CHAPTER EIGHT—Print and Out-of-Home Media

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CHAPTER EIGHT
Media Basics and Print Media
GENERAL CONTENT: MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS
1.
Newspapers, magazines, packaging, and directories are known as ___________
media.
a.
broadcast
b.
narrowcast
c.
print
d.
directional
e.
interactive
(c; easy; p. 227; LO2; AACSB Communication)
2.
The way various types of media are strategically combined in an advertising plan
is known as a ________.
a.
media mix
b.
message mix
c.
media vehicle
d.
medium
e.
gross impression
(a; easy; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Communication)
3.
Newspaper is the ________, and the Wall Street Journal is the ________.
a.
vehicle; medium
b.
medium; vehicle
c.
medium; execution
d.
execution; medium
e.
reach; impression
(b; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Communication)
4.
A ________ identifies the best media to use to deliver an advertising message to a
targeted audience and is a subsection within an advertising plan.
a.
media mix
b.
media vehicle
c.
gross impression plan
d.
media plan
e.
message plan
(d; moderate; p. 229; LO1)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
5.
________ involves implementing strategic decisions outlined in the media plan,
such as where to advertise.
a.
Media planning
b.
Media buying
c.
Media strategy
d.
Media mixing
e.
Media verification
(a; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Communication)
6.
________ implement the media plan by contracting for specific amounts of time
or space.
a.
Media planners
b.
Media buyers
c.
Media strategists
d.
Media mixers
e.
Media verifiers
(b; easy; p. 230; LO1)
7.
The percentage of the media audience exposed at least once to the advertiser’s
message during a specific time frame is known as ________.
a.
an impression
b.
circulation
c.
exposure
d.
reach
e.
frequency
(d; moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Analytical Skills)
8.
The number of times a person is exposed to an advertisement is known as
________.
a.
gross impressions
b.
circulation
c.
exposure
d.
reach
e.
frequency
(e; moderate; p. 232; LO1)
9.
One person’s opportunity to be exposed one time to an ad in a broadcast program,
newspaper, magazine, or outdoor location is known as ________.
a.
an impression
b.
circulation
c.
exposure
d.
reach
e.
frequency
(a; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Communication)
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253
Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
10.
For print media, ________ refers to copies sold, and ________ estimate(s) the
actual readership.
a.
circulation; frequency
b.
circulation; impressions
c.
frequency; circulation
d.
impressions; circulation
e.
exposure; gross impressions
(b; moderate; p. 232; LO1)
11.
Which of the following statements is true regarding print media?
a.
Circulation measures the actual readership.
b.
Impressions estimate the actual readership.
c.
Impressions refer to copies sold.
d.
Reach is more important than frequency.
e.
Frequency is more important than reach.
(b; moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Communication)
12.
One of the biggest challenges in developing a media plan is matching the
advertiser’s target audience with the audience of a particular ________.
a.
medium
b.
impression
c.
household
d.
frequency
e.
cost
(a; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
13.
Media salespeople compile profile information about the people who watch,
listen, or read the medium, along with the numbers describing audience size and
geographical coverage in packets of information known as ________.
a.
rate cards
b.
take-aways
c.
give-aways
d.
media kits
e.
sales kits
(e; moderate; p. 230; LO1)
14.
________ are people or companies that sell space (in print) and time (in
broadcast) for a variety of media.
a.
Media salespeople
b.
Media reps
c.
Media buyers
d.
Media brokers
e.
Media distributors
(b; moderate; p. 230; LO1)
254
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
15.
Who makes the strategic decisions outlined in the media plan?
a.
media buyers
b.
media specialists
c.
media planners
d.
media reps
e.
media consultants
(c; easy; p. 231; LO1)
16.
Who implements the media plan?
a.
media buyers
b.
media specialists
c.
media planners
d.
media reps
e.
media consultants
(a; moderate; p. 231; LO1)
17.
Who compiles audience measurement data, as well as media costs and availability
data for the various media options being considered by the planners?
a.
media buyers
b.
media planners
c.
media reps
d.
media researchers
e.
media detailers
(d; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
18.
________ are independent companies that specialize in doing media research,
planning, and buying.
a.
Media planners
b.
Account planners
c.
Media reps
d.
Media-buying services
e.
Media specialists
(d; moderate; p. 231; LO1)
19.
One characteristic of newspapers is that they can target specific consumer groups
through special interest newspapers, special interest sections (i.e., business,
sports, lifestyle), and advertising inserts delivered only to particular zip codes or
zones. This characteristic is known as ________.
a.
market segmentation
b.
market zoning
c.
market selectivity
d.
market focus
e.
selective binding
(c; moderate; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Communication)
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255
Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
20.
Which of the following is NOT a factor by which newspapers can be classified?
a.
selectivity
b.
frequency of publication
c.
format and size
d.
circulation
e.
All of the above are factors by which newspapers can be classified.
(a; difficult; p. 234; LO2)
21.
Frequency of publication, format and size, and circulation are ________.
a.
advantages of newspapers as an advertising medium
b.
weaknesses of newspapers as an advertising medium
c.
factors by which any medium can be classified
d.
factors by which newspapers can be classified
e.
factors by which magazines can be classified
(d; moderate; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Communication)
22.
Which of the following statements is false regarding newspapers?
a.
Readers spend twice as much time with the Sunday edition as with the
daily edition.
b.
Weekly papers appear in towns, suburbs, and smaller cities where the
volume of hard news and advertising is insufficient to support a daily
newspaper.
c.
National advertisers often shun weeklies but are heavy users of daily
papers.
d.
Weekly papers report local news in depth but tend to ignore national news,
sports, and similar subjects.
e.
National advertisers use local papers indirectly through advertising placed
by local retailers, dealers, and franchisers.
(c; moderate; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
23.
Newspapers typically are available in which of the following two sizes?
a.
broadsheet and tabloid
b.
standard and custom
c.
daily and weekly
d.
display and classified
e.
single and double
(a; moderate; p. 234; LO2)
24.
Which size of newspaper consists of five or six columns, each of which is about 2
inches wide and has a length of approximately 14 inches?
a.
broadsheet
b.
standard
c.
tabloid
d.
daily
e.
weekly
(c; difficult; p. 234; LO2)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
25.
