B2BMM,DVRS - Spidi - Indian Institute of Management Bangalore

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INDIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT, BANGALORE
PGP & PGSEM (Combined)
Business-to-Business Market Management (B2BMM) (Elective)
Term-V, 2012
Faculty: D. V. R. Seshadri
Dated: 5th March 2012 (Version 1.0); Classroom: To be assigned
[Subject to minor changes]
A. Course Objectives
1. Develop a good understanding of the concepts and frameworks of business-tobusiness market management (also referred to as B2B Marketing or business
marketing).
2. Develop critical analysis and problem-solving abilities with respect to business
market management.
3. Gain a first-hand understanding of working relationships within and between firms in
business markets.
B. Course Description
Business-to-Business (B2B) Marketing encompasses those management activities that
enable a supplier firm to understand, create, and deliver value to other businesses,
governments, and / or institutional customers. In the context of these business markets,
value is ‘the worth in monetary terms of the economic, technical, service and social
benefits a customer firm receives in exchange for the price it pays for a market offering.’
There are four guiding principles of B2B Marketing:

Make value the cornerstone

Focus on business market processes

Stress doing business across borders

Accentuate working relationships and business networks
This course is designed to provide participants with a good understanding of the concepts
of B2B market management. It helps them develop critical analysis and problem-solving
abilities with respect to business market management.
2
Target audience for the course
The course is open to PGP 2nd year as well as PGSEM 2nd and 3rd year participants.
Some Important Guidelines
1. The utility of the course to the participant will depend largely on the ability of the
participant to closely follow the readings and invest the required time to prepare for the
sessions. It is expected that participants will have read the specified material prior to
each session.
2. The material presented in the prescribed textbook will not be covered through
instructor’s lectures in the class. It is expected that all participants will read the
specified chapter(s) of the textbook as well as assigned articles BEFORE the session,
prior to embarking on case preparation.
3. Regularity in attending the sessions, preparing for the sessions before the class,
and active participation in the learning experience are vital.
4. This is a demanding course and only participants seriously desirous of enhancing
their knowledge of marketing in general and business market management in
particular are advised to take this course.
5. I expect the participants to be punctual to the class. Latecomers please excuse!!
6. Good Luck and Wishing you an Enjoyable LEARNING EXPERIENCE!
C. Pedagogy
The case method will be the primary pedagogy.
D. Evaluation
1. Class Participation: Case Preparation and Discussion
The first component will be related to regularity in attending the classes, case preparation
and discussion as well as general constructive class participation.
Each student must be prepared to thoroughly discuss each case and actively participate in
the case discussions in class, based on the assigned case and readings for the day. This
demonstrated ability is a significant though not sole determinant of each participant’s
grade for the class participation. Prior preparation is a commitment made by each
participant to himself and to the class. Hence anyone in the class may be called upon to
contribute insights during the case discussion.
The points awarded for class participation will be based on regularity of attendance to all
the classes and meaningful participation in all the case discussions.
.
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The total weight for the case discussion and related class participation will be 200 course
points, of the total 1000 points for the course.
You will earn those points as follows:



You will automatically receive 5 points for attending each session. Hence if you
attend all sessions you will receive 100 points.
Those who miss the session will get no points for that session.
Additionally, you can earn up to 100 points for the course for consistent
outstanding contribution of insights during the classes / case discussions. This will
be assigned by the instructor at his discretion based on his perception of
contributions being made by participants to the classroom discussions. However
allocation of these points based on your performance in the class discussions will
be possible only if you clearly display your name on your desk in the class.
Remember, quality of class participation, rather than simply quantity or ‘air time’ used up
will determine the points allotted for this segment of evaluation.
2. Quizzes
An important component of the evaluation will be quizzes. There will be two in-class
quizzes during the course, each of which will carry equal weight of 200 points.
They could essentially consist of short questions, which will require brief answers. The
questions will be drawn from the chapters of the prescribed textbook, various concepts
discussed in the class and the articles in the course pack. Alternately the quizzes could be
analysis of short management cases. The quizzes seek to assess each participant’s
learning and mastery of important concepts covered in the course. Duration of the quizzes
may be about 30 to 45 minutes and will be conducted during the session times.
