1 - College of Informatics

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THE UNIVERSITY OF DODOMA
COLLEGE OF INFORMATICS AND VIRTUAL EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS
DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS
PROPOSED CURRICULUM FOR THE
DIPLOMA IN GIS & REMOTE SENSING
April, 2013
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................ i
LIST OF TABLES ...................................................................................................................... i
1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 1
1.1 General Introduction ................................................................................................. 1
1.2 Programme Specifications ........................................................................................ 1
1.2.1 Programme Description ....................................................................................... 1
1.2.2 Programme Aims .................................................................................................. 1
1.2.3 Programme Objectives ......................................................................................... 1
1.3 Programme Learning Outcomes .............................................................................. 1
1.3.1 Specific Learning Outcomes................................................................................. 1
1.3.2 Job Opportunities ................................................................................................. 2
1.4 Programme Content .................................................................................................. 2
1.5 Curriculum Design and Evaluation ......................................................................... 3
2. GENERAL PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION ............................................................... 3
2.1 Programme Organization ......................................................................................... 3
2.2 Teaching and Learning Strategies ........................................................................... 3
2.2.1
Mode of Delivery .................................................................................................. 3
2.3 Student Assessment ................................................................................................... 3
2.4 Entry Requirements .................................................................................................. 4
2.4.1 Direct Entry Qualifications .................................................................................. 4
2.4.2 Equivalent Qualifications ..................................................................................... 4
3. PROGRAMME BENCHMARKING ............................................................................. 4
4. COURSE DETAILS .............................................................................................................. 7
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Course alignment to DGIS-RS Programme Learning Outcomes ................................ 2
Table 2: Codes for Departments/Sections used in course code ................................................. 3
Table 3: Course Mapping for DGIS-RS Programme ................................................................. 5
Table 4: Summary of classroom loading and minimum credits for the DGIS-RS programme .. 6
i
1.
INTRODUCTION
1.1
General Introduction
Diploma in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (DGIS-RS) programme
offers students an opportunity to visualize, question, analyse, interpret, and understand data to
reveal spatial relationships, patterns, and trends. The programme provides a well designed
technical curriculum that will equip students with skills desired by employers. Students will
be provided with training on various Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote
Sensing (RS) hardware, software and procedures found in the marketplace. The programme
will enable talents and acquired skills combine to produce graduates who will be dependable
in addressing day-to-day GIS and RS challenges faced by organizations.
1.2
Programme Specifications
1.2.1 Programme Description
DGIS-RS programme is designed to allow students to focus on hardware, software,
procedures and human aspects of GIS and RS. This will create a good balance between the
four aspects, the balance which will be of use in addressing spatial related problems and
finding their solutions.
1.2.2 Programme Aims
The DGIS & RS programme aims at addressing the human resource gap in spatial information
management which currently exists in order to improve the performance of the sector and
realize the health sector policy goals. The programme will produce graduates who are
competent and knowledgeable in the discipline and possess excellent interpersonal and
communication skills. Graduates will be able to critically analyze geographic information
including aspects related to management, development and innovative enterprise solutions.
1.2.3 Programme Objectives
Programme objectives are to:
(i).
Provide students with an experience and knowledge in the theory and
application of GIS and remote sensing.
(ii).
Develop problem solving skills ensuring that graduates have ability to
understand problems, design and/or source alternative innovative solutions
based on soundly pronounced GIS organizational requirements and make
appropriate choices and recommendations.
(iii). Acquire hands-on experience in understanding and solving practical problems
with appropriate GIS approaches.
(iv). Develop teamwork skills, attributes and behaviours among graduates in order
to mediate the communication and collaborations between professionals in
geography and IT personnel.
(v).
Understand problems that arise in data acquisition and analysis, and develop a
sound background in cartographic principles
1.3
Programme Learning Outcomes
1.3.1 Specific Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of the programme, students should be able to:
(i).
Demonstrate an experience and knowledge in the theory and application of
GIS and remote sensing
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(ii).
(iii).
(iv).
(v).
Critically understand problems while identifying and defining the Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) and Remote sensing requirements appropriate to its
solution.
Design, implement and evaluate computer-based GIS and Remote Sensing
solutions to meet desired needs and budget of an organization.
Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.
Demonstrate knowledge and ability to apply concepts and design principles
relating to data collection, storage, processing and visualization.
1.3.2 Job Opportunities
The programme prepares students to work as technicians in:
(i).
Civil and environmental engineering
(ii).
Geometrics engineering, image analysis and hydrology
(iii). Cartography and urban planning
(iv). Public safety, national security, utilities, transport engineering, forestry and
land-use planning
(v).
Self employment sector
1.4
Programme Content
The curriculum for the Diploma in GIS and RS programme has been formulated to achieve
the above stated specific learning outcomes. Students are expected to be aware of the learning
outcomes from their first semester and guided by course instructors and academic advisers
throughout the learning period. The learning outcomes for the programme and courses will be
disseminated to students through different approaches, including uploading them on the
College website to easy access. The matrix in Table 1 summarizes the correlation between
programme learning outcomes and reach course in the curriculum.
Table 1: Course alignment to DGIS-RS Programme Learning Outcomes
S/No Programme Learning Outcomes
Courses
1
Demonstrate an experience and knowledge in CS 0110, BT 0115, TN 0114, IS
the theory and application of GIS and remote 0121, IS 0130, CD 0213, TN
sensing
0231, IS 0221, IS 0222, IS 223, IS
0230
2
Critically understand problems while identifying IS 0110, IS 0121, IS 0130, IS
and defining the Geographic Information 0210, TN 0231
Systems
(GIS)
and
Remote
sensing
requirements appropriate to its solution.
3
Design, implement and evaluate computer- CS 0127, IS 0130, BT 0220, IS
based GIS and Remote Sensing solutions to 0221, IS 220
meet desired needs and budget of an
organization.
4
Demonstrate effective oral and written LG 0103, CS 0127, BT 0220, IS
communication skills.
220
5
Demonstrate knowledge and ability to apply IS 0220, IS 0223, BT 0210, CD
concepts and design principles relating to data 0110
collection, storage, processing and visualization.
2
1.5
Curriculum Design and Evaluation
The Diploma in GIS and Remote Sensing curriculum was designed and developed by CIVE
team of experts in the Department of Information Systems. The curriculum designers
considered curricula for similar and closely related diploma programmes within the country
and abroad. Before approval, the curriculum went through normal procedures, including
approval by the University Senate before submission to TCU for recognition at national level.
However, the curriculum will be evaluated annually by students and will be reviewed after
every three (3) years.
2.
GENERAL PROGRAMME DESCRIPTION
2.1
Programme Organization
The Diploma in GIS and Remote Sensing programme shall take two years. Each shall be two
semesters of 17 weeks each of which 15 shall be teaching weeks and the remaining two for
examination purposes. Each student shall be required to take a minimum of 120 and a
maximum of 144 credits per year.
The Diploma in GIS and Remote Sensing programme course codes are in the form ‘VW
0xyz’ where ‘VW’ reflects names of the offering/hosting department/section as is
summarized in Table 2. Zero (0) signifies that the course is for non-degree programme.
