Collections

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TRANSCEND
THE
TRADITIONAL
Grades 6–12
Digitally Enhanced
with DIGIMARC®
Grades 6–12
TRANSCEND
THE
TRADITIONAL
Like no other English language arts program,
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt™ Collections helps
you to transcend the traditional anthology with
a multifaceted, digital, and print approach
designed to resonate with your students.
What Sets Collections Apart?
⠕⠕ A comprehensive program with streamlined
components and a smaller book for a sharp
focus on text analysis and close reading.
⠕⠕ A Close Reader of additional complex texts
related topically to each Collection.
⠕⠕ Close Read Screencasts for anchor texts to
model careful analysis.
⠕⠕ Digital Collections for Writing, Speaking, and Listening—
interactive lessons on critical skills for college and career.
⠕⠕ Media integrated with content to engage and instruct
students in the analyses of relevant media as complex texts.
⠕⠕ Performance Assessment for learning the skills of
writing to sources, including source materials and
in-depth instruction.
DOWNLOAD THE DIGIMARC®
hmhco.com/collections
Discover app on your smartphone and
then scan the Collections book covers
for a video preview of Collections.
Text Takes Center Stage
Build Close Reading Skills
Each Collection of multi-genre texts includes one or more anchor texts chosen for their complexity
and richness, reflection of the collection topic, and demand for multiple readings and close analysis.
Close Reader
⠕⠕ Guides students through close
reading of texts across all genres.
⠕⠕ Provides independent practice with
additional texts.
⠕⠕ Reports student scores to teacher.
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Anchor Texts
Media as Text
Informational Text
Close Reads App
Background Eboo Patel believes that religion should bring people together.
Inspired by both his Muslim faith and his Indian heritage, he founded the
Interfaith Youth Core with a Jewish friend in Chicago in 2002 and later served on
President Obama’s Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood
Partnerships. This essay is from his Washington Post blog The Faith Divide. This
entry was adapted from his Freshman Convocation Address at George
Washington University on the tenth anniversary of 9/11.
Making the Future
Better, Together
Blog by Eboo Patel
1.
As you read lines 1–21, begin to collect and cite text
evidence.
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Image Credits: Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for Guinness;
Photo by Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images
• Underline the two situations Patel is comparing.
• Circle the words Patel thinks define the “essence of our nation.”
I
10
thought about George Washington when I was at the airport this
weekend, watching women in Islamic headscarves brave the stares and
scowls of some of their fellow Americans on an anniversary no one will
ever forget.
I wonder if a similar feeling prompted Moses Sessius, the leader of the
Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island to write George
Washington a letter shortly after he assumed the Presidency. It was a letter
essentially asking whether Sessius and his people—Jews—would be safe in
this new nation, or if they would be hounded and hated, blamed for crimes
they did not commit.
In his response, Washington put on paper words that I think still define
the essence of our nation:
“The Government of the United States . . . gives to bigotry no sanction, to
persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its
protection should demean themselves as good citizens.”
demean:
to behave in a
particular
manner
3
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⠕⠕ In the Close Reader, new
and additional texts, linked
in topic and form to anchor
texts, provide opportunities for
students to apply and practice
close reading strategies with
challenging content.
4
hmhco.com/collections
5
Teach the Thinking Required for Text Analysis
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Keep Students Engaged and Encouraged
Collections helps you to speak to today’s digital learners
in a language—and through activities—they understand.
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Collections gives you dynamic tools for teaching students how to do close, sustained
readings of complex texts and opportunities for them to hone their skills.
30
⠕⠕ Provide consistent and
extensive application of
close reading strategies.
40
50
60
70
moderate
(m≤d´ ∂r-∆t) adj. When
something is kept
moderate, it is kept
within a certain limit.
Cite Text Evidence
32
Annotate the Text
prowess
(prou´ ∆s) n. Prowess
is the strength and
courage someone
has.
©Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
20
As thousands of gulls soared over the island, Icarus soon
collected a huge pile of feathers. Daedalus then melted some
wax and made a skeleton in the shape of a bird’s wing. The
smallest feathers he pressed into the soft wax and the large
ones he tied on with thread. Icarus played about on the beach
happily while his father worked, chasing the feathers that blew
away in the strong wind that swept the island and sometimes
taking bits of the wax and working it into strange shapes with
his fingers.
It was fun making the wings. The sun shone on the bright
feathers; the breezes ruffled them. When they were finished,
Daedalus fastened them to his shoulders and found himself
lifted upwards, where he hung poised in the air. Filled with
excitement, he made another pair for his son. They were
smaller than his own, but strong and beautiful.
Finally, one clear, wind-swept morning, the wings were
finished, and Daedalus fastened them to Icarus’s shoulders
and taught him how to fly. He bade him watch the movements
of the birds, how they soared and glided overhead. He pointed
out the slow, graceful sweep of their wings as they beat the
air steadily, without fluttering. Soon Icarus was sure that he,
too, could fly and, raising his arms up and down, skirted
over the white sand and even out over the waves, letting his
feet touch the snowy foam as the water thundered and broke
over the sharp rocks. Daedalus watched him proudly but
with misgivings. He called Icarus to his side and, putting his
arm round the boy’s shoulders, said, “Icarus, my son, we are
about to make our flight. No human being has ever traveled
through the air before, and I want you to listen carefully to my
instructions. Keep at a moderate height, for if you fly too low,
the fog and spray will clog your wings, and if you fly too high,
the heat will melt the wax that holds them together. Keep near
me and you will be safe.”
He kissed Icarus and fastened the wings more securely
to his son’s shoulders. Icarus, standing in the bright sun, the
shining wings dropping gracefully from his shoulders, his
golden hair wet with spray, and his eyes bright and dark with
excitement, looked like a lovely bird. Daedalus’s eyes filled
with tears, and turning away, he soared into the sky, calling to
Icarus to follow. From time to time, he looked back to see that
the boy was safe and to note how he managed his wings in his
flight. As they flew across the land to test their prowess before
80
setting out across the dark wild sea, plowmen below stopped
their work and shepherds gazed in wonder, thinking Daedalus
and Icarus were gods.
Father and son flew over Samos and Delos, which lay on
their left, and Lebinthus,1 which lay on their right. Icarus,
beating his wings in joy, felt the thrill of the cool wind on his
face and the clear air above and below him. He flew higher
and higher up into the blue sky until he reached the clouds.
His father saw him and called out in alarm. He tried to follow
him, but he was heavier and his wings would not carry him.
Up and up Icarus soared, through the soft, moist clouds and
out again toward the glorious sun. He was bewitched by a
sense of freedom and beat his wings frantically so that they
would carry him higher and higher to heaven itself. The
blazing sun beat down on the wings and softened the wax.
Small feathers fell from the wings and floated softly down,
warning Icarus to stay his flight and glide to earth. But the
enchanted boy did not notice them until the sun became so
hot that the largest feathers dropped off and he began to sink.
Frantically he fluttered his arms, but no feathers remained
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to hold the air. He cried out to his father, but his voice was
CorrectionKey=A
submerged in the blue waters of the sea, which has forever
after been called by his name.
Daedalus, crazed by anxiety, called back to him, “Icarus!
anxiety
(√ng-zπ´ ∆-t∏) n.
Icarus, my son, where are you?” At last he saw the feathers
Anxiety is an uneasy,
worried feeling.
1
Samos...Delos...Lebinthus: (s∑´ m≤s´… d∏´ l≤s´… lu b∆n´ thus´): small Greek
islands in the eastern Aegean Sea.
Collection 1
The Flight of Icarus
33
Student Note
The detail “bewitched by a sense of freedom”
shows that Icarus is getting caught up in the
moment.
✔
Save to Notebook
Background The Hmong (hmông) are an ethnic group from
southern China, Laos, Vietnam, and Thailand. In the 1970s, war
and conflict caused many of the Hmong people in Laos to flee to
refugee camps in Thailand. Author Kao Kalia Yang (b. 1980 ) was
born in one of these camps. She moved with her family, including
her older sister Dawb, to Minnesota in 1987. Four other siblings
were born in the United States, where all the Yang children
received their educations.
