syllabus

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VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY
VILLANOVA SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MBA Program
MBA 8503 - 001: OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
Fall 2010
Dr. Matthew J. Liberatore
Phone No.: (610) 519-4390
Office: 3072 Bartley Hall
Fax No.: (610) 519- 6566
E-mail address: [email protected]
Class web site: http://www.homepage.villanova.edu/matthew.liberatore/MBA8503
Class schedule: Thursdays 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:30 P.m. – 2:30 p.m., Thursday 5:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
and by appointment
_____________________________________________________________________________
SYLLABUS
DESCRIPTION:
This course focuses on improving the performance of the firm’s operations
and supply chain. Topics include: operations and supply chain strategy,
project management, process management, quality management, lean
management, resource allocation, inventory management, forecasting,
vendor management, procurement/outsourcing, distribution, supply chain
integration and coordinated product and supply design.
READINGS:
Goldratt, Eliyahu M., and Jeff Cox, The Goal: A Process of Ongoing
Improvement, 20th anniversary edition, North River Press, Great
Barrington, MA, 2004, ISBN 088427178-1.
Course notes and other materials will be made available on:
http://www.homepage.villanova.edu/matthew.liberatore/MBA8503.
Selected articles and cases can be obtained on Vista\WebCT via novanet.
Harvard readings and cases can be obtained at:
http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/access/6470357
SOFTWARE:
The Beer Game simulation software on the web will be used for real-time
ordering, planning, forecasting decisions in the supply chain.
The Global Supply Chain Management Simulation is available through
http://hbsp.harvard.edu/ and allows students to manage product design,
procurement, and production for four simulated years.
MS Project will be used to support development of the project schedule
Excel will be used to support the quantitative topics
PREREQUISITES:
MBA 8502: Statistical Analysis
It is the student’s responsibility to be certain that the prerequisites have
been successfully completed. If at any time during the semester it is
determined that a student has not completed the prerequisites, the student
can be administratively dropped from the course without credit or tuition
refund.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1.
Recognize salient challenges and opportunities for managing operations and supply
chains.
2.
Learn to use several analytical tools to assess tradeoffs and support decision making.
3.
Be better prepared to discuss the global and cross-functional integration issues related to
operations and supply chain management within business organizations
METHOD:
This course stress those models, concepts, and solutions methods that can be applied to the
design, control, operation, and management of operations and supply chains. The course includes
lectures, case discussions, presentations, and hands-on, practical exercises and games to provide
both a sound base of learning and an opportunity to test and develop skill. Students should do all
of the assigned readings and cases before coming to class, and prepare for, and contribute to,
class discussions. Excel is used to support the quantitatively intensive topics.
STUDENT TEAMS:
Teams will consist of two or three students who will work together as the presenting and
questioning teams for cases as described below. The teams may allocate the work as desired, as
long as all team members agree with the allocation. The team should let a member know if they
are not performing at an appropriate level, and should contact the instructor if problems persist.
CASE PRESENTATIONS:
Each student team will have the opportunity of serving as the “presenting team” for two of the
cases and the “questioning team” for two of the cases that we will discuss in class. The
“presenting team” will provide the background and content of the case, an analysis of what the
company did correctly or incorrectly, and suggestions about what the company should do in the
future. They should also address any questions given as part of the case write-up or indicated by
the instructor. The “questioning team” will be responsible for questioning the presenting team,
offering alternative solutions, and for leading the rest of the class in a discussion of the case. The
questioning team will submit a written list of questions prior to the presentation.
WRITTEN CASES:
All students are individually required to submit two written case reports. The cases selected will
be among those that a student is not participating as part of either the presenting or questioning
team. These reports should be no more than six typed pages in length. Proper grammar, spelling,
and paragraph construction as well as evidence of effort in crafting a well-written analysis are
required. Any questions listed in the case itself or on the class web site should be addressed
within the report. Charts, tables and other graphical displays should be attached as an addendum,
and do not count toward the page requirement. Please note that the sources used for written
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reports and presentations should be limited to the case itself and the material covered in this
course.
In addition, each project group must submit written solutions to the XYZ Case and Kristin’s
Cookie Case (A). These reports require a 250 word summary and the report should focus on the
questions specified. These reports should not exceed three typed pages in length (double spaced,
one inch margins, 12-point Times New Roman font). The comments concerning attachments and
material sources given above also apply.
