Syllabus06_Spring_

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Educational Leadership 820 – The Politics of Educational Leadership
Spring 2006, Monday & Wednesday, 4:40-7:20PM, 300A Porter
Instructor: James E. Barott, Office: 304Z Porter Building
Phone: 487-0255, Email: [email protected]
The Mission of the faculty of the Educational Leadership Program is to develop leaders with
the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to build learning communities within a pluralistic,
democratic society.
Course Introduction
This course will examine the politics of educational organization and leadership. It is designed
for the educational leader and researcher who deal with the impact of political action on
managing and leading educational institutions. It provides an introduction to the field of
educational politics with special emphasis on theoretical and conceptual analysis of the political
behavior of education’s stakeholders.
Prerequisites
Admission to the doctoral program in educational leadership.
Course Objectives
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Develop and educate leaders of educational organizations.
Develop conceptual knowledge and skills in order to explore, analyze, and explain the
societal forces that influence educational policy and decision making at all levels of the
educational system, as well as within different organizational settings.
Analyze, synthesize and apply research and theory derived from the political and social
sciences, educational politics, and policy making literature to problems of practice.
Increase your capacity to deal with uncertainty, instability, uniqueness, and the value
conflicts inherent in educational organizations and leadership.
Understand the nature of political action.
Understand the ways that political activity shapes educational policy and organization.
Understand the elements of macro-politics and micro-politics as related to educational
organization and leadership.
Examine the challenges to the leader/administrator of micro-politics within an
educational setting.
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10.
Examine the moral/ethical dilemmas facing educational leaders in dealing with the
political dimensions of education.
Develop the skills to critically evaluate your beliefs about the educational enterprise and
its role in society.
Topical Outline of Course Content
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The Politics of Education as a Field of Inquiry
Political Culture
Nature of the Polity
Citizenship
Political Structures
Political Participation
Interest Groups
Coalitions
Political Conflict
Power, Influence and Control
Policy Formation: Political Systems Analysis
Policy Formation: Agendas, Alternatives & Public Policy
Elite Theory: Abrupt versus Incremental Change
Micropolitics – Building Level Politics
Local Level Politics
State Level Politics
Federal Level Politics
Global Level Politics
Intergovernmental Relations
Current Political Controversies
Administration
The course is designed to be a collaborative effort with each student responsible for his or
her own learning. The instructor’s responsibility is to provide a structure within which the
student is free to learn. To this end, class structures and processes will be based on student and
instructor interests and are subject to change.
The Class will consist of:
1.
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3.
The first section of each class will focus on the politics of educational organization and
leadership through discussion of the assigned and supplemental readings.
There will be a fifteen-minute break
The second part of each class period will be a lab.
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Each student is responsible for:
1.
The readings for each class prior to the topic except for the first session.
2.
Participation in class discussions and lab. You are expected to attend all class sessions,
to be on time, and to contribute to the class discussions and the lab. If emergencies arise,
you should notify me as soon as possible and secure class notes and assignments from
fellow classmates. More than two absences will constitute grounds for failure in the
course.
3.
As stated above, the primary objective of this course is to develop and educate leaders of
educational organizations. There are two fundamental components to consider in this
process: 1.) the leader; and 2.) the educational system. You, as the educational leader,
are the first component. Therefore I will ask you to make explicit your interests, beliefs,
values, attitudes, biases, ideologies, etc. It is essential that you have some awareness of
yourself, as you are the instrument through which political leadership takes place. In
addition, it is important that you develop the capacity to express your interests, etc. to
others. In other words, develop your own "voice".
Secondly, the ability to analyze or "make sense" of the politics of educational organizing
is an essential skill for educational leadership as organizational systems are the context
within which this leadership occurs. In order to meet this objective, this course seeks to
demystify the politics of educational organizations and facilitate the student's
development of critical thinking skills.
In order to accomplish the above, written papers will be used as a vehicle to describe and
analyze your current political experiences in the light of course concepts and
propositions. Each paper should be approximately 10 pages in length and counts for
20% of the grade. All assignments are due the class session after they are listed in course
syllabus.
The paper will consist of two sections:
a. Description and Analysis: Use relevant concepts and propositions from
the readings and/or the class to make sense of your political situation,
experiences or events. Use empirical data (descriptions) from your
educational system if possible (approx. 8 pages).
b. Your personal response and what that tells you about yourself as an
educational leader. Make explicit your values, beliefs, attitudes, affective
responses, etc. to the events which you described and analyzed (approx. 2 pages).
