques.
Students learn to convert copy to various garments, T-shirts, sweatshirts, bags, and mouse pads by using
a heat transfer method or computer-controlled cutting machines. Throughout the activity, students
observe safety regulations in the safe handling of equipment.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
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An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4c – takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4d – responds to, manages, and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5c – develops one’s God-given potential and makes a meaningful contribution to society;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others;
CGE5h – applies skills for employability, self-employment, and entrepreneurship relative to Christian
vocation.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7d – promotes the sacredness of life;
CGE7e – witnesses Catholic social teaching by promoting equality, democracy, and solidarity for a just,
peaceful, and compassionate society;
CGE7g – respects and understands the history, cultural heritage and pluralism of today’s contemporary
society;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j - contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.01 – identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Unit 1 - Page 18
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Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
SP1.01 – produce technical drawings and illustrations for printing;
SP1.02 – apply composition and typographic principles to produce camera-ready artwork for print
production;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Teachers provide students with various styles of typography and digital images that might be used;
samples would be helpful.
 Teachers need to make students aware of the typographical effects available in design software and
how they can be applied to a graphic to create design changes.
 Equipment includes: heat transfer machines, transfer printer, vinyl cutting machine, digital camera,
scanner, colour printer, and software.
 Cross-curricular connections include English, Religion, and Art.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the T-shirt Design
industry to share their education and career paths with students.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 An understanding of computer operations and the software programs needed to produce the project is
preferred, but not required.
 Students understand the principles of design in order to apply these to their design.
 Students must be aware of general classroom safety and the safety precautions required when using
all equipment.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
Unit 1 - Page 19
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 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Show students samples of T-shirt designs.
 Students may choose to form design teams with classmates.
 Students investigate the existing T-shirt marketplace. They may bring in their own T-shirts or look at
samples provided by the teacher. They discuss, with the class or in small groups, the possible design
alternatives.
 Teachers encourage students to use the problem-solving process to find a final solution to their
design. Students create thumbnail sketches of possible solutions for their T-shirt design.
 Teachers provide lessons on the safe and proper use of all the equipment and software required for
completion of this activity.
 Students are directed to various software tutorials to develop skills in file and graphic manipulation.
 Through discussion with the teacher, students discuss their design solutions and implement potential
design modifications. They explore the possibility of creating a design that reflects antidiscrimination, equity/social justice, conflict resolution/violence prevention, or other issue that
makes a social statement in keeping with the gospel values.
 Teachers conference with students on a regular basis to consider potential design solutions and
problems that occur with both software and equipment.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Each student is evaluated on the thumbnail sketches they develop for their design of the T-shirt:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets.
 Software tutorial exercises are assessed:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets.
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil tests.
 Students are assessed on how well they used and understood the design process and print process:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing;
 Teacher observation both formal and informal.
 The final product is evaluated in terms of how well the student was able to accomplish their designed
T-shirt. The overall layout design, typography, colour use, safety, and effective message are used to
evaluate:
 Performance assessment of finished project.
 Formative assessment of each student’s ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess contributions of individual group members by completing daily log sheets;
 Self, peer, and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project;
 Personal communication – self/peer and group assessment (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV);
 Reflection – daily log/journal entries (see Overview Appendices VI).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Performance assessment of exercises, worksheets ,and finished project;
 Paper and pencil tests.
Unit 1 - Page 20
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
Students are assessed on their ability to make decisions in light of gospel values with an informed
conscience:
 Teacher observation both formal/informal;
 Reflection – log/journal entries.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist special needs students with the handling of equipment.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to develop an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or the school.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturers equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of T-shirt designs.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Sandmann, Kathy. T-shirt Designs. USA: Sewing Productions, Inc., 1994. ISBN 0-93767901-1
Taylor, Carol. The Great T-shirt Book & Kit: Make Your Own Spectacular, One of A Kind Designs.
USA: Sterling Publishing Company, 1992. ISBN 0-8069-8798-0
Sanders, Mark. Communication: Technology Today and Tomorrow. USA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991.
ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Web Sites
Glory Graphics
http://www.Glorygraphics.com
Christian T-shirt Designs
Haines
http://www.haines2u.com
T-shirt Design
Mirror Image
http://www.mirrorimage.com
T-shirt Designs and Screen Printing
Shirt Studio
http://www.t-shirtstudio.com
T-shirt Designs
Shirt Shopper
http://www.t-shirtshopper.com
T-shirt Designs
Unit 1 - Page 21
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Appendix 1.1a
Off-set Printing Assessment/Evaluation Guidelines
Each of these technical steps requires careful study and preparation of the facility.
 Mechanical layouts must be error free and contain all necessary trim, register, and centre lines.
 Cover sheet should be attached to protect elements from dirt.
 Pre-press image conversion includes the production of a line negative from the camera-ready
mechanical, film repairs and stripping the mask, and plate making.
 Line negatives should be of the proper density and contain minimal pinholes.
 Film flaws must be repaired with the proper materials.
 Film must be attached (stripped) in position on the masking sheet to produce a printing plate.
 Printing of the plate requires the careful and safe handling of sensitive equipment.
 Students must observe safety and operating procedures as outlined by the machine manufacturer.
 Printing image must be positioned on the paper as planned on the mechanical layout, all adjustments
are to be made when the printing press is stopped.
 Copies are printed with consistent ink density and minimum waste of paper.
 Printing press is cleaned after use; printed sheets are carefully stored. Printed copies are finished the
day after printing (cut, folded, stapled, etc.).
Unit 1 - Page 22
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Appendix 1.1b
Personal Stationery Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
- is able to
Knowledge/
identify and
Understanding
TFV.01, TF1.01,
describe all of the
TF1.02, TF1.03,
techniques used to
TF1.04
produce print
media
- demonstrates a
Thinking/Inquiry
TFV.04
thorough
understanding of
electronic
communication
equipment
IC1.04
- identifies career
opportunities and
developed an
appropriate
education plan
with a high degree
of effectiveness
-communicates
Communication
SPV.01
graphic
information with a
high degree of
clarity
- uses computer
- uses computer
- uses computer
Application
SPV.04
graphics software graphics software
graphics software
with limited
with moderate
with a high degree
effectiveness
effectiveness
of effectiveness
ICV.02, IC1.02,
- operates
- operates
- demonstrates
IC1.03
equipment safely
equipment safely
and promotes the
and correctly only and correctly with
safe and correct
with supervision
some supervision
procedures when
operating
equipment
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 1 - Page 23
Level 1
(50-59%)
- is able to
identify and
describe few of
the techniques
used to produce
print media
- demonstrates
limited
understanding of
electronic
communication
equipment
- identifies career
opportunities and
developed an
appropriate
education plan
with limited
effectiveness
- communicates
graphic
information with
limited clarity
Level 2
(60-69%)
- is able to
identify and
describe some of
the techniques
used to produce
print media
- demonstrates
moderate
understanding of
electronic
communication
equipment
- identifies career
opportunities and
developed an
appropriate
education plan
with moderate
effectiveness
- communicates
graphic
information with
moderate clarity
Level 3
(70-79%)
- is able to
identify and
describe most of
the techniques
used to produce
print media
- demonstrates
understanding of
most of the
electronic
communication
equipment
- identifies career
opportunities and
developed an
appropriate
education plan
with considerable
effectiveness
- communicates
graphic
information with
considerable
clarity
- uses computer
graphics software
with considerable
effectiveness
- operates
equipment safely
and correctly
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 1.2
Community Newsletter Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.01
TF1.O2
- demonstrates limited
knowledge identifying
and describing the
techniques of
producing print media
and the use of basic
composition
principles
- demonstrates some
knowledge identifying
and describing the
techniques of
producing print media
and the use of basic
composition
principles
- demonstrates a high
ability to identify and
describe the
techniques used to
produce print media
and the use of basic
composition
principles
Thinking/
Inquiry
SPV.01
SPV.04
- applies few
principles of design
and inquiry while
using the computer
and software
competently
- communicates
information with a
limited degree of
clarity and knowledge
of the ethical
standards and policies
used in
communications
technology
- demonstrates limited
ability to compose,
capture, and process
images in print
production
- applies some
principles of design
and inquiry while
using the computer
and software
competently
- communicates
information with
some degree of clarity
and knowledge of the
ethical standards and
policies used in
communications
technology
- demonstrates limited
ability to integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition, in the
critical analysis of
arts, media,
technology, and
information systems,
to enhance the quality
of life
- demonstrates some
ability to integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition, in the
critical analysis of
arts, media,
technology, and
information systems,
to enhance the quality
of life
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge
identifying and
describing the
techniques of
producing print
media and the use of
basic composition
principles
- applies most
principles of design
and inquiry while
using the computer
and software
competently
- communicates
information with a
considerable degree
of clarity and
knowledge of the
ethical standards
and policies used in
communications
technology
- demonstrates a
considerable ability
to compose,
capture, and process
images in print
production
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition, in the
critical analysis of
arts, media,
technology, and
information
systems, to enhance
the quality of life
Communication
ICI.05
Application
SPV.03
OCSGD
CGE1i
CGE2b
CGE2c
CGE2e
CGE3f
CGE4f
CGE6e
CGE7g
- demonstrates some
ability to compose,
capture, and process
images in print
production
- applies all or almost
all principles of
design and inquiry
while using the
computer and
software competently
- communicates
information with a
high degree of clarity
and knowledge of the
ethical standards and
policies used in
communications
technology
- demonstrates a high
ability to compose,
capture, and process
images in print
production
- demonstrates and
integrates thoroughly
the Catholic faith
tradition, in the
critical analysis of
arts, media,
technology, and
information systems,
to enhance the quality
of life
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 1 - Page 24
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Appendix 1.3a
Development Drawing Handout
Development Drawing
A development drawing can be described as the true shape of a flat piece of material needed to make a
three-dimensional object. They are often referred to as developments.
Videocassette cases come in a variety of formats, including coloured plastic, clear plastic, and cardboard.
You will create a cardboard cassette cover for one of your video projects.
Getting Started Exercise:
 Using the packages you brought to class, draw them with all tabs and folds (do not take the packages
apart).
 Upon completion of your drawings, take the packages apart to see how accurately they were sketched
(if not re-draw the package).
 Practise with some of the other (at least two) three-dimensional objects and draw the development
drawing of the object (scale 1:1) on cardboard, adding any tabs and glue seams required, and put
them together.
Guidelines:
 Measure a videocassette to understand exactly how big your package needs to be.
 Develop some rough drawings of how you would like the package to be shaped and how the cassette
id taken out of the case.
 Draft the cassette case development drawing (by hand or on computer), showing all tabs, folds, and
glue seams using proper drafting conventions.
 Create thumbnail sketches of the graphics for each side of the cassette case (you must have graphics
on all sides).
 Create your graphics using computer software (you may scan them into the computer but they must
be original images, not copyrighted material).
Put It All Together:
 Print out your drafting and graphics.
 Lay out the draft plan on bristol board and cut out with scissors or X-acto knife.
 Fold all tabs neatly (use a ruler) and glue together ensuring that edges are straight.
 Make sure that the videocassette fits into case (if not redo) before adding graphics.
 Glue computer graphics onto cassette cover.
Hand In:
 all drafting and sketching (hand drawn and computer generated);
 final videocassette cover design with graphics on all sides.
Unit 1 - Page 25
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Appendix 1.3b
Package Design Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.04
- demonstrates limited
ability to identify,
describe, and explain
the techniques used to
produce technical
drawings and
illustrations
- demonstrates some
ability to identify,
describe, and explain
the techniques used
to produce technical
drawings and
illustrations
- demonstrates a high
ability to identify,
describe, and explain
the techniques used to
produce technical
drawings and
illustrations
TF1.01
- demonstrates limited
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates some
understanding of
concepts
Thinking/
Inquiry
TFV.03
TF1.09
- uses thinking skills
with limited
effectiveness
- uses thinking skills
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to identify, describe,
and explain the
techniques used to
produce technical
drawings and
illustrations
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
concepts
- uses thinking skills
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies few of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
Communication
TF1.01G
- communicates
information with
limited clarity
- applies some of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design
process
- communicates
information with
moderate clarity
- applies most of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design
process
- communicates
information with
considerable clarity
SP1.01
SPV.04
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with limited accuracy
and effectiveness
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with some accuracy
and effectiveness
Application
SP1.01
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with limited
effectiveness
SPV.04
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with
limited effectiveness
IC1.04
ICV.03
- makes connections
with limited
effectiveness
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- makes connections
with moderate
effectiveness
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with considerable
accuracy and
effectiveness
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- makes connections
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies all or almost
all of the skills
involved in an
inquiry/design process
- communicates
information with a high
degree of clarity and
with confidence
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with a high degree of
accuracy and
effectiveness
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with a high
degree of effectiveness
- demonstrates
thorough and insightful
understanding of
concepts
- uses thinking skills
with a high degree of
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with a
high degree of
effectiveness
- makes connections
with a high degree of
effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 1 - Page 26
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Unit 2: Short Audio-Video Productions
Time: 22 hours
Unit Description
This unit gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of audio-video pre-production,
production, and post-production. Students develop scripts, treatments, and storyboards, utilize basic shot
sizes, camera movements, camera angles, and special effects to create short video projects. Students
demonstrate the safe operation of all equipment used for the construction of sets, the filming, lighting,
and editing required to produce a final audio-video production. Co-operative work strategies and video
content reflect the moral and ethical philosophy of the gospel values.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d, i; CGE2a, b, c, d; CGE3b, c, d, e;
CGE4a, b, d, e, f; CGE5a, b, d, e, g; CGE6e; CGE7a, b, d, f, g, i, j.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.02, TFV.03, TFV.04, SPV.02, SPV.03, SPV.04, ICV.01, ICV.02,
ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: TF1.05, TF1.06, TF1.07, TF1.11, SP1.05, SP1.06, SP1.07, SP1.08, SP1.11,
IC1.01, IC1.02, IC1.03, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
An Instructional Video
In Spirit We Grow
Promotional Video – A Visual Essay of School Life
Community Outreach
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
Prior Knowledge Required



A basic understanding of computer operations and the use of audio-video equipment would be
beneficial, but is not necessary for the completion of activities in this unit.
A basic understanding of the principles of design.
Co-operative teamwork skills.
Unit Planning Notes








It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording notes of their accomplishments.
Students should be reminded that their portfolios should also include video projects. The portfolio
content will be examined for completeness at the end of the course.
The activities depend on the equipment that is available in the school. The contents of this unit
should be adapted to the technology that is available locally.
The teacher must provide a safe work environment for all students and stress the correct and safe use
of all equipment and materials.
The activities explore a variety of audio-video production methods as well as the safe and correct use
of related equipment.
Unit 2 - Page 1
 Communications Technology - Open


Teachers should investigate potential cross-curricular connections with other subject areas and
community links for the activities.
Teachers should refer to Unit 6 Careers Exploration. The careers unit can be most effectively
delivered by the integration of topics throughout the unit activities.
 Classroom teachers work closely with the student services department to co-ordinate the
planning of the unit.
 Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of career options in the Communications
Technology field, based on the activities, that are appropriate for the range of ability levels
within the classroom.
 Students should be reminded at the start of each unit that their Student Manuals (see Overview
Appendix I) should include career research information for the unit. This content is used to
complete their career presentation at the completion of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Each activity provides the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and
provide insights into the skills required for a variety of related professions. Teaching/learning
strategies that allow for career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and
education research, field trips, and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose
careers are in the technology area dealt with in each Video activity to share their education and
career paths with the students.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout all the activities in this unit, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promotes
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Audio-video and multimedia production combines a variety of academic and applied learning
strategies, including independent and group work, problem solving, co-operation, communication,
time management, brainstorming new ideas, presenting, and report writing. The student-centred,
activity-based mode of delivery provides students opportunities to develop individual and group
skills.
Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment and evaluation are based on testing, product development, and product delivery using a
variety of media, and includes both diagnostic and summative methods.
Assessment is an ongoing daily process that includes: log/journal entries, portfolios, regular practical
and theory tests and/or quizzes, activity worksheets and exercises, project evaluation criteria,
student/group presentations, conferences, self and/or peer critiques, checklists, and rubrics.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Various samples of instructional, historical biographies, promotional, commercials, and public service
announcement videos collected by the teacher.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Unit 2 - Page 2
 Communications Technology - Open
Software tutorials and manuals.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Andersen, Neil and John J. Punjente, SJ. Scanning Television: Videos for Media Literacy in Class.
Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1997. ISBN 0-7747-0173-0
Hitchcock, Peter. Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc.
and TV Ontario, 1992. ISBN 0-9696-2610-X
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video. Toronto:
Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6344-4
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video, Teacher’s Guide.
Toronto: Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6281-2
Kyker, Keith and Christopher Curchy. Television Production: A Classroom Approach. USA: Librairies
Unlimited, 1993. ISBN 1-5630-8101-6
Utz, Peter. Today’s Video, Equipment, Setup and Production. USA: Prentice-Hall, 1992.
ISBN 0-1392-5033-6
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4786-5
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics Workbook. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4787-X
Videos
Commercial Mania: Highlights from the Weirdest, Wackiest, Wildest Commercials of the 50’s and 60’s.
California: Rhino Video, 1987. 30 minutes. RNVD 902
Basic Shooting. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 42 minutes.
Video Editing. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 47 minutes.
Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc. and TV Ontario,
1992, Eight 30-minute videos.
Magazines
Digital Imaging. New York: Cygnus Publishing.
Digital Video. USA: Miller Feeman Publications.
New Media.pro. Toronto: Southam Inc.
Video Systems. USA: Interac/Primedia Publication.
VideoMaker. USA: VideoMaker Inc.
Web Sites
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
New Media.pro Magazine
http://www.newmediapromagazine.com
A good Canadian source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Videomaker Magazine
http://www.videomaker.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Unit 2 - Page 3
 Communications Technology - Open
Videonics Systems
http://www.videonics.com
Articles on video/editing, links to user groups, industry information, and equipment information.
Video Systems Magazine
http://www.videosystems.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment Information.
Activity 1: An Instructional Video
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students are introduced to the principles of video production by shooting an instructional video that
introduces new students to the school community. In addition to the facilities, services and programs at
the school, the video focusses on the Christian community that exists in the school to support student life
in all dimensions: body, mind, and spirit. The students learn to develop basic scripts, treatments, and
storyboards, apply audio and video techniques, basic lighting set-ups, and editing procedures to complete
the project.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4c – takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4d – responds to, manages, and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
Unit 2 - Page 4
 Communications Technology - Open
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7a – acts morally and legally as a person formed in Catholic traditions;
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.05 – describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.06 – use basic lighting techniques and props competently to accentuate audio-video productions;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1-11 – enhances or creates sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 The teacher collects and provides examples of instructional videos that outline the steps required for
successful completion of the task. A wide range of topics should be assembled (e.g., sports,
equipment, cooking, etc.) as well as any previous samples of student work.
 Teachers should investigate cross-curricular connections with other subject areas, student services,
special education/resource, and administration. The need for student specific instructional aids in
other school departments may already exist (opening a locker, finding specific rooms, cleaning up in
the cafeteria, etc.).
Unit 2 - Page 5
 Communications Technology - Open

Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Video industry
to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may provide
students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 A basic understanding of computer operations and the basic use of video equipment would be
beneficial, but is not necessary for completion of this project.
 An understanding of the principles of design.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promotes
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher introduces the project to the students through a discussion of daily school life. The
teacher develops a list of aspects of daily school life that may be suited to a short instructional video
and presents any needs that may exist in other school departments.
 The teacher presents samples of instructional videos to the students and discusses the required
components. The teacher introduces format for scripts, treatment, and storyboards and outlines the
steps in producing a video (pre-production, set-up and rehearsal, production, and post-production).
 In groups of three or four, students brainstorm and select a topic. If a topic requires specific
information, individual groups may meet with contacts in other areas of the school.
 Students discuss their ideas with the teacher and then map out a proposal and treatment for the topic
by creating a script and storyboard for a one- to two-minute instructional video and developing a
production/shooting schedule.
 The teacher introduces the basic set-up and correct handling procedures for the equipment and
software involved in this activity through a series of small group lessons as the need for new
equipment occurs (e.g., cameras at the start, editing equipment at the editing stage).
 Students work through a series of short exercises that reinforce the teachers equipment
demonstrations by:
 practising the safe and correct use of video, audio, lighting, and editing/titling equipment;
 utilizing various camera techniques, lighting schemes (if lighting kits are available), audio setups, and editing techniques to film and edit their work;
 learning basic desktop video techniques for titling and editing;
 completing equipment exercise worksheets and quizzes.
 Students, upon completion of all pre-production, set-up, and rehearsal work, move into the
production and post-production stages of the activity. They shoot all appropriate footage, prepare any
audio or graphic source material, perform all appropriate editing of their source material, and insert
other audio and graphics.
Unit 2 - Page 6
 Communications Technology - Open



Students present their instructional videos to their classmates. Groups exchange videos and see if
they succeeded in solving the task. If the videos have been developed for other school groups, they
are given the opportunity to critique the final product.
Upon completion of the activity and after all student work has been presented the overall project is
discussed and the opportunity for all students to complete a self and peer assessment is given.
Where only a limited video set-up is available, editing may be done in camera, and a photo essay may
be created, using a digital or instant camera, accompanied by narration and/or music.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of video concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Formative assessment of each students ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess the contribution of the individual group members by completing daily log sheets
– personal communication – self and peer assessment (see Overview Appendix VI);
 Self, peer, and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project (see Overview
Appendices II, III, and IV).
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of completed worksheets (proposal sheets, scripts, and storyboards):
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Summative assessment of finished instructional video:
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 2.1).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity.
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of project presentation and class discussion of student work:
 Performance assessment of finished presentation – presentation rubric (see Overview Appendix
V);
 Personal communication through self/peer and group assessment and critique;
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment (see Overview Appendices II, III, and IV).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion of this activity.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Various samples of instructional videos.
Samples of student work.
Unit 2 - Page 7
 Communications Technology - Open
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Andersen, Neil and John J. Punjente, SJ. Scanning Television: Videos for Media Literacy in Class.
Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1997. ISBN 0-7747-0173-0
Hitchcock, Peter. Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc.
and TV Ontario, 1992. ISBN 0-9696-2610-X
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video. Toronto:
Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6344-4
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video, Teacher’s Guide.
Toronto: Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6281-2
Kyker, Keith and Christopher Curchy. Television Production: A Classroom Approach. USA: Libraries
Unlimited, 1993. ISBN 1-5630-8101-6
Utz, Peter. Today’s Video, Equipment, Setup and Production. USA: Prentice-Hall, 1992.
ISBN 0-1392-5033-6
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4786-5
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics Workbook. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4787-X
Videos
Commercial Mania: Highlights from the Weirdest, Wackiest, Wildest Commercials of the 50’s and 60’s.
California: Rhino Video, 1987. 30 minutes. RNVD 902
Basic Shooting. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 42 minutes.
Video Editing. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 47 minutes.
Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc. and TV Ontario,
1992. Eight 30-minute videos.
Magazines
Digital Imaging. New York: Cygnus Publishing.
Digital Video. USA: Miller Feeman Publications.
New Media.pro. Toronto: Southam Inc.
Video Systems. USA: Interac/Primedia Publication.
VideoMaker. USA: VideoMaker Inc.
Web Sites
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
New Media.pro Magazine
http://www.newmediapromagazine.com
A good Canadian source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Videomaker Magazine
http://www.videomaker.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Unit 2 - Page 8
 Communications Technology - Open
Videonics Systems
http://www.videonics.com
Articles on video/editing, links to user groups, industry information, and equipment information.
Video Systems Magazine
http://www.videosystems.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Activity 2: In Spirit We Grow
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students explore video, audio, and presentation software through the preparation of a multimedia project
chronicling the history, growth, and role that an individual or group plays in the community and society.
An understanding of digital media is developed by capturing video and still images, recording original
narration, adding musical clips, preparing graphic content, and assembling all resources in a desktop
video or presentation/multimedia software. Students complete the project by exploring methods of
electronic distribution (Internet, CDs, etc.). The presentation of completed work at the end of this activity
provides students with insight, respect and understanding of the history, cultural heritage, and pluralism
of contemporary society.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4d – responds to, manages, and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4e – sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
Unit 2 - Page 9
 Communications Technology - Open
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the World’s peoples and cultures;
CGE7g – respects and understands the history, cultural heritage, and pluralism of today’s contemporary
society;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.05 – describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.06 – use basic lighting techniques and props competently to accentuate audio-video productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1-11 – enhances or creates sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 The teacher collects and provides examples of work created by other students to be used for
discussion.
Unit 2 - Page 10
 Communications Technology - Open