The standard size of newspaper, which is usually 8 columns wide and 300 lines
deep, or 22 inches deep by 14 inches wide, is known as ________.
a.
broadsheet
b.
standard
c.
tabloid
d.
daily
e.
weekly
(a; moderate; p. 234; LO2)
26.
Which size of newspaper is considered the standard size?
a.
broadsheet
b.
standard
c.
tabloid
d.
daily
e.
weekly
(a; moderate; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
27.
________ refers to the number of copies a newspaper sells and is the primary way
newspapers’ reach is measured and compared with the reach of other media.
a.
Run-of-paper (ROP)
b.
Circulation
c.
Impression
d.
Gross impression
e.
Exposure
(b; easy; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
28.
The pricing for newspaper advertising is sold based on the size of the space used,
and the charges are published on ________, which is a list of the charges for
advertising space and the discounts given to local advertisers and to advertisers
who make volume buys.
a.
rate cards
b.
take-aways
c.
give-aways
d.
media kits
e.
sales kits
(a; moderate; p. 235; LO2; AACSB Communication)
29.
Which of the following is NOT a type of advertising found within the local
newspaper?
a.
classified
b.
display
c.
gatefold
d.
supplements
e.
retail.
(c; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
30.
What form of newspaper advertising is by individuals to sell their personal goods
and advertising by local business?
a.
classified
b.
display
c.
supplements
d.
gatefolds
e.
co-op
(a; easy; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
31.
What form of newspaper advertising is the dominant form, and can be any size
and be placed anywhere in the newspaper except the editorial page?
a.
classified
b.
display
c.
supplements
d.
gatefolds
e.
co-op
(b; moderate; p. 236; LO2)
32.
Advertisers who don’t care where their ads run in the newspaper pay which rate?
a.
co-op rate
b.
preferred-position rate
c.
run-of-paper (ROP) rate
d.
non-preferred rate
e.
standard rate
(c; moderate; p. 236; LO2)
33.
An arrangement between a national advertiser and a local retailer whereby the
retailer buys the ad and then the manufacturer pays for half or a portion is known
as ________.
a.
joint advertising
b.
co-op advertising
c.
run-of-paper advertising (ROP)
d.
selective advertising
e.
subsidized advertising
(b; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
34.
What type of newspaper advertising can carry both national and local advertising
and is usually full-color advertising inserts that appear throughout the week and
especially in the Sunday edition of the newspaper?
a.
classified
b.
display
c.
supplements
d.
gatefolds
e.
co-op
(c; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
35.
Which company is an independent auditing group that represents advertisers,
agencies, and publishers and verifies statements about newspaper circulation
statistics?
a.
A. C. Nielsen
b.
Simmons-Scarborough
c.
MediaMark, Inc
d.
Auditing Bureau of Circulations (ABC)
e.
International Circulation Service (ICS)
(d; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Ethical Reasoning)
36.
Which company provides a syndicated study that annually measures readership
profiles for newspapers in approximately 70 of the nation’s largest cities,
readership of a single issue, and the estimated unduplicated readers for a series of
issues?
a.
A. C. Nielsen
b.
Simmons-Scarborough
c.
MediaMark, Inc
d.
Auditing Bureau of Circulations (ABC)
e.
International Circulation Service (ICS)
(b; moderate; p. 237; LO2)
37.
Which of the following is NOT considered an advantage of advertising in
newspapers?
a.
market coverage
b.
comparison shopping
c.
reaches educated consumers
d.
flexibility
e.
short life span
(e; easy; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Communication)
38.
Which of the following is NOT considered an advantage of advertising in
newspapers?
a.
range of market coverage
b.
flexibility
c.
clutter
d.
positive consumer attitudes
e.
interaction of national and local
(c; moderate; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Communication)
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259
Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
39.Which of the following is NOT considered a disadvantage of advertising in
newspapers?
a.
negative consumer attitudes
b.
short life span
c.
clutter
d.
limited coverage of certain groups
e.
poor reproduction
(a; moderate; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Communication)
40.
Which of the following is NOT a main type of audience that magazines target?
a.
consumer
b.
business
c.
farm
d.
newspaper
e.
industrial
(d; difficult; p. 238; LO2)
41.
Which classification of business magazines presents stories and information about
an entire industry?
a.
trade papers
b.
industrial magazines
c.
professional magazines
d.
vertical publications
e.
horizontal publications
(d; moderate; p. 239; LO2; AACSB Communication)
42.
Which of the following is NOT a way to classify magazines?
a.
audience focus
b.
demographics
c.
geography
d.
editorial content
e.
price
(e; easy; p. 239; LO2)
43.
Which of the following is NOT considered a nontraditional delivery method for
magazines?
a.
hanging bagged copies on doorknobs
b.
inserting magazines in newspapers
c.
split run editions
d.
delivering through professionals, such as doctors’ and dentists’ offices
e.
electronic delivery
(c; difficult; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
44.
Nontraditional delivery of magazines is referred to as ________, meaning the
magazine is distributed free to specific audiences.
a.
controlled circulation
b.
nonmeasured circulation
c.
nontraditional circulation
d.
discounted circulation
e.
selective circulation
(a; moderate; p. 240; LO2)
45.
What two factors must advertisers consider when deciding in which magazines to
place ads?
a.
size and format
b.
frequency of publication and size
c.
frequency of publication and format
d.
format and technology
e.
size and technology
(d; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
46.
Normally, the largest unit of ad space that magazines sell is the ________.
a.
full-page ad
b.
double-page spread
c.
gutterless spread
d.
bleed page
e.
nonbleed page
(b; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
47.
The white space running between the inside edges of the pages of a magazine is
known as the ________.
a.
gutter
b.
inside edge
c.
cover
d.
gatefold
e.
spread
(a; moderate; p. 240; LO2)
48.