NO MAKE-UP QUIZZES WILL BE ADMINISTERED under any circumstances. The
quizzes will be pre-announced.
Please note that mastery of all of the course material is essential to do well in the
quizzes.
3. Group project
There will be two projects (Group), each of which will carry 200 points. The details of
the projects will be discussed in due course. One project will be submitted by the 10th
session of the course and the second project will be submitted on the day of the 20th
session of the course. Groups of four will be formed by participants. No negotiation on
deadline for submission size or group size please!
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In summary, the total of 1000 points will be allocated as follows:
Component
1.
2.
3.
Points
Class participation
Two Quizzes, each 200 points
Two Group projects, each 200 points
200 (Individual)
400 (Individual)
400 (Group)
--------1000
--------Your final grades will depend on consistent and superior performance in the class against
the above components as well as your performance relative to other students in your
class. Note that each of these components will be relative graded, and based on the above
weights, the final grade for the course will evolved. The final grades will also be relative
graded based to adhere to the norms of PGP Office regarding distribution of grades
(Maximum: 25% A’s and Minimum: 30% C’s and below, in the class will be awarded
finally as the course grades).
IMPORTANT
Each participant is required to bring to every class his / her name board that will be
conspicuously displayed for the instructor / teaching assistant to clearly see. Also make
sure you bring the relevant course material for each class.
4. Text book for the course and other course material
Text: James C. Anderson, James A. Narus, Das Narayandas and DVR Seshadri, Business
Market Management: Understanding, Creating and Delivering Value, 3rd Edition, Pearson
Education, Low Price Edition, 2011. You may obtain your personal copy of the book
from PGP / PGSEM Office (as applicable) during the first week of the term.
Cases and other course material: You may obtain a pack containing the cases and other
course material from PGP / PGSEM Office (as applicable) during the week prior to the
first week of the term.
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5. Session Plan
Session #
Week #
Day
Date
Topic(s) / Concept(s)
1.
Week-1
Introduction and Course Overview
Friday
Chapter #
in course
textbook
Case Name
Remarks
-
Connected
Article Sl.
No.
10,12,27
-
-
-
2
Case # 1:
Kunst 1600
9
Business Market Management:
Guiding Principles
1
Market Sensing
2
Introduction: Customer Value
Management
Caselet # 1:
Automobile Fleet Marketing
2.
Week-1
Saturday
3.
Week-2
Friday
Caselet # 2:
Zeus Laser Technologies
Really Understanding Value in
Business Markets
Value cannot be created from thin
air!
Market Sensing
(Note: Kunst-3500 case will be
handed over in class after discussion
of Kunst-1600)
Really Understanding Value in
Business Markets
Building Customer Value Models
4.
Week-2
Saturday
5.
Week-3
Friday
6.
Week-3
Understanding Firms as Customers
2
Marketing value in a tendering
situation
Case: # 2:
Kunst 3500
Read:
Article titled:
‘Marketing “Value” to PriceSensitive Customers during
the Tendering process’
-
Caselet # 3:
Purchasing a Computer
Component
Understanding Firms as Customers
2
Case # 3:
Bose Corporation: The JIT
II Program (A)
2,5
Market Sensing
2
Crafting Market Strategy
4
Case # 4:
Algypug (will be sent as soft
copy on or before 23/6/11)
Discussion
on Project
#1
Saturday
Building Brands in Business Markets
7.
Week-4
Market Sensing
2
Selected Articles and a
book chapter on Branding
in B2B Markets
Case # 5:
Sundram Fasteners Ltd. –
15
6
Understanding Firms as Customers
3
Radiator Caps Project (A)
Market Sensing
2
Case # 6:
Cumberland Metal Industries
17
Understanding Firms as Customers
3
Crafting Market Strategy
4
13
Crafting Market Strategy
4
New Offerings Realisation
6
Case # 7:
Ingersoll-Rand (India)
Ltd.: The Air Compressors
Business at the Crossroads
(A)
Case # 8:
Mahindra & Mahindra:
Creating Scorpio
Friday
8.