Teachers should investigate cross-curricular connections with other subject areas including English,
Music, Religion, Social Science, and Student Services (Guidance).
Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the
Multimedia/Presentation industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members
of the community and/or multicultural agencies may provide students with some insights into career
opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 A basic understanding of computer operations and the use of video equipment would be beneficial,
but is not necessary for completion of this project.
 Previous reflection by the student on their community and cultural history may prove helpful, but is
not necessary for the completion of this project.
 An understanding of the principles of design.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 To help students get started, the historical biography format should be discussed as part of a
brainstorming session, including research techniques and how information can be gathered. Students
(with teacher direction) develop a plan of action for gathering information.
 Students decide on a focus for their project (individual or group). Each student should do a
preliminary search of their topic to see what resources are easily accessible. Other sources of
information may arise from this preliminary search. Interview questions based on this focus are
prepared.
 Each student creates a storyboard that diagrams the project frame by frame.
 Demonstration of the basic set-up and correct handling procedures for the equipment and software
involved is introduced by the teacher through a series of small group lessons as new equipment is
required (e.g., cameras and scanners at the start, the CD burner for the final output).
 Students work through a series of short exercises that reinforce the safe and correct use of all
equipment and software and the basic techniques and options that the equipment and software
provides. Students complete equipment and software exercise worksheets and quizzes.
 Students complete the research of their topic, gathering and compiling all resource material.
 Students are now at the editing/authoring stage that includes constructing, collecting, and editing all
raw materials (text, photos, sound, and video) to be used in the project. Using these materials and
desktop video or presentation/multimedia software, students can create multimedia projects based on
their storyboard guide.
 The teacher discusses the output options that are available for the completed work and students
decide on the format best suited to their needs (traditional print to video and other means of
electronic distribution – CDs/Internet).
Unit 2 - Page 11
 Communications Technology - Open



Students present their projects to the class. A presentation to the larger school community (a school
event – Arts Night or in the Cafeteria during lunch) should be discussed by the class and left open as
an option.
Upon completion of the activity and after all student work has been presented the overall project is
discussed and the opportunity for all students to complete a self and peer assessment is given.
The presentation of completed work, provides each student with insight, respect and understanding
of the history, cultural heritage, and pluralism of contemporary society and the many people who
make it up. This should provide the focus of a class discussion
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of video and multimedia concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of completed worksheets (proposal and storyboards):
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Summative assessment of finished project (see Appendix 2.2):
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet.
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil test – at end of activity.
 Summative assessment of project presentation and class discussion of student work:
 Performance assessment of finished presentation using presentation rubric (see Overview
Appendix V);
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment and critique;
 Reflection through self/peer assessment (see Overview Appendices II and III).
Accommodations
 Students should be given the opportunity to select their own topic to ensure that they are comfortable
with it. A wide range of topics should be available for the students. Some alternate topics could
include;
 a local person or someone who they admire who is a scientist, politician, writer, athlete, artist,
musician, or author and construct a digital biography of the major events in that person's life;
 a family focus, either their immediate or extended;
 their cultural background and the country that their ancestors may have emigrated from, and
investigate the role this culture has played in the development of our Canadian culture;
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion of this activity.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Unit 2 - Page 12
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Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Various samples of historical biography videos collected by the teacher.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Andersen, Neil and John J. Punjente, SJ. Scanning Television: Videos for Media Literacy in Class.
Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1997. ISBN 0-7747-0173-0
Hitchcock, Peter. Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc.
and TV Ontario, 1992. ISBN 0-9696-2610-X
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video. Toronto:
Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6344-4
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video, Teacher’s Guide.
Toronto: Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6281-2
Kyker, Keith and Christopher Curchy. Television Production: A Classroom Approach. USA: Libraries
Unlimited, 1993. ISBN 1-5630-8101-6
Utz, Peter. Today’s Video, Equipment, Setup and Production. USA: Prentice-Hall, 1992.
ISBN 0-1392-5033-6
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4786-5
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics Workbook. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4787-X
Videos
Basic Shooting. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 42 minutes.
Video Editing. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 47 minutes.
Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc. and TV Ontario,
1992. Eight 30-minute videos.
Magazines:
Digital Imaging. New York: Cygnus Publishing.
Digital Video. USA: Miller Feeman Publications.
New Media.pro. Toronto: Southam Inc.
Video Systems. USA: Interac/Primedia Publication.
VideoMaker. USA: VideoMaker Inc.
Web Sites
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
New Media.pro Magazine
http://www.newmediapromagazine.com
A good Canadian source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Unit 2 - Page 13
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Videomaker Magazine
http://www.videomaker.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Videonics Systems
http://www.videonics.com
Articles on video/editing, links to user groups, industry information, and equipment information.
Video Systems Magazine
http://www.videosystems.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Activity 3: Promotional Video – A Visual Essay of School Life
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students explore audio and video production through the creation of a short one- to two-minute
promotional video for the incoming Grade 8 students. The focus of this short video is to reveal the spirit
of the school community and encourage new students to enroll at the school. In groups, students follow a
given shot list, shoot the required footage and then edit their shots. Original music (created by the Music
Department) is added to complete the project. Basic audio-video equipment use, shot types, transitions,
camera movements, lighting, and editing are introduced. Animated titles and credits should be added if
equipment is available.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4d – responds to, manages, and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4e – sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
Unit 2 - Page 14
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A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7a – acts morally and legally as a person formed in Catholic traditions;
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.05 – describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.06 – use basic lighting techniques and props competently to accentuate audio-video productions;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1-11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
Unit 2 - Page 15
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
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The teacher collects and provides examples of a variety of promotional videos that target various
groups of people. A selection of sample promotional videos from the school, other schools, and the
board should be collected.
Teachers should investigate cross-curricular connections with other subject areas since this project
has an overall school focus. All members of the school community should be involved for input into
the overall content and approach of the project (Chaplaincy, Student Services, clubs, teams, and
Administration). The Music department should be approached for original scores to be used for this
project. Members of the surrounding community (Parish, School Council, etc.) may also provide
input into the project.
Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Audio-Video
Production industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the
community may provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 A basic understanding of computer operations and the basic use of video equipment would be
beneficial, but is not necessary for completion of this project.
 An understanding of the principles of design.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher introduces the unit by showing examples of promotional videos and questioning students
as to what attracts them and how to incorporate those ideas into a promotional video for the school.
 The teacher discusses the concept of the target audience and how this applies to promotional videos.
 The teacher outlines the basic stages of television production (pre-production/planning, set-up and
rehearsal, production, and post-production) and how they are modified to apply to this activity.
 The teacher deconstructs a promotional video by:
 analysing the components of a promotional video and involving the students in this analysis
through discussion and questioning;
 pointing out shot composition, camera, lighting and editing techniques used to achieve a desired
effect or to convey a particular message;
 outlining the process involved in putting together a promotional video (with references to the
stages of television production) and providing examples of these stages specific to this activity.
 Demonstration of the basic set-up and correct handling procedures for the equipment and software is
introduced by the teacher through a series of small group lessons as new equipment is required (e.g.,
cameras at the start, editing equipment at the editing stage).
 The teacher introduces and shows examples of basic shot composition and shot types, pacing,
transitions, and lighting and how they can be utilized to create varying types of action and moods.
Unit 2 - Page 16
 Communications Technology - Open
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





Students work through a series of short exercises that reinforce the teachers lessons on equipment use
and video techniques by:
 practising the safe and correct use of video, audio, lighting, and editing/titling equipment;
 utilizing various camera techniques, lighting schemes, audio set-ups, and editing techniques to
film and edit their work;
 learning basic desktop video techniques for titling and editing;
 completing equipment exercise worksheets and quizzes.
The teacher introduces the required shot list and discusses it with the students.
In groups of three or four, students develop a shooting schedule and prepare to shoot the required
footage. The teacher should review the footage to see that the groups are meeting the required shot
list.
Once the required footage is obtained and reviewed, groups edit their footage following the edit list
provided by the teacher. The score provided by the Music Department is added through the audio
dubbing process and all graphics (titles and credits) are added.
Students present their promotional videos to the class and a committee that represents the school
community. Student work can then be used for Grade 8 school presentations. Completed videos may
also be shown to the school community (a school event –Arts Night or in the Cafeteria during lunch).
Upon completion of the activity and after all work has been presented the overall project is discussed
and the opportunity for students to complete a self and peer assessment is given. The teacher should
initiate a discussion to see if the finished projects managed to successfully capture the spirit of the
school community.
Where only a limited video set-up is available editing may be done in camera and a photo essay may
be created, using a digital or instant camera, accompanied by narration and/or music.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of video concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Formative assessment of each student’s ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess the contribution of the individual group members by completing daily log sheets
(see Overview Appendix VI);
 Self, peer and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project (see Overview
Appendices II, III, and IV).
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of finished promotional video:
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 2.3).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of project presentation and class discussion of student work:
 Performance assessment of finished presentation – presentation rubric (see Overview Appendix
V);
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment and critique;
 Reflection through self/peer assessment.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
Unit 2 - Page 17
 Communications Technology - Open





Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Various samples of promotional videos collected by the individual teacher.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Andersen, Neil and John J. Punjente, SJ. Scanning Television: Videos for Media Literacy in Class.
Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1997. ISBN 0-7747-0173-0
Hitchcock, Peter. Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc.
and TV Ontario, 1992. ISBN 0-9696-2610-X
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video. Toronto:
Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6344-4
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video, Teacher’s Guide.
Toronto: Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6281-2
Kyker, Keith and Christopher Curchy. Television Production: A Classroom Approach. USA: Libraries
Unlimited, 1993. ISBN 1-5630-8101-6
Utz, Peter. Today’s Video, Equipment, Setup and Production. USA: Prentice-Hall, 1992.
ISBN 0-1392-5033-6
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4786-5
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics Workbook. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4787-X
Videos
Basic Shooting. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 42 minutes.
Video Editing. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 47 minutes.
Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc. and TV Ontario,
1992. Eight 30-minute videos.
Magazines
Digital Imaging. New York: Cygnus Publishing.
Digital Video. USA: Miller Feeman Publications.
New Media.pro. Toronto: Southam Inc.
Video Systems. USA: Interac/Primedia Publication.
VideoMaker. USA: VideoMaker Inc.
Unit 2 - Page 18
 Communications Technology - Open
Web Sites
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
New Media.pro Magazine
http://www.newmediapromagazine.com
A good Canadian source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups,
and equipment information.
Videomaker Magazine
http://www.videomaker.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Videonics Systems
http://www.videonics.com
Articles on video/editing, links to user groups, industry information, and equipment information.
Video Systems Magazine
http://www.videosystems.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Activity 4: Community Outreach
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students have the opportunity to investigate existing industry standards and requirements for the
production and broadcast of commercial messages, in particular Public Service Announcements (PSAs).
In groups, students design and produce a short video that touches upon a social justice issue that reflects
the needs of their individual school and/or the surrounding community (ex. the Out of the Cold program).
Research for this project involves organizations supported by ShareLife in the school community.
Scriptwriting, storyboards, various camera techniques, lighting schemes, audio set-ups, and editing
techniques are explored to enable students to produce a broadcast quality Public Service Announcement.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
CGE1i – integrates faith with life.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
Unit 2 - Page 19
 Communications Technology - Open
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4d – responds to, manages, and constructively influences change in a discerning manner;
CGE4e – sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6e – ministers to the family, school, parish, and wider community through service.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7a – acts morally and legally as a person formed in Catholic traditions;
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions;
CGE7d – promotes the sacredness of life;
CGE7g – respects and understands the history, cultural heritage and pluralism of today’s contemporary
society;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.05 – describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
Unit 2 - Page 20
 Communications Technology - Open
SP1.06 – use basic lighting techniques and props competently to accentuate audio-video productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1-11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 The teacher collects and provides examples of a variety of television commercials and public service
announcements (PSAs) that target various groups of people (e.g., age, race, social status, interests –
and other social justice issues). Suggestions for video collections are included in Unit Resources but
the teacher is encouraged to collect examples currently running in the community.
 Teachers should investigate cross-curricular connections with other subject areas including English,
Music, Religion, and Social Science.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Video industry
to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community and/or ShareLife
Agencies may provide students with some insights into the issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 A basic understanding of computer operations and the basic use of video equipment would be
beneficial, but is not necessary for completion of this project.
 An understanding of the principles of design.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
Unit 2 - Page 21
 Communications Technology - Open










The teacher introduces the activity by:
 showing a variety of television commercials/PSAs, preferably from various decades (see
Commercial Mania listed under Resources);
 questioning students in terms of how commercials have changed over the years;
 discussing the concept of the target audience and how it applies to commercials and the type of
television show they are often linked with;
 discussing the style differences between commercials and PSAs;
 illustrating the differences between a commercial and PSA.
The teacher outlines the basic stages of television production (pre-production/planning, set-up and
rehearsal, production and post-production) and how they will apply to this activity.
The teacher deconstructs a television commercial/public service announcement by:
 analysing the components and involving the students in this analysis through discussion and
questioning;
 pointing out shot composition, camera, lighting, and editing techniques used to achieve a desired
effect or convey a particular message;
 outlining the process of putting together a commercial/PSA, referring to the stages of television
production and providing examples of the stages specific to the activity.
Students work in groups to demonstrate their understanding of the process involved in constructing a
public service announcement by brainstorming ideas for a PSA for a given issue (see Appendix 4.3),
keeping in mind their target audience. Students discuss their initial ideas with the teacher and map
out a proposal and treatment for the issue selected by the group Students then create a script and
storyboard for a 30- to 60-second PSA and develop a production/shooting schedule.
Demonstration of the basic set-up and correct handling procedures for the equipment and software is
introduced by the teacher through a series of small group lessons as new equipment is required (e.g.,
cameras at the start, editing equipment at editing stage).
Students work through a series of short exercises that reinforce the teachers’ equipment
demonstrations by:
 practising the safe and correct use of video, audio, lighting, and editing/titling equipment;
 utilizing various camera techniques, lighting schemes, audio set-ups, and editing techniques to
film and edit their work;
 learning basic desktop video techniques for titling and editing;
 completing equipment exercise worksheets and quizzes (see Appendix 2.4a).
Students, on completion of all pre-production, set-up and rehearsal work, move into the production
and post-production stages. They shoot all appropriate footage and prepare any audio or graphic
source material. Students perform all appropriate editing of their source material and insert all other
audio and graphics.
Students present their public service announcements by putting themselves in the role of an ad
agency and selling their product to the client (i.e., the class). They then present their final PSA to the
potential clients.
Students present their work to the larger school community (a school event –Arts Night or in the
Cafeteria during lunch) and the social agency/community group used as a source for the project
(Local Parish Church, etc.).
Upon completion of the activity and after all work has been presented a teacher, self, peer, and group
evaluation session of the project is completed and discussed by the class. The teacher should initiate
a discussion in which students examine the issues dealt with in relation to spiritual understanding as
it reflects on them individually, in their families, and in their communities.
Unit 2 - Page 22
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
Where only a limited video set-up is available:
 students act out their PSA during presentation of the script and storyboard;
 editing may be done in camera;
 a photo essay may be created, using a digital or instant camera, accompanied by narration and/or
music.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Refer to Appendices 2.4b and 2.4c.
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of video concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Formative assessment of each student’s ability to work co-operatively in group situations:
 Students assess the contribution of individual group members by completing daily log sheets (see
Overview Appendix VI);
 Self, peer, and group evaluation sheets are filled out at the end of the project (see Overview
Appendices II, III, and IV).
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of completed worksheets (proposal sheets, scripts, and storyboards):
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Summative assessment of finished commercial/public service announcement:
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet.
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity.
 Paper and pencil test.
 Summative assessment of project presentation and class discussion of student work:
 Performance assessment of finished presentation – presentation rubric (see Overview Appendix
V);
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment and critique;
 Reflection through self/peer assessment.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion of this activity.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial opportunities for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Unit 2 - Page 23
 Communications Technology - Open
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Various video samples of commercials and PSAs collected by the teacher.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Andersen, Neil and John J. Punjente, SJ. Scanning Television: Videos for Media Literacy in Class.
Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1997. ISBN 0-7747-0173-0
Hitchcock, Peter. Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc.
and TV Ontario, 1992. ISBN 0-9696-2610-X
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video. Toronto:
Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6344-4
Hone, Rick and Liz Flynn. Video in Focus: A Guide to Viewing and Producing Video, Teacher’s Guide.
Toronto: Globe/Modern Curriculum Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8899-6281-2
Kyker, Keith and Christopher Curchy. Television Production: A Classroom Approach. USA: Libraries
Unlimited, 1993. ISBN 1-5630-8101-6
Utz, Peter. Today’s Video, Equipment, Setup and Production. USA: Prentice-Hall, 1992.
ISBN 0-1392-5033-6
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4786-5
Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics Workbook. Toronto: Nelson Canada, 1995. ISBN 0-5342-4787-X
Videos
Commercial Mania: Highlights from the Weirdest, Wackiest, Wildest Commercials of the 50’s and 60’s.
California: Rhino Video, 1987. 30 minutes. RNVD 902
Basic Shooting. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 42 minutes.
Video Editing. USA: Videomaker, Inc., 1994. 47 minutes.
Videography: The Guide to Making Videos. Toronto: Peter Hitchcock Productions Inc. and TV Ontario,
1992. Eight 30-minute videos.
Magazines
Digital Imaging. New York: Cygnus Publishing.
Digital Video. USA: Miller Feeman Publications.
New Media.pro. Toronto: Southam Inc.
Video Systems. USA: Interac/Primedia Publication.
VideoMaker. USA: VideoMaker Inc.
Unit 2 - Page 24
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Web Sites
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
New Media.pro Magazine
http://www.newmediapromagazine.com
A good Canadian source of digital video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment
information.
Videomaker Magazine
http://www.videomaker.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Videonics Systems
http://www.videonics.com
Articles on video/editing, links to user groups, industry information, and equipment information.
Video Systems Magazine
http://www.videosystems.com
A good source of video/editing online articles, links to user groups, and equipment information.
Unit 2 - Page 25
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 2.1
Instructional Video Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates
thorough knowledge of
facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards required to
produce audio-video
production
- demonstrates
thorough and insightful
understanding of
concepts involved in
audio-video production
- demonstrates
thorough and insightful
understanding of
relationships between
concepts
- uses thinking skills
with a high degree of
effectiveness
- applies all or almost
all of the skills
involved in an
inquiry/design process
- communicates
information with a high
degree of clarity, and
with confidence
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with a high degree of
accuracy and
effectiveness
- demonstrates
extensive command of
the various forms
- demonstrates and
promotes the safe and
correct use of audiovideo production
procedures, equipment,
and technology
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.02, TFV.04,
TF1.05
- demonstrates limited
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards required to
produce audio-video
production
- demonstrates some
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards required to
produce audio-video
production
TFV.O2,
TF1.06
- demonstrates limited
understanding of
concepts involved in
audio-video production
- demonstrates some
understanding of
concepts involved in
audio-video production
TFV.04,
TF1.06, TF1.07
- demonstrates limited
understanding of
relationships between
concepts
- demonstrates some
understanding of
relationships between
concepts
Thinking/
Inquiry
ICV.03
TFV.02,
TF1.06, TF1.07
- uses thinking skills
with limited
effectiveness
- uses thinking skills
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards required to
produce audio-video
production
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
concepts involved in
audio-video production
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
relationships between
concepts
- uses thinking skills
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies few of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
- applies some of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
- applies most of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
Communication
ICV.01,
ICV.03
- communicates
information with
limited clarity
- communicates
information with
moderate clarity
- communicates
information with
considerable clarity
ICV.01,
IC1.O4
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with limited accuracy
and effectiveness
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with some accuracy and
effectiveness
TFV.04, TF1.09,
IC1.04, IC1.05
- demonstrates limited
command of the
various forms
- uses audio-video
production procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly only with
supervision
- demonstrates
moderate command of
the various forms
- uses audio-video
production procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly with some
supervision
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with considerable
accuracy and
effectiveness
- demonstrates
considerable command
of the various forms
- uses audio-video
production procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly
- makes connections
with limited
effectiveness
- makes connections
with moderate
effectiveness
Application
SPV.02,
SP1.05, SP1.06,
SP1.08,
TFV.04, TF1.09
TFV.02,
SPV.02, SP1.08
- makes connections
with considerable
effectiveness
- makes connections
with a high degree of
effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 2 - Page 26
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 2.2
Multimedia Project Evaluation
Categories
Needs
Improvement
Content
 Research
 Spelling
 Grammar
Technical Design
 Buttons
 Graphics
 Animation
 Digital
Images
 Audio
 Order of
Cards
 Creativity
Total
Fair
Good
Excellent
Mark
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/10
/100
1. Strengths:
2. Suggestions for improvement:
Unit 2 - Page 27
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 2.3
Promotional Video Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
The Student demonstrates:
Criteria
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
(50-59%)
(60-69%)
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
- demonstrates some - demonstrates
Knowledge/
limited knowledge
knowledge in
considerable
Understanding
in
identifying
and
identifying
and
knowledge in
TFV.02
describing
the
describing
the
identifying and
SPV.02
techniques and
techniques and
describing the
TFI.06
procedures used for procedures used for techniques and
TFI.07
creating/editing
creating/editing
procedures used for
audio-video
productions
audio-video
productions
Thinking/
Inquiry
TFV.02
SPV.02
TFI.06
TFI.07
- applies few of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating/editing
audio-video
productions
Communication
ICV.01
IC1.05
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with audio-video
productions with
limited clarity
- applies some of
the design and
inquiry skills
required for
outlining procedures
for creating/editing
audio-video
productions
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with audio-video
productions with
moderate clarity
Application
ICV.03I
C1.04
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
audio-video field
with limited
effectiveness
- demonstrates
limited ability to
integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of
electronic
communications
OCSGD
CGE1i
CGE2c
CGE3c
CGE4d
CGE5g
CGE7e
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
audio-video field
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates some
ability to integrate
the Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of
electronic
communications
creating/editing
audio-video
productions
- applies most of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating/editing
audio-video
productions
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with audio-video
productions with
considerable clarity
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
audio-video field
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of
electronic
communications
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates a
high ability to
identify and
describe the
techniques and
procedures used for
creating/editing
audio-video
productions
- applies all or
almost all of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating/editing
audio-video
productions
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with audio-video
productions with a
high degree of
clarity, and with
confidence
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
audio-video field
with a high degree
of effectiveness
- thoroughly
demonstrates and
integrates the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of
electronic
communications
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 2 - Page 28
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 2.4a
Camera Exercise: Tilt, Pan, and Level
After you have familiarized yourself with the operation of the tripod, place the camera onto the tripod,
screw it onto the quick release plate, and then lock the plate into place. Hook up the camera to the AC
power adapter and the monitor on the A/V cart so that the rest of the group can see your work.
Try these basic exercises. Get another group member to count for you and tick off your exercises as you
do them.
1. Levelling the camera.
 Place the forward leg of the tripod under the barrel of the lens on the camera. Place a book under
one of the “side” legs and, using the bubble level on the tripod, level the camera. (It is easier to
level the camera this way than to try and fiddle with all three legs.)
Done _____

Pan the camera at least 90 degrees to the left and to the right. Notice that your picture may no
longer be level when you pan far to either side. How far can you go without losing your “level”
picture? (Use a table or desk to determine what is level in your frame.)
Done _____
2. Panning
 Do a “swish pan”, moving the camera rapidly to the left and right. This often is used as an editing
transition or to give the illusion of an objective observer quickly moving his/her point of view
from a person or object in the frame, to one far to the left or right, out of frame.
Done _____