A magazine page without outside margins, in which the color extends to the edge
of the page, is called a ________ page.
a.
marginless
b.
gatefold
c.
double-spread
d.
full
e.
bleed
(e; moderate; p. 240; LO2)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
49.A single or double page in a magazine can be broken into a variety of units called
________.
a.
gatefolds
b.
fractional page space
c.
segments
d.
standard advertising units
e.
cut-outs
(b; moderate; p. 240; LO2; Analytical Skills)
50.
________ combines information on subscribers kept in a database with a
computer program to produce magazines that include special sections for
subscribers based on their demographic profiles.
a.
Fractional page space
b.
Satellite transmission
c.
Selective binding
d.
Desktop publishing
e.
Custom publishing
(c; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
51.
Which technology allows a magazine to print personalized messages on ads or on
inserts?
a.
selective binding
b.
desktop publishing
c.
ink-jet imaging
d.
global positioning system
e.
satellite transmission
(c; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
52.
Which company verifies magazine circulation numbers by auditing subscriptions
as well as newsstand sales and also checks the number of delinquent subscribers
and rates of renewal?
a.
A. C. Nielsen
b.
Simmons-Scarborough
c.
MediaMark, Inc
d.
Auditing Bureau of Circulations (ABC)
e.
International Circulation Service (ICS)
(d; moderate; p. 241; LO2; AACSB Ethical Reasoning)
53.
Which of the following companies does NOT provide useful information to
advertisers regarding magazines?
a.
Starch
b.
Gallup
c.
Simmons Market Research Bureau (SMRB)
d.
Auditing Bureau of Circulations (ABC)
e.
FED
(e; moderate; p. 241; LO2)
262
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
54.
Which of the following is NOT considered to be an advantage of advertising in
magazines?
a.
ability to reach specialized audiences
b.
long life span
c.
flexibility
d.
visual quality
e.
can accommodate complex messages
(c; moderate; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Analytical Skills)
55.
Which of the following is considered a disadvantage of advertising in magazines?
a.
lack of immediacy
b.
high cost
c.
limited distribution
d.
limited flexibility
e.
good for brand messages
(e; easy; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Communication)
56.
Which marketing communication tool has the goal of creating impact on the store
shelf?
a.
in-store media
b.
packaging
c.
shelf-talkers
d.
coupons
e.
brand name
(b; moderate; p. 248; LO3; AACSB Communication)
57.
________ includes advertising on outdoor billboards, buses, posters on walls,
telephone booths and shopping kiosks, taxi signs, grocery store carts, blimps, and
so forth.
a.
Outdoor advertising
b.
Out-of-home advertising
c.
Broadcast advertising
d.
Transit advertising
e.
Miscellaneous advertising
(b; moderate; p. 242; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
58.
________ refers to billboards along streets and highways, as well as posters in
other public locations.
a.
Outdoor advertising
b.
Out-of-home advertising
c.
Broadcast advertising
d.
Transit advertising
e.
Miscellaneous advertising
(a; moderate; p. 243; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
59.
Which type of billboard is created by designers, printed, and shipped to an
outdoor advertising company who then prepastes and applies them in sections to
the poster panel’s face on location?
a.
painted bulletin
b.
printed bulletin
c.
painted posters
d.
printed posters
e.
extensions
(d; difficult; p. 244; LO3; AACSB Communication)
60.
Which type of billboard is normally created onsite, and can even be painted on the
sides of buildings, roofs, and natural structures, such as the side of a mountain?
a.
painted bulletin
b.
printed bulletin
c.
painted posters
d.
printed posters
e.
extensions
(a; moderate; p. 244; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
61.
________ refers to a standard unit for space sales based on the opportunity a
person has to see a particular outdoor board and is typically based on a traffic
count of vehicles passing a particular location during a specified period of time.
a.
Impressions
b.
Showing
c.
Exposure
d.
Reach
e.
Frequency
(b; moderate; p. 245; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
62.
Which of the following is NOT an advantage of outdoor advertising?
a.
serves as a brand reminder
b.
short viewing time
c.
directional medium
d.
inexpensive
e.
very few words possible
(e; moderate; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
63.
________ is seen by people riding inside buses, subway cars, and some taxis.
a.
Interior transit advertising
b.
Exterior transit advertising
c.
Kiosk advertising
d.
On-premise advertising
e.
Mobile advertising
(a; moderate; p. 248; LO3)
264
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
64.
Directory advertising is described as ________ advertising because it tells people
where to go to get the product or service they want.
a.
primary
b.
secondary
c.
directional
d.
promotional
e.
selective
(c; moderate; p. 242; LO3)
65.
What is the key difference between directory advertising and brand-image
advertising?
a.
Directory advertising reaches prospects, people who already know they
have a need for the product or service.
b.
Directory advertising provides directions on how to use the product, and
brand-image advertising does not.
c.
Directory advertising provides maps with directions on how to find the
retailer’s location.
d.
Directory advertising is used in the initial stages of consumer decision
making regarding a purchase.
e.
Directory advertising is not as effective as brand-image advertising.
(a; moderate; p. 242; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
66.
Which directory lists all local and regional businesses that have a telephone
number as well as display advertising that is purchased by businesses?
a.
Standard Pages
b.
Yellow Pages
c.
Directory Pages
d.
Local Pages
e.
Listing Pages
(b; easy; p. 242; LO3)
67.
Which of the following statements is true regarding Directory and Yellow Pages
advertising?
a.
Only businesses that have paid for advertising space are listed in the
Yellow Pages.
b.
Only 10 percent of consumers who consult the Yellow Pages follow up
with some kind of action.
c.
Because a Yellow Pages ad is the last step in the search for a product or
service by a committed consumer, the ads are not intrusive.
d.
Advertising in directories is extremely expensive.
e.
Only directories published by AT&T can used the name Yellow Pages.
(c; moderate; p. 242; LO3)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
68.
Which of the following is NOT an advantage of directory advertising?
a.
inexpensive
b.
long life
c.
shopping medium
d.
competitive clutter
e.
flexibility with respect to size, colors, and formats
(d; difficult; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
69.
What is the primary weakness of directories as an advertising medium?
a.
competitive clutter
b.
long life
c.
cannot be changed for months
d.
expensive and provide a low return on investment
e.
limited size, color, and format options
(a; moderate; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
70.