FINAL CASE:
All students will be required to individually submit a written report for a final case. The same
submission format as mentioned above for the written cases will be followed.
OTHER ASSIGNMENTS:
Graded problem assignments requiring the use of Excel and will be made for the quantitatively
oriented topics. Each student team must submit an Excel spreadsheet for each assigned problem
that clearly indicates the suggested solution. Other individual or group assignments may be
given.
EXAMINATION:
The examination will consist of two parts: short answer/essay questions (closed book, with a
sheet of notes allowed), and one or more problems requiring the use of Excel (open notes, open
computer).
Make-up examinations will only be given in cases of serious, documented emergencies or if
permission is obtained from the professor PRIOR to the scheduled examination time.
PARTICIPATION:
Expectations for participation and involvement are high. You should come to class prepared to
become involved in the discussion, and have read the specified material and prepared questions
about areas that were not clear to you, and offer observations about other situations/examples
that may help generate class discussion. The instructor will form a subjective impression of your
performance. In addition, each class member is to provide the instructor with an evaluation of
the performance of each their classmates using the following categories: 5 = exceptional
participation that really contributed to my learning in the course; 4 = many solid contributions
that helped the class to learn; 3 = solid participation that contributed to the discussion; 2 =
sometimes contributed, but not at a high enough level; and 1 = this person did not pull their
weight either in terms of the number or quality of contributions. Based on the aggregation of
these reports, I will adjust the participation grade up or down.
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ATTENDANCE:
Students are expected to make every effort to attend all classes. Missing more than one class
during the semester will reduce your class participation grade. Students must be present when
their team is presenting or questioning a case. Not being present will reduce the student’s grade
for that assignment by 30 points.
CELL PHONES, WEB SURFING AND LAPTOPS:
It is important to display courtesy and respect towards others during class. Please turn off all cell
phones prior to the start of class. Please do not surf the web, text message, or email during class.
If you need to make or receive a call or if you feel you must surf the web, text message, or
answer emails, please excuse yourself and leave the class room. Your laptop should not be
turned on unless you are following the PowerPoint or electronic materials being used by the
instructor.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY:
The Code of Academic Integrity of Villanova University addresses cheating, fabrication of
submitted work, plagiarism, handing in work completed for another course without the
instructor’s approval, and other forms of dishonesty. For the first offense, a student who violates
the Code of Villanova University will receive 0 points for the assignment. The violation will be
reported by the instructor to the Dean’s office and recorded in the student’s file. In addition, the
student will be expected to complete an education program. For the second offense, the student
will be dismissed from the University and the reason noted on the student’s official transcript.
DISABILITY:
If you have a disability that may affect your success in this course and wish to discuss academic
accommodations, please arrange to meet with me as soon as possible and not later than the end
of the second week of the semester.
GRADING:
Case presentations and questioning
Case reports (individual and group)
Examination
Final Case
Other written assignments
Harvard Global Supply Chain Simulation
Attendance and class participation
Total
20%
25%
20%
10%
5%
10%
10%
100%
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The assignment of grades based on the student’s weighted average numerical class grade:
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
F
100 - 93
92 - 90
89 - 87
86 - 83
82 - 80
79 - 76
75 - 70
69 -
TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE
No
.