Do a series of slow pans and try to be as smooth as you can, all the way through. Count “one
Mississauga, two Mississauga”, etc. to determine how long your pans are.
Note: To prevent “strobing or spray painting”, no object in the shot should take less than four
seconds to cross the screen when you pan past it. The eyes cannot follow it if your pan is too fast.
 Do a 3-sec. pan.
Done _____
 Do a 5-sec. pan.
Done _____
 Do a 10-sec. pan.
Done _____
3. Tilting
Tilting is like panning, only in a vertical motion rather than a horizontal one. Try the same series of
exercises, moving from an object on the ceiling, down to someone’s feet, and back up. Can you
“find” the object you started with? Or did you have to search around for it?
 Do a 3-sec. tilt down and a 3-sec. tilt up
Done _____
 Do a 5-sec. tilt down and a 3-sec. tilt up
Done _____
 Do a 10-sec. tilt down and a 3-sec. tilt up
Done _____
4. Review your work and report to the teacher before starting the next exercise.
Unit 2 - Page 29
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Appendix 2.4b
Community Outreach Project Evaluation
Categories
Creativity
 Performance


Visual
Music/SFX
 Graphics
Technical
 Picture
Quality

Sound Quality

Editing/
Continuity
Criteria
Mark
Video – acting, believable/credible
Audio – voice over/dubbing, convincing, well delivered
Creative/imaginative use of: sets, props, and costumes
Appropriate use of music or special effects, original or audio clips
Letter of permission written (use “Music Rights” form letter) and
mailed for use of pre-recorded music (Bonus)
Titles and credits: legible and attractive
/10
Image in focus and steady
Smooth camera movements
Good lighting and white balance
Voices audible and understandable
Voices, music, and effects mixed at appropriate levels
Background levels checked
Smooth flow in the succession of images
Good choice of length and order of shots
Balanced and varied use of transitions
/15
Total
/10
/10
(5)
/10
/20
/25
/100
1. Strengths:
2. Suggestions for improvement:
Unit 2 - Page 30
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 2.4c
Community Outreach Task Specific Rubric
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
Camera Set-up
- demonstrates a
TFV.02, ICV.02,
high degree of
IC1.01
ability in the
completion of a
basic camera,
tripod, and
monitor set-up
Pre-production:
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
limited
some
thorough and
 Script
insightful
 Storyboards understanding of understanding of
the
relationship
the
relationship
understanding of
TFV.02, SPV.02,
between a script
between a script
the relationship
TF1.06
and storyboard
and storyboard
between a script
and storyboard
Creativity
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates a
TF1.05, SP1.05
limited
some originality
considerable
high degree of
originality with
with choice of
originality with
originality with
choice of shot
shot type, frame
choice of shot
choice of shot
type, frame
composition, and type, frame
type, frame
composition, and use of transitions composition, and composition, and
use of transitions
use of transitions use of transitions
Quality of
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates a
Communicated
limited ability to some ability to
considerable
high degree of
Information/
communicate a
communicate a
ability to
ability to
Ideas
message and/or
message and/or
communicate a
communicate a
SP1.08
social justice
social justice
message and/or
message and/or
issue through an
issue through an
social justice
social justice
edited video
edited video
issue through an
issue through an
edited video
edited video
Safety and Handling - follows some
- follows most lab - follows all lab
- reminds other
of Equipment
lab safety rules
safety rules when safety rules when students of safety
ICV.02, IC1.02
when handling
handling video
handling video
rules and proper
video equipment equipment
equipment
handling of video
equipment when
they are not being
followed
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 2 - Page 31
Level 1
(50-59%)
- demonstrates
limited ability in
the completion of
a basic camera,
tripod, and
monitor set-up
Level 2
(60-69%)
- demonstrates
some ability in
the completion of
a basic camera,
tripod, and
monitor set-up
Level 3
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
considerable
ability in the
completion of a
basic camera,
tripod, and
monitor set-up
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
the relationship
between a script
and storyboard
 Communications Technology - Open
Unit 3: Short Animations
Time: 22 hours
Unit Description
This unit introduces students to the fundamental principles of traditional and computer-generated
animation. Students develop scripts, storyboards, and flipbooks prior to creating computer animation.
Students learn and apply composition and 2-D modelling techniques and discover how image sequences
interact with audio to create animated short films. Critical evaluation and problem solving help students
make decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d, g, i; CGE2a, b, c, d, e; CGE3a, b, c, d,
e, f; CGE4a, b, c, d, e, f; CGE5a, b, c, d, e, g, h; CGE6e; CGE7a, b, d, e, f, g, i, j.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.02, TFV.03, TFV.04, SPV.02, SPV.03, SPV.04, ICV.01, ICV.02,
ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: TF1.01, TF1.02, TF1.06, TF1.07, SP1.07, SP1.08, SP1.09, IC1.01, IC1.02,
IC1.03, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Animated Text
2-D Animation to Music/Poem: “The Joys of Life”
2-D Original Story/Cartoon
Web Animations
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
Prior Knowledge Required


Students should be familiar with the operation of a computer and be able to save, import, export, and
create files.
Previous experience from Unit 2 with storyboarding, digital audio recording, and editing is
beneficial.
Unit Planning Notes








It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording notes of their accomplishments.
The teacher must provide a safe work environment for all students stress the correct and safe use of
all equipment and materials.
The teacher should investigate the software that is accessible and available at the school site or
available through the board system that is suitable for the activities.
Prepare appropriate teacher-produced and collected resources and support materials, including
examples of classical animation techniques (flipbooks, zoetropes, thaumatropes, cels), previous
student animations, and industry samples.
The activities explore a variety of animation production methods as well as the safe and correct use
of related equipment.
Unit 3 - Page 1
 Communications Technology - Open


Teachers should investigate potential cross-curricular connections with other subject areas and
community links.
Teachers should refer to Unit 6. The careers unit can be most effectively delivered by the integration
of topics throughout the unit activities.
 Classroom teachers work closely with the student services department to co-ordinate the
planning of the unit.
 Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of career options in the Communications
Technology field.
 Students should be reminded at the start of the unit that their Student Manuals (see Overview
Appendix I) should include career research information for this unit. This content is used to
complete their career presentation at the completion of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Each activity provides the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and
provide insights into the skills required for a variety of related professions. Teaching/learning
strategies that allow for career links in the unit activities should be investigated (e.g., job
shadowing, career and education research, field trips, and guest speakers). Arrange for
appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Animation industry to share their education
and career paths with the students.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout all the activities in this unit, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Animated productions combine a variety of academic and applied learning strategies, including
independent and group work, problem solving, co-operation, communication, time management,
brainstorming new ideas, presenting, and report writing. The student-centred, activity-based mode of
delivery provides students with opportunities to develop individual and group skills.
 Teachers provide their expertise and the material and equipment resources required for the
completion of each task.
Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment and evaluation are based on testing, product development and product delivery using a
variety of media, and include both diagnostic and summative methods.
Assessment is an ongoing daily process that will include: log/journal entries, portfolios, regular
practical and theory tests and/or quizzes, activity worksheets and exercises, project evaluation
criteria, student/group presentations, conferences, self and/or peer critiques, checklists, and rubrics.
Unit 3 - Page 2
 Communications Technology - Open
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Blair, Preston. Cartoon Animation. Laguna Hills, California: Walter Foster Publishing Corporation,
1994. ISBN 1-5601-0084-2
Eddy, Sandra. GIF Animator's Guide. USA: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997. ISBN 1-5582-8561-X
Hahn, Don. Animation Magic Book. New York: H.B. Fenn & Co., 1998. ISBN 0-7868-3072-7
Jenkins, Patrick. Flipbook Animation & Other Ways to Make Cartoons Move. Toronto: Kids Can Press
Ltd., 1991. ISBN 1-5507-4007-5
Laybourne, Kit. The Animation Book. Indianopolis: The Crown Publishing Group, 1998.
ISBN 0-5178-8602-2
Locke, Lafe. Film Animation Techniques: A Beginner’s Guide and Handbook. USA: Betterway
Publications, Inc., 1992. ISBN 1-5587-0236-9
Lutz, E.G. Animated Cartoons: How They Are Made; Their Origin & Development. New York:
Applewood Books, 1998. ISBN 1-5570-9474-8
Morrison, M. “Becoming a Computer Animator”, Bring Illustrations to Life. USA: Sams Publishing,
1994. ISBN 0-6723-0463-5
McKelvey, Roy. Hypergraphics: Design for the Internet. London: Watson-Guptill Publications, Inc.,
1997. ISBN 2-8804-6313-0
O’Rourke, Michael. Principles of Three-Dimensional Computer Animation. USA: W.W. Norton &
Company, 1995. ISBN 0-393-70202-2
Parkin, George. Animation Funstation. Los Angeles, California: Price Stern Sloane, Inc., 1995.
ISBN 0-8431-3990-0
Parkin, George. Animation. USA: Putnam Publishing Group, 1996. ISBN 0-8431-3990-0
Street, Rita. Computer Animation: A Whole New World. USA: Rockport Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 0-1564-9377-2
Thomas, Bob. Disney's Art of Animation. New York: Hyperion, 1992. ISBN 1-5628-2899-1
White, Tony. The Animator’s Workbook: Step-by-Step Techniques of Drawn Animation. New York:
Watson-Guptil Publications, 1986. ISBN 0-8230-0229-2
Web Sites
Angelfire
http://angelfire.lycos.com/doc/graphics.html
Provides instruction on making animated GIFs, from creating the original images through animation and
presentation on the web.
Animation Stand
http://www.animationstand.com/gallery
A good source of animation clips and cels.
Unit 3 - Page 3
 Communications Technology - Open
AutoDesk
http://www.AutoDesk.com
A good source of animation tips, clips, cels, and links to other animation sites.
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital animation.
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital animation.
Moving Pix Company
http://www.movingpixco.com
A good source of animation clips and cels.
Pulsar
http://www.pulsar.to.it/pages/grafica3.html
A site providing details about the key concepts of animation including storyboards and frames. Stop
motion, 2-D, 3-D animation and video production are covered.
Old House
http://www.old.myhouse.com/anim/page16htm
History of animation is outlined with essays, illustrations, and clips from classic works. Contains a howto section for animated GIFs.
Warner Brothers
http://www.warnerbrothers.com
The Warner Brothers site provides lessons in Animation 101. The site describes the animation process
from writers to sound effects. Sample animations are available.
Web Monkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
Interactive site provides tutorials, tips, and articles.
Activity 1: Animated Text
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Using available 3-D animation software, students design and construct an animated personal identity text.
Students apply composition and typographic principles, along with motion paths, lighting, sound, and 3D modelling techniques to accentuate the overall visual effect of the text. The use of this completed
animation in computer presentations, video, or web pages is also explored.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations:
The graduate is expected to be:
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
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A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6a – relates to family members in a loving, compassionate, and respectful manner.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Cross-curricular connections to English, Religion, Music, and Visual Arts.
 For the benefit of the teacher and student, ALL relevant software manuals and step-by-step procedure
lists need to be available throughout the activity.
 A collection of text and object animations from television, video, and film is needed to provide
students with finished examples.
 It is vital that teachers establish compatibility for all software programs and external equipment that
are integrated into this activity.
 Storyboards, copyright free music, CD, or audio cassette, and sound effects collections are great
assets.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Animation
Unit 3 - Page 5
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industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
Students should be familiar with basic computer functions such as creating and saving files, converting
files to different formats, as well as importing and exporting files between programs.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 The teacher reviews with the class the concepts involved such as frames, key frames, background,
character, storyboard, story line, etc.
 Students review principles of graphic design (proximity, alignment, repetition, and contrast).
 The teacher introduces typography and how its appropriate use adds an overall sense of design to a
finished product. The teacher reviews how primary and complementary colours enhance the overall
effectiveness of graphic elements. The class views collected samples and discusses the practical
application of typographic elements, colour, and design principles. Design principles, typographic
elements and colour use are evaluated in an assignment that requires recognition and labelling of
elements from samples and/or a written quiz.
 The teacher emphasizes the need for a storyboard before the production begins. The storyboard
reflects the proposed typeface, a general indication of text colour and size, proposed lighting plan,
motion paths for text and objects, and approximate running times. The storyboard also indicates all
audio sources used in the soundtrack. Text/object motion paths and run times determine the overall
length of the animation. Storyboards are evaluated for clarity, creativity, and attention to detail.
 Students use a digital camera (or video camera attached to a computer) to capture a self-portrait.
They save it in a picture file to use as a background in the final animation. Students manipulate the
image in a paint program (e.g., Adobe Photoshop, Corel Photo Paint). Students save the image in a
format compatible to the animation software.
 The teacher introduces elements of a 3-D text (face, side, bevels, and back) and discusses primary
and complementary colours – what works well and what does not. Led by the teacher’s example,
students discover that changing one or more of the text elements changes the overall appearance and
effectiveness of the animation.
 The teacher introduces concepts of lighting (ambient light, highlighting; front, side, top, and bottom
lighting), defines basic lighting terms, and demonstrates how an overall lighting design affects the
text. Students explore the possibilities and limitations of a chosen lighting plan and its impact on
their test.
 The teacher introduces motion paths for text (e.g., entering the screen, spins, turns, bounces, rolls,
holding positions, dropouts, and blow-a-ways). For the student to employ effective text animation
and balanced use of screen space, the teacher demonstrates grouping and ungrouping letters to create
individual units (first and last names) that are positioned as the student wishes. Students discover that
co-ordinated motion paths add readability and interest to the animation. The teacher discusses the
dangers of overusing motion paths and the resulting distractions that often detract from the overall
design.
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The teacher introduces the use of sound by recording a soundtrack with voice-over.
The student records a music track equal in time to the animation. A voice-over track identifying or
containing information about the student is recorded. The music and voice-over tracks are mixed to
create a final soundtrack. Students then save the file and export it to the animation software.
After the soundtrack is inserted into the animation, the student creates a final AVI or appropriate
video file and exports it to other computer applications, to a web page, or prints it to videotape.
Settings for creating the final video file (e.g., resolution, compression, dithering, frame rate, etc.)
depend on the proposed use of the file. If necessary, different video file formats are created for
different purposes.
Students present their final work to the class.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of animation concepts through the use of a skills
inventory checklist.
 Observation checklists and student conferences, relevant to the available equipment, are used to
evaluate the processes of image capture.
 To assess the lighting portion of the activity, observations of particular skills are recorded on
checklists.
 Pencil and paper quizzes can be employed for theoretical material like composition and typographic
principles.
 The final summative evaluation is allocated to the individual student, peer, and teacher.
 Various technical and aesthetic categories should be considered as part of the final mark depending
on the final use of the animation.
 Summative assessment of completion of lists:
 Performance assessment of the completed lists by the teacher.
 Summative assessment of finished product:
 Performance assessment of the finished project (see Appendix 3.1).
 Summative assessment of students' knowledge with a unit test.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Students work with a partner or in small groups.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 Students with special needs are accommodated in this activity by changing the requirements of the
animation or by altering the steps of the production process (e.g., as skill building activities, students
are provided pre-determined storyboards to complete or are given existing animations to alter).
 Students with special artistic abilities may wish to add original drawings, music, or other media to
the final animation.
Unit 3 - Page 7
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Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software tutorials and manuals.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Morrison, M. “Becoming a Computer Animator”, Bring Illustrations to Life. USA: Sams Publishing,
1994. ISBN 0-6723-0463-5
O’Rourke, Michael. Principles of Three-Dimensional Computer Animation. USA: W.W. Norton &
Company, 1995. ISBN 0-3937-0202-2
Street, Rita. Computer Animation: A Whole New World. USA: Rockport Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 0-1564-9377-2
Web Sites
Animation Stand
http://www.animationstand.com/gallery
A good source of animation clips and cels
AutoDesk
http://www.AutoDesk.com
A good source of animation tips, clips, cels, and links to other animation sites.
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital animation
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital animation.
Moving Pix Company
http://www.movingpixco.com
A good source of animation clips and cels
Warner Brothers
http://www.warnerbrothers.com
The Warner Brothers site provides lessons in Animation 101. The site describes the animation process
from writers to sound effects. Sample animations are available.
Web Monkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
Interactive site provides tutorials, tips, and articles.
Unit 3 - Page 8
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Activity 2: 2-D Animation to Music/Poem: “The Joys of Life”
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students select and analyse a biblical passage, poem, nursery rhyme, or short piece of music in order to
understand a positive, underlying, literary or musical theme and meaning of a work. They investigate
how visual images interact with audio signals to create cohesive final animated audio/visual works.
Students prepare a storyboard that incorporates visual images with sound to produce an animated short
film. Students learn to use available 2-D animation software to create a short film that reflects the
meaning and qualities of the story or music.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6a – relates to family members in a loving, compassionate, and respectful manner.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communication field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Unit 3 - Page 9
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Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Cross-curricular connections to English, Religion, Music, and Visual Arts.
 The teacher collects samples of biblical passages, poems, nursery rhymes, and short pieces of music.
 Create handout with the Basics of Animation; (ideally, the teacher creates a short animation to
outline these basics and serve as an example for the students).
 Collect samples of flipbooks, cartoons, and zoetropes.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Animation
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Students should have mastered some aspects of animation software in previous activities and in
Grade 9 Integrated Technology.
 A concept of basic animation terms (frames, storyboards, etc.).
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 The teacher reviews with the class the concepts involved such as frames, key frames, background,
character, storyboard, story line, etc.
 As a class, students discuss the various jobs available in the field of animation.
 While listening to several songs, students compose a list of feelings, images, and colours they would
associate with the sounds. (Note: If using a poem or biblical passage, students read a sample supplied
by the teacher. Students circle all adjectives, adverbs, and words that convey feelings.)
 Students use a thesaurus to generate a list of antonyms and synonyms for the words found in their
original list to help generate imagery suitable to the lyrics.
 Using the generated words, students create a short story to accompany the music/passage.
 Students then take their story line and create an animation storyboard. Remind students that the story
line and storyboard should reflect the music they have selected.
 The teacher demonstrates the basic tools of a 2-D animation software using a computer projection
system.
 Students use their story line and storyboard to create a short animation.
Unit 3 - Page 10
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The teacher will demonstrate for students the various means for assembling animation and audio
(traditional print to video and audio dubbing; desktop video or multimedia package; and other means
of electronic distribution – CDs)
Students add music to their animation.
Students share finished animations.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of animation concepts through the use of a skills
inventory checklist.
 Observation checklists and student conferences, relevant to available equipment, are used to evaluate
the processes of animation.
 Pencil and paper quizzes can be employed for theoretical material like storyboards and animation
principles.
 The final summative evaluation is allocated to the individual student, peer, and teacher:
 Performance assessment through the use of project evaluation checklists.
 Various technical and aesthetic categories should be considered as part of the final mark depending
on the final use of the animation.
 Summative assessment of finished product (animation set to biblical passage/music/poem):
 Performance assessment of the finished project (see Appendix 3.2).
 Summative assessment of students' knowledge with a unit test.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Students create a semantic web to categorize the feelings, images, and colours they associate with the
selected biblical passage, poem, or song.
 Students work with a partner or in small groups.
 Students create a flipbook.
 Students compose and record their own music to add to the animation.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling of equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software tutorials and manuals.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Unit 3 - Page 11
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Texts
Hahn, Don. Animation Magic Book. New York: H.B. Fenn & Co., 1998. ISBN 0-7868-3072-7
Jenkins, Patrick. Flipbook Animation & Other Ways to Make Cartoons Move. Toronto: Kids Can Press
Ltd., 1991. ISBN 1-5507-4007-5
Laybourne, Kit. The Animation Book. Indianopolis: The Crown Publishing Group, 1998.
ISBN 0-5178-8602-2
O’Rourke, Michael. Principles of Three-Dimensional Computer Animation. USA: W.W. Norton &
Company, 1995. ISBN 0-393-70202-2
White, Tony. The Animator’s Workbook: Step-by-Step Techniques of Drawn Animation. New York:
Watson-Guptil Publications, 1986. ISBN 0-8230-0229-2
Web Sites
Animation Stand
http://www.animationstand.com/gallery
A good source of animation clips and cels
AutoDesk
http://www.AutoDesk.com
A good source of animation tips, clips, cels, and links to other animation sites.
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital animation
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital animation
Warner Brothers
http://www.warnerbrothers.com
The Warner Brothers site provides lessons in Animation 101. The site describes the animation process
from writers to sound effects. Sample animations are available.
Web Monkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
Interactive site provides tutorials, tips, and articles.
Unit 3 - Page 12
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Activity 3: 2-D Original Story/Cartoon
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students research a variety of short stories and cartoons to develop an understanding of how a short piece
of work is developed. They are encouraged to improve their literacy skills by writing a short story or a
child’s cartoon that reflects the moral and ethical philosophy of gospel values. Students investigate how
visual images are created to emphasize the story and how visual images interact with audio signals to
create final animated films. Using storyboards, students develop the story line with titles and image
sequences, then create the story using animation software. They transfer the computer file to video and
add sound effects, voice, and music in order to construct a short animated film.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6a – relates to family members in a loving, compassionate, and respectful manner.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.05 – describe various video recording techniques;
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
Unit 3 - Page 13
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IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Cross-curricular connections to English, Religion, Music, and Visual Arts.
 Respect for each student’s individuality and creativity should be stressed.
 Teachers should prepare quick reference sheets for animation software, storyboarding (if students
have not done video production), and video editing with audio dubs.
 Create handout with the Basics of Animation; (ideally, the teacher creates a short animation to
outline these basics and serve as an example for the students).
 Collect samples of flipbooks, cartoons, and zoetropes and devise a list of web sites dealing with
animation techniques.
 Discuss with students, prior to viewing the finished animated films, the importance of respecting
others and their work. Watching the films should be entertaining and students should not be critical
of the work of others.
 A projector or large screen television is preferred for viewing the films.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Animation
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Students should have mastered some aspects of animation software in previous activities and in
Grade 9 Integrated Technology.
 A concept of basic animation terms (frames, storyboards, etc.).
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 The teacher reviews with the class the concepts involved with animation.
 As a class, students discuss the various jobs available in the field of animation.
 Teachers should introduce samples of animated short films based on other short stories, show
corresponding samples of student work, and outline the process by which students arrived at the final
animation.
Unit 3 - Page 14
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




The teacher then introduces the concepts of establishing plot, story line, character development, and
how interest is developed in an animated film. Discuss and review the elements of writing a short
story (may be done as a cross-curricular activity with English).
The teacher introduces the animation software. Students investigate the software by working through
tutorials (moving objects with paths, tweening, clipping, titling, and using .GIF files).
As students become comfortable with the software, they begin to formulate their final story and
develop a storyboard complete with audio.
Once the animation is complete students add sound effects, voice over, and music (on computer or in
video edit suite). The teacher introduces other equipment and techniques as required (e.g., output of
animations to videotape, audio dubbing, etc.).
The class watches the final animations together. The teacher should stress that this is a positive,
entertaining activity and respect for the work of others is important. After watching the videos,
discuss the positive aspects of the project, as well as what students would change if they had more
time.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of animation concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Summative assessment of completion of worksheets and tutorial exercises:
 Performance assessment of worksheets and exercises by the teacher;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Summative assessment of finished animation:
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 3.3b).
 Summative assessment of students' knowledge with a unit test.
 Roving conferencing – teacher-student
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Students may be given finished short stories to work with if necessary.
 Students work with a partner or in small groups.
 Students create a flipbook.
 Students compose and record their own music to add to the animation.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should be given throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 Students should be encouraged to develop more detailed stories and to add computer graphics (such
as GIFs that they have designed as backgrounds and as part of the final animation).
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Unit 3 - Page 15
 Communications Technology - Open
Software tutorials and manuals.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Texts
Morrison, M. “Becoming a Computer Animator”, Bring Illustrations to Life. USA: Sams Publishing,
1994. ISBN 0-6723-0463-5
O’Rourke, Michael. Principles of Three-Dimensional Computer Animation. USA: W.W. Norton &
Company, 1995. ISBN 0-393-70202-2
Street, Rita. Computer Animation: A Whole New World. USA: Rockport Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 0-1564-9377-2
Web Sites
Animation Stand
http://www.animationstand.com/gallery
A good source of animation clips and cels
AutoDesk
http://www.AutoDesk.com
A good source of animation tips, clips, cels, and links to other animation sites.
Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital animation
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital animation
Moving Pix Company
http://www.movingpixco.com
A good source of animation clips and cels
Warner Brothers
http://www.warnerbrothers.com
The Warner Brothers site provides lessons in Animation 101. The site describes the animation process
from writers to sound effects. Sample animations are available.
Web Monkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
Interactive site provides tutorials, tips, and articles.
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Activity 4: Web Animations
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students create two-dimensional animations that can be viewed on the web. Using student artwork,
scanned images, paint and illustration software, and digitally captured images, students develop graphic
resources. Students import and animate the resources using web animation software. Completed
animations are inserted into existing web pages. New knowledge is developed in resource management
and data transfer.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Caring Family Member who
CGE6a – relates to family members in a loving, compassionate, and respectful manner.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the techniques used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.07 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
SP1.07 – create simple animations using video cameras;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
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Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Cross-curricular link to Visual Arts, Business Studies, Religion, and English Media.
 Links made to Unit 4: Information Displays and Environments.
 The teacher creates file of web animations and a web page for students to insert animations.
 The teacher designs a worksheet: Analysing Web Animations.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Animation
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 An understanding of capturing and manipulating still images.
 An understanding of the principles of design.
 Basic computer skills.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 The teacher shows examples of web animations. Students analyse the samples using the Analysing
Web Animations handout provided. As a class, students discuss the merits and shortcomings of the
various samples.
 The teacher demonstrates the basic tools of the web animation software using a computer projection
system. The teacher gives quick tip lessons at the beginning of the remaining classes.
 Students select/create and digitize an image to animate. They animate the selected image and insert it
into an existing web page.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment includes students' awareness of animation concepts:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Summative assessment of equipment worksheets and quizzes:
 Performance assessment of assigned exercises and worksheets;
 Paper and pencil test.
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