Which of the following is a limitation of directory advertising?
a.
directional
b.
inexpensive
c.
low production quality
d.
good ROI
e.
flexible in size, color, format
(c; difficult; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytical Skills)
GENERAL CONTENT: TRUE/FALSE QUESTIONS
71.
A media mix is the way various types of media are strategically combined in an
advertising plan.
(True; easy; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
72.
The goal of a media plan should be to maximize reach.
(False; difficult; p. 229; LO1)
73.
Reach is more important than frequency.
(False; moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Communication)
74.
Gross impressions are the number of times a person is exposed to the
advertisement.
(False; moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Communication)
75.
Media reps work for a medium, such as a magazine or local television station, and
their objective is to build the best possible argument to convince media planners
to use the medium they represent.
(False; difficult; p. 230; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
266
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
76.
Media-buying services are independent companies that specialize in doing media
research, planning, and buying.
(True; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
77.
Newspapers are primarily used by advertisers trying to reach a national market.
(False; easy; p. 233; LO2; AACSB Communication)
78.
Newspapers can be classified by three factors: frequency of publication, format
and size, and circulation.
(True; moderate; p. 234; LO2)
79.
Just over half of all newspapers use the broadsheet size.
(False; moderate; p. 234; LO2)
80.
National advertisers are not heavy users of newspapers as an advertising medium
because each paper has its own size guidelines for ads, making it impossible to
prepare one ad that would fit every newspaper.
(False; moderate; p. 235; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
81.
The primary advertising revenue for newspapers comes from local retail
advertising and classified advertising.
(True; moderate; p. 234; LO2; AACSB Communication)
82.
The dominant form of newspaper advertising is classified advertising.
(False; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
83.
Advertisers who don’t care where their ads run in the newspaper pay the
nonpreferred-position rate (NPR).
(False; difficult; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
84.
One alternative that allows a national advertiser to pay the local rate is
cooperative advertising with a local retailer.
(True; easy; p. 235; LO2)
85.
One reason free-standing insert (FSI) advertising is growing is because it allows
greater control over the reproduction quality of the advertisement.
(True; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
86.
Newspaper readership tends to be highest among older people and people with a
higher educational level and lowest among people in their late teens and early
twenties.
(True; easy; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Communication)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
87.
Newspapers obtain objective measures of newspaper circulation and readership
by subscribing to the Auditing Bureau of Circulations (ABC) and/or MediaMark
readership studies.
(False; difficult; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Ethical Reasoning)
88.
A disadvantage of advertising in newspapers is that newspapers have a short life
span because the ink rubs off and the paper is of low quality.
(False; moderate; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
89.
The emergence of the Internet as a mechanism for delivering a newspaper is
threatening to make printed newspapers, and thus the advertising within them,
obsolete.
(False; difficult; p. 237; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
90.
The three main types of audiences that magazines target are consumer, business,
and farm audiences.
(True; moderate; p. 238; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
91.
Business magazines target business readers and include trade papers, industrial
magazines, and professional magazines.
(True; moderate; p. 238; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
92.
A horizontal publication deals with a business function that cuts across industries.
(True; moderate; p. 239; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
93.
Selective binding allows a magazine to print personalized messages directly on
ads or on inserts.
(False; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
94.
Magazine rates are based on the readership of the publication.
(False; difficult; pp. 240-241; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
95.
Starch is the industry leader in readership measurements, measuring readership
for many popular national and regional magazines and issues reports to
subscribers twice a year covering readership by demographics, psychographics,
and product use.
(False; difficult; p. 241; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
96.
One advantage of advertising in magazines is that they have high reach potential
because they are passed along to family, friends, customers, and colleagues.
(True; easy; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
97.
The disadvantages of advertising in magazines are limited flexibility, lack of
immediacy, high cost, and limited distribution.
(True; moderate; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
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98.
The Internet is proving to be a real threat to the existence of printed magazines.
(False; difficult; p. 241; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
99.
A package is the last ad a customer sees before making a decision on which brand
to buy.
(True; moderate; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
100.
Outdoor advertising includes everything from billboards to hot air-balloons,
including ads on buses; posters on walls, telephone booths, and shopping kiosks;
painted semi-trucks; taxi signs; and skywriting.
(False; difficult; p. 242; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
101. The two sizes of printed posters are 8 sheet and 20 sheet.
(False; moderate; p. 244)
102.
The outdoor industry uses a system based on impressions, which refers to a
standard unit for space sales based on the opportunity a person has to see a
particular outdoor board.
(False; moderate; p. 243; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
103. One advantage of outdoor advertising is that it is a passive medium.
(False; moderate; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
104.
Transit advertising is mainly an urban advertising form that places ads on vehicles
such as buses and taxis that circulate through the community.
(True; easy; p. 248; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
105.
Directory advertising is described as directional advertising because it tells people
where to go to get the product or service they want.
(True; easy; p. 242; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
GENERAL CONTENT—ESSAY QUESTIONS
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
106.
Define media mix and media vehicle.
Answer:
There were several basic media concepts covered in the chapter, and students can
answer any five of the following:
(1)
Media Mix—The way various types of media are strategically combined
in an advertising plan.
(2)
Media Vehicle—A specific TV program (e.g., Today Show), newspaper
(e.g., USA Today), magazine (e.g., Golf), or radio station or program (e.g.,
Rush Limbaugh).
(moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
107.
Explain the three main types of newspaper advertising.
Answer:
Types of newspaper advertising:
(1)
Classified Advertising—Advertising by individuals to sell their personal
goods and advertising by local businesses. These ads are arranged
according to their interest to readers, such as “Help Wanted,” “Real Estate
for Sale,” and “Cars for Sale.”
(2)
Display Advertising—Can be any size and can be placed anywhere in the
newspaper except the editorial page. Display advertising is further divided
into two subcategories: local (retail) and national (general).
(3)
Supplements—Syndicated, meaning an independent publisher sells its
publications to newspapers throughout the country, or they are local fullcolor advertising inserts that appear throughout the week and especially in
the Sunday edition of newspapers. A free-standing insert (FSI) is the set of
advertisements, such as the grocery ads, that are inserted into the
newspaper.