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Grading
Final Grades will be computed as follows. Breaking it down by paper, from 0-6 points
will be awarded for the category of empirical data, from 0-10 points for the category of concept
application, and from 0-4 points for the category of personal response. “Empirical data” means
providing empirical data on which to base your analysis. “Concept application” means applying
concepts from the reading and class to your empirical data. And lastly, “personal response”
means explicating your personal response to the organizational events that you used as empirical
data.
Empirical
Data
Concept
Application
Personal
Response
Weekly
Total
Organizational Level Politics
Local Level Politics
State Level Politics
National Level Politics
0-6
0-6
0-6
0-6
0-10
0-10
0-10
0-10
0-4
0-4
0-4
0-4
0-20
0-20
0-20
0-20
Subtotals
0-24
0-40
0-16
0-80%
Class Participation
0-20%
Total
0-100%
REQUIRED READINGS:
Schattschneider, E. E. (1997). The Semisovereign People: A Realist’s View of Democracy
in America. Hinsdale, ILL: Dryden Press.
Wirt, F. W. & Kirst, M. W. (2001). The Political Dynamics of American Education (2nd ed.).
Richmond, CA: McCutchan Publishing.
Kingdon, J. W. (1995). Agendas, Alternatives and Public Policies (2nd ed.). New York:
HarperCollins.
Edelman, M. J. (1985). The Symbolic Uses of Politics. Chicago, ILL: University of Illinois
Press.
Catton, B. (1876). Michigan: A History. W.W. Norton: New York.
(Or an appropriate area history book of your choice)
Course Pack, Halle Library, E-Reserves
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TOPICS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS
1. May 8, 2006
Course Introduction
Required Readings:
a. Iannaccone – Practitioners and researchers: The what and why of
concepts.
b. Scribner, J. D. & Englert, R.. (1977). The politics of education: An
introduction, pp. 1-29 in J. D. Scribner (Ed.), The politics of
education,The Seventy-sixth Yearbook of the National Society for the
Study of Education, Part II. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
c. Mahler- Comparative Political Analysis
d. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Goodlad, J. (1984). We want it all. Chapter 2 in A place called school:
Prospects for the future. Toronto: McGraw-Hill.
b. Goodlad, J. I. & Keating, P. (Eds.) (1994). Access to knowledge: The
continuing agenda for our nation’s schools. New York: College
Entrance Examination Board.
c. Kirst, M (1984). Who controls our schools: American values in conflict.
Stanford: Stanford Alumni Association.
d. Ripley, R. B. (1985). Political science and public policy. Chapter 1 in
Policy analysis in political science. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.
2. May 10, 2006
Political Culture and Ideology
Required Readings:
a. Stout, Tallerico & Scribner (1995). Values: The “whats” of the politics of
education. Chapter 1 in Scribner, J. D. & Layton, D H. (Eds.) The
study of educational politics. Washington, DC: Falmer.
b. Elazar, D. J. (1994). Chapter 7, The peoples of the United States and their
cultures & Chapter 8, The political subculture of the United States. In
The American mosaic: The impact of space, time, and culture on
Amercian politics. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
c. Catton, B. (1876). Michigan: A History. W.W. Norton: New York.
(Or an appropriate area history book of your choice)
d. Marshall, C., Mitchell, D., & Wirt, F. (1989). Chapter 4, Public values in
the policy culture. In Culture and education policy in the American
States. New York: Falmer Press.
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e. O’Neill, W. F. (1981). Educational Ideologies, pp. 64-67 & pp. 297-309.
Santa Monica, CA: Goodyear Publishing Co.
f. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Elazar, D. (1966). Chapter 4 in American Federalism: A View from the
States. New York: Crowell.
b. Hanson, R. (1980). Political culture, interparty competition, and political
efficacy in American state. Publius (Spring), 17-36.
c. Laitin, D. & Wildavsky, A. (1988). Political culture and political
preferences. American Political Science Review, 82(2), 589-597.
d. Pye, L. W. (1968). Political culture. In International Encyclopedia of the
Social Sciences, Vol 12. New York: Crowell, Collier & MacMillan.
e. Pye, L. W (1991). Political culture revisited. Political Psychology, 12(3),
487-507.
f. Verba, S. (1965). Comparative political culture. In S. Verba (Ed.),
Political culture and political development. Princeton: Princeton
University Press.
g. Werlin, H. & Eckstien, H. (1990). Political culture and political change.