Integer ‘x’ signifies year of study, while ‘y’ signifies the semester in which the course is
offered and ‘z’ is an integer value for a specific course. Integer value for “x” can be 1 or 2
whereas one (1) represents the first year and two (2) the second year. Integer value for “y” can
be 1 or 2 whereas one (1) represents the first semester and two (2) the second semester.
Table 2: Codes for Departments/Sections used in course code
Code
Department/Section
CS
Computer Science Department
IS
TN and CN
BT and LG*
CD
Information System Department
Telecommunications and Computer Networks Department
Computer Technologies and Applications Department
Content Development Section
* Special code
Number of credits for each course and total credits per semester are in accordance with the
recommendations of TCU. Courses for each academic year are as shown in Table 3.
2.2
Teaching and Learning Strategies
2.2.1 Mode of Delivery
The courses will be delivered as a combination of lectures, practical, assignments,
independent study and tutorials. Lectures cover 40% of a credit hour, practical 30%
independent study 10%, assignment 10% and tutorials/seminar 10%.
2.3
Student Assessment
Candidates taking DGIS & RS programme at UDOM shall be evaluated using examinations
regulations applicable at the time of study subject to revision from time to time as shall be
approved by Senate. In general, based on regulations currently in force, evaluation shall be as
follows:
(i)
Continuous assessment (CA) for each course shall carry 50% of the final mark.
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(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
(vii)
End of semester University examination (UE) shall carry 50% of the final mark.
The pass mark for each course shall be a C (50%) grade average.
Candidates must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 (C) to proceed to the next
year of study.
Candidates shall be allowed to sit for supplementary examinations of failed
courses if the attained overall GPA is 1.8 or above.
Candidates scoring an overall GPA of 2.0 after supplementary may carryover
only once failed courses flexibly and pass in the subsequent years of study or
within the maximum period of registration to graduate.
Candidates must meet a minimum cumulative number of credits prescribed in a
programme to graduate.
2.4
Entry Requirements
Admission requirements to CICT programme are guided by the admission requirements for
non-degree studies of UDOM which are in conformity with those specified by TCU. The
entry qualifications are intended to ensure that each student has appropriate academic
qualifications to successfully complete the programme.
2.4.1 Direct Entry Qualifications
Possession of at least four passes of relevant form four subjects or its equivalent established
by NECTA based on Tanzania education system;
2.4.2 Equivalent Qualifications
Possession of at least two passes of relevant form four subjects or its equivalent established by
NECTA based on Tanzania education system and NVA level 3 or its equivalent established
by VETA.
3.
PROGRAMME BENCHMARKING
The Diploma in GIS and Remote Sensing is first of its kind to be offered by any institution of
a higher learning in Tanzania with blended contents from both information systems and
Geography related fields. Therefore, much of benchmarking with local institution was at the
courses level. Geography related courses were intra-institutional benchmarked with courses in
the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHSS). They were also inter-institutional
benchmarked with information from stakeholders and online resources. At programme level,
programme was benchmarked with other programs offered outside the country. However,
much care was taken to the context and future career plans the grounds of this programme
might think of.
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Table 3: Course Mapping for DGIS-RS Programme
Year 1
Semester I
Semester I
Code
Course Title
Credits
Code
CS 0110
Course Title
Computing Mathematics
10.0
CS 0126
LG 0103
Communication Skills
10.0
CS 0121
BT 0115
Introduction to Information
Technology
10.0
CS 0120
Introduction to Database
Management Systems
10.0
CN 0112
Introduction to Web Design
using HTML and CSS
10.0
TN 0120
Introduction to Computer
Networking
10.0
10.0
Introduction to High Level
Programming using C++
Operating Systems
Credits
10.0
10.0
CD 0110
Multimedia Technologies
10.0
IS 0121
Basics of Geometrics,
Geomorphology and
Climatology
IS 0110
Fundamentals of Geographic
Information Systems
10.0
CS 0127
Systems and Management
Concepts
10.0
TN 0114
Introduction to electronic
measurement and
instrumentation
10.0
IS 0130
Practical Training I
10.0
70.0
Total
Total
Year II
Semester I
70.0
Semester II
BT 0210
Project Management and
Entrepreneurship
10.0
BT 0220
CS 0215
Visual Basic Programming
10.0
IS 0221
CS 0234
Design and Implementation of
Programming with Python
10.0
IS 0222
CD 0213
Introduction to Computer
Graphics
10.0
TN 0231
Principles of Remote Sensing
10.0
CS 0217
Implementation of Database
Systems
10.0
CN 0223
Introduction to Cloud
Computing
10.0
IS 0210
Basics of Demography,
Human Settlement and
Planning
10.0
IS 0220
Management Information
Systems
10.0
IS 0211
GIS for Natural Resources
Management
10.0
IS 0230
Practical Training II
7.0
70.0
Total
Total
Professional Issues and Ethics
Introduction to Statistics and
Geographic Data Analysis
Geographic Information
Systems Project
10.0
10.0
10.0
67.0
5
Table 4: Summary of classroom loading and minimum credits for the DGIS-RS programme
STUDY YEAR ►
ITEM ▼
CORE
FIRST
SEMESTER
I
70.0
SEMESTER
II
60.0
SECOND
TOTAL
SEMESTER SEMESTER
I
II
70.0
60.0
260.0
IPT CREDIT
10.0
7.0
17.0
TOTAL
140.0
137.0
277.0
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4. COURSE DETAILS
CS0110: COMPUTING MATHEMATICS
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description
Computing mathematics is fundamental to all ICT and engineering related programmes. This
course will provide an intermediate-level mathematical and computational background as the
foundation to other courses.
Course Objective
Objective of the course is to:
(i). Provide mathematical concepts and methods that provide a background for the study
of Computer Science and contributes to the development of students’ mathematical
sophistication.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course students will be able to:
(i). Use mathematics to solve problems and determine if the solutions are reasonable;
(ii). Relate mathematical principles in various applications.
(iii). Have the ability to manipulate and solve different mathematical problems
especially from an algebraic perspective.
Mode of Delivery:
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial hours, 20 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study hours per
Semester
Prerequisites:
None
Course Content
Logic: Sentential Logic: The language of sentential logic, formulas, truth assignments,
Tautologies, extensions of truth assignments, satisfaction and implication, etc.
Set: set notation, union and intersection of sets, Venn diagrams, set theory, etc.
Number systems: Binary, decimal, hexadecimal, conversion between binary and other
number systems, floating point representation.
Boolean algebra: Boolean Expressions, Standard forms for Boolean functions, AND, OR and
NOT operators, NAND, NOR, XOR and XNOR operators, truth tables, Fundamental sum of
products and product of sum forms, Application to switching circuits.
Number and Algebra: Quadratic equations and inequalities, partial fractions, indices and
surds, polynomials, simultaneous equations, binomial expansions, functions and graph,
Trigonometry: Trigonometric functions, identities and equations, etc.
Matrix: Determinant, inverse matrix, solving simultaneous linear equations using the inverse
matrix method, product of scalar quantity and a matrix, matrix operations, etc.