(moderate; p. 236; LO2; Reflective Thinking)
108.
Explain three advantages and three disadvantages of advertising in magazines.
Answer:
Students can discuss any three advantages of magazines:
(1)
Target Audiences—Ability of magazines to reach specialized audiences.
(2)
Audience Receptivity—The editorial environment of a magazine lends
authority and credibility to the advertising.
(3)
Long Life Span—People tend to read magazines at a comparatively slow
rate, typically over a couple of days, so they offer an opportunity to use
detailed copy. In addition, magazines have high reach potential because
they are passed along to others.
(4)
Format—Allows creative advertising variety through multiple pages,
inserts, and other features.
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(5)
(6)
Visual Quality—Excellent because they are printed on high-quality paper
that provides superior photo reproduction.
Messages—good for complex messages
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
Students can discuss any three disadvantages of magazines:
(1)
Limited Flexibility—Ads must be submitted well in advance of the
publication date.
(2)
Lack of Immediacy—Some readers do not look at an issue of a magazine
until long after it comes to them, so the ad may take a long time to have an
effect on the reader.
(3)
High Cost—Rates are quite high; however, magazines with carefully
segmented audiences can be cost-efficient because they reach a tightly
targeted audience.
(4)
Distribution—Sometimes limited. Many of the different magazines that
exist typically are not distributed to a broad spectrum of potential audience
members.
(moderate; p. 249; LO2; Reflective Thinking)
109.
Describe how outdoor advertising space is purchased.
Answer:
The industry uses a system based on showings, which refers to a standard unit for
space sales based on the opportunity a person has to see a particular outdoor
board. This is typically based on a traffic count, that is, the number of vehicles
passing a particular location during a specified period of time. For example, if
three posters in a community of 100,000 people achieve a daily exposure to
75,000 people, the result is a 75 showing. Advertisers can purchase any number of
units (75, 50, or 25 showings daily are common quantities). Boards are rented for
30-day periods, with longer periods possible. Painted bulletins are bought on an
individual basis, usually for one, two, or three years.
(moderate; p. 245; LO3; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
110.
Explain how directory advertising is different from brand-image advertising.
Answer:
Directory advertising is described as directional advertising because it tells people
where to go to get the product or service they want. The key difference between
directional advertising and brand-image advertising is that directory advertising
reaches prospects, people who already know they have a need for the product or
service; brand-image advertising seeks to create a need. Directory advertising is
the main medium that prospects consult once they have decided to buy something
they need or want.
(moderate; pp. 241-242)
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APPLICATION QUESTIONS: MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS
111.
Michelle is a specialist in media planning. She tells clients about media trends in
the future. She often talks about the digitization of media, in which all mass media
save and transmit information through the same digital forms. The integration of
the media work through and with each other. What media trend is Michelle
discussing?
a.
Interactivity
b.
Engagement
c.
Convergence
d.
Commodization
e.
Cadence
(c; moderate; p. 223)
112.
How did Apple initially announce the new product news about the iPod and
iTunes?
a.
CEO Steve Jobs announced the new product news and created the initial
buzz that started an effective word-of-mouth campaign among music and
computer fans.
b.
Apple launched a combination of iconic print advertising and posters,
creatively presenting the digital player, and its player, as cool.
c.
Apple spent $9 million on television advertising.
d.
Apple used a combination of TV shows, billboards, and mainstream print
magazines to initially launch the iPod.
e.
Apple allowed consumers to download 20 free songs with each purchase
of an iPod.
(a; moderate; p. 225)
113.
In which medium did advertisers spend the most in 2003, 2004, and 2005?
a.
newspapers
b.
magazines
c.
television
d.
radio
e.
outdoor
(c; easy; p. 230 [Table 8.2])
114.
June’s job at an advertising agency entails identifying and selecting media options
based on research into the audience profiles of various media as well as
scheduling and budgeting. What is June’s job responsibility?
a.
media planning
b.
media buying
c.
account planning
d.
account management
e.
message development
(a; easy; p. 230-231; LO1; AACSB Communication)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
115.
Lisa works at a major advertising agency and is an expert in the television
schedule for eight major markets in the United States. Her job entails identifying
specific television shows that will deliver the desired audience for her agency’s
client, negotiating the costs to advertise in them, and handling the details of
billing and payment. What is Lisa’s job title?
a.
media planner
b.
media buyer
c.
account planner
d.
creative director
e.
account manager
(b; easy; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
116.
Honda is launching its new Ridgeline truck and wants to expose the largest
percentage of the prime time TV viewing audience as possible to their message at
least once during the next six months. Which media concept is Honda trying to
maximize?
a.
frequency
b.
impressions
c.
reach
d.
circulation
e.
HUTs
(c; moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Analytic Skills)
117.
How many different types of advertising are available to advertisers using
newspapers as an advertising medium?
a.
10
b.
25
c.
3
d.
150
e.
250
(c; difficult; p. 236; LO1)
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118.
A national advertiser would like to advertise more in newspapers, but there is a
substantial rate differential between national advertisers purchasing the same ad
size as local retailers, and, on average, the national advertisers must pay more
than 60 percent more for the same space. What can a national advertiser do to
avoid this rate differential?
a.
Use the “one-order, one-bill” ordering system because they’ve negotiated
the rates down to the local rates.
b.
Use the “co-op” ordering system because they’ve negotiated the rates
down to the local rates.
c.
Advertise only in larger cities because newspapers in those markets do not
charge a rate differential.
d.
Use co-op advertising, which is an arrangement between an advertiser and
a retailer whereby the retailer buys the ad at the local rate and the
advertiser reimburses some or all of the costs.
e.
There’s really nothing a national advertiser can do to avoid the higher rate.
(d; moderate; p. 235; LO2)
119.
Procter & Gamble is a major user of consumer coupons and prefers to deliver
them to consumers through newspaper advertising. P&G is very concerned about
the reproduction quality of the advertisements, wants to command more attention
than just another ad in the paper, and wants to place different ads in different
markets. Which type of newspaper advertising will meet P&G’s needs?
a.
classified
b.
display
c.
supplements
d.
co-op
e.
promotional
(c; moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
120.