Summative assessment of completed worksheets:
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
Summative assessment of finished product (animated GIF):
 Performance assessment of finished product – project evaluation sheet.
Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil unit test.
Summative assessment of project presentation and class discussion of student work:
 Performance assessment of finished presentation – presentation rubric (see Overview Appendix
V);
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment and critique;
 Reflection through self/peer assessment (see Overview Appendices II and III).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Students work with a partner.
 Students have opportunities to script and program animations.
 The teacher reviews and/or introduces technical skills if required.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software tutorials and manuals.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Eddy, Sandra. GIF Animator's Guide. USA: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997. ISBN 1-5582-8561-X
McKelvey, Roy. Hypergraphics: Design for the Internet. London: Watson-Guptill Publications, Inc.,
1997. ISBN 2-8804-6313-0
O’Rourke, Michael. Principles of Three-Dimensional Computer Animation. USA: W.W. Norton &
Company, 1995. ISBN 0-3937-0202-2
Web Sites
Animation Stand
http://www.animationstand.com/gallery
A good source of animation clips and cels
AutoDesk
http://www.AutoDesk.com
A good source of animation tips, clips, cels, and links to other animation sites.
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Digital Imaging Magazine
http://www.digitalimagingmag.com
A good source of digital animation
Digital Video Magazine
http://www.dv.com
A good source of digital animation
Moving Pix Company
http://www.movingpixco.com
A good source of animation clips and cels
Warner Brothers
http://www.warnerbrothers.com
The Warner Brothers site provides lessons in Animation 101. The site describes the animation process
from writers to sound effects. Sample animations are available.
Web Monkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
Interactive site provides tutorials, tips, and articles.
Unit 3 - Page 20
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Appendix 3.1
Animated Text Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of facts,
technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates
thorough knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.02
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates some
knowledge of facts,
technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
TF1.06
- demonstrates
limited
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates some
understanding of
concepts
IC1.01
- demonstrates
limited
understanding of
relationships
between concepts
- demonstrates some
understanding of
relationships
between concepts
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
relationships
between concepts
Thinking
/Inquiry
IC1.01
TF1.09
- uses thinking skills
with limited
effectiveness
- uses thinking skills
with moderate
effectiveness
- uses thinking skills
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies few of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design
process
- applies some of
the skills involved
in an inquiry/design
process
- applies most of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design
process
Communication
TF1.07
- communicates
information with
limited clarity
- communicates
information with
moderate clarity
- communicates
information with
considerable clarity
SPV.02
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with limited
accuracy and
effectiveness
- communicates
with a limited sense
of audience and
purpose
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with some accuracy
and effectiveness
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with considerable
accuracy and
effectiveness
- communicates
with a clear sense of
audience and
purpose
SP1.07
- communicates
with some sense of
audience and
purpose
- demonstrates
thorough and
insightful
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates
thorough and
insightful
understanding of
relationships
between concepts
- uses thinking skills
with a high degree
of effectiveness
- applies all or
almost all of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design
process
- communicates
information with a
high degree of
clarity and with
confidence
- uses language,
symbols, and visuals
with a high degree
of accuracy and
effectiveness
- communicates
with a strong sense
of audience and
purpose
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
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Appendix 3.1 (Continued)
Animated Text Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Application
SP1.07
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
limited effectiveness
SP1.08
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with
limited effectiveness
SPV.02
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely
and correctly only
with supervision
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely
and correctly with
some supervision
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely
and correctly
IC1.04G, IC1.05
- makes connections
with limited
effectiveness
- makes connections
with moderate
effectiveness
- makes connections
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with a high
degree of
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and
procedures to new
contexts with a high
degree of
effectiveness
- demonstrates and
promotes the safe
and correct use of
procedures,
equipment, and
technology
- makes connections
with a high degree
of effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
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Appendix 3.2
2-D Animation to Music/Poem Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge and
understanding in
identifying and
describing the
techniques,
procedures, and
concepts for
creating animated
productions
- applies most of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating
animated
productions
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.02, TF1.06,
TF1.07
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
and understanding
in identifying and
describing the
techniques,
procedures, and
concepts for
creating animated
productions
- demonstrates some
knowledge and
understanding in
identifying and
describing the
techniques,
procedures, and
concepts for
creating animated
productions
Thinking/Inquiry
TFV.02, TF1.06,
TF1.07
- applies few of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating
animated
productions
Communication
ICV.03
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with animated
productions with
limited clarity
- applies some of
the design and
inquiry skills
required for
outlining procedures
for creating
animated
productions
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with animated
productions with
moderate clarity
Application
ICV.03
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
field of animation
with limited
effectiveness
- demonstrates
limited ability to
integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of an
animation
OCSGDCGE1d,
CGE4f, CGE7f
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
field of animation
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates some
ability to integrate
the Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of an
animation
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with animated
productions with
considerable clarity
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
field of animation
with moderate
effectiveness
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to integrate the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of an
animation
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates a
high ability to
identify and
describe the
techniques,
procedures, and
concepts for
creating animated
productions
- applies all or
almost all of the
design and inquiry
skills required for
outlining procedures
for creating
animated
productions
- communicates and
explains the
benefits, risks, and
ethics associated
with animated
productions with a
high degree of
clarity and with
confidence
- makes connections
and identifies career
opportunities in the
field of animation
with a high degree
of effectiveness
- thoroughly
demonstrates and
integrates the
Catholic faith
tradition in the
identification of the
strengths and
weaknesses of an
animation
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 3 - Page 23
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Appendix 3.3a
2-D Original Story/Cartoon Project Criteria
(The teacher should go over the criteria for this activity)
Introduction
Computer animation is fast becoming an acceptable form for depicting stories, both serious and funny.
An animated story and a cartoon are very different. A cartoon is a drawing depicting a humourous
situation. The cartoon may be one drawing with a caption, a comic strip, or an animated cartoon.
Cartoons may be humourous or satirical (satire uses irony and wit to expose wickedness) but are often
thought of as the Saturday morning cartoons that young children enjoy. A story narrates an event. A story
may be humourous like a cartoon but it may also be sad, serious, or have a moral or ethical message.
Cartoons and stories must be interesting. They should have a clear beginning, characters, plot, and
ending. Brainstorm ideas and discuss them with your classmates and teachers.
Steps to follow
 Write the story or cartoon – how will you keep the interest of the viewer
 Develop your story into a storyboard
 Include all of the sound effects and music in the audio portion of the storyboard
 Make sure to include the title and credits in the storyboard
 Develop your animation in Animator Pro
 Once the animation is complete add audio (use the video editor to do an audio dub or use
SoundBlaster to record your audio)
 Put final video on videotape
Animation Requirements
Your final animation must include the following:
 Titling
 A minimum of one GIF imported from CorelDRAW™ or other software
 Movement using optics – track, paths, or clocked
 Credits (thank everyone who helped you)
 Audio (may be music only but must enhance the story)
Hand In
 Title Page – includes graphics from your animation, your name and date
 Your storyboards
 Your final animation
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Unit 4: Information Displays and Environments
Time: 22 hours
Unit Description
Working in an authoring environment (i.e., a multimedia or scripting software), students develop
graphical displays to be used for a specific purpose. Students experiment with different compression
schemes to facilitate real-time playing on the Internet. Students continue to expand knowledge of both
personal and teamwork skills and co-operative and management skills throughout the production of
graphical displays. Students develop an understanding of how to analyse, evaluate, and utilize technology
to enhance the quality of life for all members of the community.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d, g, i; CGE2a, b, c, d, e; CGE3a, b, c, d,
e, f; CGE4a, b, c, d, e, f; CGE5a, b, c, d, e, g, h; CGE6e; CGE7a, b, d, e, f, g, i, j.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.01, TFV.02, TFV.03, TFV.04, SPV.01, SPV.02, SPV.03, SPV.04,
ICV.01, ICV.02, ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: TF1.01, TF1.02, TF1.06, TF1.07, TF1.11, SP1.01, SP1.05, SP1.06, SP1.07,
SP1.08, SP1.09, SP1.11, IC1.01, IC1.02, IC1.03, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Interactive Presentation: Faith and the 21st Century
Graphical Design – Keeping the Community Informed
Web Page with Technologies
Computer Game
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
Prior Knowledge Required
Students should be familiar with the operation of a computer and be able to save, import, export, and
create files.
Unit Planning Notes







It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments.
The activities in this unit depend on the equipment that is available in the school. In order to ensure
that activities are authentic, the contents of this unit should be adapted to the technology that is
available locally.
The teacher must provide a safe work environment for all students and stress the correct and safe use
of all equipment and materials.
The teacher should investigate the software that is accessible and available at the school site or
available through the board system that is suitable for the each of the activities listed in this unit.
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