Calculus (Differentiation and Integration): Derivative of f(x) as the gradient of the tangent
to graph of y=f(x) at a point, derivative as rate of change, use of standard notations: f’(x),
7
f”(x), dy/dx, d2y/dx2[=d/dx(dy/dx)], derivatives of xn, for any rational n, sin x, cos x, tan x, ex,
and ln x, derivatives of composite functions, derivatives of products and quotients of
functions, increasing and decreasing functions, stationary points (maximum and minimum
turning points and stationary points of inflexion), use of second derivative test to discriminate
between maxima and minima, applying differentiation to gradients, tangents and normals,
connected rates of change and maxima and minima problems, integration as the reverse of
differentiation, integration of xn, for any rational n, sin x, cos x, tan x, ex, (ax + b)n for any
rational n, sin(ax +b), cos(ax + b) and e(ax + b), definite integral as area under a curve,
evaluation of definite integrals, finding the area of a region bounded by a curve and lines
parallel to the coordinate axes, finding areas of regions below the x-axis, application of
differentiation and integration to problems involving displacement, velocity and acceleration
of a particle moving in a straight line with variable or constant acceleration, etc.
Probability and Statistics: Quartiles and percentiles, measures of spread of a set of data:
range, inter-quartile range, standard deviation, means, probability: probability of simple
combined events, addition and multiplication of probability, The Principle of inclusion and
exclusion, The Multiplication principle, Permutations, Combinations, etc.
Key References:
(i). Grossman, P., (2008), Discrete Mathematics for Computing, 3rd Edition, Palgrave
Macmillan.
(ii). Jamison, R. V., (1973), Introduction to Computer Science Mathematics, McGrawHill.
(iii). Floyd, T. F., (2008), Digital Fundamentals, 6th Edition, Prentice-Hall
International Inc.
(iv). Rosen, K. H., (2011), Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 7th Edition,
McGraw-Hill.
(v).
Aufmann, R. N., Barker, V. C. and Lockwood, J., (2007), Beginning Algebra with
Applications, 7th Edition, Brooks Cole.
(vi). Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., and Williams, T. A., (1994), Introduction to
Statistics, Concepts and Application, 3rd Edition, West Publishing Company.
LG 0103: COMMUNICATION SKILLS
(10 CREDITS)
Course descriptions
The course is designed to enhance communication skills to students. They will learn the use
of the main four language skills, skills for seeking information as well as the use of English
language grammar in daily communication. Also it will induce students the skills of writing
an office correspondence like letters, CV, etc.
.
Course Objectives:
Objectives of the course are to:
(i). Enhance student’s ability to learn effectively through the medium of English.
(ii). Enable student to seek, deliver and manage information while undertaking their
educational studies at college and place of work.
(iii). Enable students interact effectively during the learning and teaching process.
(iv). Identify various communication styles using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and
apply them to specific scenarios.
(v).
Be able interpret verbal and nonverbal communication in others.
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Learning outcomes
(i). The student should gain the necessary skills for learning through the medium of
English.
(ii). Students will deliver and managing information while undertaking their
educational studies at college and place of work.
(iii). Students will be Interacting effectively during the learning and teaching process.
(iv). Interpret verbal and nonverbal communications in others.
Prerequisite
None
Mode of Delivery:
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial hours, 20 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study hours per
Semester
Course evaluation: Continuous Assessment is 50%, University Examination 50%
Course content
Communication, Its types & Significance:The concepts of Communication,Components/
process of communication,Importance and benefits of effective communication,Kinds of
communication,Barriers in communication,The 7 C’s of Effective communication
Grammar :Transformation/rewriting of sentences,Words used as different parts of
speech,one word substitution,join clauses, abbreviations,technical terms etc.
Reading skills: Reading styles (Skimming and scanning),Reading strategies, Reading
methodologies,reading activities
Academic Listening skills: The process of listening,The barriers to listening,The effective
listening skills.
Writing skills: Elements of effective writing,Writing styles,Scientific and technical writing.
Speaking skills: The skills of effective speaking, The components of an effective talk; Oral
presentation and the role of audio visual aids in it.
Office correspondence: Business letters; elements of business writing, kinds of business
letters – purchase order,quotations and tenders,job application letters, personal resume and
curriculum vitae etc.
REFERENCE BOOKS
(i). Anderson, Kenneth at all (2004). Study Speaking: A Course in Spoken
(ii). English for Academic Purposes. Cambridge CUP.
(iii).
Bellare, Nirmala(1998). Reading Strategies. Vols. 1 and 2. New Delhi. Oxford
University Press,DSM
(iv). Michael, K. (2005) ,Communication Skills Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition
AfroplusIndustries Ltd ,DSM.
(v).
Mchiri, M.N. (1993), Communication Skills: A self study course for Universities
and College, Longman Kenya Ltd. Nairobi, Kenya.
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BT 0115: INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course intends to introduce to students the holistic view of Information and
Communication Technology (ICT). The emphasis will be in introducing the main concepts
found in the ICT field in early stages of their programmes so as to enable them to take
advanced courses in ICT with more interest and less difficulties.
Course Objective
i. To introduce students to common terminologies used in ICT.
ii. To enable students acquire an overall understanding of the operation of computer
hardware.
iii. To introduce students on computer software.
iv.
To introduce students on the current developments in ICT.
v. To introduce and sensitize students on ICT security issues.
Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
i. Define accurately common terminologies used in ICT field.
ii. Describe main components of a computer system and their interaction.
iii. Distinguish between commercial and free software.
iv.
Discuss critically on the current trends in the development of ICT and their
implication to society.
v. Describe possible threats in ICT and security measures to be taken to minimize
their effects.
Mode of Delivery:
2 hours lecture + 1 hour tutorial per week
Prerequisite
None
Course evaluation: CA :50%
UE:50%
Course Contents:
Definition of ICT Terminologies: Computer Categories (Supercomputers, mainframe,
workstation, and microcomputer (personal, desktop, tower, notebook, PDA), microcontrollers,
Primary Computer Operation: Input, output, storage, processing, communication,
Computer Hardware Overview: System unit (motherboard, CPU, power supply, primary
storage devices),
Elementary introduction of I/O devices: secondary storage devices, expansion devices,
Computer Software (Commercial, Free): Software types (Application, System, service),
software features (interface, GUI, pointer),
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Computer Systems Data and Instruction Representation: bit, Byte, ASCII, EBCDIC,
Unicode,
Basics of Databases: data, database definition, database types and their applications,
Computer Applications: word processing, Database using Access, spreadsheet, desktop
publishing, Create presentations.
Working with files and folder: Command prompt, in GUI,
Internet & Web Technology Concepts: Internet,Types of Networks,URLs.World Wide Web,
Security concepts: files protection, backups, Viruses, Worms, and Trojans, Spam.
Recommended References/Textbooks
1. Williams and Sawyer, “Using Information Technology: A Practical Introduction to
Computers & Communication”, 7th edition, ISBN9780072260717, 2006, Publisher:
Irwin Professional
2. Larry Long and Nancy Long, “Computers: Information Technology in Perspective”,
12th edition, Prentice-Hall, 2005
3. Parker, C.S., Morley, D. & Miketta, B., “Understanding computers: today and
tomorrow”, Fort Worth, TX: Dryden Press, 2002
CN 0112: INTRODUCTION TO WEB DESIGN USING HTML AND CSS
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course provides students with an orientation and introduction to Web-based content
generation Using HTML and CSS. The HyperText Markup Language is the original language
of the Web and still a very good language to start with for providing website content. But for
those who have more detailed electronic publishing requirements, Cascading Style Sheets
provide the opportunity to layout Web pages more exactly as if they were being designed for
a physical medium (like paper).