The ________is the most important change that has occurred over the last twenty
years discussed in Media Explosion in A Matter of Practice.
a.
internet
b.
newspaper.
c.
television
d.
magazine
e.
billboard
(a; moderate; p. 229; LO1; AACSB Use of IT)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
121.Dole, the fresh banana, juice, and canned fruit company, began testing a glossy
magazine, Dole Fresh Choices, in the banana section of a grocery store in
Houston and has plans for more widespread distribution. The magazine offers
women-targeted articles on health and nutrition. Which magazine classification
best describes this magazine?
a.
geography
b.
editorial content
c.
physical characteristics
d.
ownership
e.
distribution
(d; difficult; p 239; LO2; AACSB Analytic Skills)
122.
Recently, advertisers were upset because, apparently, some magazines were
reporting circulation figures to be higher than they actually were. Why do you
think advertisers were upset?
a.
Any negative publicity for a magazine will reflect poorly on their brands
because they are supporting that publication.
b.
Falsifying circulation figures will hinder future distribution for a
magazine.
c.
Inflated circulation figures by just a few publications make the entire
industry suspect.
d.
Magazine advertising rates are based on circulation figures.
e.
It generated negative publicity among consumers, which are the
advertisers’ target market.
(d; difficult; pp. 240-241; LO2)
123.
The outdoor board on the side of the highway with the message telling drivers that
the Holiday Inn Express is at the next exit illustrates which advantage of outdoor
advertising?
a.
high-impact medium offering larger-than-life visuals, on a hard-to-ignore
structure
b.
directional medium
c.
lack of flexibility
d.
reinforce a creative concept employed in other media
e.
least expensive of all major media
(b; easy; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Analytic Skills)
124.
Media buyers must be aware of how mass media is changing. Which of the
following is NOT one of the 5 trends discussed in The Future of Media in
Advertising in the Part 3 introduction?
a.
convergence
b.
interactivity
c.
engagement
d.
commoditization
e.
newspaper selectivity
(d; moderate; pp. 222-223; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
What is the issue discussed in the “Hands-On: Next Month’s Magazine Issue:
Credibility” case at the end of chapter 8?
a.
The issue discussed is the controversy surrounding brand information
being integrated into the content of newspaper stories.
b.
The issue discussed is the controversy surrounding brand information
being integrated into the content of magazine articles.
c.
The issue discussed is the controversy of digital billboards being used by
outdoor companies without providing adequate measurement of the
showings gained by advertisers.
d.
The issue discussed is the fact that newspapers hold back the bad or
controversial news they should be reporting to the public but withhold
because the news concerns one of their major advertisers.
e.
The issue discussed is the use of anorexic-looking models in advertising
appearing in women’s fashion magazines.
(b; moderate; p. 253; LO2; AACSB Ethical Reasoning)
125.
APPLICATION QUESTIONS: MINI-CASE MULTIPLE-CHOICE
Allison works in the media department of a major advertising agency that has several
national advertisers as clients. Her responsibilities include identifying specific media
vehicles, such as TV programs, newspapers, magazines, or radio programs and stations
for their clients’ advertising, negotiating the costs to advertise in them, and handling the
details of billing and payment. Although one of their major clients advertises primarily in
magazines, the media plan calls for the use of newspaper advertising as well.
126.
Mini-Case Question. What is Allison’s job function?
a.
media planning
b.
rate negotiator
c.
media buyer
d.
account planner
e.
account buyer
(c; moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
127.
Mini-Case Question. The media plan calls for placing ads in all the major
newspapers in the southeastern United States. Because newspaper is primarily a
local medium, Allison seeks the services of a professional to assist her in placing
the buy with one order. What are the people or companies that sell space (in print)
and time (in broadcast) for a variety of media known as?
a.
media salespeople
b.
customer service reps
c.
media reps
d.
media-buying services
e.
media consolidators
(c; moderate; p. 230; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
128.
Mini-Case Question. If the advertiser doesn’t care where its ads run in the
newspaper, what rate will Allison request for her client?
a.
classified rate
b.
display rate
c.
supplement rate
d.
run-of-paper (ROP) rate
e.
differential rate
(d; moderate; p. 236; LO2)
129.
Mini-Case Question. The media plan also calls for magazine advertising, and the
creative execution will have the color extend to the edge of the page. What type of
page will Allison need to purchase?
a.
gatefold
b.
back cover
c.
double-page spread
d.
bleed
e.
gutterless
(d; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
130.
Mini-Case Question. Allison learns that one magazine that she is considering for
her client combines information on subscribers kept in a database with a computer
program to produce magazines that include special sections for subscribers based
on their demographic profiles. What is this known as?
a.
selective binding
b.
relationship management
c.
segmented distribution
d.
ink-jet imaging
e.
satellite transmission
(a; moderate; p. 240; LO2; AACSB Use of IT)
APPLICATION QUESTIONS: SHORT-ANSWER
131.
Describe the media strategy used by Apple when launching the iPod.
Answer:
Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced the new product news and created the initial
buzz that started an effective word-of-mouth campaign among music and
computer fans. This public relations effort was successful with more than 6,000
iPod and iTunes stories in major publications around the world. Apple then
launched a combination of iconic print advertising and posters, creatively
presenting the digital player, and its player, as cool. The print campaign was
followed by an equally interesting television campaign using the same graphic
images as the print ads.
(moderate; p. 225; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
132.
Rank the following media from most to least ad spending in 2003: outdoor,
television, directories, magazines, newspapers, radio, and Internet.
Answer:
In terms of 2003 ad spending by medium ranked from highest to lowest:
(1)
television
(2)
newspaper
(3)
magazine
(4)
directories
(5)
radio
(6)
Internet
(7)
outdoor
(Note: there was also an “other” category that ranked between newspapers and
magazines.)
(difficult; p. 228 [Table 8.1])
133.
Explain what is meant by the term media vehicle, and give an example for each
major advertising medium.
Answer:
A media vehicle is a specific TV program (e.g., 60 Minutes, The Apprentice),
newspaper (e.g., New York Times, Wall Street Journal), or radio station or
program (e.g., NPR’s All Things Considered, Rush Limbaugh’s talk show).