Appropriate teacher produced and collected resources and other support materials should be
gathered, including previous student project work (multimedia presentations, games, web sites, etc.)
and industry samples.
Activities explore a variety of information display and environment methods as well as the safe and
correct use of related equipment.
Teachers should investigate potential cross-curricular connections with other subject areas and
community links.
Teachers should refer to Unit 6. The careers unit can be most effectively delivered by the integration
of topics throughout the unit activities.
 Classroom teachers work closely with the student services department to co-ordinate the
planning of the unit.
 Students should be reminded at the start of the unit that their Student Manuals (see Overview
Appendix I) should include career research information for the unit. This content is used to
complete their career presentation at the completion of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Each activity provides the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and
provide insights into the skills required for a variety of related professions.
 Teaching/learning strategies that allow for career links in the unit activities should be
investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips, and guest speakers).
Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Graphical Display industry to
share their education and career paths with the students.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout the unit, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Information Displays and Environments productions combine a variety of learning strategies,
including independent and group work, problem solving, co-operation, communication, time
management, brainstorming new ideas, presenting, and report writing. The student-centred, activitybased mode of delivery provides students opportunities to develop individual and group skills and
promote critical thinking and problem solving.
Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment and evaluation are based on testing, product development and product delivery using a
variety of media and include both diagnostic and summative methods.
Assessment is an ongoing daily process that includes: log/journal entries, portfolios, regular practical
and theory tests and/or quizzes, activity worksheets and exercises, project evaluation criteria,
student/group presentations, conferences, self and/or peer critiques, checklists, and rubrics.
Unit 4 - Page 2
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Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
List of organizations supported by ShareLife (see Appendix 4-1c).
Books
Dean, Damon. FrontPage 2000 for Dummies Quick Reference. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1999.
ISBN 0-7645-0499-1
Fleck, Tim, et al. HyperStudio for Terrified Teachers. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher Created
Materials, Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-5569-0180-7
Gredler, Margaret. Designing & Evaluating Games & Simulations. Connecticut: Gulf Publishing
Company, 1994. ISBN 0-8841-5157-3
Hunt, Wayne and Gerry Rosentsweig. Designing & Planning Environmental Graphics. New York:
Madison Square Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9426-0435-0
Hyman, Michael. Dynamic Html for Dummies, 2nd ed. Toronto: Harper Collins Canada, 1998.
ISBN 0-7645-0467-3
Lamothe, Andre. Windows Game Programming for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide
Inc., 1998. ISBN 0-7645-0337-5
Lowe, Doug. Powerpoint 97 For Windows for Dummies. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997.
ISBN 0-76450-051-1
Levine-Young, Margaret, John Levine, and Carol Baroudi. The Internet for Dummies. New York: IDG
Books Worldwide, 1998. ISBN 0-76450-506-8
Maran, Ruth. Creating Web Pages with HTML: Simplified. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1999. ISBN 0-7645-6067-0
Palmer, Scott. Build Your Own PC Game in 7 Easy Steps Using Visual Basic. Toronto: Addison-Wesley,
1996. ISBN 0-2014-8911-2
Rathbone, Andy. Multimedia & CD-ROMs for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1997. ISBN 1-5688-4225-2
Rockport Publishers Editorial Staff. Computer Graphics 2: More of the Best of Computer Art & Design.
London: Rockport Publishers, 1994. ISBN 1-5649-6090-0
Sprague, Michael. Using Visual Basic (2nd Ed). Arizona, USA: South-Western Educational Publishing,
1998. ISBN 0-5386-7886-0
Szeto, Gong, et al. Designing Interactive Websites. USA: Hayden Books, 1997. ISBN 1-5683-0311-4
Taylor, Dave. Creating Cool Web Pages with HTML. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1995. ISBN 1-5688-4705-X
Technical Learning Resources Editorial Staff. Get Going with Power Point 97 for Windows. New York:
Technical Learning Resources Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-8873-9117-7
Weadock, Glenn. Intranet Publishing for Dummies. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997.
ISBN 0-7645-0222-0
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White, John. Designing 3D Graphics: How to Create Real-Time 3D Models for Games. Toronto: John
Wiley & Sons Canada, Limited, 1998. ISBN 0-4711-4926-8
Wilhelm, Jeffery, et al. Hyperlearning: Where Projects, Inquiry, and Technology Meet. USA: Stenhouse
Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-5711-0054-7
Wolfgram, Douglas E. Creating Multimedia Presentations. USA: Que Corporation, 1994.
ISBN 1-5652-9667-2
Web Sites
Chesworth Technologies
http://www.chesworth.com/pv/games/index.html
This site provides the basics and steps for game design as well as C++ programming.
Design and Graphic Center
http://www.graphic-design.com
The Design and Graphic Center focusses on visual communications design. It has tips and frequently
asked questions about web design, typography, graphics, writing, printing, and publication.
How Stuff Works
http://www.howstuffworks.com
Detailed site by Marshall Brain provides information on the workings of several commonly found items
in our world, including the Internet, web sites, etc.
Learning Development Center
http://www.staffs.ac.uk/cital/
This site covers everything related to the use of communications and information technology in the
teaching and learning processes, and includes recommended online journals, software, links to computerassisted learning, as well as information on computer-mediated communication.
Learning Space Foundation
http://www.learningspace.org/tech/tech.html
This site provides directions and tutorials on various technology skills as well as how to create classroom
or school web pages.
SchoolNet
http://www.schoolnet.ca
A lengthy list of web sites related to the Internet and the teaching of Technology.
Webmonkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
An interactive site that provides tutorials, tips, and articles on authoring, multimedia, design, e-business,
programming, backend, and jobs. Individuals are introduced to the basics of HTML and Java Script on
site.
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Activity 1: Interactive Presentation: Faith and the 21st Century
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Working in an authoring environment (i.e., a multimedia software or scripting software), students
develop a multimedia presentation to be used at school assemblies and liturgical celebrations. Students
develop co-operative and management skills that promote an understanding of how to analyse, evaluate,
and utilize technology to enhance the quality of life for all members of the community.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1c – actively reflects on God’s Word as communicated through the Hebrew and Christian scriptures;
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2f – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4e - sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g - achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
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Create overheads with the Basics of Multimedia Tools; (ideally, teacher should create a multimedia
presentation to outline these basics and serve as an example for the students.)
Collect a list of the readings to be used at the school assembly and liturgical celebrations
(Remembrance Day, Easter, Christmas, Graduation Assembly).
Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Graphical
Display industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community
may provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Skills related to scanning and composing images.
 Word-processing skills.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 Students brainstorm a definition of communication.
 Students individually complete What is Communication? worksheet (see Appendix 4.1a) and write a
paragraph on the role of communication in our world today.
 As a class discuss the importance of interactive presentations in communicating information today.
The teacher introduces the Faith in the 21st Century Assignment (see Appendix 4.1b).
 Students select a reading from the list provided by the teacher. In two to three sentences, students
summarize the message being conveyed in the reading.
 Students decide on a focus for their project. They brainstorm a list of images and words that would
help convey the message and create a storyboard that diagrams the project frame by frame.
 Demonstration of the basic set-up and correct handling procedures for the equipment and software is
introduced by the teacher through a series of small group lessons as new equipment is required (e.g.,
digital camera, scanner).
 Students work through a series of short exercises that reinforce the teacher’s equipment and software
demonstrations by:
 learning the safe and correct use of all equipment and software;
 learning the basic techniques and options that the equipment and software provides;
 completing equipment and software exercise worksheets and quizzes.
 Students work individually (or in pairs) to create a multimedia. Students gather and compile all
resource material. They are now at the editing/authoring stage that includes constructing, collecting,
and editing all raw materials (text, photos, sound, and video). Using these materials and
presentation/multimedia software, the students create a presentation based on their storyboard guide.
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Students present their projects to the class. A presentation to the larger school community at a school
assembly or a liturgical celebration can be left open as an option.
Upon completion of the activity and after all student work has been presented, the overall project is
discussed and students complete a self and peer assessment.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment of definition of communication:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Summative assessment of worksheets:
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Formative assessment of contribution to class discussion:
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II and
III);
 Reflection – daily log/journal entries (see Overview Appendix VI).
 Summative assessment of multimedia presentation:
 Performance assessment of finished project (see Overview Appendix V and Appendix 4.1c).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil unit test.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should occur throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 Students create a poster/collage depicting the message from a biblical reading.
 Students use AutoContent Wizard to design a presentation.
 Students may choose to add music to their interactive presentation.
 Students create a semantic web to represent the images and words associated with the reading.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Fleck, Tim, et al. HyperStudio for Terrified Teachers. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher Created
Materials, Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-5569-0180-7
Rathbone, Andy. Multimedia & CD-ROMs for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1997. ISBN 1-5688-4225-2
Szeto, Gong, et al. Designing Interactive Websites. USA: Hayden Books, 1997. ISBN 1-5683-0311-4
Unit 4 - Page 7
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Technical Learning Resources Editorial Staff. Get Going with Power Point 97 for Windows. New York:
Technical Learning Resources Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-8873-9117-7
Wilhelm, Jeffery, et al. Hyperlearning: Where Projects, Inquiry, and Technology Meet. USA: Stenhouse
Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-5711-0054-7
Wolfgram, Douglas E. Creating Multimedia Presentations. USA: Que Corporation, 1994.
ISBN 1-5652-9667-2
Web Sites
SchoolNet
http://www.schoolnet.ca
A lengthy list of web sites related to the Internet and the teaching of Technology.
Webmonkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
An interactive site that provides tutorials, tips, and articles on authoring, multimedia, design, e-business,
programming, backend, and jobs. Individuals are introduced to the basics of HTML and Java Script on
site.
Activity 2: Graphical Design: Keeping the Community Informed
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students research a variety of information and advertising graphical displays. They analyse the success of
a variety of display types and explore the possibilities of using 2-D surface design to create 3-D displays.
They develop a graphical display to be used for a specific purpose (event/promotion). They develop
rough sketches and final scale prototype drawings and fabricate the final display using available
resources.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1c – actively reflects on God’s Word as communicated through the Hebrew and Christian scriptures;
CGE1d– develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2f – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4e - sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5g - achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures.
Unit 4 - Page 8
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Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.01 – identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.01 – explain the technique used to produce technical drawings and illustrations;
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
SP1.11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communication;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Create overhead with Basic Principles of Design as a review (see Appendix 4.2a)
 Collect current popular magazines and newspapers and assemble materials required for learning
centres such as: newspaper/magazine articles, government/national organization material, and current
music.
 Generate handouts and worksheets and obtain a list of upcoming school events (e.g., Parent's Night,
Hallowe’en Dance, Soccer try-outs, Music Concert).
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Graphical
Display industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community
may provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Basic computer skills.
 Knowledge of composing and capturing still images.
 A basic knowledge of sketching and prototype drawings.
Unit 4 - Page 9
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Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good;
 Students brainstorm various elements that contribute to the visual appeal of a graphical display. The
teacher records responses on the board.
 As a class, students discuss the Principles of Layout and copy Basic Principles of Design from the
overhead (see Appendix 4.2a).
 In pairs, students evaluate a layout chosen by the teacher. Students complete the Assessing Good
Design worksheet.
 The teacher demonstrates the features of a desktop-publishing program using a projection system and
distributes handout on the Basics of Desktop-Publishing Software.
 Students select a school event from the list provided by the teacher. Using a desktop-publishing
program, students individually design a flyer/pamphlet/newsletter to advertise the event.
 After reviewing the principles of design, students, in groups of three to four, design a graphical
display to be used for future school events.
 Students develop rough sketches and final prototype drawings of their final display.
 Students explore ways in which the 2-D surface design can be used to create 3-D displays.
 Students fabricate a graphical display using available materials.
 Students share finished displays.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment of students' awareness of design principles:
 Skills inventory/checklist given at the start of the activity.
 Summative assessment of worksheets:
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Formative assessment of contribution to class discussion:
 Personal communication through self/peer assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II and
III);
 Reflection – daily log/journal entries (see Overview Appendix VI).
 Summative assessment of finished product (flyer/brochure):
 Performance assessment of finished project (see Appendix 4.2b).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil unit test.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should be ongoing throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling the equipment.
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For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial business for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Student designs a poster to advertise for the school event.
Student works with a partner to create a flyer/pamphlet.
Student composes and delivers an announcement over the school's PA system.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Hunt, Wayne and Gerry Rosentsweig. Designing & Planning Environmental Graphics. New York:
Madison Square Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9426-0435-0
Lowe, Doug. Powerpoint 97 For Windows for Dummies. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997.
ISBN 0-76450-051-1
Rockport Publishers Editorial Staff. Computer Graphics 2: More of the Best of Computer Art & Design.
London: Rockport Publishers, 1994. ISBN 1-5649-6090-0
Technical Learning Resources Editorial Staff. Get Going with Power Point 97 for Windows. New York:
Technical Learning Resources Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-8873-9117-7
Web Sites
Design and Graphic Center
http://www.graphic-design.com
The Design and Graphic Center focusses on visual communications design. It has tips and frequently
asked questions about web design, typography, graphics, writing, printing, and publication.
SchoolNet
http://www.schoolnet.ca
A lengthy list of web sites related to the Internet and the teaching of Technology.
Webmonkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
An interactive site that provides tutorials, tips, and articles on authoring, multimedia, design, e-business,
programming, backend, and jobs. Individuals are introduced to the basics of HTML and Java Script on
site.
Unit 4 - Page 11
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Activity 3: Web Page with Technologies
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students explore the principles of electronic data transmission by designing a web page containing both
audio and video streaming capabilities. After preparing the text, graphic, and A/V resources of their web
page, students experiment with different compression schemes to facilitate real time playing over the
Internet. As well as learning to manage resources requiring high transfer rates, students develop
understanding of digital audio and video editing.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1c – actively reflects on God’s Word as communicated through the Hebrew and Christian scriptures;
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages;
CGE2f – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4e – sets appropriate goals and priorities in school, work, and personal life.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5g - achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.02 – identify and describe the basic techniques required to produce animations and audio-video
productions;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.02 – produce audio-video and/or animated productions;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.06 – outline the procedures required to create audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
TF1.07 – outline the steps used to edit audio-video, audio, and animated productions;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.08 – edit audio-video and/or animated productions;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communication;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
Unit 4 - Page 12
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Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
Create overhead/handout with the Basics of Web Authoring and Design (HTML) and compose a list
of ShareLife and other social justice organizations.
Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Graphical
Display industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community
may provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Computer literacy skills.
 Understanding of desktop-publishing software.
 Understanding of composing and capturing still images.
 Web browser skills/inquiry skills.
 Co-operative skills.
 Organizational skills.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher introduces the multimedia software designed to assist in the streaming of audio and
video. The teacher provides students with a handout summarizing the features and steps of the
software a list of organizations supported by ShareLife .
 Working in pairs, students select one organization and research it.
 Students organize the information they gather and design a web site to represent the organization.
 Students use a work log and portfolio throughout the research process and conference with teacher to
brainstorm suggestions for improving their site.
 The teacher demonstrates the process of streaming video and audio using a projection system.
Students work through teacher-designed exercises designed to familiarize themselves with the
process.
 Students implement suggestions and stream video and music for the site.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment of student’s research skills, log/journal, and portfolio:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing;
 Performance assessment of checklists.
 Summative assessment of worksheets:
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
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Summative assessment of finished project (web site and web site with audio-video):
 Performance assessment of finished project.
Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil unit test.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Peer tutoring is given to those students who need extra help.
 Student-to-student discussion and teacher-to-student conferencing should be given throughout the
project.
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
 Students incorporate both official languages in their construction of the web site.
 Students produce a web site with animated GIFs using the Wizard feature in web animation software.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to develop an entrepreneurial business for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Dean, Damon. FrontPage 2000 for Dummies Quick Reference. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1999.
ISBN 0-7645-0499-1
Hyman, Michael. Dynamic Html for Dummies, 2nd ed. Toronto: Harper Collins Canada, 1998.
ISBN 0-7645-0467-3
Levine-Young, Margaret, John Levine, and Carol Baroudi. The Internet for Dummies. New York: IDG
Books Worldwide, 1998. ISBN 0-76450-506-8
Maran, Ruth. Creating Web Pages with HTML: Simplified. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1999. ISBN: 0-7645-6067-0
Taylor, Dave. Creating Cool Web Pages with HTML. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc.,
1995. ISBN 1-5688-4705-X
Weadock, Glenn. Intranet Publishing for Dummies. New York: IDG Books Worldwide, 1997.
ISBN 0-7645-0222-0
Web Sites
How Stuff Works
http://www.howstuffworks.com
Detailed site by Marshall Brain provides information on the workings of several commonly found items
in our world, including the Internet, web sites, etc.
Unit 4 - Page 14
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Learning Space Foundation
http://www.learningspace.org/tech/tech.html
This site provides directions and tutorials on various technology skills as well as how to create classroom
or school web pages.
SchoolNet
http://www.schoolnet.ca
A lengthy list of web sites related to the Internet and the teaching of Technology.
Webmonkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
An interactive site that provides tutorials, tips, and articles on authoring, multimedia, design, e-business,
programming, backend, and jobs. Individuals are introduced to the basics of HTML and Java Script on
site.
Activity 4: Computer Game
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students apply design and programming principles to develop and package a simple computer game
using an object-oriented language such as Visual Basic or Java. Students create and manipulate objects to
produce an application appropriate for the development of math skills in children aged five to seven.
Students combine computer programming with image generation in the creation of a learning tool that
provides practice and monitors performance.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2f – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7f – respects and affirms the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Unit 4 - Page 15
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Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to observe and uphold copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 The teacher prepares previously made templates reflecting different levels of programming skills
(beginner, intermediate, advanced).
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Graphical
Display industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community
may provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 The teacher reviews process for creating and editing vector and bitmapped images.
 Although no prior knowledge of programming is required, some students who have taken Grade 9
Integrated Technology have completed a programming activity and are familiar with many of its
principles and routines. The dimensions of the activity depends upon the students’ level of
experience; it is therefore vital to arrive at an understanding of the students’ capabilities before
finalizing written requirements, expectations, evaluations, etc.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher reviews imaging and typography and introduces a programming language.
 The teacher leads examination of three completed applications and their code, one each from the
beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels.
 The teacher explains the steps in the development of the application and emphasize that although
each example differs in its level of complexity, each is a significant advance from the producer's
starting point and a significant achievement in its own right.
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Students complete short assignments to combine typography, imaging, and a programming language.
The teacher provides students with handout outlining details about the objectives and requirements of
the activity (see Appendix 4-4a).
Students write a draft for the Project Specifications section of the Design Brief.
The teacher checks for understanding by checking draft.
The teacher introduces purposes and symbolic language of a programming flowchart.
Students construct a flowchart for their project. They conference with teacher to check their
flowchart.
The teacher reviews principles of design leads students through the design of the interface, noting the
necessary controls and GUI conventions.
Students hand in final copy of flowchart and thumbnail sketch of interface for evaluation.
Students use an image editing and a drawing program to create the graphic files that are included in
their application. They create a background, banner for the title, and two images for
congratulations/consolation.
The teacher introduces the concept of object-oriented, event-driven programming and provides
instruction in the use of the application/language used in the activity.
Students make a form with a background in place.
The teacher reviews the creation and naming of controls.
Students add controls (or paste in controls from the template supplied to them).
The teacher provides instruction in selection structure and changing object properties and reviews the
code required for objects and events.
Students produce a game that requires a user to type the response to a question. A correct response
causes a congratulatory image to appear; an incorrect response produces a consolatory one.
Students finish application by creating an executable file and packaging it with the necessary
resources on a floppy disk. Among the resources is a Read_Me file that in addition to providing
usage instructions serves as the platform of their Design Brief.
Students prepare a thumbnail sketch of a disk label design, ensuring its consistency with the design
treatment of the program interface.
Student use graphics programs and a colour ink-jet printer to produce the labels.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment of typography and imaging:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing;
 Performance assessment of checklists.
 Formative assessment of thumbnail sketches:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing;
 Performance assessment of checklists.
 Summative assessment of finished sketches and flowcharts:
 Performance assessment of assigned worksheets, sketches, and flowcharts;
 Personal communication – teacher-student conferencing.
 Summative assessment of finished project:
 Performance assessment of finished project (see Appendix 4.3b).
 Summative assessment of the concepts and techniques utilized in this activity:
 Paper and pencil unit test.
Unit 4 - Page 17
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Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students complete assignment with simplified requirements or prepared resources.
 Students work in pairs or with a senior student.
 An online, self-marking, multiple-choice quiz, viewable in any web browser, may provide a
simplified alternative.
 Many web sites offer downloadable scripts and code.
 Students include sound events, a splash screen, or message boxes in the applications.
 Students may create code by cutting and pasting.
 Students write their own code from written instructions provided.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Gredler, Margaret. Designing & Evaluating Games & Simulations. Connecticut: Gulf Publishing
Company, 1994. ISBN 0-8841-5157-3
Lamothe, Andre. Windows Game Programming for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide
Inc., 1998. ISBN 0-7645-0337-5
Palmer, Scott. Build Your Own PC Game in 7 Easy Steps Using Visual Basic. Toronto: Addison-Wesley,
1996. ISBN 0-2014-8911-2
Sprague, Michael. Using Visual Basic (2nd Ed). Arizona, USA: South-Western Educational Publishing,
1998. ISBN 0-5386-7886-0
White, John. Designing 3D Graphics: How to Create Real-Time 3D Models for Games. Toronto: John
Wiley & Sons Canada, Limited, 1998. ISBN 0-4711-4926-8
Web Sites
Chesworth Technologies
http://www.chesworth.com/pv/games/index.html
This site provides the basics and steps for game design as well as C++ programming.
SchoolNet
http://www.schoolnet.ca
A lengthy list of web sites related to the Internet and the teaching of Technology.
Webmonkey
http://www.webmonkey.com
An interactive site that provides tutorials, tips, and articles on authoring, multimedia,
design, e-business, programming, backend, and jobs. Individuals are introduced to the basics of HTML
and Java Script on site.
Unit 4 - Page 18
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Appendix 4.1a
Faith and the 21st Century Student Worksheet
Communication in Our World
Here are some key questions to think about:
What is communication?
List different kinds of communication.
In what ways can a painting be a form of communication?
In what ways can music be a form of communication?
How do animals communicate?
What is language?
Why do you need language to communicate?
Is mathematics a form of communication?
In a brief paragraph, explain the importance of communication in our world today.
Unit 4 - Page 19
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Appendix 4.1b
Faith and the 21st Century Activity Assignment
"Pre-history" is what professional historians usually call a country's past before written history. At this
time people did not write down their history; instead it was told orally by professional singers and poets.
Using rhyme and rhythm made telling a story from memory easier.
The Code of Hammurabi is the first set of public laws written down. It established a series of set
punishments for each type of crime. The laws were carved on a stela, like a stone billboard, set up in
Babylon; all citizens could read it and know what the laws were.
By the age of Homer 3000 years ago, the boundary between oral and written history became evident.
People relied less on the oral telling of history, and only those stories that were written down are now
remembered. So while writing helped record much of the past, it also let people forget much of it as well.
The introduction of written history, however, did not abolish the need for visual aids. Many people in the
Middle Ages remained illiterate and therefore the playwrights of the day were given the responsibility of
educating the masses in their religious faith. Today, few people have difficulty reading. Yet the
development of technology and videos has increasingly produced visual learners. As we head into the
21st century, the Church recognizes the need to reach people on a technological level.
The principal has asked you to design a slide presentation reflecting the readings to be heard at one of
your school's liturgical celebrations this year.
Unit 4 - Page 20
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Appendix 4.1c
Faith and the 21st Century Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
- demonstrates
Understanding
thorough
TF1.02, TFV.03,
knowledge of
TFV.04
facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
TF1.06, TF1.07
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
limited
some
thorough and
understanding of
understanding of
insightful
relationships
relationships
understanding of
between concepts between concepts
relationships
between concepts
Thinking/Inquiry
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
ICV.01
skills with limited skills with
skills with
skills with a high
effectiveness
moderate
considerable
degree of
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
Communication
- communicates
- communicates
- communicates
- communicates
ICV.03, IC1.01,
information with
information with
information with
information with a
IC1.04
limited clarity
moderate clarity
considerable
high degree of
clarity
clarity and with
confidence
Application
- uses procedures, - uses procedures, - uses procedures, - demonstrates
SPV.02, SPV.03,
equipment, and
equipment, and
equipment, and
and promotes the
SP1.05, SP1.08,
technology safely technology safely technology safely safe and correct
SP1.09, SP1.10
and correctly only and correctly with and correctly
use of procedures,
with supervision
some supervision
equipment, and
technology
SPV.04
- applies ideas and - applies ideas and - applies ideas and - applies ideas and
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
contexts with
contexts with
contexts with
contexts with a
limited
moderate
considerable
high degree of
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 4 - Page 21
Level 1
(50-59%)
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
Level 2
(60-69%)
- demonstrates
some knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
Level 3
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of
facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
relationships
between concepts
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 4.2a
Keeping the Community Informed Student Handout
Basic Principles of Design
What Are Principles of Design?
1. Guidelines used to organize visual elements.
2. Tools used to help solve visual problems.
The Six Principles of Design
Rhythm
 Uses repetition to create movement
 Can be created by a pattern
 The individual unit of a pattern is called a "motif."
Balance
 Strives for equality among visual elements
 Two types of Balance: Formal and Informal
Formal Balance – arranges elements symmetrically around the central axis
Informal Balance – is difficult because it is asymmetrical
Proportion
 Deals with size relationship
 Consider:
 Scale – objects that are large appear closer to the reader
 Rule of Thirds – images are more interesting when divided into three parts
 Placement – objects near the bottom of a composition appear closer
 Overlapping Shapes – elements are seen to be behind the objects that overlap them
Variety
 This principle is concerned with difference
 If all elements are the same in an image the results can be boring
 However, too much variety can be chaotic
 Think in terms of contrast (size, shape, colour)
 When using type in a design limit the number of fonts, the styles, the size, the alignments, and the
colour
Emphasis
 Helps define the visual "centre of interest"
 Convergence – diagonal lines lead the eye to the dominant area
 Radial lines also draw attention
Unity (sometimes called Harmony)
 Totality of the image created; the relationships among visual elements
 The Principles of Design used in creating the image
Breaking the Rules: Principles are guidelines not laws -- Don't be afraid to break them.
Unit 4 - Page 22
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Appendix 4.2b
Keeping the Community Informed Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.04, TFV.01
Thinking/Inquiry
SPV.01, SPV.03,
SPV.04
Communication
IC1.05
Application
IC1.01, IC1.02,
IC1.05
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
- demonstrates
limited knowledge in
identifying and
describing the
techniques of
producing print
media
- demonstrates some
knowledge in
identifying and
describing the
techniques of
producing print
media
- demonstrates
limited knowledge of
electronic
communication
equipment
- demonstrates some
knowledge of
electronic
communication
equipment
- exhibits limited
level of composing,
capturing, and
processing still
images
- exhibits some level
of composing,
capturing, and
processing still
images
- shows limited
knowledge of
graphics software
- shows limited
ability to prepare
camera-ready artwork
- communicates
information with
limited degree of
clarity
- demonstrates
limited ability to
recognize strengths
and weaknesses of
graphic, electronic,
and live
communication
- demonstrates
limited ability to
operate equipment
safely
- shows some
knowledge of
graphics software
- shows some ability
to prepare cameraready artwork
- communicates
information with
some degree of
clarity
- demonstrates some
ability to recognize
strengths and
weaknesses of
graphic, electronic,
and live
communication
- demonstrates some
ability to operate
equipment safely
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge in
identifying and
describing the
techniques of
producing print
media
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of
electronic
communication
equipment
- exhibits
considerable level of
composing,
capturing, and
processing still
images
- shows considerable
knowledge of
graphics software
- shows considerable
ability to prepare
camera-ready artwork
- communicates
information with a
considerable degree
of clarity
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to recognize strengths
and weaknesses of
graphic, electronic,
and live
communication
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to operate equipment
safely
- demonstrates high
level of knowledge in
identifying and
describing the
techniques of
producing print
media
- demonstrates high
level of knowledge of
electronic
communication
equipment
- exhibits high level
of composing,
capturing, and
processing still
images
- shows high level of
knowledge of
graphics software
- shows high level of
ability to prepare
camera-ready artwork
- communicates
information with a
high level of clarity
- demonstrates a high
level of ability to
recognize strengths
and weaknesses of
graphic, electronic,
and live
communication
- demonstrates a high
level of ability to
operate equipment
safely
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 4 - Page 23
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 4.2b (Continued)
Keeping the Community Informed Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to apply ethical
standards and
policies for
communications
technology
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to integrate Catholic
social teaching and
act to promote
social responsibility
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to communicate
effectively
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to respect and affirm
the diversity and
interdependence of
the world’s people
- demonstrates high
level of ability to
apply ethical
standards and
policies for
communications
technology
- demonstrates high
level of ability to
integrate Catholic
social teaching and
act to promote
social responsibility
- demonstrates high
level of ability to
communicate
effectively
- demonstrates high
level of ability to
respect and affirm
the diversity and
interdependence of
the world’s people
Application
IC1.01, IC1.02,
IC1.05
- demonstrates
ability to apply
ethical standards
and policies for
communications
technology
- demonstrates some
to apply ethical
standards and
policies for
communications
technology
OCSGD CGE1d,
CGE4f, CGE7f
- demonstrates
limited ability to
integrate Catholic
social teaching and
act to promote
social responsibility
- demonstrates
limited ability to
communicate
effectively
- demonstrates
limited ability to
respect and affirm
the diversity and
interdependence of
the world’s people
- demonstrates some
ability to integrate
Catholic social
teaching and act to
promote social
responsibility
- demonstrates some
ability to
communicate
effectively
- demonstrates some
ability to respect
and affirm the
diversity and
interdependence of
the world’s people
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 4 - Page 24
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Appendix 4.3a
Designing a Game Assignment Sheet
PART A
Bill Gates has asked you to design a game that requires a user to type the response to a question. The
game should help students in one of the following areas. (These games may be used by one of the subject
departments or in the Special Needs department in your school.)








Math – Addition
Math – Subtraction
Math – Multiplication and Division
English – Punctuation
English – Spelling
English – Adjectives and Adverbs
Religion – Journey through the Sacraments
History – The Beginnings of a Country: Canadian History
PART B
In addition to those design principles already studied in the course, keep in mind the following design
considerations:
1. A correct response should prompt a congratulatory image to appear; an incorrect response should
produce a consolatory one.
2. Your users must choose between operations: between two levels (Beginner or Expert), and decide
whether they want the results of their attempts tallied and displayed.
3. Use the template provided by the teacher to help complete the project.
Unit 4 - Page 25
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 4.3b
Computer Game Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
- demonstrates
Understanding
thorough
TFV.03, TFV.04,
knowledge of
IC1.05
facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
TF1.02
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
limited
some
thorough and
understanding of
understanding of
insightful
concepts
concepts
understanding of
concepts
Thinking/
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
- uses thinking
Inquiry
skills with limited skills with
skills with
skills with a high
TFV.03, TFV.O4, effectiveness
moderate
considerable
degree of
IC1.O5, TF1.02
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
Communication
- communicates
- communicates
- communicates
- communicates
ICV.01, ICV.03,
information with
information with
information with
information with a
IC1.01, IC1.02,
limited clarity
moderate clarity
considerable
high degree of
IC1.03, IC1.04
clarity
clarity and with
confidence
Application
- uses procedures, - uses procedures, - uses procedures, - demonstrates
SP1.09, SP1.11
equipment, and
equipment, and
equipment, and
and promotes the
technology safely technology safely technology safely safe and correct
and correctly only and correctly with and correctly
use of procedures,
with supervision
some supervision
equipment, and
technology
SPV.03, SPV.04
- applies ideas and - applies ideas and - applies ideas and - applies ideas and
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
skills in familiar
contexts with
contexts with
contexts with
contexts with a
limited
moderate
considerable
high degree of
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
effectiveness
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 4 - Page 26
Level 1
(50-59%)
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
Level 2
(60-69%)
- demonstrates
some knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
Level 3
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of
facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
concepts
 Communications Technology - Open
Unit 5: Image Production and Processes
Time: 22 hours
Unit Description
This unit enables students to develop a variety of techniques for capturing and manipulating still images.
Traditional black and white, 35 mm, pinhole, and colour digital photography are explored. Students learn
the basic optic principles, technical terminology, lighting techniques, and production processes necessary
to safely create printed images. Students are encouraged to reflect on how relationships between
themselves and their community are reflected in print images.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d, g, i; CGE2a, b, c, d, e; CGE3a, b, c, d,
e, f; CGE4a, b, c, d, e, f; CGE5a, b, c, d, e, g, h; CGE6a, b, c, e; CGE7a, b, d, e, f, g, i, j.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.01, TFV.03, TFV.04, SPV.01, SPV.03, SPV.04, ICV.01, ICV.02,
ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: TF1.08, TF1.09, TF1.10, TF1.11, SP1.02, SP1.03, SP1.05, SP1.09, SP1.10,
SP1.11, IC1.01, IC1.02, IC1.03, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Pinhole Camera
My Community – A Personal Photo Album
Studio Shooting/Lighting
Photo Collage
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
330 minutes
Prior Knowledge Required



Students should be familiar with the safe and proper use of 35 mm camera and/or digital camera.
Basic computer knowledge.
Co-operative teamwork skills.
Unit Planning Notes









It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments.
The teacher must provide a safe work environment for all students.
The teacher must stress the correct and safe use of all equipment and materials throughout the unit,
including darkroom processes and safety, the safe handling of chemicals, and the use of personal
protection equipment.
The teacher should investigate the software that is accessible and available at the school site or
available through the board system that is suitable for the each of the activities.
Appropriate teacher-produced and collected resources and other support materials should be
gathered, including previous student work and lighting samples.
Activities explore a variety of Image Production and Processing methods as well as the safe and
correct use of related equipment.
Unit 5 - Page 1
 Communications Technology - Open


Teachers should investigate potential cross-curricular connections with other subject areas and
community links for the activities.
Teachers should refer to Unit 6. The careers unit can be most effectively delivered by the integration
of topics throughout the unit activities.
 Classroom teachers work closely with the student services department to co-ordinate the
planning of the unit.
 Students should be reminded at the start of the unit that their Student Manuals (see Overview
Appendix I) should include career research information for the unit. This content is used to
complete their career presentation at the completion of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Each activity will provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and
provide insights into the skills required for a variety of related professions.
 Teaching/learning strategies that allow for career links in the unit activities should be
investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips, and guest speakers).
 Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Photography industry to share
their education and career paths with the students.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout the unit, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Image production and processing combine a variety of academic and applied learning strategies,
including independent and group work, problem solving, co-operation, communication, time
management, brainstorming new ideas, presenting, and report writing. The student-centred, activitybased mode of delivery provides students opportunities to develop individual and group skills and
promote critical thinking and problem solving.
Assessment and Evaluation