Course Objectives
This course has been designed to provide the students with the fundamentals of web design
through the use of HTML and CSS. The course aims at providing the students who pursue it
some hands on experience on modern web design techniques.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course, students should demonstrate a level of understanding in the
following matters:
(i) Students should be able to create a basic HTML page that has been styled by using CSS
(ii) Students should be able to customize CSS designed templates to suit their needs
Prerequisites
None
Mode of delivery:
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial hours, 20 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study hours per
Semester
11
Course Contents
 Course Introduction & Policies
 Instructor and Student Introductions
 Opening Pre-test of Student Skills
 How HTML, XHTML, and CSS fits into the Big Picture of the Web
 Comparative Web Page Examples (PHP and Flash)
 Syntax Review / Introduction
 Managing HTML and CSS text files
 HTML Document Structure
Recommended References/Textbooks
1. Elizabeth Castro,”HTML, XHTML &CSS (Visual QuickStart Guide Series), sixth edition
CD 0110: MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGIES
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic tools and technology to develop multimedia delivered
through the Internet or CD-ROM. Students will work with various types of multimedia,
including digital sound, images, video and web pages. Students will learn to use major
software packages and tools used in multimedia production.
Course Objectives:
At the completion of this course, students should be able to perform the following tasks:
(i) Identify and understand the use of various graphics editing tools
(ii) Be able to work with video, enhance and publish video using selected video editing
software
(iii)Be able to prepare presentation, enhance presentation and work with multimedia objects.
(iv) Be able to create a web page, link between web pages, work with website programs and
publish a website.
Prerequisite:
None
Delivery mode:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per Semester
Course contents:
Introduction: define multimedia, features and category of multimedia and application of
multimedia systems.
Graphics: graphics programs, creating graphics using drawing tools, importing and exporting
graphics, modifying graphics, adding text to graphics and special effects.
Video: working with video by using selected software, enhancing video and publishing video.
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Presentations: working with presentation using selected software, enhancing a presentation,
working with graphics objects, working with movies, animation and sound, preparing and
delivering presentations.
Websites: creating a web page using basic html tags, formatting and linking website pages,
working in a website design program, polishing and publishing website.
Technical aspect of media: Data sampling and digitization; Media formats; Compression.
Key References/Textbooks:
1. Multimedia Basics, Second Edition. Suzanne Weixel. Thomson Course Technology.
Boston, MA. 2006.
IS 0110: FUNDAMENTALS OF GIS
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
This course provides an overview of the theory, concepts and related disciplines of GIS.
Topics include fundamental terminology and technologies associated with GIS, practical
examples of GIS applications, raster and vector spatial data representations, the data
modelling process, concepts of file and database systems, methods of data collection,
extraction, translation and loading; spatial analysis and geo-processing, data quality, spatial
data management, and organizational issues.
Objectives:
(i).
To impart technical skills in spatial data collection and analysis.
(ii).
Compare representations and uses of spatial data.
(iii). Describe the data modelling process.
(iv). Describe architectures of GIS software.
(v).
Discuss data acquisition, conversion and integration issues.
Prior knowledge expected:
Upon successful completion, the student will be able to:
(i) Describe the fundamental concepts and characteristics of GIS.
(ii) Compare representations and uses of spatial data.
(iii)Describe the data modelling process.
(iv) Describe architectures of GIS software.
(v) Discuss data acquisition, conversion and integration issues.
Prerequisites:
There are no prerequisites for this course
Mode of delivery:
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial hours, 20 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study hours per
Semester
Course content:
13
By the end of the course, we expect those who go through this course to be competent in the
following areas.
Introduction: History of GIS, Current GIS applications, GIS information sources,
Disciplines using GIS, Uses of GIS, GIS applications, geographical information and
spatial data types
GIS concepts: GIS definitions in GIS, Database management systems (graphic & nongraphic data), Software for manipulating, displaying & plotting data, Algorithms and
techniques for spatial analysis.
Components of GIS: hardware and software, GIS, steps in spatial data handling
GIS Data: Data entry methods, data quality, measures of location errors on maps, spatial
data input, and data preparation, spatial data models
Data processing steps: Data input and conversion, Data management, Data processing,
Data analysis and modelling and Data output
Satellite-based positioning
Operations on continuous field rasters
Neighbourhood operations, network analysis, error propagation
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
40%
10%
50%
References:
(i).
Aronoff S. (1993) Geographic Information Systems: A Management Perspective.
WDL Publications.
(ii).
Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. And Rhind, D. (2005) Geographic
Information Systems and Science, Wiley.
(iii). DeMers Michael N. (2005) Fundamentals of GIS. John Wiley and Sons
CS 0126: INTRODUCTION TO HIGH LEVEL PROGRAMMING WITH C++
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
This is a fundamental course of computer programming. Its contents are concerned with
programming techniques in C++ programming language. It covers all the basic concepts to
computer programming.
Course Objectives
14
The main objective of this course is to introduce to students the general overview of computer
programming and programming language and general structure of C++ programs. Also it
introduces to students the flow control statements, functions, arrays and strings used in C++.
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
i. Understand the basic principles of computer programming.
ii. Analyze different elements pertinent to programming languages (syntax and
semantic).
iii. Have an understanding of the main programming construct of C++.
iv.
Write, compile, execute and debug a C++ program.
v. Design and implement programs in C++.
Prerequisites:
BT 0115: Introduction to Information Technology
Delivery Mode:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Content
Introduction to programming languages: Introduction to Programming languages: machine,
assembly and high level. C++ Language and its Advantage, The Structure of a C++ Program,
Writing C++ Program, Compiling and Executing a C++ Program. Programming Errors:
syntax, runtime, and logical,
Basic elements of C++:Keywords and identifiers, Constants, Comments, Variables, C++ Data
Types, Declaration of Variables and assigning values. C++ Operators and Expressions:
Arithmetic Operators, Relational Operators, Logical Operators, Assignment Operators,
Increment and Decrement Operators, Bit-wise Operator, Arithmetic Expressions, Precedence
of Operators. Input and output management: Reading and Writing a Character (Cin and Cout),
formatted input and output. Write C++ Programs (examples): C++ Libraries, Initializing C++
main function, compiling and executing C++ Programs,
Control structures: Decision making statements (If, if…Else, if…Else if…Else), Nested of
If…Else, switch statements, GOTO Statements. Loop statements: (For, while and do…while
loops), Jumps in Loops, Nesting of Loops,
Array and strings:One dimensional Arrays, Two dimensional Arrays, Declaring arrays,
accessing arrays, sorting and searching arrays. Strings:Declaring and Initializing string,
Reading and Writing Strings, String Handling Functions, String manipulation,
Introduction to Functions:In-built functions: main() function, User defined functions:
Function declaration (function name, return data type, function parameters), Defining
function: function header, function parameters, parameter passing (pass by reference, pass by
value), function body, categories of Functions, calling function, mathematical functions,
function overloading and recursive functions, Passing Arrays to Functions, Passing String to
Functions, Scope, Visibility and Lifetime of Variables,
File Input and Output: Writing to File and Reading from File,
15
Fundamentals of the Object-Oriented: Introduction to Classes and Objects.