American Political Science Review, 84(1), 249-260.
h. Wirt, F. M. (1991). “Soft” concepts and “hard” data: A research review of
Elazar’s political culture. The Journal of Federalism, 21(2), 1-14.
3. May 15, 2006
The Nature of the Polity: Citizenship Rights, Political
Participation, Representation, Interest Groups and Coalitions
Required Readings:
a. Iannaccone, L. (1991). Micropolitics of education: What and why. Education
and Urban Society, 23(4), 465-471
b. Wirt & Kirst – Chapter 3: The Origins and Agents of School Demands
c. Mann, D. (1977). Participation, representation and control (pp.67-93).
Chapter 3 in J. D. Scribner (Ed.) The politics of education, The
Seventy-sixth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of
Education, Part II. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
d. Berry, J. M. (1984). Madison’s Dilemma. Chapter 1 in The interest
group society (pp. 1-15). Boston: Little, Brown & Co.
e. Stroufe, G. E. (1991). Interest groups and public policy: A status report.
Education and Urban Society, 13(2), 149-171.
f. Dey, & Zeigler, (1993). Organized interests: Defenders of the status quo.
Chapter 9 in The irony of democracy, pp. 215-235. Belmont, CA:
Wadsworth.
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g. March, J. G. (1962). The business firm as a political coalition. The Journal
of Politics, 24, 662-678.
h. Pfeffer, J. (1981). Coalitions. In Power in organizations. Marshfield, MA:
Pitman.
i. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings- Political Participation:
a. Conway, M. (1991). Political participation in the United States.
Washington, DC: Congressional Press Quarterly.
b. Delgado-Gaitan, C. (1991). Involving parents in the schools: A process of
empowerment. American Journal of Education, 100(1), 20-46.
c. Flanigan, W. H. & Zingale, N. H. (1987). Political behavior of the
American Electorate. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
d. Lewis, E. (1988). American politics in a bureaucratic age: Citizens,
constituents, clients, and victims. Lanham, MD: University Press of
America.
e. Malen, B. & Ogawa, R. (1988). Professional-patron influence on sitebased governance councils: A confounding case study. Educational
Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 19(4), 251-270.
f. McGuire, K. (1989). Business involvement in education in the 1990’s. In
D. E. Mitchell & M. E. Goertz (Eds.), Politics of Education
Association Yearbook 1989 (pp. 107-117). London: Taylor & Francis
Ltd.
g. Sacken, D. M/ (1991). And then they go home: School reform and the
elusive community of interest. Urban Education, 26(3), 253-268.
h. Stroufe, G. E. (1991). Interest groups and public policy: A status report.
Education and Urban Society, 13(2), 149-171.
i. Verba, S., Schlozman, K. L. Brady, H., & Nie, N. H. (1993). Citizen
activity: Who participates? What do they say? American Political
Science Review, 87(2), 303-
Supplemental Readings- Interest Groups:
a. Berry, J. (1977). Lobbying for the people: The political behavior of
public interest groups. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
b. Hrebenar, R. J. & Scott, R. K. (1990). Interest group politics in America.
Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
c. Schlozman, K. L. & Tierney, J. T. (1986). Organized interests and
American democracy. New York: Harper and Row.
d. Wolpe, (1990). Lobbying Congress: How the system works. Washington,
DC: Congressional Quarterly Press.
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4. May 17, 2006
Political Conflict
Required Readings:
a. Schattschneider - The Semisovereign People: Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4
b. Coser, L. A. (1956). Chapters 7 & 9 in The functions of social conflict.
New York: The Free Press.
c. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Baldridge, J. V. (1972). Chapter 2 in Power and conflict in the university
(pp. 7-26). New York: John Wiley & Sons.
b. Duverger, M. (1972). (1.) The forms of political conflict; and (2) the
development of integration. In The study of politics. New York:
Crowell.
c. Minar, D. W. (1966). The community base of conflict in school system
politics. American Sociological Review, 31(6), 822-835.
d. Wirt, F., & Kirst, M. W. (1989). Schools in conflict (2nd ed.). Berkeley:
McCutchan.