Delete
Save
⠕⠕ Explore media as complex text with
digital Media Lessons for news
reports, ads, websites, and more.
⠕⠕ Provide frequent practice for writing, speaking,
and listening and tutorials as needed.
Close Read Screencasts
from
The Latehomecomer
Memoir by Kao Kalia Yang
hmhfyi.com
SETTING A PURPOSE As you read, notice the challenges and
the opportunities that life in a new country presents Kao Kalia
Yang and her family. How does Yang react to her situation?
⠕⠕ Engage students with current,
real-world texts on the FYI site,
hmhfyi.com, updated monthly.
myNotebook
⠕⠕ Utilize the personal myNotebook
to collect, organize, and tag text
evidence for writing assignments.
⠕⠕ Teach citing of text evidence to support
analysis, discussion, and writing to sources.
(c) ©Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; (tr) ©Der Yang
W
10
e had been in America for almost ten years. I was
nearly fifteen, and Dawb had just gotten her driver’s
license. The children were growing up. We needed a new
home—the apartment was too small. There was hardly room
to breathe when the scent of jasmine rice and fish steamed
with ginger mingled heavily with the scent of freshly baked
pepperoni pizza—Dawb’s favorite food. We had been looking
for a new house for nearly six months.
It was in a poor neighborhood with houses that were
ready to collapse—wooden planks falling off, colors chipping
away, sloping porches—and huge, old trees. There was a
realty sign in the front yard, a small patch of green in front
of the white house. It was one story, with a small open patio
and a single wide window framed by black panels beside a
black door. There was a short driveway that climbed up a
The Latehomecomer
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6
53
1/31/2013 2:19:44 PM
⠕⠕ Model conversations about text
with audio and visual screencasts
to make complex texts and analysis
more accessible.
⠕⠕ Energize and extend text
discussions with related videos
from A&E®, bio®, and HISTORY®.
⠕⠕ Maximize support from
myWriteSmart, a dynamic digital
workspace for drafting, revising,
collaborating, editing, and
completing performance tasks.
hmhco.com/collections
7
Writing—Interactive Digital
Tools to Sharpen Writing
Writing—Integrated with
Reading and Text Analysis
Collections connects writing instruction to
the reading and analyzing of complex texts.
Collections provides dynamic tools for engaging
digital learners in writing, revising, and evaluating.
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LACC.910.RI.3.8
RIELACC9-10RI8
8
Delineate and Evaluate an Argument
Background Futurists study the future and make predictions about
it by analyzing current trends. Ray Kurzweil (b. 1948) is a well-known
futurist, as well as an inventor, a writer, and an expert on artificial
intelligence. In the 1970s, he developed the first machine that translated
text into speech, and he has been a pioneer in the field of speech
recognition technology. In “The Coming Merging of Mind and Machine,”
Kurzweil makes some astonishing predictions about the future of
artificial intelligence.
The Coming Merging
of Mind and Machine
Argument by Ray Kurzweil
Image Credits: (t) ©The Boston Globe/Getty Images; (b) ©Lobke Peers/Shutterstock
To support a claim, authors develop and refine their ideas throughout the text. An
author may use a particular sentence to develop a claim, or use an entire paragraph
or larger section of the text to develop a claim with reasons and evidence.
S
ometime early in this century the intelligence of machines will
exceed that of humans. Within a quarter of a century, machines
will exhibit the full range of human intellect, emotions and skills,
ranging from musical and other creative aptitudes to physical
movement. They will claim to have feelings and, unlike today’s virtual
personalities, will be very convincing when they tell us so. By around
2020 a $1,000 computer will at least match the processing power of
the human brain. By 2029 the software for intelligence will have been
largely mastered, and the average personal computer will be equivalent
to 1,000 brains.