(easy; p. 231; LO1)
134.
Jane is teaching an undergraduate introductory advertising course and is trying to
explain the difference between reach and frequency. How should Jane explain
these terms, and what is the goal of a media plan with respect to these two terms?
Answer:
The goal of most media plans is to reach as many people in the target audience as
often as the budget allows. Reach is the percentage of the media audience exposed
at least once to the advertiser’s message during a specific time frame. Frequency
refers to the number of times a person is exposed to the advertisement. Different
media have different patterns of frequency, as well as different patterns of reach.
(easy; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
135.
Four college roommates who were advertising majors are now in New York
working in the advertising industry. John is a media planner, Carl is a media
buyer, George is a media researcher, and they all work at the same advertising
agency. Chuck works at a media-buying service and jokes that he will be taking
over all of their jobs. Describe how all their jobs are different and why Chuck can
make the joke he did.
Answer:
John, the media planner, makes the strategic decisions outlined in the media plan,
such as identifying and selecting media options based on research into the
audience profiles of various media, and his responsibilities also include
scheduling and budgeting.
Carl, the media buyer, implements the media plan. Media buying is the task of
identifying specific vehicles, such as TV programs or magazines, negotiating the
costs to advertise in them, and handling the details of billing and payment.
George, the media researcher, compiles audience measurement data, as well as
media costs and availability data for the media options being considered by media
planners.
Chuck, who works at a media-buying service, specializes in doing media research,
planning, and buying. These agencies are taking over the media role that used to
be the responsibility of advertising agency media staff. In many cases, they are
the media department that spun off from a full-service agency, such as the one in
which his college buddies are employed.
(moderate; p. 231; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
136.
Your friend is confused about the terms impression and circulation. What would
you say to help him understand the difference in these concepts?
Answer:
An impression is one person’s opportunity to be exposed one time to an ad in any
media vehicle. Impressions can be added up as a measure of the size of the
audience either for one medium or for a combination of vehicles in a media mix
as estimated by media research. The idea of impressions is different from
circulation, because impressions (in print) estimate the actual readership, rather
than just circulation, which refers to copies sold. For example, a magazine may
have a circulation of 1 million but it might be read, on the average, by 2.5 people
per issue, resulting in an estimate of impressions for that issue of 2.5 million. If
the ad ran in three consecutive issues, then the estimate of total impressions, or
gross impressions, would be 7.5 million.
(moderate; p. 232; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
137.
Claire is training to become a media buyer at an advertising agency. Describe
what she should know regarding daily and weekly newspapers and national
advertisers’ use of each.
Answer:
Most newspapers are published either daily or weekly. Daily newspapers usually
are found in cities and larger towns, and have morning editions, evening editions,
or all-day editions. Approximately 30 percent of the dailies and a few of the
weeklies also publish a Sunday edition, which is usually much thicker and
contains a great deal of news, advertising, and special features. For a media
planner, it is useful to know that consumers spend twice as much time with the
Sunday edition as with the daily edition, suggesting that to be the best placement
for many local advertisers. However, the Sunday paper is more cluttered with
competitive advertising. Many national advertisers use supplements, particularly
on Sunday.
Weekly papers appear in towns, suburbs, and smaller cities where the volume of
hard news and advertising is insufficient to support a daily newspaper. These
papers emphasize the news of a restricted area, reporting local news in depth but
tending to ignore national news, sports, and similar subjects.
National advertisers often shun weeklies and are not heavy advertisers in daily
papers. They use local papers indirectly through advertising placed by local
retailers (e.g., co-op advertising), dealers, and franchisees.
(moderate; pp. 234-235; LO1; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
138.
How has the information and communication technology contributed to the Media
Explosion in A Matter of Practice?
Answer:
There was an explosion of new products developed since 1985 including TiVo,
cell phones, text messaging, Blackberrys, voicemail, faxes that have changed the
way people communicate.
The Internet is the main link to most information and communication. Many Web
sites, blogs, weblogs, and specialty sites are created each day.
(moderate; p. 229; LO1; AACSB Use of IT)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
139.
Laurie was with her toddler in the hair care aisle of Wal-Mart. Her daughter saw a
bottle of shampoo that had a Winnie-the-Pooh head on the top and begged for it
because she wanted to “pway wiff Pooh!” Laurie purchased it for her daughter
even though it cost almost three times as much as a similar shampoo that wasn’t
in a cute bottle. Why do you think Laurie did this?
Answer:
The package can also deliver customer benefits; in this case, Laurie’s daughter
perceived it as a toy.
(moderate; p. 249; LO3; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
140.
To announce the expansion of a Louis Vuitton flagship store in the center of Hong
Kong’s luxury shopping district, the marketer made a building resemble an LV
hard-case canvas trunk, with brass fittings and a cherry monogram print from
their summer collection. The 3D ad is 26 feet high and 151 feet by 59 feet wide.
Describe the type of advertising medium this represents and the advantages of it.
Answer:
Out-of-home advertising includes everything from billboards to hot-air balloons,
and a building fits in this category. This probably best represents a painted
bulletin with the entire building being the medium. Students could probably also
discuss this as an “on-premise sign” since the entire building is really a sign.
(moderate; pp. 242, 244; LO3; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
141.
Seasons is a new restaurant opening in town, and the owners know they should
advertise to attract customers. Based on what you learned in this chapter,
recommend some media options for this restaurant.
Answer:
Students can answer a variety of ways, but their answers should demonstrate
knowledge of the print media concepts covered in this chapter. For example,
because this is a local restaurant, newspapers, out-of-home, and directory
advertising would be most appropriate.
(moderate; p. 249; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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142.
Carla works in the student activities office of her university and was given the
task of finding a way to better inform students of upcoming activities and events.
It’s a rather large university with a bi-weekly newspaper. Give Carla some
suggestions on how she might accomplish this.
Answer:
Because Carla is trying to reach a targeted audience, students attending the
university, she needs to determine the best media to reach them. One obvious
media vehicle is the student newspaper. Another medium that might be useful is
out-of-home media, such as kiosks and posters. Also, if there is a bus route
through the campus, transit advertising, both interior and exterior, would be
appropriate.