5. May 22, 2006
Who Rules: Political Power, Influence
and Control
Required Readings:
a. Morgan, G. (1997). Organizations as political systems. Chapter 6 in
Images of organization (pp. 153-213). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
b. Scott, W. R. (2003). Chapter 11 – Goals, Power , and Control in
Organizations: Rational, Natural and Open Systems (pp. 291-325). Upper
Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
c. Dahl, R. A. (1968). Who Governs? In W. D. Hawley & F. M. Wirt (Eds.),
The search for community power (pp.93-114). Englewood Cliffs, NJ:
Prentice-Hall.
d. Hunter, F. (1968). Community power structure. In W. D. Hawley & F. M.
Wirt (Eds.), The search for community power (pp.51-64). Englewood
Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
e. Pfeffer, J. (1981). Chapter 1 in Power in organizations (pp. 18-33).
Marshfield, PA: Pitman Publishing.
f. Salancik, G. R., & Pfeffer, J. (1974). The bases and use of power in
organizational decision making: The case of the university.
Administrative Science Quarterly, 19(4), 453-473.
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Supplemental Readings:
a. Bacharach, P., & Baratz, M. S. (1968). Two faces of power. In W. D.
Hawley & F. M. Wirt (Eds.), The search for community power (pp.
239-249). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
b. Bacharach, S. & Lawler, E. (1980). Power and politics in organizations.
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
c. Kreisberg, S. (1992). Transforming power: Domination, empowerment,
and education. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
d. McNeill, K. (1978). Understanding Organizational Power: Building on
the Weberian Legacy. Administrative Science Quarterly, 23: 65-90.
e. Michels, R. (1949). Political Parties. New York: Free Press.
f. Miliband, R. (1973). The State in Capitalist Society. London: Quartet.
g. Mintzberg. H. (1983). Power in and around organizations. Englewood
Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
h. Mosca, G. (1939). The Ruling Class. New York: McGraw Hill.
i. Mouzelis, N. (1975). Organization and Bureaucracy, (2nd Ed.). London:
Routledge & Kegan Paul.
j. Pareto, V. (1935). The Mind and Society. New York: Harcourt, Brace &
Co.
k. Perrow, C. (1979). Complex Organizations: A Critical Essay. New York:
Random House.
l. Pfeffer, J. (1981). Power in organizations. Marshfield, PA: Pitman
Publishing.
m. Reyes, P., & McCarty, D. J. (1990). Factors related to the power of lower
participants in educational organizations: Multiple perspectives.
Sociological Focus, 23(1), 17-30.
n. Salaman, G. (1978). Towards a Sociology of Organizational Structure.
Sociological Quarterly, 26: 519-554.
o. Simon, H. A. (1968). Notes on the observation and measurement of
political power. In Hawley & F. M. Wirt (Eds.), The search for
community power (pp.21-35). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
p. Wartenberg, T. E. (1988). The forms of power: From domination to
transformation. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
q. Weber, M. (1946). From Max Weber, (Eds. H. Gerth and C. W. Mills).
New York: Oxford University Press.
r. Weber, M. (1947). The Theory of Social and Economic Organization.
London: Oxford University Press.
s. Westoby, A. (Ed.), (1988). Culture and power in educational
organizations. Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press.
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6. May 24, 2006
Policy Formation
Topic #1 - Political Systems Analysis
Required Readings:
a. Wirt & Kirst – Part I, Chapters 1 & 2: Political Systems Analysis
b. Scribner, J. D. (1979). In search of one-armed policy analysts: A
framework for understanding state educational policymaking
systems. Cross Reference, 2(6), 347-368.
c. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Almond, G. & Powell, F. (1966). Comparative politics: A developmental
approach. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.
b. Berry, N. (1972). Political configurations: An analysis of the political
system in society. Pacific Palisades, CA: Goodyear Publishing Co.
c. Dye, T. R. (1992). Inputs, outputs and black boxes: A systems analysis of
state policies. In Understanding public policy, 7th Ed. (pp. 312-327).
Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
d. Easton, D. (1965). A systems analysis of political life. New York: John
Wiley & Sons.
e. Hurn, C. J. (1985). Theories of schooling and society: The functional and
conflict paradigms. Chapter 2 in The limits and possibilities of
schooling, 2nd ed. Newton, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
f. Malen, B. et. al. (1993). Policy and political influences. Chapter 20 in S. D.