Week-4
Saturday
9.
Week-5
Friday
10.
Week-5
Saturday
1,23
Quiz-I
(Chapters
1-4 and 6;
articles for
sessions 1
to 10)
Due date
for
submission
of Project
#1
11.
Week-6
Friday
12.
Week-6
Managing Market Offerings
5
Case # 9:
Microsoft Corporation:
The Design of Microsoft
Support Network 1.0
22,24
Gaining Customers
8
20
Sustaining Customer Relationships
10
Case # 10:
Infosys® Technologies Ltd.:
Growing Share of a
Customer’s Business
Application of Value-based
Marketing in Software Industry
Capstone Case
2,3
Case # 11:
Value Chain Migration at
Infosys: Case (A)
Discussion
on Project
#2
Caselet # 4:
What’s on your Business’ Menu?
Saturday
13.
Week-7
Friday
Case # 12:
Bucking the Trend: A Look
at Zyme Solutions’ NonLinear Business Model
Case # 13:
Non-linear Initiatives @
Wipro
7
14.
Week-7
Gaining Customers
8
Sustaining Customer Relationships
10
Sustaining Customer Relationships
10
Saturday
15.
Week-8
Workshop on SPIN Selling
Friday
Workshop on Major Account Selling
16.
Week-8
Case # 14:
CMR Enterprises
Read Note: “Note on
Customer Management,” by
Das Narayandas
Case # 15:
Reinventing Marketing at
Tata Steel
Case # 16:
Tata Steel Drive on
Institutional Sales
Case # 17:
Retail Business
Transformation at Tata
Steel
8,19
Case # 18:
WESCO
-
21
Business Channel Management
7
Sustaining Reseller Partnerships
9
Caselet # 5:
Regency Sign Corporation
Gaining Customers
8
Sustaining Customer Relationships
10
Capstone Case
-
Case # 19:
Zucamor S.A.: Global
Competition in Argentina
11
19.
Week-10
Creating an Effective Go to Market
Strategy
-
Case # 20:
Aurolab
25
Friday
Caselet # 6:
Bachan Distilleries
20.
Week-10
Applying the concepts of the course
Case # 21:
Croon and Oce
(Negotiation role-play case.
Case will be handed over
during Session # 18. Please
complete the role-play
before the Session # 20. The
Session # 20 will only be
used to provide a debrief of
the case.)
Quiz-2
(Chapters
5,7-10;
articles for
sessions
11-20)
Saturday
17.
Week-9
7,14,26
Friday
18.
Week-9
Saturday
Gaining Customers
8
Sustaining Customer Relationships
10
Saturday
Course Wrap-up
Feedback
Due date
for
submission
of Project
#2
8
List of articles [Please access from HBR Site / EBSCO]: For each session, the serial nos. of
the articles to be read are indicated in the session plan above (where ever relevant)
1.
Corey, E. Raymond (1975), “Key Options in Market Selection and Product Planning,” Harvard
Business Review # 75502. [CKS, Orbcomm]
2.
Bonoma, Thomas V. (1982), “Major Sales: Who Really Does the Buying?” Harvard Business Review
# 82305. [Industry.Net]
3.
Narayandas, Das (1998), “Factor Analysis – The Basics,” Harvard Business School Note: 598042. [Projects] [Ignore]
4.
Narayandas, Das (1998), “Cluster Analysis – The Basics,” Harvard Business School Note: 598043. [Projects] [Ignore]
5.
Shapiro, Benson P. and Robert J. Dolan (1989), “Performance Curves: Costs, Prices, and Value,”
Harvard Business School Note: 590-010.
6.
Shapiro, Benson P. (1987), “Variety vs. Value: Two Generic Approaches to Product Policy,”
Harvard Business School Note: 587-119. [Ignore]
7.
Rangan, V. Kasturi (1994), “Designing Channels of Distribution,” Harvard Business School Note:
594-116.
8.