Once computers achieve a level of intelligence comparable to that
of humans, they will necessarily soar past it. For example, if I learn
French, I can’t readily download that learning to you. The reason
is that for us, learning involves successions of stunningly complex
patterns of interconnections among brain cells (neurons) and among
the concentrations of biochemicals known as neurotransmitters that
enable impulses to travel from neuron to neuron. We have no way of
⠕⠕ Teach thinking and writing
with digital lessons.
Use a chart to help you analyze and evaluate how Anna Quindlen develops
her claim in “A Quilt of a Country.” First, identify the claim. Then, list specific reasons
or evidence from the text. Finally, evaluate if the reason or evidence supports the
claim. Read this example from a student newspaper editorial.
CLAIM
succession
(s∂k-s≈sh´∂n) n. an
ordered sequence.
The Coming Merging of Mind and Machine
11_LNLESE_088061_C6S8.indd 569
⠕⠕ Assign Collections writing tasks, provide rubrics,
and view students’ drafts.
⠕⠕ Respond to their “hands up” for help.
⠕⠕ Schedule peer editing and monitor conversations.
⠕⠕ Provide feedback before submission.
LACC.910.RI.2.5
RIELACC9-10RI5
5
Analyze and Evaluate Author’s Claim
AS YOU READ Pay attention to the scientific ideas and theories that
Kurzweil uses to explain his predictions. Write down any questions you
generate during reading.
10
In “A Quilt of a Country,” Anna Quindlen presents an argument about how America
works as a country. An argument presents a claim, or position, on an issue and
supports it with reasons and evidence. To evaluate the strength of Quindlen’s
argument, you must delineate, or describe in detail, these elements:
• Identify the claim, or Quindlen’s position, on the issue.
• Look for the reasons Quindlen uses to support her claim. Reasons should be
valid and logical.
• Evaluate whether the evidence Quindlen cites for each reason is credible,
or believable, and relevant to the claim. Evidence can include facts, statistics,
examples, anecdotes, or quotations.
• Look for counterarguments, which are statements that address opposing
viewpoints. Does Quindlen anticipate opposing viewpoints and provide
counterarguments to disprove them?
“Students have told me how
rushed they are to gather
materials from their lockers for
their next classes.”
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More time should be given to students to transition between classes.
CLAIM
Reasons/Evidence from Text
How the Reasons/Evidence Support the Claim
The evidence is a quotation from the school counselor,
an objective observer who hears from many students.
Her statement is logical support for the claim because
it would be easier to gather materials if students had
more time.
COLLEC TION 6
PERFORMANCE TASK B
If you need help...
• Writing Arguments
• Writing as a Process
• Using Textual Evidence
2/12/2013 11:25:27 AM
⠕⠕ Connect reading and
writing by using selections
as mentor texts.
⠕⠕ Relate text analysis to
writing skills.
Write an Argument
A Quilt of a Country
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InCopy Notes
InDesign Notes
1. COMP/DSN: Second instructional section, “Analyze and Evalute Author’s Claim”, 1. EDIT: We are waiting for an arrow graphic from TPS that would go behind the
should also be tinted. Tint should start with gold band and extend to the chart.
word “CLAIM” in the chart. MB 12/14
MKS/KV
Arrow graphic has been added from design library. —DSNV/JH 1.03.13
2. COMP/DSN: The “Claim” chart is boring and bland. Add some color to liven up
2. COMP: Delete Image Credits (no image shown). —DSNV/JH 1.03.13
the page.
3. COMP: Add selection title to footer.
4. COMP: commas after claim (2x) and after counterarguments s/b emphasis
medium. I couldn’t make the changes. LS 12/31/12 Fixed MKS 1.2.13
5. File CED by Lesley Sullivan 12/31/12.
A strong, well-constructed argument can convince readers to
change their minds about an issue or to understand and accept
an opposing view. In this activity, you will write an argument that
justifies your views about whether it is important for teenagers
to gain work experience during their school years. You will use
evidence from the texts in the collection to support your position.