Key References:
1. Deitel, H. M. and Deitel, P. J., (2005), C++ How to Program, 5th Edition, Prentice
Hall.
2. Lafore, R., (1998), Object-Oriented Programming in C++, 3rd Edition, Macmillan
Computer Publishing.
3. Liberty, J. and Jones, B., (2005), Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, 5th Edition, Sams
Publishing.
4. David, S. R., (2004), C++ For Dummies, 5th Edition, Wiley Publishing.
5. Skansholm, J., (1997), C++ From the Beginning, Addson-Wesley.
6. Mselle, L. J., (2010), C++ For Novice Programmers, LAP Lambert Academic
Publishing.
CS 0121: OPERATING SYSTEMS
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course introduces students to basic concepts to operating system design and
implementation. The operating system provides a well-known, convenient, and efficient
interface between user programs and the bare hardware of the computer on which they run.
The course also introduces students to a broad range of operating system concepts, including
installation and maintenance. Emphasis is operating system concepts, management,
maintenance, and resources required.
Course Objectives
i. To introduce basic principles of an operating system (process management, memory
management, file management, and device management).
ii. Understand file systems design principles.
iii. To study computer security issues and Operating System tools.
iv.
To introduce the Unix Operating System.
v.
To introduce aspects of Windows Operating System.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
i. Configure and securely manage operating systems using existing tools.
ii. Discuss and analyze different components of Operating Systems.
iii. Modify and use different components of Operating Systems.
iv.
Evaluate, prioritize and defend against realistic threats where technical solutions exist.
v. Select and configure operating system security policies for end users and applications.
Prerequisites
None
Mode of Delivery:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Content:
16
Introduction to Operating System:overview of system software (including OS, Assembler,
Compiler, Linker, Loader), OS basic Concepts, Common components of Operating system,
Types of operating systems, Interfaces: Shells and API, System calls, Virtual Machines,
System Boot Process,
Windows Operating System: Introduction to Windows Operating Systems, Installation and
Configuration of Windows Operating Systems, Windows OS management, Introduction to
DOS,
Linux Operating System: Introduction to Linux Operating Systems, Advantages, Installation
and configuration of Linux Operating System, Linux System: File System, Basic Features,
Advantages, Basic Architecture of UNIX/Linux System,
Process and Thread Management: Concept of Process and Threads, Process states, Process
management, Context Switching, Interaction between processes and OS, Multithreading, CPU
scheduling,
Memory Management: Memory partitioning, swapping, Segmentation, Virtual memory
(virtual memory concepts, overlays, Demand Paging, Performance of Demand Paging),
paging, Page replacement algorithms, Allocation Algorithms,
I/O Systems: Principles of I/O Hardware (I/O devices, Devices Controllers, Direct memory
access), Principles of I/O Software (Goals, Interrupt handler, Device drivers, Device
independent I/O software), Secondary-Storage Structure (Disk structure, Disk scheduling,
Disk management, Swap-Space management, Disk reliability, Stable storage
implementation), Introduction to Clock (Clock hardware, Clock software),
File System: File concept, File support, Access methods, Allocation methods, Directory
systems, File protection, free space management,
Protection and Security:Protection (Goals of Protection, Domain of protection, Access
matrix, Implementation of access matrix, Revocation of access rights), Security (The security
problem, Authentication, One-Time passwords, program threats, System threats, Threat
monitoring, Encryption, Computer-security classifications).
Key References:
1. Silberschatz, A., Galvin, P. B. and Gagne, G., (2005), Operating System Concepts, 7th
Edition, John Wiley & Sons.
2. Stallings, W., (2005), Operating System Concepts, 5th Edition, Prentice-Hall.
3. Tanenbaum, A.S. and Woodhull, A. S., (2006), Operating System Design and
Implementation, Prentice-Hall.
4. Tanenbaum, A. S., (2007), Modern Operating System, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education.
5. Nutt, G., (2002), Operating System Concepts: A Modern Perspective, 3rd Edition,
Addison Wesley.
CS 0120: INTRODUCTION TO DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
17
This course gives introduction to the theory and design of database management systems.
Topics covered include internals of database management systems, fundamental concepts in
database theory, and database application design and development. In particular, logical
design and conceptual modeling, physical database design strategies, relational data model
and query languages, query optimization and transaction management.
Course objectives:
Students will gain familiarity with the creation and use of database management systems to
organize, search and store information in variety of formats. There is a high demand for
library and information science graduates with an information technology skill set. This
course will consist of mix of hands on assignments and readings on the current issues in
database management systems
Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
i. Describe the architecture and capabilities of a modern Relational Database
Management System (DBMS) and compare and contrast with other database models.
ii. Explain the concepts and maintenance of data independence.
iii. Explain and describe how a DBMS facilitates transaction management, concurrency
and recovery.
iv.
Implement a concurrent, multi-user business application using form based software.
v. Explain how OLAP is implemented.
vi.
Describe the principles involved in ensuring data security and privacy in a database
system.
Prerequisite:
None
Delivery Mode:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Content:
Database Objects and the Data Dictionary, Data Independence through Views, Transactions
and Concurrency, Database Recovery Control, Client server systems.Forms based
applications, Database models. Introduction to OLAP,Introduction to Data Warehousing and
Data Mining and Data security and privacy
Key References:
1. Hoffer, J. A., Prescott, M. B.& McFadden, F. R., (2005), Modern Database
Management, 7th Edition, Prentice-Hall.
2. Kroenke, D. M., (2006), Database Processing: Fundamentals Design and
Implementation, 10th Edition, Prentice-Hall.
3. Rob, P.& Coronel, C., (2004),Database Systems: Design, Implementation and
Management, 6th Edition, Thomson.
4. Simsion, G. C.& Witt, G. C., (2005),Data Modeling Essentials, 3rd Edition,Morgan
Kaufmann.
5. Watson, R. T., (2004), Data Management: Databases and Organizations,Wiley.
18
TN 0120: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NETWORKING
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
Provides a technical and operational overview of digital computer networks, the foundation
for all modern information systems and services.
Learning Outcomes
i. Explain the basic design and operation of the Internet, including the software and
hardware components used to provide Internet services.
ii. Describe the key industry standardsthat define the Internet as an “open”
communications platform
iii. Supporting a broad range of information services
iv.
Describe the major security threatsassociated with computer networking and the most
common tools and techniques used to mitigate these threats.
v. Explain the protocols, tools, and strategies used in the effective management of
modern communication networks.
vi.
Describe the relationship between the Internet infrastructure and key networked
application architectures.
Prerequisites:
None
Delivery Mode
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Content
Computer networks and the internet, Application layer, Transport layer, Network layer and
Routing, LAN, security in computer networks, Network Management
Key References:
1. Kurose, J. F. and Ross, K.,Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring
the Internet, 3rd Edition,Pearson Addison Wesley.