(easy; p. 249; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
143.
Media buyers must be aware of how mass media is changing. What are the 5
trends discussed in The Future of Media in Advertising in the Part 3 introduction?
Answer:
The 5 trends discussed in The Future of Media in Advertising in the Part 3
introduction are convergence, interactivity, engagement, commoditization, and
cadence.
(moderate; pp. 222-223; LO1; AACSB Analytical Skills)
144.
You are working at a summer job selling advertising space for the campus
telephone directory. Some of the businesses you call on, even those that currently
advertise in the directory, are reluctant because they don’t see the benefit of
advertising in this media vehicle. Provide some advantages of directory
advertising that might help persuade these advertisers.
Answer:
Directories offer several advantages for advertisers:
(1)
Shopping Medium—Consumers initiate the search process when they
have a need or want.
(2)
Price—Inexpensive and provides a return on investment of 1:15; every
dollar spent on a directory ad produces $15 in revenue.
(3)
Flexibility—With respect to size, colors, and formats.
(4)
Long Life.
(easy; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
145.
The “Hands On” case at the end of the chapter discusses the boundary between
editorial content and advertising in magazines. Discuss both sides of this issue.
Answer:
At most newspapers and magazines there is a boundary that cannot be crossed—
the one that exists between the news or feature stories created by the publication’s
writers and the advertising. Publications work hard to convince readers that
advertising revenue does not drive story selection, the flavor or scope of news
coverage, or critical reviews and recommendations. That independence has long
been viewed as a lynchpin for the credibility of a publication’s articles.
Although newspapers and magazines have fought to maintain the independence of
the product from the influence of advertising, there are some instances where that
independence is weakening. For example, Country Living Magazine ran an eightpage insert advertisement for Expo Design Center adjacent to a story describing
how Expo helped remake a kitchen, and Playboy ran ads for Tommy Hilfiger
featuring playmates modeling the designer’s clothes.
These practices raise some concerns about whether they follow the guidelines of
the American Society of Magazine Editors for separating ads from content. But
with advertisers pressuring print vehicles to be more accommodating in a
competitive marketplace, magazines may have a hard time saying no. One
rationale provided for why they should say no pointed out the fact that readers
have a personal relationship with magazines, and product placement runs the risk
of undermining that special relationship.
(moderate; p. 253; LO1; AACSB Ethical Reasoning)
APPLICATION QUESTIONS: MINI-CASE SHORT ANSWER
Haley and Lauren, who recently graduated with MBAs, are opening a new shoe boutique,
called The Pampered Soul, in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, which is classified as a
Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) with more than 100,000 people, and it’s also home
of The University of Southern Mississippi. They will offer national brands of shoes that
are not available in the department stores in the mall, and their primary target market will
be women ages 18 to 35. They’ve rented a location on the main street in front of the
USM campus. The owners realize that most of their business will come from a five-mile
radius and want to limit their advertising to those potential customers. They have a
modest budget for advertising, so they want to get as much out of it as they can.
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Chapter Eight: Media Basics and Print Media
146.
Mini-Case Question. Haley and Lauren are thinking about advertising in the local
newspaper, the Hattiesburg American, but they don’t have a basic understanding
of advertising in newspapers. Provide a brief overview of the types of advertising
in newspapers, noting which would be most appropriate for them, and how they
can learn of the prices for advertising space.
Answer:
There are three types of advertisements found within the local newspaper:
classified, display, and supplements. Classified advertising is usually done by
individuals to sell their personal goods as well as by local businesses and is
arranged according to their interest to readers. The dominant form of newspaper
advertising is display advertising, which can be any of the standard 56 sizes and
placed anywhere in the paper except the editorial page. Finally, newspaper
supplements can carry both national and local advertising and are usually
produced by independent publishers that sell their publication to newspapers.
Display advertising would be most appropriate for this business.
The pricing for newspaper advertising is sold based on the size of the space used.
The charges are published on rate cards, which is a list of the charges for
advertising space and the discounts given to local advertisers and to advertisers
who make volume buys.
(moderate; p. 236; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
147.
Mini-Case Question. Haley and Lauren recall learning something in their
marketing class about an arrangement between manufacturers of national brands
and local businesses with respect to advertising. Name and describe this
arrangement.
Answer:
This arrangement is referred to as cooperative (co-op) advertising. This is an
alternative that allows the national advertiser to pay the local rate. It is an
arrangement between the advertiser and the retailer whereby the retailer buys the
ad and then the manufacturer pays half—or a portion depending on the amount of
space the manufacturer’s brand occupies.
(easy; p. 235; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
285
Part Three: Practice: Where Are Media Heading?
148.
Mini-Case Question. Haley and Lauren want to hold a special event for the USM
college women in an attempt to get them into their store. Would advertising in the
local newspaper be a good advertising medium to make them aware of the special
event? Why or why not?
Answer:
No, because one of the disadvantages of newspapers is limited coverage of certain
groups. Although newspapers have wide market coverage, certain market groups
are not frequent readers. The under-20 age group and college students are not
frequent readers of newspapers, but the campus newspaper might be a good
option.
(easy; p. 249; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
149.
Mini-Case Question. Discuss some out-of-home advertising vehicles that might
be appropriate for this business.
Answer:
The out-of-home vehicles appropriate for this business could include outdoor
advertising, such as billboards, an on-premise sign, posters (perhaps around
campus), kiosks (if available on campus, for example), and perhaps transit
advertising.
(moderate; pp. 242–248; LO3)
150.
Mini-Case Question. Finally, Haley and Lauren want to make sure that customers
know how to find their business. Which medium is most appropriate for providing
consumers information on where to purchase the shoes they are looking for?
Answer:
Directory advertising, because it is directional advertising telling people where to
go to get the product or service they want. Haley and Lauren could purchase an ad
in the Yellow Pages, which lists all local and regional businesses that have a
telephone number. They could also advertise in a specialty directory, such as the
campus directory.
(easy; pp. 241-242; LO2; AACSB Reflective Thinking)
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