A successful argument
• contains an engaging introduction that clearly establishes the
claim being made
• supports the claim with clear reasons and relevant evidence
from a variety of credible sources
• establishes and maintains a formal style
• uses language that effectively conveys ideas and adds interest
• includes a conclusion that follows from the argument
presented and leaves a lasting impression
ELACC8RI1
CiteCite
textual
LACC.8.RI.1.1
textual
RI 1 Cite textual
evidence
evidence
supportand
analysis
to supporttoanalysis
and
inferences.
inferences.
ELACC8W1a–e
Write
LACC.8.W.1.1a–e
Write
W 1a–e Write arguments.
arguments.
W 4 Produce clear and
ELACC8W4
Produce
clear
LACC.8.W.2.4
Produce
coherent writing.
and
writing.
clear
and coherent
W 5 coherent
Develop
and writing.
ELACC8W5
Develop
andand
LACC.8.W.2.5
Develop
strengthen writing.
strengthen
W 8 Gatherwriting.
information
ELACC8W8
Gather
LACC.8.W.3.8
Gather
from print/digital
sources.
information
W 9b Applyfrom
gradeprint/
8
digital
sources.
Reading
standards to
ELACC8W9b
Apply
grade
LACC.8.W.3.9b
Apply
literary nonfiction.
8grade
standards
to
Reading
standards
WReading
10 8Write
routinely
over
literary
nonfiction.
to
literary
nonfiction.
extended
time
frames and
ELACC8W10
Write
LACC.8.W.4.10
Write
shorter time frames.
routinely over extended
time frames and shorter
time frames.
⠕⠕ Apply the writing
skills with Collection
Performance Tasks.
⠕⠕ Originality Check reports percentage of paper found in other sources.
⠕⠕ Sources are color-coded and hyperlinked in student text.
⠕⠕ A side-by-side comparison shows each source and student text.
⠕⠕ Select QuickMark® comments for fast grading.
⠕⠕ Highlight sections, add custom comments, and save
them as QuickMark comments.
⠕⠕ Record voice comments to personalize feedback.
PLAN
Choose Your Position
8
Revisit the texts you read in the
collection and the points the writers made about the value of
work. Consider whether teenagers need to gain work experience
during their school years, and think about why or why not. Then,
take a position you can argue effectively and write your claim.
Use the annotation
tools in your eBook
to find evidence
that supports your
viewpoint. Save each
piece of evidence to
your notebook.
hmhco.com/collections
9
Prepare for Performance-Based
Reading and Writing to Sources
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If you need help...
• Writing Informative Texts
• Using Textual Evidence
PERFORMANCE TASK B
Write an Analytical Essay
This collection focuses on the conflict and the tension between
individuals and society—from the individual’s struggle to be a part
of a society to a nation’s struggle to unite for a common cause. Look
back at the anchor text, “Once Upon a Time,” and at the other texts
you have read in this collection. Synthesize your ideas about them by
writing an analytical essay.
Performance Tasks challenge students to respond
creatively and analytically to complex, real-world tasks.
An effective analytical essay
• clearly and accurately analyzes the content of the texts
• provides quotations or examples from the texts to illustrate main
points
• has an introduction, a logically structured body including
transitions, and a conclusion
• follows the conventions of written English
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ELACC9-10W2
a-f
LACC.910.W.1.2
a-fWrite
Write
W 2 a-f Write informative/
informative/
explanatory
explanatory texts.
texts.
W 4 Produce writing
ELACC9-10W4
Produce
LACC.910.W.2.4
Produce
appropriate to task,
writing
to task,
purpose,appropriate
and audience.
purpose,
and audience.
W 5 Develop
and
ELACC9-10W5
Develop
LACC.910.W.2.5
Develop
strengthen writing.
and
strengthen
writing.
W 9 a–b Draw
ELACC9-10W9
a–b
LACC.910.W.3.9
a–bDraw
Draw
evidence from literary
or
evidence
fromtexts.
literary or
informational
informational texts.