1
Date
Topic
8/26/10
Class Introduction
2
9/2/10
Introduction to Operations and Supply
Chain Management and Strategy
Project Management
3
9/9/10
4
5
6
Readings
MS Project
Process Management
Process Performance Measures and
H. R. Anna Cases
9/16/10
XYZ Case due
Project Management Homework due
Six Sigma and Quality Management
9/23/10
Kristin’s Cookie Case (A) due
Process Management Homework due
Lean Management
9/30/10
Six Sigma Implementation at Maple
Leaf Foods Case due
Quality Management Homework due
Resource Allocation
Lego Game
Excel’s Solver
Eagle Services Asia Case due
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Class 1 PowerPoint
Class 2 PowerPoint
Liberatore et al. (2007)
MS Project PowerPoint
Class 3 PowerPoint
Hammer (1990), Hammer (2004)
Class 4 PowerPoint
Plotkin (1999), Gale (2003)
Class 5 PowerPoint
Womack and Jones (1996), Spear
and Bover (1999), Swank (2003)
Class 6 PowerPoint
7
10/7/10
8
10/14/10
10/21/10
10/28/10
9
11/4/10
10
11/11/10
11
11/18/10
11/25/10
12
13
14
12/2/10
Speaker
Complete Resource Allocation
Resource Allocation Homework Due
Class discussion of The Goal
FALL BREAK
SEMINAR WEEK
Forecasting
Wachovia Case
Inventory Management and Risk
Pooling
Sport Obermeyer Case due
Forecasting Homework Due
Value of Information and the Bullwhip
Effect
Beer Game
Barilla SpA case due
Procurement and Outsourcing
Zara Case due
Supply Chain Integration
Dell Inc.: Improving the Flexibility of
the Desktop PC Supply Chain case due
THANKSGIVING BREAK
EXAMINATION DUE
Coordinating Product and Supply Chain
Design
H-P Network Printer Design Case due
Harvard Global Supply Chain
Simulation Practice Round
12/9/10
Outside Speaker
Harvard Global Supply Chain
Simulation – Results
McDonald’s Corporation: Managing a
Sustainable Supply Chain case due
12/16/10
FINAL CASE
Speaker PowerPoint
Class 6 PowerPoint
Class 8 PowerPoint
Class 9 PowerPoint
Class 10 PowerPoint
Lee et al. (1997), Kahn (2003)
Class 11 PowerPoint
Ferdows et al. (2004)
Narayanan & Raman (2004), Kahn
(2004)
Class 12 Notes
Fisher et al. (1994)
Speaker PowerPoint
READINGS:
Ferdows, K., Lewis, M. A., and Machura, J. A. D., “Rapid-Fire Fulfillment,” Harvard Business Review,
November 2004, 104 - 109.
Fisher, M. L., “What is the Right Supply Chain for Your Product?” Harvard Business Review, March –
April 1997, 105 – 117.
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Fisher, M., J. Hammond, W. Obermeyer, and A. Raman, “Making Supply Meet Demand in an Uncertain
World,” Harvard Business Review, May-June 1994, 83-92.
Gale, S., “Building Frameworks for Six Sigma Success,” Workforce, May 2003, 64 – 69.
Hammer, M., “Reengineering Work: Don’t Automate, Obliterate,” Harvard Business Review, July –
August 1990, 104 – 112.
Hammer, M., “Deep Change: How Operational Innovation Can Transform Your Company,” Harvard
Business Review, April 2004, pp. 85 - 93.
Kahn, G., “Made to Measure: Invisible Supplier Has Penney’s Shirts All Buttoned Up,” Wall Street
Journal, September 11, 2003, A1.
Kahn, G., “Style & Substance: Tiger’s New Threads,” Wall Street Journal, March 26, 2004, B1.
Lee, H., P. Padmanabhan, and S. Wang, “The Bullwhip Effect in Supply Chains,” Sloan Management
Review, Spring 1997, 93 – 102.
Liberatore, M., Stout, D., and Robbins, J., “Key Project Management (PM) Concepts for Accountants,”
Management Accounting Quarterly, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Winter 2007), 15 – 23. Awarded a Certificate of Merit,
Institute of Management Accountants, 2007
Narayanan, V.G., and Raman, A., “Aligning Incentives in Supply Chain,” Harvard Business Review,
November 2004, 94 – 101.
Plotkin, H., “Six Sigma: What It Is and How To Use It,” Harvard Management Update, Boston: Harvard
Business Publishing, 1999.*
Spear, S., and Bover, H., “Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System,” Harvard Business
Review, September - October 1999, 96 – 106.
Swank, C. K, “The Lean Service Machine,” Harvard Business Review, September – October 2003, 12329.
Womack, J., and Jones, D. "Beyond Toyota: How to Root Out Waste and Pursue Perfection." Harvard
Business Review, 74(5), 140-158, 1996.
Cases:
XYZ Corporation
Process Performance Measures
H. R. Anna
Kristin’s Cookie Case (A)
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Six Sigma Implementation at Maple Leaf Foods*
Eagle Services Asia*
Wachovia
Sport Obermeyer*
Barilla SpA*
Zara
Dell Inc.: Improving the Flexibility of the Desktop PC Supply Chain
H-P Network Printer Design*
McDonald’s Corporation: Managing a Sustainable Supply Chain*
*available through Harvard publishing
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