Animal Risk Fact Sheet - Saint Michael`s College

advertisement
ANIMAL-RELATED RISK FACT SHEET for those working
with or around vertebrate animals
September 2011
POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES OF EXPOSURE
Laboratory animal allergens induce allergic reactions in susceptible individuals.
Although exposure within the classroom environment is limited, you may experience
allergic reactions. If allergies occur, inform your Professor immediately so that you may
either receive proper protective equipment and/or be referred to an occupational health
professional. Laboratory animal allergies may also develop after a variable exposure
period. Symptoms of laboratory animal allergy include: urticaria (itchy skin, hives),
conjunctivitis, sneezing, nasal drainage, nasal congestion, asthma (cough, wheezing,
shortness of breath) or in extreme cases anaphylaxis (shortness of breath, fainting,
vomiting.)
RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH ANIMAL AREAS
The main risk you may encounter is that animal fur and/or dander is present in your
classroom/lab area when animals are nearby or cages are opened. It is critical that
precautions be taken to minimize exposure to laboratory animal allergens.
Allergies to Animals:
If you have any of the above-listed symptoms or have concerns related to possible animal
exposure in the classroom/lab, immediately inform your Professor. If you develop
laboratory animal allergies, you may require additional protective equipment (special
mask, respirator, etc.) to continue to be able to work with animals. An Occupational
Health Assessment may be completed to evaluate the level of protective equipment
necessary or to determine if working with animals should be discontinued.
Zoonoses:
Although modern laboratory animal breeding and production have greatly improved the
microbiologic quality of research animals, some animals are naturally infected with
viruses or bacteria that may cause severe disease in people. Protection for researchers
and students handling laboratory animals requires strict adherence to standard laboratory
safety practices, prompt reporting of all animal-related injuries, compliance with OSHA
and mandatory occupational health processes. All laboratory and classroom use of
animals has been reviewed and approved by the Saint Michael's College IACUC for the
specific purposes stated in the approved Animal Study Proposal.
1
ANIMAL-RELATED RISK FACT SHEET for those working
with or around vertebrate animals
BITE WOUNDS
When working with laboratory animals, there is always the risk of a bite wound. Should
this occur:
1. Immediately cleanse the wound
2. Immediately alert your Professor about follow-up and documentation of the injury
3. If in doubt, consult with the student health services nurse for further follow-up
and instructions
4. The injured person must report their injury to Security at x2374
5. After you have sought medical treatment, you must complete a “first report of
injury form” with Occupational Health and Rehabilitation.
6. If your injury is not an emergency, you MUST go to OH&R (Concentra) before
seeing another health professional
7. This is true for any work related injury (cuts from glassware, chemical spills,
falls, etc.)
8. Forms for OH&R can be obtained from our HR office in Klein. Ask your
professor if you need assistance contacting the HR office.
9. Within 24 hours of the injury, the professor must email Patty Knowlden
([email protected]) in the HR office and copy Vanda Ripley in payroll to
report the exact date and time the student began losing time due to the injury.
10. If injury will impact student academic performance, the professor must contact
Joan Wry’s office within one-week of the injury. A plan of action will be
developed with the student and professor.
2
Download
Related flashcards
Pork dishes

78 Cards

Animal diseases

26 Cards

Sausages

22 Cards

Bullfighting

12 Cards

Create flashcards