The body of the essay should
society as presented in each of the texts
image and the theme or central idea of each text
The focus of this collection is the
individual and society—from the
individual’s struggle to be a part
of a society to a nation’s struggle
to unite for a common cause.
• Make notes about the symbol or image used in each text.
• Think about how each writer uses the symbol or image to
develop the theme or central idea of the text.
• Compare and contrast the authors’ views. Do the authors share
a common view about the individual’s role in society, or do they
differ? Explain.
hmhfyi.com
COLLECTION
Get Organized
PERFORMANCE TASK Preview
Your introduction should
At the end of this collection, you will have the opportunity to complete two tasks:
audience connect to the topic
• Write an essay discussing how symbols or images can convey ideas about the
individual’s role in society.
• identify the authors and titles of each text
• Include a controlling idea that identifies the symbols or images
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY
Your conclusion should
• make a concluding statement that follows from or supports your
2. PRODUCE
enforceable, enforcer,
enforcement
entity
(≈n´ t∆-t∏) n.
a thing that exists as a unit
entities
internal
(∆n-tûr´n∂l) adj.
inner; located within something or someone
internality, internally
presume
(pr∆-z◊m´) v.
to take for granted as being true; to assume
something is true
presumably,
presumption, presumed
resolve
(r∆-z≤lv´) v.
to make a decision about
resolution, resolvable
2
InCopy Notes
1. This is a list,
41
5/15/13 10:10 AM
Is it better to be at the center of one
group of friends or at the perimeter
of several?
Have your partner
or a group of peers
review your draft in
myWriteSmart. Ask
your reviewers to note
any main points that
are not adequately
supported with text
evidence.
PRESENT
Exchange Essays
When your new draft is completed, exchange
your essay with a partner. Read your partner’s essay and provide
feedback. Reread the criteria for an effective analytical essay and ask
the following
42
Collectionquestions
1
• What did your partner do well in the essay?
• How could your partner’s essay be improved?
9_LNLESE091009_C1PT.indd 42
9_LNLESE091009_C1O.indd 2
ANALYZE THE MODEL
InCopy Notes
1. This is a list Bold, Italic, Strickthrough.
2/4/2013 9:41:36 PM
InDesign Notes
1. This is a list
You will read:
You will analyze:
▶ ▶ TWO INFORMATIONAl
▶ ▶ A STudENT MOdEl
ARTIClES
Are Close Friends Better?
New School, New Groups of Friends
Teen Friendships: A Cauldron of
Closeness
InCopy Notes
1. This is a list
9_LNLEAS147591_U1S1O.indd 3
10
practice the task
perform the task
Is reaching consensus always a good
idea, or are there times when it is
better to disagree?
Can you make real friends
on the Internet?
of a well-written analytical essay. Ensure that your first draft
• makes important connections between each symbol or image
REVISE
and the theme or central idea of the text
Make
Things
You should
have a rough draft
• has Sense
sufficientof
evidence
to support
thesenow
connections
that
explores
thedeveloped
authors’ use
of symbolsbody,
and images
to develop their
• has
a clearly
introduction,
and conclusion
ideas about the individual’s role in society. Revise your draft so that
•
uses language and tone appropriate for an essay
your readers will easily understand your analytical essay and the claim
• follows
the conventions
of standard
English
you
are making.
It is your goal
to produce
a clear and coherent text.
Then write a new draft of your essay, incorporating any changes.
2/4/2013 9:41:31 PM
InDesign Notes
1. This is a list
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CorrectionKey=A
DO NOT EDIT--Changes must be made through “File info”
CorrectionKey=A
• What did your partner do well in the essay?
• How could your partner’s essay be improved?
As you draft your analytical essay, remember that this kind of writing
requires formal language and a respectful tone. Essays that analyze
texts
to be
appropriate
academic
context.
Refer
to are
theexpected
chart on the
following
pagefor
to an
review
the characteristics
4. PRESENT
9_LNLESE091009_C1PT.indd 41
Write your rough
draft in myWriteSmart.
Focus on getting your
ideas down, rather
than perfecting your
choice of language.
