Pectoral Girdle Checklist Pectoral girdle Consists of the clavicles

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Pectoral Girdle Checklist
Pectoral girdle
Consists of the clavicles and scapulae. It is the
attachment site of the upper limbs and muscles moving
the upper limb.
Manubrium
Superior part of the sternum; functions as a midline
support, or brace, for the clavicles.
Clavicle
Bone extending from the manubrium to the scapula;
helps to hold the scapula (and arm) in position, but also
allows the scapula to move, resulting in increased
mobility of the shoulder and arm.
Scapula
A triangular-shaped bone that is
1. mobile because its only skeletal attachment to the
trunk is the clavicle.
2. the attachment site of the arm bone (humerus) to the
trunk.
3. the attachment site for muscles moving the arm.
4. the attachment site for muscles holding/moving the
scapula.
Acromion process
Part of the scapula joining the clavicle.
Glenoid cavity
Part of the scapula joining to the arm bone (humerus);
allows a wide range of arm movements.
Points of the scapula
The scapula is triangular-shaped with three “points”:
inferior angle, superior angle, and glenoid cavity.
Edges
Medial and lateral borders. The lateral border is on the
same side as the glenoid cavity.
Spine
Raised ridge on the posterior surface of the scapula.
Fossae
Supraspinous fossa
Infraspinous fossa
Subscapular fossa
The fossae are depression on the surface of the scapula.
Located above the spine
Located below the spine
Located on the anterior surface of the scapula.
Coracoid process
Anterior projection of the scapula.
Muscles moving the arm.
Muscles moving the arm attach to the fossae, spine,
acromion, coracoid process, and clavicle.
Muscles holding/moving the
scapula
Muscles holding/moving the scapula attach to the edges,
angles, spine, acromion, and coracoid process of the
scapula.
Upper Limb Checklist
Upper limb
Consists of the arm, forearm, wrist, and hand.
Arm bone
Forearm bones
Wrist bones
Hand bones
Humerus
Radius (lateral forearm) and ulna (medial forearm)
Eight carpal bones
Five metacarpal bones (palm of hand) and 14 phalanges
(thumb and fingers)
Head of humerus
Ball-like proximal end of humerus; connects to the
scapula, allowing a wide range of movements.
Greater and lesser tubercles
Lateral bump (greater tubercle) and anterior bump (lesser
tubercle); attachment site for muscles moving the arm.
Intertubercular groove
Furrow between the greater and lesser tubercles; tendon
for a muscle passes through the intertubercular groove.
Anatomical neck
Groove immediately distal to the head; attachment site
for connective tissue that holds the humerus in position.
Surgical neck
Constriction of the humerus distal to the head and
tubercles; part of the humerus often broken and repaired
surgically.
Shaft of humerus
Weight bearing part of the humerus; attachment site for
muscles moving the arm and forearm.
Capitulum/head of radius
The capitulum and head of radius allow the elbow to
bend and straighten.
Head of radius/head of ulna
While the ulna remains stationary, allows the radius to
move relative to the ulna, as when turning the hand from
face up to face down.
Trochlea/trochlear notch
The trochlea of the humerus and the trochlear notch of
the ulna allow the elbow to bend and straighten.
Olecranon process
Posterior edge of the trochlear notch; attachment site for
muscles moving the forearm.
Upper Limb Checklist
Coronoid process
Anterior edge of the trochlear notch; attachment site for
arm muscle moving the forearm.
Ulnar/radial tuberosities
Attachment sites for arm muscles moving the forearm.
Medial and lateral epicondyles
Attachment sites for muscles moving the wrist and
fingers.
Shaft of radius and ulna
Weight bearing part of the radius and ulna; attachment
site for muscles moving the forearm, wrist, thumb, and
fingers.
Carpal bones
Allow movement of the wrist; muscle attachment sites.
Metacarpal bones
Allow movement of the wrist, thumb, and fingers; muscle
attachment sites.
Phalanges
Allow movement of the thumb and fingers; muscle
attachment sites.
The fingers have proximal, distal, and middle phalanges.
The thumb has only proximal and distal phalanges.