2. Tanenbaum, A. S.,Computer Networks, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall.
3. Panko, R. R. and Panko, J. L., (2011), Business Data Networks and
Telecommunications, 8th Edition, Pearson Education.
IS 0211: GIS FOR NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
This course is particularly distinctive. It combines GIS with quantitative methods and modelling for
natural-resource applications. Students should learn about important functions encountered in biology
and spatial and temporal processes.
Course objectives
This course aims at:
(i).
Introducing students to aspects regarding to natural resources,
(ii).
To impart skills on how to manage natural resources for national development and
(iii). the use of ICT application to ensure effective utilization of natural resources being
land, water, minerals, forestry, wildlife, etc.
19
Learning outcome
By the end of the course, all students who pass should have mastered the following:
(i).
Students should be able to present the agricultural challenges and discuss how
ICTs could be used to address them
(ii).
Students should be able to explore how ICTs could be used for effective advocacy
and lobbying to promote agriculture
(iii). Students should be able to identify the possible ways of using ICTs to improve
access to markets
Mode of delivery
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent studies,
10 hrs practical hrs
Course contents:
Hydro-informatics: students should be able to understand how Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) can be used in addressing the increasingly serious problems of the
equitable and efficient use of water as a natural resource for many different purposes.
Geo-Informatics: Geo-data: capture, sources and standards; Spatial referencing, databases
and spatial databases; GIS theory + practice; Geo-statistics and spatial modelling; Digital
photogrammetry, feature extraction; Satellite and airborne Earth Observation data,
advanced image enhancement and classification, image fusion; Customisation, Internet
GIS and visualisation. Students should be able to use software such as ArcGIS, ERDAS
Imagine MATLAB on related themes, Methodological approaches and technical skills of
importance in geo-informatics.
Modelling Environmental Processes: students should be introduced to the major stages
of computer-aided modelling of environmental processes, with application to real
environmental problems, such as pollution dispersal in rivers and estuaries, temperature
changes in the northern hemisphere and rainfall flow processes. The emphasis is on the
use of computer-based methods, case studies and practical examples.
Environmental Quality and Standards: students should examine how environmental
standards for dangerous substances in the environment are identified, established and
maintained.
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
40%
10%
50%
References:
(i).
(ii).
Harding R., 1998, Environmental Decision-Making: The Role of Scientists, Engineers and
the Public, Federation Press, Leichhardt.
Dale, VH, Brown, S, Hawuber, RA, Hobbs, NT, Huntly, Nj Naiman, RJ, Riebsame, WE,
Turner, MG & Valone, TJ 2000, ‘Ecological guidelines for land use and management’, in
Dale, VH & Hawuber, RA (eds), Applying ecological principles to land management,
Springer-Verlag, NY
20
IS 0121: BASICS OF GEOMETRICS, GEOMORPHOLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
The course introduces the student to concepts regarding to the formation of the earth’s landscape and
map reading and analysis. This course further introduces students to concepts regarding to the study of
the earth’s climate being the effects of the earth’s climate on human activities, etc.
Course objectives
This course aims at:
(i).
To enable the students understand and apply basic concepts of geometrics to
spatial data and information management
(ii).
To enable students understand the earth’s morphology and their relationship.
(iii). To impart knowledge and skills of the earth’s landscape characteristics
(iv). To introduce concepts of climatology and their importance in contemporary world.
Learning outcome
At the end of the course, all students who pass should be able to:
(i).
Explain and apply basic concepts of geometrics to GIS
(ii).
Describe various morphological features on the earth
(iii). Reading the map and analyse data related to geomorphology
(iv). Discuss various concepts of climatology and their relationship to geomorphology
Mode of delivery
40 hrs lecture hours, 30 hrs practical, 10 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 10 hrs
independent studies
Contents
Basics of geometrics: definition of geometrics, geometric shapes, geometric aspects of
mapping (methods, vectors, transformation), geometric distortions, viewing geometry
Introductory physical geography: nature and history of geomorphology, students should
be able to understand how wind, water, glaciers and volcanic activities have managed to
shape the earth’s crust by creating the different erosion, deposition and volcanic features,
types of rocks and the way they are formed, weathering and mass wasting, coastal
processes and landforms, weathering, mass wasting and landslides, plate tectonics.
Climatology: Climate and atmosphere: Introductory definitions, the scope of climatology,
nature of the atmosphere, origin of the atmosphere, planetary atmospheres, vertical
thermal structure of the atmosphere,
Energy and temperature: insolation, the theory of radiation, the solar source, radiation
and heat budgets, variability of insolation, air, temperature and it’s measurements,
temperature records, horizontal and vertical temperature distribution
Motion in the climate: atmospheric pressure measurements, pressure height relations,
horizontal pressure distribution, pressure and circulation, factors affecting wind direction
and speed, winds aloft, diurnal variation of wind speed, wind observations, mapping wind
data, local winds.
21
Weather disturbances: air masses, properties of air masses, air mass identification and
analysis, air mass regions and classifications, stability and instability, the extra tropical
cyclone, fronts, mountain barrier and surface fronts, anti-cyclones, tropical weather,
hurricanes, thunder storms, tornados and water spouts, air masses and storm effects,
regional weather patterns.
Applied climatology: climate and natural resources, climate and the biosphere, climate,
agriculture and food, human bio-climatology, climate and housing, climate modifications
i.e. past climates and climate forecasting
Natural hazards: earthquakes, floods, Tsunamis, hurricanes and typhoons, volcanic
activities, landslides and mass wasting.
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
References
(i).
(ii).
40%
10%
50%
Opsbaum, Roger, 1994: Climatology Notes, 1st Ed, Kendall/Hunt, Dubukue,
IA
Geometry and its Applications
CS 0127: SYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description
Information systems are an essential part of the infrastructure of most organization. This
course introduces basic information systems and management concepts. It intends, among
other things to enable students understand the information systems and its management in
supporting and enabling core business processes.
Course Objectives
The main objective of this course is to develop critical understanding of the management of
information systems in modern organizations in context of the organisational issues and
challenges that impact on their development and application.
Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Identify the characteristics and elements underpinning business and IS/IT strategies.
 Apply analytical tools and techniques to align business and IS/IT strategies.
 Identify problems, opportunities and challenges in IS management and make
recommendations based on sound IS management theory and practice.
Prerequisite:
None
22
Delivery Mode:
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial/Seminar hours, 10 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study
hours, 10 Practical hours per Semester
Course Content:
Foundation concepts of Information Systems: Definition of a system, System components,
Data and Information, Information systems, Types of information systems, Information
Systems Components: Data, Objects (Hardware, Software, etc,); People (Titles and roles for
both End users and IT specialists), Information technology, Relationship between IS and IT:
Information systems in relation to Information Technology (IT), The role of Information
systems in organizations, Opportunities and challenges of information systems.
Information technology Infrastructure: Overview of IT infrastructure; The IT infrastructure
for business and IS, overview of Computer Hardware and software for information systems,
Data Resource Management for information systems: Managing data resource: Database
Management,
Telecommunication
and
Networks
for
information
systems:
Telecommunications Network alternatives, Internet, Intranet and Extranet.
MIS in organizational control: Organizational control procedures, Information system
management and control, characteristics of control processes in a system, negative feedback
control, the nature of control in organizations, information system support for control.