Thompson (Ed.), Principals for our changing schools: Knowledge and
skills base (pp. 20:1-20:37). Fairfax, VA: National Policy Board for
Educational Administration.
g. Mitchell, W. (1962). The American polity. New York: The Free Press.
h. Prestine, N. A. (1991). Political system theory as an explanatory
paradigm for teacher education reform. American Educational
Research Journal, 28(2), 237-274.
i. Thompson, J. (1976). Policy making in American public education: A
framework for analysis. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
j. Wald, K. D., Owen, D. E. & Hill, S. S. Jr. (1988). Churches as political
communities. American Political Science Review, 82(2), 531-548.
k. Zeigler, L. H. & Jennings, M. K. (1974). The politics of local school
systems. Chapter 1 in Governing American schools: Political
interaction in local school districts (pp. 1-22). North Scituate, MA:
Duxbury Press.
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Topic #2 - Agendas, Alternatives & Public Policy
Required Readings:
a. Kingdon – Agenda, Alternatives, and Public Policies
b. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Linblom – Science of Muddling Through
b. Wildavsky – Politics of the Budgetary Process
c. Other readings as assigned
7. May 29, 2006
Memorial Day
8. May 31, 2006
Policy Formation
Topic #3 - Abrupt versus incremental change: Dissatisfaction Theory - The Laws of
Political Quiescence and Discontent
Required Readings:
a. Lutz, F. & Iannaccone, L. (1978). The dissatisfaction theory of
governance: Implications for practice and research. Chapter 10 in F.
W. Lutz & L. Iannaccone (Eds.), Public participation in local school
districts (pp. 123-135). Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.
b. Iannaccone, L. & Lutz F. (1995). The crucible of democracy: The local
arena. Chapter 3, pp. 39-52 in Scribner, J. D. & Layton, D H. (Eds.)
The study of educational politics. Washington, DC: Falmer.
c. Key, V. O. Jr. (1955). A theory of critical elections. Journal of Politics,
17(1), 3-18.
d. Iannaccone, L, (1982). Turning-point election periods in the politics of
education, Chapter 1, pp. 1-26 in N. H. Cambron-McCabe & A.
Odden (Eds.), The changing politics of school finance, Third annual
yearbook of the American Education Finance Association.
Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.
e. Iannaccone, L. (1982). Community education and turning point election
Periods (TPEPs), pp. 105-115 in Schoney, D H. & Decker, L. E. (Eds.),
Community, educational and social impact perspectives.
Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia.
j. Iannaccone, L. (1977). Three views of change in educational politics,
Chapter 9, pp. 255-286 in J. D. Scribner (Ed.) The Politics of
Education, The Seventy-sixth Yearbook of the National Society for the
Study of Education, Part II. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
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Supplemental Readings:
a. Burnham, W. D. (1970). Critical elections and the wellsprings of
American politics. New York: W. W Norton.
b. Lindblom, C. E. (1968). The policy making process. Englewood Cliffs,
NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Topic #4 – Symbols, Theatre & Myth.
a. Edelman, M. (1985) The Symbolic Uses of Politics. Urbana, Ill: University of
Illinois Press.
b. Other readings as assigned
9.
June 5, 2006
Micropolitics: Building Level Politics
Required Readings:
a. Iannaccone, L. (1991). Micropolitics of education: What and why.
Education and Urban Society, 23(4), 465-471.
b. Marshall, C. & Scribner, J. C. (1991). It’s all political (pp. 347-355).
Education and Urban Society, Vol. 23, No. 4. Sage.
c. Malen, B. (1995). The micropolitics of education: Mapping the multiple
dimensions of power relations in school polities, Chapter 9, pp. 147167 in Scribner, J. D. & Layton, D H. (Eds.) The study of educational
politics. Washington, DC: Falmer.
d. Pfeffer, J. (1978). The Micropolitics of Organizations, Chapter 2, pp. 2950.In M. W. Meyer and Associates (Eds.) Environments and
Organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
d. Wirt & Kirst – Chapter 7: The Micropolitics within schools
e. Marshall, C. & Scribner, J. D. (1991). “It’s all political”, Inquiry into the
micropolitics of education. Education and Urban Society, 23(4), 347355.
g. Other readings as assigned.