Assessment and evaluation are based on testing, product development, and product delivery using a
variety of media, and include both diagnostic and summative methods.
Assessment is an ongoing daily process that includes: log/journal entries, portfolios, regular practical
and theory tests and/or quizzes, activity worksheets and exercises, project evaluation criteria,
student/group presentations, conferences, self and/or peer critiques, checklists, and rubrics.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Unit 5 - Page 2
 Communications Technology - Open
Books
Adobe Creative Team Staff. Adobe Photoshop 5.5 Classroom in a Book. USA: Peachpit Press, 1999.
ISBN 0-2016-5895-X
Ang, Tom. The Art of Digital Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto Books, 1999. ISBN 0-8174-3794-0
Bakler, Robin. Designing the Future. Hong Kong: Thames & Hudson, 1993. ISBN 0-5000-1578-3
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Albany, New York: Delmar
Publishers, 1990. ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Bible, New Standard Version.
Brenner, E. Pinhole Photography: Rediscovering a Historic Technique. USA: Focal Press, 1995.
ISBN 0-2408-0237-3
Calder, Julian and John Garrett. The 35 mm Photographers Handbook. London: Panbooks, 1990.
ISBN 0-3303-1626-5
Cologne Museum Ludwig Staff. Photography in the Twentieth Century. Cologne, Koln: Taschen
America, LLC, 1996. ISBN 3-8228-8648-3
Davenport, Alma. The History of Photography: An Overview. USA: University of New Mexico Press,
1999. ISBN 0-8263-2076-7
Freeman, Michael. The Photographers Studio Manual. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1991.
ISBN 0-8174-5464-0
Gaynor, Adam. Images of God, Sixty Reflections of Spiritual Beliefs. Minnesota: Hazelden, 1999.
ISBN 1-5683-8322-3
Gilmore, Steven. Electronic Workshop – Photography. England: RotoVision, 1997. ISBN 2-8804-6422-6
Giolas, John. How to Operate a Successful Photo Portrait Studio. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc.,
1999. ISBN 0-9362-6269-9
Golding, Stephen. Photo Montage. Rockport, Massachusetts: Rockfort Publishers Inc., 1997.
ISBN 1-5649-6289-X
Greco, Nick and Kathleen Ziegler. Digital Focus, The New Media of Photography. Southampton, PA:
Dimensional Illustrators Inc., 1997. ISBN 0-6881-5418-2
Hicks, Roger and Frances Schultz. Pro Lighting, Portraits – A Guide to Professional Lighting
Techniques. Switzerland: RotoVision, 1996. ISBN 2-8804-6273-8.
Howell-Koehler, Nancy. Photo Art Processes. Worcester, Massachusetts: Davis Publications, 1980.
ISBN 0-8719-2117-0
Huss, David. Corel PhotoPaint 9, The Official Guide. Berkeley, California: McGraw-Hill, 1999.
ISBN 0-0721-1985-3.
Kirkland, Douglas. Icons – Creativity with Camera and Computer. San Francisco: Collins Publishers,
1993. ISBN 0-0025-5227-2
Koemptgen, Catherine. Connections and Reflections. Duluth, MN: Pfeifer-Hamilton Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 1-5702-5147-9
Lozoya, Oscar. Fine Art Portrait Photography. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc., 1999.
ISBN 0-9362-6271-0
Mante, Harald. Colour Design in Photography. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1972.
ISBN 0-0771-7630-3
Perweiler, Gary. Secrets of Studio Still Life Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1984.
ISBN 0-8174-5897-2
Proulx, Brenda Zosky. L.O.V.E. Works, Photojournalism by the Leave Out Violence Teens. Toronto,
Ontario: Stoddart Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-7737-6008-3
Unit 5 - Page 3
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Rockport Publishers Editorial Staff. Digital Graphics. Rockport, Massachussetts: Rockport Publishers
Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-5649-6336-5
Sanders, M. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. USA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991.
ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Swedlund, Charles. Photography. USA: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999. ISBN 0-1550-8378-3
Wall, Jeff and Kerry Brougher. Los Angeles: The Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles). USA:
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1997. ISBN 0-9143-5747-6
Weinman, Elaine and Peter Lourekas. Photoshop for Windows & Macintosh. Berkeley: Peachpit Press,
1998. ISBN 0-2013-5352-0
Web Sites
BetterPhoto
http://www.betterphoto.com/home.asp
Photography tips, a FAQ of photo basics, an equipment guide, and information on digital imaging.
Digital Photography Review
http://www.dpreview.com/
Digital photography news, reviews, galleries, plus hints and tips.
Eastman Kodak
http://www.kodak.com
Imaging in Education links.
Exposure
http://www.88.com/exposure/index.htm
Photographic information - instruction guide for beginners. Includes Sim-Cam camera simulator
program.
Foto Info
http://www.fotoinfo.com/
Technical photographic information.
Gnome Technologies
http://www.cool.mb.ca/~gnome/pinhole.html
Pinhole camera information - including box, cylinder and 35 mm film can. Alternative processes include
sunprints, gum dichromate, and emulsion transfer.
Grepstad, John
http://home.sol.no/~gjon/pinhole.htm
Pinhole camera information - history, images, cameras, and formulas.
MegaPixel Online Magazine
http://www.megapixel.net/html/issueindex.html
Still camera reviews and information.
PC Photo Review
http://www.pcphotoreview.com/
Digital camera reviews and resources.
Photo Source
http://www.digitaltruth.com/
Photographic information - featuring b/w developing times, tech tips, data sheets, and links.
Pinhole
http://www.pinhole.com/resources/mirror/
Pinhole camera information - pinhole samples, links to other sites.
Unit 5 - Page 4
 Communications Technology - Open
Pinhole Resources
http://www.pinholeresource.com/
Pinhole camera information - journals, cameras, books, workshops, and gallery.
Plug-In Systems
http://www.plugin.com/digitalcameraguide/index.html
Listing of digital cameras with links to sample images, data sheets, manufacturers sites, and more.
Short Courses in Photography
http://www.shortcourses.com/
A series of online books dealing with photography.
Web Monkey
http://www.hotwired.com/webmonkey/design/graphics/
An interactive site that provides tutorials on image editing software.
Yahoo
http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Visual_Arts/Photography/Photographers/Masters/
Link to hundreds of master photographers.
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Portrait/
Links to portrait photographers.
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Still_and_Pro
duct/
Links to still and product photographers.
http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Visual_Arts/Photography/Digital/Photographers/
Sample photographs from various digital photographers.
Activity 1: Pinhole Camera
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students study the history of still photography and imaging. The principles of the camera obscura
(pinhole camera) and drawing with light are emphasized. Students design and fabricate a pinhole camera
and take still images of their surroundings. They learn how images are captured with a camera and how
prints are exposed onto film paper. They develop darkroom skills and an understanding of the chemical
processes by producing negatives and final positive prints of their images. The safe handling of
chemicals and the use of personal protection equipment are emphasized.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
Unit 5 - Page 5
 Communications Technology - Open
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5f – exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
TF1.08 – identify the types and uses of still photography;
TF1.09 – identify various cameras and accessories and describe how to test the component parts;
TFI.10 – explain the process of developing and printing photographic images
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.10 – process and obtain prints and film and/or digital output;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Provide samples of previously built cameras and the images that they produce.
 Provide a sample of the project report, which outlines the process and shows the final prints and
copies of Pinhole Camera Assignment and Theory Notes (see Appendix 5.1a).
Unit 5 - Page 6
 Communications Technology - Open


Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Photography
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Note: The theory of focal length (see Appendix 5.1a) impacts on the type of cameras constructed
and the final images produced. The best set-up for success is to create a studio layout with lighting so
that lighting remains constant throughout. Using daylight is unreliable, as day-to-day cloud cover
causes great changes in exposure times. Teachers must be aware of darkroom processes and safety
issues and must stress darkroom safety and the importance of safe chemical handling.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Mathematics - solving for the unknown
 Drafting and measuring accurately
 Safety procedures when working in a Photography technology environment
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher introduces the concept of early pinhole optics and the wave theory of light.
 The teacher shows the class samples of previously built cameras and the images that they produce
and discuss how the shape of the camera determines whether the picture is a wide angle or telephoto
shot.
 The teacher hands out Pinhole Camera Assignment and Theory Notes, reviews the criteria for the
activity, and outlines the procedure of designing and fabricating the camera.
 Students work in groups of two. They research camera types to develop designs.
 The teacher reviews basic drafting techniques.
 Students design and build a prototype model and study it to ensure the design works.
 Students build the final product while keeping a daily journal of events (problems and solutions) and
a photo-shoot log to log pictures taken and the results.
 The teacher reviews basic darkroom techniques and safety procedures.
 Students take and develop negatives and positives of their images and create a final report of the
results.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment of students ability to work co-operatively in groups. Students complete daily
log sheets:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing (see Overview Appendix VI) ;
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
Unit 5 - Page 7
 Communications Technology - Open


Summative assessment of techniques and skills:
 Paper and pencil tests.
Summative assessment of pinhole camera construction and shooting assignment/final report:
 Performance assessment of finished project – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 5.1b);
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for the completion of this activity.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to develop an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
 Students work in groups
 The teacher may vary options and levels of difficulty in camera construction.
 Option for oral testing
 Students demonstrate acquired skills
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Albany, New York: Delmar
Publishers, 1990. ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Brenner, E. Pinhole Photography: Rediscovering a Historic Technique. USA: Focal Press, 1995.
ISBN 0-2408-0237-3
Freeman, Michael. The Photographers Studio Manual. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1991.
ISBN 0-8174-5464-0
Perweiler, Gary. Secrets of Studio Still Life Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1984.
ISBN 0-8174-5897-2
Sanders, M. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. USA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991.
ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Web Sites
Eastman Kodak
http://www.kodak.com
Imaging in Education links
Gnome Technologies
http://www.cool.mb.ca/~gnome/pinhole.html
Pinhole camera information - including box, cylinder, and 35 mm film can. Alternative processes include
sunprints, gum dichromate, and emulsion transfer.
Unit 5 - Page 8
 Communications Technology - Open
Grepstad, John
http://home.sol.no/~gjon/pinhole.htm
Pinhole camera information - history, images, cameras, and formulas.
Pinhole
http://www.pinhole.com/resources/mirror/
Pinhole camera information - pinhole samples, and links to other sites.
Pinhole Resources
http://www.pinholeresource.com/
Pinhole camera information - journals, cameras, books, workshops, and gallery.
Activity 2: My Community – A Personal Photo Album
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students produce a personal photo album of community images by exploring the basic processes of 35
mm black and white photography. Students identify various cameras and camera accessories. Employing
the available equipment, students create still images utilizing composition techniques. They shoot,
process, and obtain final prints from 35 mm black and white film. The safe handling of equipment and
materials is a central component of this activity.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills;
CGE4g – examines and reflects on one’s personal values, abilities, and aspirations influencing life’s
choices and opportunities.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5f – exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely.
Unit 5 - Page 9
 Communications Technology - Open
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
TF1.08 – identify the types and uses of still photography;
TF1.09 – identify various cameras and accessories and describe how to test the component parts;
TF1.10 – explain the process of developing and printing photographic images;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.10 – process and obtain prints and film and/or digital output;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 The teacher develops a file of examples of professionally finished photographs and ensures a
complete inventory of film, development equipment, chemicals, and papers is kept.
 Provide information on a variety of 35 mm cameras (SLR and Range-finder) and, if possible, a
collection of various types of cameras for display and identification.
 Handouts and well-placed wall signs can remind students of step-by-step procedures
 Opportunities for cross-curricular involvement should be considered as an enrichment activity e.g.,
English media, fine art, or Social Science.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Photography
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
The nature of this activity requires rigorous adherence to step-by-step procedures, therefore, prior
knowledge is not essential to its successful completion. Some knowledge of design and/or composition
principles enhances the work the students produce.
Unit 5 - Page 10
 Communications Technology - Open
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
Introduction to Theme
 The teacher solicits definitions of the word “Community” from the class and a list is generated of
types of community (e.g., church, family, friends, school, ethnic groups, clubs, neighbourhood,
environment, etc.).
Introduction to Composition
 The class views the collected samples of photographs. They discuss the elements and principles of
design employed in each image and the emotional impact it conveys. (As an assignment, students
collect photographs from magazines or newspapers and clearly indicate the use of
elements/principles of design. This assignment is evaluated with a checklist.)
Light
 Students are introduced to the concept of light as an energy form. The teacher then moves on to the
properties of light waves – frequency, amplitude, length, speed, and direction. These concepts enable
the students to understand the reaction that occurs when light travels through the camera lens and
interacts with the film. A written quiz is used to test this knowledge.
Camera Functions and Controls
 In groups of three or four, students research, through various means (manuals, textbooks, Internet,
etc.), the controls and functions (external and internal) for the types of cameras being used.
 The teacher hands out a diagram-labelling sheet, reviews camera controls and functions, and
introduces the concept of film speed and how cameral controls (aperture and shutter speed) alter the
amount of light that hits the film. Focal length and field of view are explored to ensure that students
are free to manipulate all of the variables the camera and film offer.
 The teacher demonstrates camera handling techniques, composition rules, etc.
 Students write a review quiz before beginning the assignment.
Shooting the Film
 Students shoot a roll of film. The theme is the Community. Students are encouraged to capture
images that represent various communities that have a positive influence in their lives.
Film Processing
 The teacher demonstrates the developing process to small groups, stressing the importance of the safe
handling of all chemicals.
 Students follow clear instructions to complete the seven steps necessary to develop the exposed film:
loading the film tank, developing the film within the tank, stopping the developing process, fixing the
images on the film, washing the film, wetting the film, and drying the film.
Making Prints
 The teacher demonstrates the procedure for making a simple contact sheet, stressing darkroom safety.
 Students make contact sheets of their negatives.
 The teacher demonstrates cleaning the negative; setting up the enlarger; exposing the step test or test
strip; processing the step test print; printing the photograph, including techniques such as using
filters on the enlarger, burning-in, and dodging; and finally drying the print.
 Students create test strips and print their images.
Unit 5 - Page 11
 Communications Technology - Open
Displaying the Prints
 The teacher demonstrates techniques for mounting and displaying prints including mat boards,
frames, dry mounting, and album creation.
 Students mount, display, and present their prints.
Review and Report
 The class critiques the images with respect to technique, composition, and theme.
 The teacher reviews the positive roles of various communities and emphasizes the role of the
individual in a community.
 Students produce a written report on current job prospects and required education for professional
photographers. The report includes a review of the changes in the photographer’s job as a result of
new digital technologies.
(Note: All teacher demonstrations should be given to small groups of students – approximately six to
eight students per group)
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment of students daily log sheets:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing (see Overview Appendix VI);
 Reflection through self/peer assessment sheets.
 Summative assessment of quizzes is employed for theoretical material like elements and principles of
design, properties of light, camera functions, safety, careers, and each particular process:
 Paper and pencil tests;
 Performance assessment by teacher of worksheets and exercise sheets;
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing – ongoing verbal feedback.
 Formative and summative assessment of collage assignment:
 Performance assessment of finished project – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 5.2);
 Reflection through self/peer assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II and III).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 Some students need extra time to repeat the processes involved.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to develop an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
 Students work in partners and groups.
 Option for oral testing
 Students demonstrate acquired skills
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Unit 5 - Page 12
 Communications Technology - Open
Books
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Albany, New York: Delmar
Publishers, 1990. ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Calder, Julian and John Garrett. The 35 mm Photographers Handbook. London: Panbooks, 1990.
ISBN 0-3303-1626-5
Cologne Museum Ludwig Staff. Photography in the Twentieth Century. Cologne, Koln: Taschen
America, LLC, 1996. ISBN 3-8228-8648-3
Freeman, Michael. The Photographers Studio Manual. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1991.
ISBN 0-8174-5464-0
Gaynor, Adam. Images of God, Sixty Reflections of Spiritual Beliefs. Minnesota: Hazelden, 1999.
ISBN 1-5683-8322-3.
Giolas, John. How to Operate a Successful Photo Portrait Studio. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc.,
1999. ISBN 0-9362-6269-9
Koemptgen, Catherine. Connections and Reflections. Duluth, MN: Pfeifer-Hamilton Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 1-5702-5147-9
Lozoya, Oscar. Fine Art Portrait Photography. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc., 1999.
ISBN 0-9362-6271-0
Perweiler, Gary. Secrets of Studio Still Life Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1984.
ISBN 0-8174-5897-2
Proulx, Brenda Zosky. L.O.V.E. Works, Photojournalism by the Leave Out Violence Teens. Toronto,
Ontario: Stoddart Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-7737-6008-3
Sanders, M. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. USA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991.
ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Swedlund, Charles. Photography. USA: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999. ISBN 0-1550-8378-3
Web Sites
Eastman Kodak
http://www.kodak.com
Imaging in Education links
Exposure
http://www.88.com/exposure/index.htm
Photographic information - instruction guide for beginners. Includes Sim-Cam camera simulator
program.
Foto Info
http://www.fotoinfo.com/
Technical photographic information
Photo Source
http://www.digitaltruth.com/
Photographic information - featuring b/w developing times, tech tips, data sheets, and links.
Yahoo
http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Visual_Arts/Photography/Photographers/Masters/
Link to hundreds of master photographers
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Portrait/
Links to portrait photographers
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Still_and_Pro
duct/
Links to still and product photographers
Unit 5 - Page 13
 Communications Technology - Open
Activity 3: Studio Shooting/Lighting
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students capture still images, figures, and objects in a studio setting. They learn image composition
techniques by using direct and indirect light. They design and build simple backdrops and arrange a
variety of lighting schemes using a single light source, two light sources, and three light sources to take
traditional 35 mm or digital pictures.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2a – listens actively and critically to understand and learn in light of gospel values;
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2d – writes and speaks fluently one or both of Canada’s official languages.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience;
CGE3e – adopts a holistic approach to life by integrating learning from various subject areas and
experience.
A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills;
CGE4g – examines and reflects on one’s personal values, abilities, and aspirations influencing life’s
choices and opportunities.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5f – exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
TF1.08 – identify the types and uses of still photography;
TF1.09 – identify various cameras and accessories and describe how to test the component parts;
Unit 5 - Page 14
 Communications Technology - Open
TF1.11 – identify the elements of lighting and staging;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.10 – process and obtain prints and film and/or digital output;
SP1-11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Teachers acquire a series of examples to demonstrate lighting mistakes; lighting in portraiture;
proportion and composition in portraiture; lighting in product shots; effective backdrops; simple
backdrops used for product shots; and objects for shooting.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Photography
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Safe and proper use of 35 mm camera and/or digital camera.
 Safe and proper techniques for developing and printing 35 mm and/or digital pictures.
 Co-operative teamwork skills.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher reads Genesis1:26 “…..let there be light …” and leads a discussion on the behavior of
light using biblical imagery to emphasize the importance of light as it relates to the mystical quality
of space and subject matter. The teacher then reads Genesis1:27: “Let us make humankind in our
image, according to our likeness…so God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he
created them; male and female he created them.
Unit 5 - Page 15
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Students discuss the concept of inner beauty, character versus physical beauty, and image stereotypes
of both males and females.
The teacher uses a slide projector to show portraits that demonstrate how lighting and composition
are essential to communicating the mood and character of the inner person. These images are
contrasted against typical examples of lighting mistakes.
The teacher uses a slide projector to show object/product shots that demonstrate how lighting,
composition, and backdrops are essential to communicating the mood and character of the person
that might use these objects. Students briefly discuss the power of the image and the ethics of
advertising.
The teacher sets up a video camera on a tripod connected to a monitor in the studio and demonstrates
various lighting techniques using volunteer students and classroom objects as subject matter. Types
of lights and the safe handling of lights are discussed.
The teacher distributes photo assignment and instructional aid sheets and reviews the various lighting
set-ups.
Students work on photo assignments in groups (maximum three to four students per group).
Students create three images:
 traditional portrait and portrait pose using a classic three-point lighting system;
 portrait using lighting scheme and pose of individual student’s choice that communicates the
mood and character of the student;
 object of student’s choice that reflects the student’s character shot with backdrop and lighting
scheme of student’s choice.
Students discuss the rationale for choice of lighting scheme, pose, and backdrop with respect to
communicating their personal inner characteristics.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment of student’s ability to work co-operatively in groups. Students assess the
contribution of individual group members by completing daily log sheets:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing (see Overview Appendix VI);
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
 Summative assessment of theoretical material:
 Paper and pencil test - lighting quiz (see Appendix 5.3c);
 Performance assessment by teacher of worksheets and exercise sheets;
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing – ongoing verbal feedback.
 Summative assessment of portrait lighting and shooting assignment:
 Performance assessment of finished project – project evaluation sheet (See Appendices 5.3a and
5.3b);
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to propose an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
 Students work in groups
 More sophisticated lighting techniques can be experimented with by advanced students.
Unit 5 - Page 16
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Compositions of multiple subjects rather than single subjects.
Option for oral testing
Students demonstrate of acquired skills
Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Albany, New York: Delmar
Publishers, 1990. ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Bible, New Standard Version.
Calder, Julian and John Garrett. The 35 mm Photographers Handbook. London: Panbooks, 1990.
ISBN 0-3303-1626-5
Cologne Museum Ludwig Staff. Photography in the Twentieth Century. Cologne, Koln: Taschen
America, LLC, 1996. ISBN 3-8228-8648-3
Davenport, Alma. The History of Photography: An Overview. USA: University of New Mexico Press,
1999. ISBN 0-8263-2076-7
Freeman, Michael. The Photographers Studio Manual. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1991.
ISBN 0-8174-5464-0
Gaynor, Adam. Images of God, Sixty Reflections of Spiritual Beliefs. Minnesota: Hazelden, 1999.
ISBN 1-5683-8322-3.
Gilmore, Steven. Electronic Workshop – Photography. England: RotoVision, 1997.
ISBN 2-8804-6422-6.
Giolas, John. How to Operate a Successful Photo Portrait Studio. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc.,
1999. ISBN 0-9362-6269-9
Hicks, Roger and Frances Schultz. Pro Lighting, Portraits – A Guide to Professional Lighting
Techniques. Switzerland: RotoVision, 1996. ISBN 2-8804-6273-8.
Koemptgen, Catherine. Connections and Reflections. Duluth, MN: Pfeifer-Hamilton Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 1-5702-5147-9
Lozoya, Oscar. Fine Art Portrait Photography. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc., 1999.
ISBN 0-9362-6271-0
Perweiler, Gary. Secrets of Studio Still Life Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1984.
ISBN 0-8174-5897-2
Proulx, Brenda Zosky. L.O.V.E. Works, Photojournalism by the Leave Out Violence Teens. Toronto,
Ontario: Stoddart Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-7737-6008-3
Sanders, M. Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow. USA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1991.
ISBN 0-0267-7110-1
Swedlund, Charles. Photography. USA: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999. ISBN 0-1550-8378-3
Weinman, Elaine and Peter Lourekas. Photoshop for Windows & Macintosh. Berkeley: Peachpit Press,
1998. ISBN 0-2013-5352-0
Unit 5 - Page 17
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Web Sites
Eastman Kodak
http://www.kodak.com
Imaging in Education links
Exposure
http://www.88.com/exposure/index.htm
Photographic information - instruction guide for beginners. Includes Sim-Cam camera simulator
program.
Foto Info
http://www.fotoinfo.com/
Technical photographic information
Photo Source
http://www.digitaltruth.com/
Photographic information - featuring b/w developing times, tech tips, data sheets, and links.
Yahoo
http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Visual_Arts/Photography/Photographers/Masters/
Link to hundreds of master photographers
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Portrait/
Links to portrait photographers
http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Photography/Photographers/Still_and_Pro
duct/
Links to still and product photographers
Activity 4: Photo Collage
Time: 330 minutes
Description
Students explore the processes and techniques of digital imaging by preparing a photographic collage
centred on a human virtue (e.g., charity, honesty, purity). Employing masks, paths, layers, filters,
channels, text, contrast, and colour balance, students manipulate their own original images in order to
communicate the defined virtue. End uses include the school yearbook, web site, theme week posters, or
projections during assemblies or masses and other school/community events.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2e – uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems;
CGE3d – makes decisions in light of gospel values with an informed moral conscience.
Unit 5 - Page 18
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A Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4a – demonstrates a confident and positive sense of self and respect for the dignity and welfare of
others;
CGE4c – takes initiative and demonstrates Christian leadership;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills;
CGE4g – examines and reflects on one’s personal values, abilities, and aspirations influencing life’s
choices and opportunities.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5a – works effectively as an interdependent team member;
CGE5f – exercises Christian leadership in the achievement of individual and group goals;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7e – witnesses Catholic social teaching by promoting equality, democracy, and solidarity for a just,
peaceful, and compassionate society;
CGE7i – respects the environment and uses resources wisely;
CGE7j – contributes to the common good.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.01 – identify and describe the techniques used to produce print media;
TFV.03 – identify and describe the processes of capturing still images;
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
SPV.01 – prepare camera-ready artwork for print and post-production;
SPV.03 – compose, capture, and process still images;
SPV.04 – use computer graphics software competently;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.02 – observe safety rules and regulations;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
TF1.02 – identify basic composition and typographic principles;
TF1.03 – describe the characteristics of materials used in print production;
TF1.04 – describe printing and finishing processes;
TF1.08 – identify the types and uses of still photography;
TF1.09 – identify various cameras and accessories and describe how to test the component parts;
TF1.10 – explain the process of developing and printing photographic images;
SP1.02 – apply composition and typographic principles to produce camera-ready artwork for print
production;
SP1.03 – produce printed copies using a variety of reproduction methods;
SP1.04 – apply finishing operations to printed products;
SP1.05 – create various effects using video and digital camera techniques;
SP1.09 – create still images using composition techniques;
SP1.10 – process and obtain prints and film and/or digital output;
SP1-11 – enhance or create sets, lighting schemes, and information displays;
IC1.01 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.02 – operate equipment safely;
IC1.03 – apply health and safety standards when using products and materials;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Unit 5 - Page 19
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Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 Teachers provide the opportunity for students to focus on specific career options and provide insights
into the skills required for related professions (see Unit 6). Teaching/learning strategies that allow for
career links should be investigated (e.g., job shadowing, career and education research, field trips,
and guest speakers). Arrange for appropriate speakers whose careers are related to the Photography
industry to share their education and career paths with students. Members of the community may
provide students with some insights into career opportunities and issues.
 Remind students to update the career research section of their Student Manual.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Basic computer knowledge
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 Students brainstorm an extensive list of Christian virtues and define each virtue.
 In small groups (maximum of four), students are given a portion of the list and brainstorm a list of
images from the school community that could help communicate the particular virtues.
 The teacher gives an electronic slide presentation of examples of collages.
 The teacher demonstrates the basic tools of a photo editing/composition software on a single image
using a computer projection system.
 In pairs, students experiment manipulating stock images with photo editing/composition software.
While students are experimenting, the teacher demonstrates to small groups, (maximum of six), how
to use and download images from a digital camera to a computer. This demonstration is repeated
 The teacher demonstrates various techniques for assembling several images in the photo
editing/composition software using a computer projection system. The teacher should demonstrate
the complete process of creating a collage.
 Students share the use of the digital cameras and capture still images that communicate the essence
of their selected virtue while the rest of the class practises assembling techniques using stock images.
 The teacher gives quick tip lessons at the beginning of remaining classes.
 Students print out and display their completed collage.
Unit 5 - Page 20
 Communications Technology - Open
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment of student’s ability to work co-operatively in groups. Students will assess the
contribution of the individual group members by completing daily log sheets:
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing (see Overview Appendix VI);
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
 Summative assessment of theoretical material:
 Paper and pencil test;
 Performance assessment by teacher of worksheets and exercise sheets;
 Personal communication through teacher-student conferencing – ongoing verbal feedback.
 Summative assessment of collage assignment:
 Performance assessment of finished project – project evaluation sheet (see Appendix 5.4);
 Reflection through self/peer and group assessment sheets (see Overview Appendices II, III, and
IV).
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Students with special needs can be given appropriate timelines for completion.
 For enrichment, students may use this technology to develop an entrepreneurial opportunity for the
community, another subject area, or for the school.
 Students work in partners and groups.
 Option for oral testing
 Students demonstrate of acquired skills
 Peer tutors assist students with special needs when handling equipment.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
Samples of student work.
Manufacturer’s equipment manuals.
Software manuals and tutorial exercises.
Various samples of activity project work.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Books
Adobe Creative Team Staff. Adobe Photoshop 5.5 Classroom in a Book. USA: Peachpit Press, 1999.
ISBN 0-2016-5895-X
Ang, Tom. The Art of Digital Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto Books, 1999. ISBN 0-8174-3794-0
Bakler, Robin. Designing the Future. Hong Kong: Thames & Hudson, 1993. ISBN 0-5000-1578-3
Barden, Robert and Michael Hacker. Communication Technology. Albany, New York: Delmar
Publishers, 1990. ISBN 0-8273-3225-4
Bible, New Standard Version.
Cologne Museum Ludwig Staff. Photography in the Twentieth Century. Cologne, Koln: Taschen
America, LLC, 1996. ISBN 3-8228-8648-3
Unit 5 - Page 21
 Communications Technology - Open
Davenport, Alma. The History of Photography: An Overview. USA: University of New Mexico Press,
1999. ISBN 0-8263-2076-7
Gaynor, Adam. Images of God, Sixty Reflections of Spiritual Beliefs. Minnesota: Hazelden, 1999.
ISBN 1-5683-8322-3.
Golding, Stephen. Photo Montage. Rockport, Massachusetts: Rockfort Publishers Inc., 1997.
ISBN 1-5649-6289-X
Greco, Nick and Kathleen Ziegler. Digital Focus, The New Media of Photography. Southampton, PA:
Dimensional Illustrators Inc., 1997. ISBN 0-6881-5418-2
Hicks, Roger and Frances Schultz. Pro Lighting, Portraits – A Guide to Professional Lighting
Techniques. Switzerland: RotoVision, 1996. ISBN 2-8804-6273-8
Howell-Koehler, Nancy. Photo Art Processes. Worcester, Massachusetts: Davis Publications, 1980.
ISBN 0-8719-2117-0
Huss, David. Corel PhotoPaint 9, The Official Guide. Berkeley, California: McGraw-Hill, 1999.
ISBN 0-0721-1985-3
Kirkland, Douglas. Icons – Creativity with Camera and Computer. San Francisco: Collins Publishers,
1993. ISBN 0-0025-5227-2
Koemptgen, Catherine. Connections and Reflections. Duluth, MN: Pfeifer-Hamilton Publishers, 1998.
ISBN 1-5702-5147-9
Lozoya, Oscar. Fine Art Portrait Photography. Buffalo, NY: Amherst Media Inc., 1999.
ISBN 0-9362-6271-0
Mante, Harald. Colour Design in Photography. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1972.
ISBN 0-0771-7630-3
Perweiler, Gary. Secrets of Studio Still Life Photography. New York, NY: Amphoto, 1984.
ISBN 0-8174-5897-2
Proulx, Brenda Zosky. L.O.V.E. Works, Photojournalism by the Leave Out Violence Teens. Toronto,
Ontario: Stoddart Publishing, 1998. ISBN 1-7737-6008-3
Rockport Publishers Editorial Staff. Digital Graphics. Rockport, Massachusetts: Rockport Publishers
Inc., 1997. ISBN 1-5649-6336-5
Swedlund, Charles. Photography. USA: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999. ISBN 0-1550-8378-3
Wall, Jeff and Kerry Brougher. Los Angeles: The Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles). USA:
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1997. ISBN 0-9143-5747-6
Web Sites
BetterPhoto
http://www.betterphoto.com/home.asp
Photography tips, a FAQ of photo basics, an equipment guide, and information on digital imaging.
Digital Photography Review
http://www.dpreview.com/
Digital photography news, reviews, galleries, plus hints and tips.
Eastman Kodak
http://www.kodak.com
Imaging in Education links
MegaPixel Online Magazine
http://www.megapixel.net/html/issueindex.html
Still camera reviews and information
Unit 5 - Page 22
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PC Photo Review
http://www.pcphotoreview.com/
Digital camera reviews and resources
Plug-In Systems
http://www.plugin.com/digitalcameraguide/index.html
Listing of digital cameras with links to sample images, data sheets, manufacturers sites, and more.
Short Courses in Photography
http://www.shortcourses.com/
A series of online books dealing with photography
Web Monkey
http://www.hotwired.com/webmonkey/design/graphics/
An interactive site provides tutorials on image editing software.
Yahoo
http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Visual_Arts/Photography/Digital/Photographers/
Sample photographs from various digital photographers
Unit 5 - Page 23
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Appendix 5.1a
Pinhole Camera Assignment and Theory Notes
Guidelines
The assignment allows you to design and make your own camera and create your own photographs with
the camera. You research pinhole camera designs and then create your own. Research and design keeping
the following points in mind:
 The shape of your camera determines whether the picture will be a wide angle or telephoto shot (the
longer the camera the greater its telephoto capabilities).
 The camera must be light tight to operate properly (paint the inside black).
 A shutter system that opens and closes at your discretion controls the amount and time of light.
 Your design must allow you to open the camera to load photographic paper and hold paper firmly.
 You will create design blueprints using pencil and scale ruler. Your blueprint must be submitted
before you begin construction.
 The quality of the pinhole is of paramount importance. The hole should be drilled in pop can
aluminum and sanded. To optimize the picture quality the size of the pinhole should be calculated
using the following formula: Hole diameter in inches = 0.007 x (focal length)
Prototype
Once your research and blueprints are complete, build a prototype of your camera. This will allow you to
test the shape and focal length of the camera and ensure that it will operate properly.
Final Camera
 Build your final camera and take it into the darkroom to ensure it is light proof (tape or paint over).
 As a group (2-3 groups together) set up lights and the objects you wish to photograph.
 Do a number of test shots and print them to find out what timed exposure works well.
 Take the final good photograph of your set-up and develop. This is your negative.
 Make test strips of your positive then print out your final positive.
Final Report
The final report should include all research materials, blueprints, test prints, final prints, and an analysis
of the process. Also include what went right and what went wrong and conclude by stating any
improvements or changes you might have made to your camera.
Additional Activity
If there are improvements that could be made, make them and develop new negatives and positives.
Focal Length
The 35-mm film used by most single lens reflex cameras produces a negative, which is 24 mm high by
36 mm wide. The total film height is 35 mm in height. Normal focal length is usually considered to be
roughly equal to the diagonal dimension of the negative, or slightly more.
The normal focal length for a pinhole camera would be:
F.L.= 242  362
F.L.= 43.6
To calculate the focal length of pinhole camera with a negative size of 4" x 5". The diagonal dimension
or focal length would be calculated as:
F.L.= 42  52
F.L= 6.4 inches
As focal length increases, image size increases, but due to the Inverse Square Law, brightness decreases.
Unit 5 - Page 24
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Appendix 5.1b
Pinhole Camera Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
Understanding
TFV.03,
TF1.08,TF1.11
- demonstrates limited
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates some
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards
TF1.10G
- demonstrates limited
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates some
understanding of
concepts
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge of facts,
technical terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
concepts
Thinking/Inquiry
TFV.03
- uses thinking skills
with limited
effectiveness
- applies few of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
- uses thinking skills
with moderate
effectiveness
- applies some of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
- uses thinking skills
with considerable
effectiveness
- applies most of the
skills involved in an
inquiry/design process
Communication
TF1.10
- communicates
information with
limited clarity
- communicates
information with
moderate clarity
- communicates
information with
considerable clarity
Application
SP1.09, SP1.10
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with limited
effectiveness
SP1.11
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with
limited effectiveness
ICV.02, IC1.02,
IC1.03, SPV.03
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly only with
supervision
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with
moderate
effectiveness
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly with some
supervision
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with
considerable
effectiveness
- uses procedures,
equipment, and
technology safely and
correctly
IC1.04, ICV.03,
IC1.05
- makes connections
with limited
effectiveness
- makes connections
with moderate
effectiveness
- makes connections
with considerable
effectiveness
- demonstrates
thorough knowledge
of facts, technical
terminology,
procedures, and
standards
- demonstrates
thorough and
insightful
understanding of
concepts
- uses thinking skills
with a high degree of
effectiveness
- applies all or almost
all of the skills
involved in an
inquiry/design process
- communicates
information with a
high degree of clarity
and with confidence
- applies ideas and
skills in familiar
contexts with a high
degree of
effectiveness
- transfers concepts,
skills, and procedures
to new contexts with a
high degree of
effectiveness
- demonstrates and
promotes the safe and
correct use of
procedures,
equipment, and
technology
- makes connections
with a high degree of
effectiveness
TF1.09
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 5 - Page 25
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Appendix 5.3a
Studio Shooting/Lighting Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
Understanding
TF1.11, IC1.02
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
in identifying the
elements of lighting
and staging and
operating them
safely
- demonstrates some
knowledge in
identifying the
elements of lighting
and staging and
operating them
safely
Thinking/Inquiry
SPV.03, SP1.09,
SP1.11
- applies few of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and creating
sets and lighting
schemes
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
limited degree of
clarity
- demonstrates
limited ability to
identify career
opportunities in
professions related
to lighting, staging,
and imaging and to
develop appropriate
education plans
- applies some of
the design and
inquiry principles
while composing
still images and
creating sets and
lighting schemes
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with
some degree of
clarity
- demonstrates some
ability to identify
career opportunities
in professions
related to lighting,
staging, and
imaging and to
develop appropriate
education plans
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge in
identifying the
elements of lighting
and staging and
operating them
safely
- applies most of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and creating
sets and lighting
schemes
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
considerable degree
of clarity
- demonstrates a
considerable ability
to identify career
opportunities in
professions related
to lighting, staging,
and imaging and to
develop appropriate
education plans
- demonstrates
limited ability to
examine and reflect
on one’s personal
values, abilities, and
aspirations
influencing life’s
choices and
opportunities and to
work as an
interdependent team
member
- demonstrates some
ability to examine
and reflect on one’s
personal values,
abilities, and
aspirations
influencing life’s
choices and
opportunities and to
work as an
interdependent team
member
- demonstrates a
high degree of
knowledge in
identifying the
elements of lighting
and staging and in
operating them
safely
- applies all of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and creating
sets and lighting
schemes
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
high degree of
clarity
- demonstrates a
high degree of
ability to identify
career opportunities
in professions
related to lighting,
staging, and
imaging and to
develop appropriate
education plans
- demonstrates a
high degree of
ability to examine
and reflect on one’s
personal values,
abilities, and
aspirations
influencing life’s
choices and
opportunities and to
work as an
interdependent team
member
Communication
TFV.03
Application
ICV.03, ICI.04
OCSGD CGE4g,
CGE5a
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to examine and
reflect on one’s
personal values,
abilities, and
aspirations
influencing life’s
choices and
opportunities and to
work as an
interdependent team
member
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 5 - Page 26
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Appendix 5.3b
Studio Shooting/Lighting Task Specific Rubric
Criteria
Level 4
(80-100%)
Lighting Set-up
- demonstrates a
high degree of
ability to place the
Key light, Fill
light, and Back
light in
relationship to the
camera and
subject
Subject/Object
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates a
Presentation and
limited ability to
some ability to
high degree of
Set-up
correctly pose
correctly pose
ability to correctly
subjects and setsubjects and setpose subjects and
up objects for
up objects for
set-up objects for
studio shooting
studio shooting
studio shooting
Creativity
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates a
limited originality some originality
high degree of
with choice of
with choice of
originality with
lighting,
lighting,
choice of lighting,
object/subject,
object/subject,
object/subject,
and backdrop
and backdrop
and backdrop
Quality of
- demonstrates
- demonstrates
- demonstrates a
Communicated
limited ability to
some ability to
high degree of
Information/
communicate
communicate
ability to
Ideas
personality and
personality and
communicate
character through character through
personality and
captured still
captured still
character through
images
images
captured still
images
Safety and
- follows some lab - follows most lab
- reminds other
Handling of
safety rules when safety rules when
students of safety
Equipment
handling lighting
handling lighting
rules and proper
equipment.
equipment.
handling of
lighting
equipment when
they are not being
followed.
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 5 - Page 27
Level 1
(50-59%)
- demonstrates
limited ability to
place the Key
light, Fill light,
and Back light in
relationship to the
camera and
subject
Level 2
(60-69%)
- demonstrates
some ability to
place the Key
light, Fill light,
and Back light in
relationship to the
camera and
subject
Level 3
(70-79%)
- demonstrates
considerable
ability to place the
Key light, Fill
light, and Back
light in
relationship to the
camera and
subject
- demonstrates
considerable
ability to correctly
pose subjects and
set-up objects for
studio shooting
- demonstrates
considerable
originality with
choice of lighting,
object/subject,
and backdrop
- demonstrates
considerable
ability to
communicate
personality and
character through
captured still
images
- follows all lab
safety rules when
handling lighting
equipment.
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 5.3c
Lighting Quiz
Name:
/35
Answer questions in the space provided:
1. List six basic single light lighting directions and describe how each affects rendition of a subject.
(12 marks)
2. List and describe five lighting arrangements/techniques for lighting an object. (5 marks)
3. In the space provided below, neatly sketch a plan view of a traditional three-point lighting system for
portraiture. Include the camera, subject, backdrop, name of each light, and note the angle of each
light relative to the subject. (10 marks)
4. Sunlight is both specular and diffused. Describe this phenomenon. Include definitions of specular
and diffused light in your answer. (4 marks)
5. Define four of the following (inverse square law, barn doors, snoot, floodlight, spotlight). (4 marks)
You have been given the task of photographing a modern day saint. Illustrate how you would light your
subject and give a rationale as to how this lighting scheme helps to communicate the character of the
saint. (Answer this question on the back of the sheet.)
Unit 5 - Page 28
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 5.4
Photo Collage Activity Specific Achievement Chart Rubric
Criteria
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
Knowledge/
Understanding
TF1.08, TF1.09
- demonstrates
limited knowledge
in identifying
various cameras and
accessories and the
uses of still
photography
- demonstrates some
knowledge in
identifying various
cameras and
accessories and the
uses of still
photography
Thinking/Inquiry
SPV.03, SPV.04,
SP1.09, SP1.10
- applies few of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and using
computer graphics
software
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
limited degree of
clarity
- demonstrates
limited ability to
identify career
opportunities in
professions related
to photography and
digital imaging and
to develop
education plans
- applies some of
the design and
inquiry principles
while composing
still images and
using computer
graphics software
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with
some degree of
clarity
- demonstrates some
ability to identify
career opportunities
in professions
related to
photography and
digital imaging and
to develop
education plans
- demonstrates
considerable
knowledge in
identifying various
cameras and
accessories and the
uses of still
photography
- applies most of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and using
computer graphics
software
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
considerable degree
of clarity
- demonstrates a
considerable ability
to identify career
opportunities in
professions related
to photography and
digital imaging and
to develop
education plans
- demonstrates
limited ability to
recognize that there
is more grace in our
world than sin and
to promote social
responsibility,
human solidarity,
and the common
good
- demonstrates some
ability to recognize
that there is more
grace in our world
than sin and to
promote social
responsibility,
human solidarity,
and the common
good
- demonstrates
considerable ability
to recognize that
there is more grace
in our world than
sin and to promote
social responsibility,
human solidarity,
and the common
good
- demonstrates a
high degree of
knowledge in
identifying various
cameras and
accessories and the
uses of still
photography
- applies all of the
design and inquiry
principles while
composing still
images and using
computer graphics
software
- describes the
process of capturing
still images with a
high degree of
clarity
- demonstrates a
high degree of
ability to identify
career opportunities
in professions
related to
photography and
digital imaging and
to develop
education plans
- demonstrates a
high degree of
ability to recognize
that there is more
grace in our world
than sin and to
promote social
responsibility,
human solidarity,
and the common
good
Communication
TFV.03
Application
ICV.03, ICI.04
OCSGD CGE1d,
CGE3a
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 5 - Page 29
 Communications Technology - Open
Unit 6: Career Exploration in Communications Technology
Time: The delivery of this unit is ongoing and concurrent with the other five units.
Unit Description
In this unit students learn how to plan for participation in the working world of Communications
Technology that is increasingly characterized by innovation, project-based team work, entrepreneurship,
change, and the challenge of life-long learning. Students will learn the intrinsic value of work and will
discover techniques to realize their potential for dignity, self-respect, and success.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations: CGE1d; CGE2a, b, c, d, e; CGE3b, c, d, e;
CGE4a, b, e, f, g; CGE5b, c, d, h; CGE7b.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations: TFV.04, ICV.01, ICV.03.
Specific Expectations: IC1.01, IC1.04, IC1.05.
Activity Titles (Time + Sequence)
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Career Exploration: Introduction/Gathering Career Data
Career Exploration: Career Presentation
Career Exploration: Assessing Personal and Communications
Technology Skills
60 minutes
each (delivered
concurrently)
Prior Knowledge Required