Shapiro, Benson P., V. Kasturi Rangan, Rowland T. Moriarty, and Elliot B. Ross (1987), “Manage
Customers for Profits (Not Just Sales),” Harvard Business Review # 87513.
9.
Shapiro, Benson P. and Thomas V. Bonoma (1984), “How to Segment Industrial Markets,” Harvard
Business Review # 84312.
10. Dolan Robert J. (1995), “How Do You Know When the Price is Right?” Harvard Business Review #
95501.
11. Shapiro, Benson P. (1977), “Can Marketing and Manufacturing Co-Exist?” Harvard Business Review
# 77511.
12. Anderson, James C. and James A. Narus (1998), "Understanding What Customers Value," Harvard
Business Review, 76 (November/December), 53-65.
13. Narayandas, Das and V. Kasturi Rangan (2002), “Building and Sustaining Buyer-Seller Relationships
in Mature Industrial Markets,” Harvard Business School working paper # 03-111.
14. Narus, James A. and James C. Anderson (1986), “Turn Your Industrial Distributors into Partners,”
Harvard Business Review # 86207.
15. Dolan, Robert J. (1985), “Marketing Research: An Overview of Research Methods,” Harvard Business
School Note 585-039.
16. Churchill, Gilbert A. Jr. (1995), Marketing Research: Methodological Foundations, The Dryden
Press, Orlando, Fla., Chapter 17, pages 984-1011. [Cluster Analysis] [Ignore]
17. Dolan, Robert J. (1990), “Conjoint Analysis: A Manager's Guide,” Harvard Business School Note 590059.
18. Silk, Alvin J. (1994), “Note on Factor Analysis,” Harvard Business School Note 594-091.
[Projects] [Ignore]
19. V. Kasturi Rangan and George T. Bowman, “Beating the Commodity Magnet”
20. William Taylor, The Logic of Global Business: An Interview with ABB’s Percy Barnevik
9
21. Frank V. Cespedes, Once More: How Do You Improve Customer Service?
22. Benson P. Shapiro, V. Kasturi Rangan and John J. Sviokla, Staple Yourself to an Order
23. V. Kasturi Rangan and Kevin Bartus, New Product Commercialisation: Common Mistakes
24. Benson P. Shapiro, What the Hell is “Market Oriented”?
25. Abhishek Singh, Mandar Nayak, D V R Seshadri (2011), Marketing “Value” to Price-Sensitive
Customers during the Tendering process (Draft paper submitted to Journal of Industrial and Business
Marketing)
26. Donald V Fites, Make your Dealers your Partners, Harvard Business Review, March-April 1996
27. Philip Kotler, Neil Rackham and Suji Krishnaswamy, Ending the War Between Sales and Marketing,
Harvard Business Review
10
Additional Reading Texts

Rangan, Kasturi V., Benson P. Shapiro, and Rowland T. Moriarty, Jr. (1995), Business
Marketing Strategy. Richard D. Irwin, Inc., Chicago, IL.

Lilien, Gary L. and Arvind Rangaswamy (2002), Marketing Engineering: ComputerAssisted Marketing Analysis and Planning, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs,
N.J.
List of References for B2B Marketing
Sr. No.
Book Name
Author
Publisher / Year
1
Business Market Management:
Understanding, Creating, and Delivering
Value
James C. Anderson,
James A. Narus, Das
Narayandas
Prentice Hall;
3 edition (June 15, 2008)
2
Value Merchants: Demonstrating and
Documenting Superior Value in Business
Markets
James C. Anderson,
Nirmalya Kumar, James
A. Narus
Harvard Business School Press;
1 edition (November 7, 2007)
3
SPIN Selling
Neil Rackam
McGraw-Hill;
1 edition (May 1, 1988)
4
Major Account Sales Strategy
Neil Rackam
McGraw-Hill;
1 edition (January 1, 1989)
5
The SPIN Selling Fieldbook
Neil Rackam
McGraw-Hill;
1 edition (June 1, 1996)
6
Managing Major Sales
Neil Rackam
HarperBusiness
(June 5, 1991)
7
Getting Partnering Right: How Market
Leaders Are Creating Long-Term
Competitive Advantage
Neil Rackham,
Lawrence Friedman, and
Richard Ruff
McGraw-Hill;
1 edition (December 1, 1995)
8
Rethinking the Sales Force: Redefining
Selling to Create and Capture Customer
Value
John DeVincentis
McGraw-Hill;
1 edition (January 15, 1999)
List of References for B2B Product Management
Sr. No.