Supplemental Readings:
a. Ball, S. (1987). The micropolitics of the school: Towards a theory of
school organization. London: Methuen.
b. Blasé, J. (1988). The politics of favoritism: A qualitative analysis of the
teacher’s perspective. Educational Administration Quarterly, 24(2),
152-177.
c. Blasé, J. (1988). The teacher’s political orientation vis-a vis the principal:
The micropolitics of the school. In Politics of Education Yearbook.
Philadelphia: Falmer Press.
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d. Blasé, J. (1991). The micropolitical perspective. Chapter 1 in J. Blasé
(Ed.), The politics of life in schools: Power, conflict, and cooperation,
(pp. 1- 18). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
e. Blasé, J. (1991). The politics of life in schools: Power, conflict, and
cooperation. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
f. Hallinger, P., Murphy, J., & Hausman, C. (1992). Restructuring schools:
Principals’ perceptions of fundamental educational reform.
Educational Administration Quarterly, 28(3), 330-349.
g. Hoyle, E. (1986). The micropolitics of schools. Chapter 6 in The politics
of school management (pp. 125-149). London: Hodder & Stoughton.
h. Hoyle, E. (1986). The politics of school management. London: Hodder &
Stoughton.
i. Schriesheim, C. A. & Hinkin, T. R. (1990). Influence tactics used by
subordinates: A theoretical and empirical analysis and refinement of
the Kipnis, Schmidt, and Wilkinson subscales. Journal of Applied
Psychology, 75(3), 246-257.
j. Lipski – Street Level Bueaucracy
10. June 7, 2006
Local & State Level Politics
Topic #1 - Local Level Politics
Required Readings:
a. Wirt & Kirst – Chapters 4, 5 & 6
b. Other readings as assigned
Supplemental Readings:
a. Burlingame, M. (1988). The politics of education and educational policy:
The local level, Chapter 21, pp. 439-452. In Handbook of research on
educational administration. Washington, DC: American Educational
Research Association.
b. Kirst, M. W. (1994). A changing context means school board reform. Phi
Delta Kappan, 75(5), 379-381.
c. Usdan, M. D. (1994). The relationship between school boards and general
purpose government. Phi Delta Kappan, 75(5), 374-377.
d. Wilson, J. C. (1994). Urban education: A board member’s perspective.
Phi Delta Kappan, 75(5), 382-386.
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Topic #2 - State Level Politics
Required Readings:
a. Wirt & Kirst – Chapters 8 & 9
b. Mazzoni, T. L. (1995). State policymaking and school reform: Influences
and influentials. Chapter 4 in Scribner, J. D. & Layton, D H. (Eds.)
The study of educational politics. Washington, DC: Falmer.
c. Mazzoni, T. L. (1993). The changing politics of state education policy
making: A 20 year Minnesota perspective. Educational Evaluation
and Policy Analysis, 15(4), 357-379
Supplemental Readings:
a. James, T. (1991). State authority and the politics of educational change,
Chapter 5 in G. Grant (Ed.), Review of Research in Education, 17 (pp.
169-224). Washington, DC: American Educational Research
Association.
11. June 12, 2006
Federal & Intergovernmental
Topic #1 - Federal Level Politics
Required Readings:
a. Frantzich & Perry (1994). Chapter 3 – Federalism. In American
Government. Madison, WI: Brown and Benchmark.
b. Wirt & Kirst – Chapters 10 & 11
c. Schattschneider - The Semisovereign People: Chapters 5, 6, 7 & 8
d. Stroufe, G. E. (1995). Politics of education at the federal level. Chapter 5
in Scribner, J. D. & Layton, D H. (Eds.) The study of educational
politics. Washington, DC: Falmer.
Supplemental Readings:
a. Kantor, H. (1991). Education, social reform, and the state: ESEA and
federal education policy in the 1960s. American Journal of
Education, 100(1), 47-83.
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Topic #2 - Intergovernmental Relations and Current Policy Issues
Required Readings:
a. Wirt & Kirst – Chapters 12 & 13
b.. Grodzins, M. (1963). Centralization and decentralization in the
American federal system. In R. A. Goldwin (Ed.), A nation of states
(pp. 1-23). Chicago: Rand McNally.
c. Mosher, E. K. (1977). Education and American federalism:
Intergovernmental and national policy influences, Chapter 4, pp. 94123 in J. D. Scribner (Ed.), The politics of education, The Seventysixth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education,
Part II. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
12. June 14, 2006
Assignment – Final Papers and Student Presentations
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