Students possess a sound understanding of the Communications Technology topics that are
introduced throughout this profile and an awareness of various technologies and careers.
An understanding of the services provided by the school’s student services/guidance department.
Students are familiar with the school’s course calendar and have begun to prepare a planning chart
for their high school program.
Unit Planning Notes
The careers unit can be most effectively delivered by the integration of topics throughout the course.
Classroom teachers work closely with the student services department to co-ordinate the planning of the
unit. Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of career options in the Communications
Technology field based on the five units set out in this policy that are appropriate for the range of ability
levels within the classroom.
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and the correct use of any copyrighted materials.
 Teachers address safety/censorship on the Internet at the start of the course by implementing their
school board’s policies on appropriate student use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording notes of their accomplishments.
 This unit is run concurrently with the other five units and must be reinforced at the start of each new
unit.
 Students should be reminded at the start of each unit that their Student Manuals (see Overview
Appendix I) should include career research information for each unit. The content is used to
complete their career presentation (see Appendix 6.1a).
Unit 6 - Page 1
 Communications Technology - Open


The teacher should investigate the software that is accessible at the school site or through the board
system that is appropriate for the activities. The teacher arranges access to the various occupational
research software programs available in the school: Choices, Career Explorer, Career Gateway, and
Mazemaster.
Consult with the Student Services/Guidance Department on existing school-based career planning
initiatives.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout the unit, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
The teacher will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote
social responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The student-centred, activity-based mode of delivery provides students opportunities to develop
individual and group skills.
 Current newspapers should be available to the students.
 Teachers obtain a directory of local businesses through the Chamber of Commerce or Board of
Trade.
 Career exploration software such as Choices, Career Explorer, Career Gateway, and Mazemaster
should be accessible on the network.
 Teachers gather course calendars of community colleges, universities and private institutions for
student research.
 Teachers work closely with the Student Services/Guidance Department to co-ordinate the planning of
the unit.
 Teachers employ interest inventory software and have students explore job advertisements in the
Communications Technology field. Comparisons of Communications Technology careers should
remain a focus of the unit.
Assessment and Evaluation
Diagnostic assessment
 Completion of personal interests and skills inventories at the start of the course (see Resources and
Appendix 6.1b).
Formative assessment
 Roving conferences throughout each unit to discuss research progress with all students;
 Career research checklists;
 Personal interest and skill inventories and self-assessment exercises at the completion of the course
(see Resources and Appendix 6.1b).
Summative assessment
 The careers based research project;
 The presentation on Communications Technology careers that employ a variety of communication
methods.
 Assessment combines teacher and student feedback using a class-created rubric or Appendices
6.2a and 6.2b.
Unit 6 - Page 2
 Communications Technology - Open
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
College, university, and private institution course calendars.
Government publications such as Horizons (available in the Student Services/Guidance Departments –
many such publications are now moving to electronic versions).
School Guidance/Student Services Departments.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Samples of student work.
Software tutorials and manuals.
CD-ROM
Career Cruising. Licensed by the Ministry of Education from Anaca Technologies
Choices 2000. Licensed by the Ministry of Education. Information Systems Management, 1998.
Texts
Ministry of Education and Training. And Finally I Did Get a Job. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario,
1998.
Ministry of Education and Training. The Edge. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 1998.
Misener, J. and S. Kearns. Expanding Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1993.
ISBN 0-0755-1392-7
Misener, J. and S. Butler. Exploring Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1998.
ISBN 0-0755-2864-9
Web Sites
Career Explorer
http://cdn.cx.bridges.com/explorer/student.htm
This web site has self-assessments, interest inventories, a resume writing template, and career and postsecondary information.)
Career Gateway
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/career/
This site provides a starting point for the exploration of many online career and employment related
options. It provides links to many career based sites.
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/
This is the national site and home page. The home page has many options as well as links to related sites.
Work/Jobs, a listing of job and learning opportunities, work searches, etc.
Learning Opportunities, including self-assessment links (Career Match Up, Career Directions, Job
Futures, The Edge – Youth Magazine), learning and training programs, and financial assistance
programs.
Job Find 2000
http://www.jobfind2000.com
Youth employment information
MazeMaster (Human Resources Development Canada)
http://www.mazemaster.com
This site offers a wide variety of accesses to employment opportunities.
Unit 6 - Page 3
 Communications Technology - Open
Ontario College Application Centre
http://www.ocas.on.ca/ocas/
Information on College applications
Ontario Universities Application Centre
http://www.ouac.on.ca/osca/
Information on University applications
The Edge
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/career-carriere/edge/home.shtml
Online youth magazine with career information. Job Trek game is a good source for choosing a career.
Excellent links to youth related career sites.
TV Ontario (uChoose Program)
http://www.uchoose.tvo.org or http://www2.tvo.org/uchoose/eduprog/
A site to help you choose the right college or university program. Complete listing of colleges and
universities with links to related sites and program, admission, and housing information.
Young Canada Works
http://www.pch.gc.ca
Youth employment information
Youth Resource Network of Canada
http://www.youth.gc.ca/jobopps/summer_e.shtml
Youth employment information
Activity 1: Career Exploration: Introduction/Gathering Career Data
Time: 60 minutes
Description
Students are introduced to the overall Career Exploration project using traditional and electronic research
methods. Through this introductory activity (and the continuation of this activity throughout all units),
students come to appreciate the scope of career opportunities in the field of Communications
Technology. Students are provided with the opportunity to do in-depth research on a specific
Communications Technology career. Students are encouraged to examine and reflect on their personal
values, abilities, and aspirations influencing life’s choices and opportunities.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2e – uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems.
Unit 6 - Page 4
 Communications Technology - Open
Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
IC1.02 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 This activity is run concurrently with the other five units in this profile and must be reinforced at the
start of each new unit.
 Students should be reminded at the start of each unit that their Student Manuals should include career
research information for each unit. The content is used to complete their career presentation at the
completion of the course (see Appendix 6.1a).
 Consult with the Student Services/Guidance Department on existing school-based career planning
initiatives.
 The teacher arranges access to the various occupational research software programs available in the
school: Choices, Career Explorer, Career Gateway, and Mazemaster.
 In order to complete the various personal inventories involved in this activity, teachers may refer to
the suggested resources, use Appendix 6.1b, or develop worksheets tailored to the needs of the class.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Students possess an understanding of the Communications Technology and an awareness of various
technologies and careers.
 An understanding of the services provided by the Student Services/Guidance Department.
 Students are familiar with the school’s course calendar and have begun to prepare a planning chart
for their high school program.
Unit 6 - Page 5
 Communications Technology - Open
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
Teachers will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher begins by discussing the need for students to plan their future academic and career
endeavours. In this discussion, point out that there are tools to help them plan, such as Individual
Education Plans, documentation of personal assessments regarding interests and skills, and a
portfolio of their work to demonstrate particular skills.
 The teacher introduces the Career Exploration project and outlines how it is an ongoing project that
culminates at the end of the course with a final presentation. Provide samples of past work.
 The teacher outlines how the research component of their Student Manuals must be kept up-to-date
throughout the unit activities (this is checked for completion at the end of each unit) (see Appendix
6.1a).
 Links to the student portfolio that is created as each unit is completed and the final career
presentation should be addressed at this point.
 Exemplar work added to the portfolio helps demonstrate particular skills students possess.
 The teacher administers aptitude/interest inventories that outline student’s possible career areas and
the Communications Technology Skills inventory sheet (Appendix 6.1b). Consider inventories such
as online programs (Career Gateway, The Edge), CD-delivered packages (Choices, Career
Explorer), and paper-based traditional inventories (Strong-Campbell Jackson Vocational Inventory,
Harrington-O’Shea Career Decision-Making System – available through Student Services/Guidance
Department).
 Students complete the inventories and summarize possible career areas of interest. These inventories
are an inquiry of students’ interests and skills. Forms are assessed for completion only. (Teachers
may wish to comment on each student’s forms and have a follow-up discussion on the skills they
have, skills they need to develop, and how to develop them.)
 Forms are returned to the students and placed in Student Manuals for future reference.
 This exercise is repeated at the end of the course. Differences between “before and after” are
discussed.
 Throughout unit activities, students gather required career research data to include in Student
Manuals. They access occupational research software (Choices, Bridges: Career Explorer, Career
Explorer, and Mazemaster) for further research and visit and use the resource materials in the school
Guidance/Career Education centre and Library/Resource Centre.
 Students create a list of available career/life planning resources (human, print, technological) and
research other sources of information (e.g., local youth employment centre, Human Resources
Development Canada, Ontario Ministry of Education).
 Students collect exemplars from all unit activities for inclusion in their portfolio.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Diagnostic assessment:
 Completion of personal interests and skills inventories (see Resources and Appendix 6.1b).
 Formative assessment:
 Roving conferences throughout each unit to discuss research progress with all students;
Unit 6 - Page 6
 Communications Technology - Open