Management Thoughts and Management functions: Classical thought, Behavioural
thought, contemporary management thought i.e. contingency theory, system theory, and chaos
theory. Management functions i.e. planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling.
Analysis of Organization Information Requirements: Steps required for obtaining
organizational information requirements i.e. how to define underlying organizational
subsystems, how to develop manager by subsystem matrix, how to define and evaluate
information requirements for organizational subsystems.
Business Applications, Development, and Management: Business Applications, Development,
and Management, The Fundamental Roles of IS Applications in Business, Managerial
Challenges of Information Technology, Success and Failure with IT.
Information Systems Management: Basics of Leadership and Management, Importance of IS
Management, Managing the Information System infrastructure: Managing the Essential
Technologies; Managing Hardware, Managing Software, Managing Telecommunication,
Managing Information Resources; Managing Data, Managing Information.
Key References:
1. Laudon, J. and Laudon, K., (2008), Essentials of Management Information Systems,
9th Edition, Prentice Hall.
2. Turban, E., Leider, D., McLean, E. & Wetherbe, J., (2006), Information Technology
for Management: Transforming Organizations in the Digital Economy, 5th
Edition, Wiley.
3. McNurlin, B. C. & Sprague, R. H., (2006), Information Systems Management in
Practice, 7th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall.
23
4. Gray, P., (2006), Manager’s Guide to Making Decisions about Information Systems,
Wiley.
5. Applegate, L. M., Austin, R. D. & McFarlan, W. F., (2007). Corporate Information
Strategy and Management, 7th Edition, McGraw Hill Irwin.
6. Murdick R. G., Russ J. B. and Clagget J. R., (2000), Information Systems for modern
management, John Wiley& Son.
BT 0210: PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (10 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course introduces to the students the concepts and practices of managing business
projects and entrepreneurship.
Course Objective:
The main objective of this course is to examine the challenges of and procedures for starting a
viable and sustainable new enterprise.
Learning Outcomes
At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to:
i. Generate Project Idea and Plan a New Project
ii. Demonstrate the Information Required for Market and Demand Analysis
iii. View a Project from Different Points of View
iv.
Describe Project Implementation
v. Analyze the feasibility of a new venture business concept
vi.
Evaluate his or her own entrepreneurial tendency and ability
vii.
Brainstorm ideas for new and innovative products or services
viii. Use a variety of feasibility tests to assess and select prospective new venture concepts
for further study
ix. Demonstrate sound decision-making and analytical skills, including the ability to
apply critical thinking methods to dynamic business environments.
Prerequisites:
None
Delivery Mode:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Contents
Introduction: Concept of Project Management, Project and Capital Budgeting, Objectives and
Phases of Capital Budgeting, Resource Allocation, Generation and Screening of Project Idea,
Environmental Appraisal and Clearance, Forms of Project Organization,
Market and Technical Analysis of Project: Market and Demand Analysis for New Ventures,
Information Required for Market and Demand Analysis, Sources of Information, Market
Survey, Demand Forecasting, Uncertainties in Demand Forecasting, Technical AnalysisMaterial and Inputs, Production Technology and Product-Mix, Plant Capacity, Location Site,
Project Charts and Layouts,
24
Financial Estimates and Projections: Cost of Project, Means of Financing, Cost of
Production, Working Capital Requirement, Planning and Capital Structure of a New Project,
Financial Projections-Projected Balance Sheet, Projected Sources and Uses of Funds
Statement, Projected Cash Flow Statement and Projected Income Statement - Estimation of
Sales and Costs,
Financial Appraisal of Projects: Components of Cash Flow, Basic Principles of Cash Flow
Estimation, Viewing a Project from Different Points of View, Appraisal Criteria - Pay Back
Period, Accounting Rate of Return, NPV, IRR and Benefit-Cost Ratio, Rationale for Social
Cost- Benefit Analysis, Project Implementation,
Entrepreneurship and Entrepreneur: Nature, Types, Functions and Characteristics of
Entrepreneur, Theories of Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneur and Manager, Sources and Supply
of Entrepreneurship.
Key References:
1. Bryce, M.C., Industrial Development,Int Edition, McGraw Hill, New York.
2. Chandra, P., Project Preparation, Appraisal and implementation, Tata McGraw Hill,
Delhi.
3. IDBI: Manual of Industrial Project Analysis in Developing Countries.
4. O.E.C.D., (i) Manual for Preparation of Industrial Feasibility Studies. (ii) Guide to
Practical Project Appraisal.
5. Pitale, R.L., Project Appraisal Techniques, Oxford and IBH.
6. Planning Commission: Manual for Preparation of Feasibility Report.
7. Timothy, D. R. and Sewell, W. R., Project Appraisal and Review, Macmillan, India.
8. Chaudhary, S., Project Management, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
9. Little, I.M.D. and Mirrless, J. A., Project Appraisal and Planning for Developing
Countries, Heinemann Education Books, London.
10. Chandran, R., Entrepreneurial Development, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
11. Saini, J. S., Entrepreneurial Development Programmes and Practices, Deep & Deep
Publications (P), Ltd.
12. Khanka, S. S.,Entrepreneurial Development, S Chand & Company Ltd. New Delhi
13. Badhai, B.,Entrepreneurship for Engineers, DhanpatRai& co. (p) Ltd.
14. Desai, Vasant, (2002), Project Management and Entrepreneurship, Himalayan
Publishing House, Mumbai.
15. Gupta and Srinivasan, Entrepreneurial Development, S Chand & Sons, New Delhi.
CS 0215: VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
Visual Basic is a windows development language which can be used to create small utilities
for individual or work group, a larger enterprise wide system, or even distributed applications
or systems spanning the globe via the internet.
Course Objective
To enable students develop a working-level knowledge of programming in the
Visual Basic language, including: application design, variable declarations, programming
constructs, file and database access and user interface
25
Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
i. Use the VB application development environment
ii. Use different control structures in event driven programming environment.
iii. Write, execute and debug basic VB application programs.
iv.
Design and develop the VB application programs to meet requirements
v. Design and program window based applications
Prerequisites
None
Delivery Mode
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Contents
Introduction to visual basic:Visual basic concepts, integrated development elements (visual
Basic IDE): menu bars, tool bars, toolbox, project explorer window, properties windows, form
designer, code editor window, and form layout window,
Programming fundamentals: Data types, procedures and control structures,
Windows common controls:Creating or designing interface, creating event procedures, radio
buttons, using frame control, selecting controls inside a frame, using list boxes, combo boxes,
input and message boxes, creating menus and dialog boxes and other additional controls,
File I/O Controls:The File system objects, programming in the File system object, accessing
existing drives, folders and files. Working with drives, folders and files,
Database programming:Accessing Data using Visual basic, Using ActiveX Data
Object (ADO), Data Access Object (DAO) and Remote Data Object (RDO).
Designing and Printing a Data Report
Key References:
1. Zak, D., (2001),Programming with Visual Basic 6.0, Enhanced Edition,
CourseTechnology.