• use language that is appropriate for your audience
• include transitions to link the major sections of the text
enforce
entity
internal
presume
resolve
Collection Performance Task B
follows the conventions of standard English
Exchange Essays When your new draft is completed, exchange
your essay with a partner. Read your partner’s essay and provide
feedback. Reread the criteria for an effective analytical essay and ask
the following questions
• provide a clear and cohesive introduction, body, and conclusion
DO NOT EDIT--Changes
mustyour
be made
through
info”from the text
• support
main points
with “File
evidence
CorrectionKey=A • explain how the evidence supports your ideas
Related Forms
to compel observance of or obedience to
InDesign Notes
1. This is a list
Write a Draft Use your outline to write an analytical essay
explaining how the authors use symbols or images to develop themes
or central ideas in their work. Remember to
each author uses to develop the theme or central idea
Image Credits: ©Diana Ong/Superstock
Definition
enforce
(≈n-fôrs´) tr v.
uses language and tone appropriate for an essay
PRESENT
individual in society
ACADEMIC
VOCABULARY
As you share your
ideas about the role of
individuals in society,
be sure to use these
words.
has a clearly developed introduction, body, and conclusion
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• state a more general or universal conclusion about the role of the
Use the annotation
tools in your eBook
to locate evidence
that supports your
controlling idea. Save
each piece of evidence
to your notebook.
has sufficient evidence to support these connections
Then write a new draft of your essay, incorporating any changes.
main ideas
3. REVISE
Study the words and their definitions in the chart below. You will use these words as you
discuss and write about the texts in this collection.
Word
Organize your notes in an outline.
• begin with an engaging question or comment to help the
• Plan and deliver a speech about how people can learn to live together.
•
•
•
•
• provide evidence from each text to illustrate the main idea
• explain how the quotations or examples support the main idea
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Image Credits: ©moodboard/Alamy
Finding Common Ground
and the theme or central idea of the text
PRODUCE
Analyze the Text Choose three texts from this collection,
including “Once Upon a Time,” and identify a powerful symbol or
image used in each text to convey an idea about the individual’s role
in society.
Performance Assessment provides informational texts and
in-depth instruction to teach the skills for writing to sources.
• makes important connections between each symbol or image
• show important connections between your chosen symbol or
PLAN
COLLEC TION 1
Refer to the chart on the following page to review the characteristics
of a well-written analytical essay. Ensure that your first draft
• present and support a main idea about the individual’s role in
1. PLAN
Performance Tasks
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CorrectionKey=A
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Image Credits: © Liquidlibrary/Jupiterimages/Getty Images
COLLEC TION 1
Unit 1: Argumentative Essay
You will write:
▶ ▶ A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE
▶ ▶ AN ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY
Consensus Will Be Used to Decide
School Board Policy
▶ ▶ AN INFORMATIONAL
Is reaching a consensus always a
good idea, or are there times when it
is better to disagree?
ARTICLE
How to Reach a Consensus
▶ ▶ A LIST
Is Consensus Decision-Making Right
for Your Group?
▶ ▶ TWO LETTERS TO THE
EDITOR
Unit 1: Argumentative Essay
3
5/30/13 1:42 PM
You will read:
9_LNLEAS147591_U1S2O.indd 9
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Image Credits: ©Age Fotostock
Build Confidence for Assessment
with Performance Tasks
You will write:
▶ ▶ A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE
▶ ▶ AN ARgumENTATIvE ESSAy
Study: The Internet Helps You Make
More Friends, Be More Social
Can you make real friends on the
Internet?
▶ ▶ A bLog
Social Media, Pretend Friends, and
the Lie of False Intimacy
▶ ▶ A mAgAzINE ARTICLE
Making Friends Through the Internet
Unit 1: Argumentative Essay
9
5/30/13 1:43 PM
You will read:
9_LNLEAS147591_U1S3O.indd 21
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5/30/13 1:44 PM
11
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Writing from Sources.
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Writing from Sources
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• Close Reading of Complex Texts
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Research Simulation
• Performance Assessment Practice
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