Book Name
Author
Publisher / Year
1
Strategy and Management of Industrial
Brands: Business to Business - Products &
Services by
Philippe Malaval
Springer; 1 edition (December 31,
2003)
2
Business Marketing Management: B2B
Michael D. Hutt and
Thomas W. Speh
South-Western College Pub; 10
edition (February 13, 2009)
11
List of References for Channels
Sr. No.
Book Name
Author
Publisher / Year
1.
Transforming Your Go-to-Market
Strategy: The Three Disciplines of
Channel Management
V. Kasturi Rangan
Harvard Business Press;
1 edition (June 1, 2006)
2.
Go To Market Strategy: Advanced
Techniques and Tools for Selling More
Products to More Customers More
Profitably
The Channel Advantage
Lawrence Friedman
Butterworth-Heinemann;
1 edition (July 2, 2002)
Lawrence Friedman, Tim
Furey
Butterworth-Heinemann;
1 edition (June 15, 1999)
4.
Managing Channels of Distribution: The
Marketing Executive's Complete Guide
Kenneth Rolnicki
AMACOM
(January 6, 1998)
5.
The Strategy and Tactics of Pricing: A
Guide to Growing More Profitably
Thomas T. Nagle,
John Hogan
Prentice Hall; 4 edition
(December 3, 2005)
6.
Distribution Channels: Understanding and
Managing Channels to Market
Julian Dent
Kogan Page
(September 1, 2008)
7.
Marketing Channels (7th Edition)
Anne Coughlan,
Erin Anderson,
Louis W. Stern
Prentice Hall; 7 edition (January
8, 2006)
3.
List of References for B2B Branding
Sr. No.
Book Name
Author
Publisher / Year
1
B2B Brand Management
Philip Kotler
Springer; 1 edition (September 1,
2006)
2
The Fundamentals of Business-to-Business
Sales & Marketing
The Case for B2B Branding: Pulling Away
from the Business-to-Business Pack
Strategic Brand Management for B2B
Markets: A Road Map for Organizational
Transformation
John Coe
McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (August
29, 2003)
South-Western Educational Pub; 1
edition (August 30, 2005)
Sage Publications Pvt. Ltd
(November 10, 2010)
5
Kellogg on Branding: The Marketing
Faculty of The Kellogg School of
Management
Tim Calkins, Alice
Tybout
Wiley; 1 edition (September 29,
2005)
6
Data-Driven Marketing: The 15 Metrics
Everyone in Marketing Should Know
Mark Jeffery
Wiley (February 8, 2010)
7
B2B: How to Build a Profitable E
Commerce Strategy
Michael Cunningham
and Michael J.
Cunningham
Basic Books; 1st edition (June 15,
2002)
8
Business to Business Market Research:
Understanding and Measuring Business
Markets (Market Research in Practice)
Ruth McNeil
Kogan Page (August 28, 2005)
3
4
Bob Lamons
Sharad Sarin
12
List of References for B2B Communication
Sr. No.
Book Name
1
Application of Web Service Technologies
on a B2B Communication Platform by
Means of a Pattern and UML Based
Software Development Process
B2B and Beyond: New Business Models
Built on Trust
Arnd Schnieders
Diplomarbeiten Agentur diplom.de
(January 1, 2003)
Harry B. DeMaio
John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition
(September 14, 2001)
3
The eMarketplace: Strategies for Success
in B2B eCommerce
Warren D. Raisch
McGraw-Hill Companies; 1st
edition (December 30, 2000)
4
B2B Integration
Christoph Bussler
Springer; 1st Edition. edition
(November 2, 2010)
2
Author
Publisher / Year
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