Career research checklists;
Personal interest and skills inventories and self-assessment exercises at the completion of the
course (see Resources and Appendix 6.1b).
Summative assessment:
 The careers based research paper;
 Presentation on Communications Technology careers (see Overview Appendix V);
 Combine teacher and student feedback using a class-created rubric or Appendices 6.2a and 6.2b;
 Student portfolios.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Portfolios should be individualized to reflect accommodations made throughout all units.
 Students may work in pairs when they complete the forms.
 Allow more time for students to fill out their forms.
 Refer to strategies outlined in the Accommodations section of each activity.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
College, university, and private institution course calendars.
Government publications such as Horizons (available in the Student Services/Guidance Departments –
many such publications are now moving to electronic versions).
School Student Services/Guidance Departments.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Samples of student work.
Software tutorials and manuals.
CD-ROM
Career Cruising. Licensed by the Ministry of Education from Anaca Technologies
Choices 2000. Licensed by the Ministry of Education. Information Systems Management, 1998.
Texts
Ministry of Education and Training. And Finally I Did Get a Job. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario,
1998.
Ministry of Education and Training. The Edge. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 1998.
Misener, J. and S. Kearns. Expanding Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1993.
ISBN 0-0755-1392-7
Misener, J. and S. Butler. Exploring Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1998.
ISBN 0-0755-2864-9
Web Sites
Career Explorer
http://cdn.cx.bridges.com/explorer/student.htm
This web site has self- assessments, interest inventories, a resume writing template, and career and postsecondary information.
Career Gateway
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/career/
Unit 6 - Page 7
 Communications Technology - Open
This site provides a starting point for the exploration of many online career and employment related
options. It provides links to many career based sites.
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/
This is the national site and home page. The home page has many options as well as links to related sites.
Work/Jobs, a listing of job and learning opportunities, work searches, etc.
Learning Opportunities, including self-assessment links (Career Match Up, Career Directions, Job
Futures, The Edge – Youth Magazine), learning and training programs, and financial assistance
programs.
Job Find 2000
http://www.jobfind2000.com
Youth employment information
MazeMaster (Human Resources Development Canada)
http://www.mazemaster.com
This site offers a wide variety of accesses to employment opportunities.
Ontario College Application Centre
http://www.ocas.on.ca/ocas/
Information on College applications
Ontario Universities Application Centre
http://www.ouac.on.ca/osca/
Information on University applications
The Edge
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/career-carriere/edge/home.shtml
Online youth magazine with career information. Job Trek game is a good source for choosing a career.
Excellent links to youth related career sites.
TV Ontario (uChoose Program)
http://www.uchoose.tvo.org or http://www2.tvo.org/uchoose/eduprog/
A site to help you choose the right college or university program. Complete listing of colleges and
universities with links to related sites and program, admission, and housing information.
Young Canada Works
http://www.pch.gc.ca
Youth employment information
Youth Resource Network of Canada
http://www.youth.gc.ca/jobopps/summer_e.shtml
Youth employment information
Unit 6 - Page 8
 Communications Technology - Open
Activity 2: Career Exploration: Career Presentation
Time: 60 minutes
Description
Students work individually or in groups and use the career information compiled throughout each unit
activity to create a presentation on a career of their choice for the class. This presentation also includes
some means of passive sharing of information generated by students, utilizing a form of Communications
Technology dealt with in the course (e.g., printed poster, animation, short video, etc.). Students draw
from the presentation skills they have developed throughout each unit. Students are encouraged to utilize
the technology investigated in this course for use in their presentations.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2e – uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems.
Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
IC1.02 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Unit 6 - Page 9
 Communications Technology - Open
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 Students are to uphold and observe copyright laws and correct use of copyrighted materials.
 Teachers implement their board’s policies on appropriate use and access to Internet services.
 Students are expected to keep a daily log sheet recording brief notes of their accomplishments each
day and outlining any future needs that this activity requires.
 This activity is run concurrently with the other five units and must be reinforced at the start of each
new unit.
 Students should be reminded at the start of each unit that their Student Manuals should also include
career research information for each unit. The content is used to complete their career presentation at
the completion of the course.
 Consult with the Student Services/Guidance Department on existing school-based career planning
initiatives.
Prior Knowledge Required
 Students possess a sound understanding of the Communications Technology topics that have been
covered throughout this profile and an awareness of various technologies and careers from research
data collected by each student.
 Students possess an understanding of presentation techniques and skills developed throughout each
unit, including use of media equipment.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
Teachers will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher reviews with students the requirements of the Careers Exploration project and
presentation techniques and skills covered in previous units.
 Students, by this point, have developed detailed Student Manuals including self-assessments, results
from inventories, and career information. They use the information from their Student Manuals to
select a career area of interest.
 Students may once again access occupational research software (Choices, Bridges: Career Explorer,
Career Gateway, and Mazemaster) to further research career options.
 Students may work with other students who have similar career interests.
 The teacher allows opportunities for students to practise their presentations.
 Students present their Career topic to the class.
 Teachers facilitate the presentations and their marking with a rubric (see Overview Appendix V,
Appendix 6.2a, and Appendix 6.2b) and involve students in a related class discussion upon
completion of each presentation (time permitting).
 Students use the rubric to evaluate other presentations (see Appendix 6.2a and 6.2b) and participate
in class discussion of presentation material.
Unit 6 - Page 10
 Communications Technology - Open
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment:
 Roving conferences to discuss progress with individual or groups of students during presentation
preparation.
 Summative assessment:
 The completed Career presentation that combines teacher and student feedback using a classcreated rubric or Appendices 6.2a and 6.2b, and Overview Appendix V.
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Modify the presentation format for students who require an alternate mode of presentation
 Refer to strategies outlined in the Accommodations section of each activity.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
College, university, and private institution course calendars.
Government publications such as Horizons (available in the Student Services/Guidance Departments –
many such publications are now moving to electronic versions).
School Student Services/Guidance Departments.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Samples of student work.
Software tutorials and manuals.
CD-ROM
Career Cruising. Licensed by the Ministry of Education from Anaca Technologies
Choices 2000. Licensed by the Ministry of Education. Information Systems Management, 1998.
Texts
Ministry of Education and Training. And Finally I Did Get a Job. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario,
1998.
Ministry of Education and Training. The Edge. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 1998.
Misener, J. and S. Kearns. Expanding Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1993.
ISBN 0-0755-1392-7
Misener, J. and S. Butler. Exploring Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1998.
ISBN 0-0755-2864-9
Web Sites
Career Explorer
http://cdn.cx.bridges.com/explorer/student.htm
This web site has self-assessments, interest inventories, a resume writing template, and career and postsecondary information.
Career Gateway
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/career/
This site provides a starting point for the exploration of many on-line career and employment related
options. It provides links to many career based sites.
Unit 6 - Page 11
 Communications Technology - Open
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/
This is the national site and home page. The home page has many options as well as links to related sites.
Work/Jobs, a listing of job and learning opportunities, work searches, etc.
Learning Opportunities, including self-assessment links (Career Match Up, Career Directions, Job
Futures, The Edge – Youth Magazine), learning and training programs, and financial assistance
programs.
Job Find 2000
http://www.jobfind2000.com
Youth employment information
MazeMaster (Human Resources Development Canada)
http://www.mazemaster.com
This site offers a wide variety of accesses to employment opportunities.
Ontario College Application Centre
http://www.ocas.on.ca/ocas/
Information on College applications
Ontario Universities Application Centre
http://www.ouac.on.ca/osca/
Information on University applications
The Edge
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/career-carriere/edge/home.shtml
Online youth magazine with career information. Job Trek game is a good source for choosing a career.
Excellent links to youth related career sites.
TV Ontario (uChoose Program)
http://www.uchoose.tvo.org or http://www2.tvo.org/uchoose/eduprog/
A site to help you choose the right college or university program. Complete listing of colleges and
universities with links to related sites and program, admission, and housing information.
Young Canada Works
http://www.pch.gc.ca
Youth employment information
Youth Resource Network of Canada
http://www.youth.gc.ca/jobopps/summer_e.shtml
Youth employment information
Unit 6 - Page 12
 Communications Technology - Open
Activity 3: Career Exploration: Assessing Personal and Communications
Technology Skills
Time: 60 minutes
Description
This is the culminating activity of the Communications Technology program. Through various exercises,
students take inventory of their general interests and personal and Communications Technology skills
and compare these to those taken at the start of the course. This facilitates the students’ understanding of
themselves and assists them in developing their Individual Education Plans. The second part of the
activity is the compilation of their personal portfolio that may be useful in furthering future educational
and career plans.
Strand(s) and Expectations
Ontario Catholic School Graduate Expectations
The graduate is expected to be:
A Discerning Believer Formed in the Catholic Faith Community who
CGE1d – develops attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teaching and acts to promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
An Effective Communicator who
CGE2b – reads, understands, and uses written materials effectively;
CGE2c – presents information and ideas clearly and honestly and with sensitivity to others;
CGE2e – uses and integrates the Catholic faith tradition, in the critical analysis of the arts, media,
technology, and information systems to enhance the quality of life.
A Reflective and Creative Thinker who
CGE3b – creates, adapts, and evaluates new ideas in light of the common good;
CGE3c – thinks reflectively and creatively to evaluate situations and solve problems.
Self-Directed, Responsible, Life Long Learner who
CGE4b – demonstrates flexibility and adaptability;
CGE4f – applies effective communication, decision-making, problem-solving, time, and resource
management skills.
A Collaborative Contributor who
CGE5b – thinks critically about the meaning and purpose of work;
CGE5d – finds meaning, dignity, fulfillment, and vocation in work, which contributes to the common
good;
CGE5e – respects the rights, responsibilities, and contributions of self and others;
CGE5g – achieves excellence, originality, and integrity in one’s own work and supports these qualities in
the work of others.
A Responsible Citizen who
CGE7b – accepts accountability for one’s own actions.
Strand(s): Theory and Foundation, Skills and Processes, Impact and Consequences
Overall Expectations
TFV.04 – demonstrate understanding of electronic communication equipment;
ICV.01 – explain the benefits, risks, and ethics associated with communications technology;
ICV.03 – identify career opportunities in the communications field.
Specific Expectations
IC1.02 – identify strengths and weaknesses of graphic, electronic, and live communications;
IC1.04 – identify career opportunities and develop appropriate education plans;
IC1.05 – demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and policies for communications technology.
Unit 6 - Page 13
 Communications Technology - Open
Planning Notes
 It is expected that all student work contain positive images of race, gender, and religion. Stereotypes,
acts of violence, sexual themes, or use of profanity in student work is unacceptable.
 In order to complete the various personal inventories, teachers may use Resources and Appendix 6.1b
or develop worksheets specifically tailored to the class.
 In order to prepare the portfolio, students use exemplars of some work. Teachers must provide
students with information on the portfolio at the start of the course to ensure that students have all
required documentation.
Prior Knowledge Required
No prior knowledge is required.
Teaching/Learning Strategies
Throughout this activity, the teacher will:
 monitor and observe all student/group activity;
 conference with students on an ongoing basis to provide assistance when problems arise;
 review project expectations;
 modify project activities to deal with the availability of equipment.
Teachers will encourage attitudes and values founded on Catholic social teachings, which promote social
responsibility, human solidarity, and the common good.
 The teacher begins by reviewing the need for students to plan their future academic and career
endeavours (dealt with in Activity 1 at the start of the course). In this discussion, it point out that the
following tools exist to help them plan: Individual Education Plans, documentation of personal
assessments regarding interests and skills, and a portfolio of their work to demonstrate particular
skills.
 The teacher repeats the process of administering the aptitude, interest, and skills inventories used at
the start of the course (Unit 6, Activity 1). These inventories were used to determine the students’
interests and skills. Repeating this process at the completion of the course allows for comparison
between the “before and after”.
 Forms are assessed for completion only. (Teachers may wish to comment on each student’s forms
and have a follow-up discussion on the skills they have acquired.) Return the forms to students to add
to their Student Manuals for future reference.
 Students prepare their final portfolio of exemplars that have been completed from previous activities.
The portfolio should contain examples from each of the units. Exemplars must be organized in an
attractive format (e.g., binder) and submitted for evaluation.
Assessment/Evaluation Techniques
 Formative assessment:
 Completion of personal interests and skills inventories (see Resources and Appendix 6.1b).
 Summative assessment:
 Student portfolios;
 Reflection – self/peer evaluation (see Overview Appendices II and III).
Unit 6 - Page 14
 Communications Technology - Open
Accommodations
 Teachers should be acquainted with Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and their unique learning
characteristics in order to make the necessary accommodations.
 Portfolios should be individualized to reflect accommodations made throughout all activities.
 Extensive conferencing with students regarding further development of Communications Technology
skills.
 Students work with a partner to complete the forms.
 Allow more time for students to fill out their forms and organize their portfolios.
 Refer to strategies outlined in the Accommodations section of each activity.
Resources
General
Teacher-developed resources including handouts, worksheets, and activity sheets.
College, university, and private institution course calendars.
Government publications such as Horizons (available in the Student Services/Guidance Departments –
many such publications are now moving to electronic versions).
School Student Services/Guidance Departments.
The school Library/Resource Centre.
Samples of student work.
Software tutorials and manuals.
CD-ROM
Career Cruising. Licensed by the Ministry of Education from Anaca Technologies
Choices 2000. Licensed by the Ministry of Education. Information Systems Management, 1998.
Texts
Ministry of Education and Training. And Finally I Did Get a Job. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario,
1998.
Ministry of Education and Training. The Edge. Ontario: Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 1998.
Misener, J. and S. Kearns. Expanding Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1993.
ISBN 0-0755-1392-7
Misener, J. and S. Butler. Exploring Your Horizons. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 1998.
ISBN 0-0755-2864-9
Web Sites
Career Explorer
http://cdn.cx.bridges.com/explorer/student.htm
This web site has self-assessments, interest inventories, a resume writing template, and career and postsecondary information.
Career Gateway
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/career/
This site provides a starting point for the exploration of many online career and employment related
options. It provides links to many career based sites.
Unit 6 - Page 15
 Communications Technology - Open
Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC)
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/
This is the national site and home page. The home page has many options as well as links to related sites.
Work/Jobs, a listing of job and learning opportunities, work searches, etc.
Learning Opportunities, including self-assessment links (Career Match Up, Career Directions, Job
Futures, The Edge – Youth Magazine), learning and training programs, and financial assistance
programs.
Job Find 2000
http://www.jobfind2000.com
Youth employment information
MazeMaster (Human Resources Development Canada)
http://www.mazemaster.com
This site offers a wide variety of accesses to employment opportunities.
Ontario College Application Centre
http://www.ocas.on.ca/ocas/
Information on College applications
Ontario Universities Application Centre
http://www.ouac.on.ca/osca/
Information on University applications
The Edge
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/career-carriere/edge/home.shtml
Online youth magazine with career information. Job Trek game is a good source for choosing a career.
Excellent links to youth related career sites.
TV Ontario (uChoose Program)
http://www.uchoose.tvo.org or http://www2.tvo.org/uchoose/eduprog/
A site to help you choose the right college or university program. Complete listing of colleges and
universities with links to related sites and program, admission, and housing information.
Young Canada Works
http://www.pch.gc.ca
Youth employment information
Youth Resource Network of Canada
http://www.youth.gc.ca/jobopps/summer_e.shtml
Youth employment information
Unit 6 - Page 16
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 6.1a
Guidelines for Collecting Career Information
Guidelines
Students are reminded that this process must be ongoing throughout the course. Research is checked for
completion at the end of each unit.
 Use a variety of resources to investigate the careers related to the Communications Technology field
in each of the activities studied.
 You should use both traditional sources (print material) and electronic sources (Internet/CD-ROMs)
in your research.
 Each unit should have its own section of Careers Research.
 Place your research in your Student Manual.
 If you are storing your research electronically, make note of its location and file name for teacher
access.
The following is a guide to use when collecting your research information. The teacher has both a paper
copy for you to duplicate or an electronic version that you can add to on the computer.
Student Name: _________________________________________
Unit #: ___ Unit Title: ______________________________
1.
Name of Career being Investigated:
2.
Description of Job:
3.
Personal Qualities/Skills Required for the Job:
4.
Working Conditions:
5.
Educational Training/Requirements:
6.
Income (to start and potential income):
7.
Future Outlook for Career Field:
Please list the source of your research:
Unit 6 - Page 17
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 6.1b
My Communications Technology Skills
Criteria
My Skill Level in each of the
following areas is….
Desktop Management
Word Processing
Spreadsheets
Graphic Tools
Databases
Use of the Internet
Desktop Publishing
E-Mail
Presentation Tools
Computer Literacy (Terms:
e.g., browser, desktop, etc.)
Use of Video Equipment
(camera’s, VCR’s, etc)
Video Editing
CAD Drawing
Animation Skills
3-D Animation
Photo Manipulation
Use of Camera Equipment
Photography Darkroom
Skills
Level 1
(50-59%)
Limited
Level 2
(60-69%)
Moderate
Level 3
(70-79%)
Considerable
Level 4
(80-100%)
Thorough
In the space provided below (use the back of the page if necessary), briefly describe your
Communications Technology Skill strengths and areas to be improved.
Strengths
Areas of Improvement
 The Communications Technology skills in which I require improvement are:

What I will do to improve my Communications Technology skills:
Unit 6 - Page 18
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 6.2a
Career Research Rubric
Criteria
Knowledge/
Understanding
ICV.03, IC1.04
ICV.03
TFV.04
Thinking/Inquiry
TFV.04
Communication
ICV.03, IC1.04
Application
IC1.05
OCSGDCGE5b
CGE2c
Level 1
(50-59%)
Level 2
(60-69%)
Level 3
(70-79%)
Level 4
(80-100%)
- demonstrates limited
ability to identify
technology-based
careers
- demonstrates limited
ability to describe
educational
requirements of
selected careers
- describes few
technological
activities supported by
computer and
information
technology
- demonstrates limited
ability to investigate
methods of
communicating ideas
- demonstrates limited
ability to share
information using
media tools and a
variety of
technologies
- demonstrates limited
understanding of how
technology affects
selected careers
- demonstrates some
ability to identify
technology-based
careers
- demonstrates some
ability to describe
educational
requirements of
selected careers
- describes some
technological
activities supported by
computer and
information
technology
- demonstrates some
ability to investigate
methods of
communicating ideas
- demonstrates some
ability to share
information using
media tools and a
variety of
technologies
- demonstrates some
understanding of how
technology affects
selected careers
- demonstrates limited
ability to think
critically about the
meaning and purpose
of work
- demonstrates limited
ability to present ideas
clearly and honestly
- demonstrates some
ability to think
critically about the
meaning and purpose
of work
- demonstrates some
ability to present ideas
clearly and honestly
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
identify technologybased careers
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
describe educational
requirements of
selected careers
- describes a number
of technological
activities supported by
computer and
information
technology
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
investigate methods of
communicating ideas
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
share information
using media tools and
a variety of
technologies
- demonstrates
considerable
understanding of how
technology affects
selected careers
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
think critically about
the meaning and
purpose of work
- demonstrates
considerable ability to
present ideas clearly
and honestly
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
identify technologybased careers
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
describe educational
requirements of
selected careers
- describes a thorough
list of technological
activities supported by
computer and
information
technology
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
investigate methods of
communicating ideas
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
share information
using media tools and
a variety of
technologies
- demonstrates
thorough
understanding of how
technology affects
selected careers
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
think critically about
the meaning and
purpose of work
- demonstrates
exceptional ability to
present ideas clearly
and honestly
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 6 - Page 19
 Communications Technology - Open
Appendix 6.2a
Written, Oral/Visual Presentation, and Use of Technology Rubric
Criteria
Written
Presentation
Level 1
(50-59%)
Main idea is unclear.
Limited evidence of
a logical overall
plan.
Word choice is
limited for topic and
type of writing.
Oral/Visual
Presentation
Level 2
(60-69%)
Main idea is
recognizable but
sense of purpose
may be unclear.
Overall plan is
present but weak.
Limited command of
grade appropriate
spelling,
punctuation, and
grammar
conventions.
Presentation reflects
limited preparation.
Word choice is
limited for type of
writing; some
attempt to use
vocabulary suited to
topic.
Fair command of
grade appropriate
spelling,
punctuation, and
grammar
conventions.
Presentation reflects
some preparation.
Communicates ideas
with limited clarity.
Communicates ideas
with some clarity.
Level 3
(70-79%)
Main idea is clear.
Level 4
(80-100%)
Main idea is very
clear.
Introduction and
conclusion usually
relate to the main
idea.
Word choice is
generally
appropriate to type
of writing;
vocabulary suited to
topic.
Good command of
grade appropriate
spelling,
punctuation, and
grammar
conventions.
Presentation reflects
considerable thought
and attention to
detail.
Communicates ideas
with considerable
clarity.
Introduction and
conclusion are
strong.
Word choice is
appropriate to type
of writing;
vocabulary suited to
topic.
Thorough command
of grade appropriate
spelling,
punctuation, and
grammar
conventions.
Presentation reflects
thought and
attention to detail.
Communicates ideas
with a high degree
of clarity and
confidence.
Use of
Limited technology
Satisfactory use of
Good use of
Excellent use of
Technology
used to illustrate
technology to
technology to
technology to
ideas.
illustrate ideas.
illustrate ideas.
illustrate ideas.
Requires extensive
Requires some
Requires little or no Uses software
support to use
support to use
teacher support to
creatively and
software and to
software and to
use software and to
independently to
produce a product
produce a product
produce a product
produce a product
that matches the
that matches the
that matches the
that matches the
intended purpose
intended purpose
intended purpose
intended purpose
and audience
and audience
and audience
and audience
Note: A student whose achievement is below level 1 (50%) has not met the expectations for this
assignment or activity.
Unit 6 - Page 20
 Communications Technology - Open
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