2. Liberty, J.,(2005), Programming Visual Basic 2005, O'Reilly Media.
3. Gaddis, T. and Irvine, K., (2006),Starting Out with Visual Basic 2005, Addison
Wesley
4. Willis, T. and Newsome, B., (2005), Beginning Visual Basic 2005
CS 0234: DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAMMING WITH PYTHON
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
This Python training course leads the students from the basics of writing and running Python scripts to
more advanced features such as file operations, regular expressions, working with binary data, and
using the extensive functionality of Python modules. Extra emphasis is placed on features unique to
Python, such as tuples, array slices, and output formatting.
26
Course objectives
This course aims at:
(i).
Introducing students to some basic concepts in python programming.
(ii).
Master the fundamentals of writing Python scripts
(iii). Learn core Python scripting elements such as variables and flow control
structures
Learning outcomes
At the end of this course students should be able to:
(i).
Work with lists and sequence data
(ii).
Write Python functions to facilitate code reuse
(iii). Use Python to read and write files
(iv). Make their code robust by handling errors and exceptions properly
(v).
Work with the Python standard library
(vi). Explore Python's object-oriented features
(vii). Search text using regular expressions
Mode of delivery:
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent studies,
10 hrs practical hrs
Course contents
An Overview of Python: What is Python? Interpreted languages, Advantages and
disadvantages, downloading and installing, which version of Python, Where to find
documentation, Running Python Scripts, Structure of a Python script, Using the interpreter
interactively, Running standalone scripts under
Getting Started: Using variables, String types: normal, raw and Unicode, String operators
and expressions, Math operators and expressions, Writing to the screen, Command line
parameters, Reading from the keyboard
Flow Control: About flow control, Indenting is significant, The if and elif statements,
while loops, Using lists, Using the for statement, The range() function
Sequence Data: list operations, list methods, Strings are special kinds of lists, tuples, sets,
Dictionaries
Defining Functions: Syntax of function definition, Formal parameters, Global versus
local variables, Passing parameters and returning values
Working with Files: Text file I/O overview, Opening a text file, Reading text files, Raw
(binary) data, Using the pickle module, Writing to a text file
Dictionaries and Sets: Dictionary overview, Creating dictionaries, Dictionary functions,
Fetching keys or values, Testing for existence of elements, Deleting elements, Using
Modules, What is a module? The import statement, Function aliases, Packages
Regular Expressions: RE Objects, Pattern matching, Parsing data, Subexpressions,
Complex substitutions, RE tips and tricks
27
Highlights of the Standard Library: Working with the operating system, Grabbing web
pages, Sending email, Using glob for filename wildcards, math and random, Accessing
dates and times with datetime, Working with compressed files
An Introduction to Python Classes: About o-o programming, Defining classes,
Constructors, Instance methods, Instance data, Class methods and data, Destructors
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
References
(i).
40%
10%
50%
Downey, Allen, Jeffrey Elkner, and Chris Meyers. How to Think Like a
Computer Scientist: Learning with Python. Green Tea Press, 2002. ISBN:
9780971677500.
CD 0213: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course is intended to help the student build a foundation using current graphics software
as it relates to common Internet and desktop publishing use.
Course Objective
Upon completion of this course, student will be able to:(i) To achieve a basic familiarity with the computer and its operation
(ii) To gain a working knowledge of the software featured in the course and to apply the
Software to internet or printed publication projects
(iii)To understand the fundamental types of graphics and their appropriate applications.
Mode of Delivery
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Contents
(i) Introduction to computer graphics: Graphics created with dots versus graphics created
with objects or vectors, Resolution versus output quality, Storage requirements, web
transmission times, Line Art and Bitmaps versus Photographs and Illustrations.
Application of graphics in the classroom. Application of graphics on the web.
(ii) Photoshop tools and Palettes Tools: Options Bar, Airbrush, Paintbrush, Cloning Tool
Eraser.
(iii)Selections: Selection tools, working with selections, Image correction and adjustment.
(iv) Layers: Working with layers Palette, merging layers, History Palette.
(v) Combining images: Filters and Effects, Handling Type in Photoshop: Type special
effects, Type warping, Type layers.
28
(vi) Graphics for the Web: Creating JPG versus GIF images, Limitations of formats, PNG,
Extract image function, Image Ready Slicing images, Creating rollover effects and
buttons.
(vii)
Graphics for Print: Working with Photos, Scanning (if available) Types of
images for print, Working with illustrations and clip art. Modifying images for offset
print production color models.
(viii)
Animation in Imageready.
(ix) Working with Vector based Graphics: Drawing Bezier Curves. The Adobe Pen tool,
Bezier curves in Photoshop or Illustrator, Creating Vector shapes, Fill and Stroke,
color palette, working with objects, Stacking order and Pathfinder.
Key References
1. Required Text(s): Adobe Classroom in a Book: Photoshop CS2. Adobe Press ISBN 0321-32184-7
CS 0217 IMPLEMENTATION OF DATABASE SYSTEMS
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course examines the data structures and algorithms underlying database management
systems such as Oracle or PostgreSQL. It covers techniques from both research literature and
commercial systems.
Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, students should
i. Have a basic insight into how DBMSs function internally
ii. Understand how to analyze the performance of data-intensive systems
iii. Be familiar with basics of programming techniques for large-scale data
manipulation
iv.
Apply the insights achieved to build components of a mini-DBMS.
Prerequisites
Introductory course on Databases
Delivery Mode:
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per semester.
Course Contents
Hardware: Secondary-storage devices, disk access time, Input/Output model of computation,
optimized disk access,
File and System Structure: page layout and access, buffer management, file organizations
(heap, sorted, clustered), row stores versus column stores,
Indexes: Tree-structured (ISAM, B+tree), hash-based (static, extendible, linear), multidimensional (UB-tree, k-d-b tree, R-tree),
External Sorting: external n-way merge sort, sorting based on B+ trees,
29
Query Evaluation: Selection (index-based, hash-based, arbitrary selection predicates),
projection (duplicate elimination, hash-based, sorting-based), joins (nested-loops, index
nested, block nested, sort-merge, hash joins), set operations, aggregation, impact of buffering,
pipelining, blocking, evaluation techniques in existing systems,
Query Optimization: cardinality estimation for all query operators, histograms, equivalences
of relational algebra, query plans, cost estimation, nested queries, join optimization algorithms
(dynamic programming and greedy join enumeration approaches), optimization techniques in
existing systems,
Transaction Management: ACID properties, concurrency control (serialisability criteria),
locking (two-phase locking, index locking, multiple granularity locks, intention locks),
deadlock detection, isolation levels, concurrency control in existing systems.
Key References:
1. Ramakrishan and Gehrke, (2002),Database Management Systems, 3rd
Edition,McGraw-Hill.
2. Garcia-Molina, Ullman, Widom, (2008),Database Systems: The Complete Book, 2nd
Edition, Prentice Hall.
CS 0210: BASICS OF DEMOGRAPHY, HUMAN SETTLEMENT AND PLANNING
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
Students who have specialised in GIS should have knowledge regarding to demography and
human settlement analysis and planning as through GIS they may have to address issues
related to the latter. This course has been designed to enable a student to be equipped with the
necessary knowledge required in solving the GIS – Human related problems.
Course objectives
This course aims at:
(i).
Introducing the students with the fundamental concepts of human settlement
planning, demography and demographic data analysis
(ii).
Learning outcomes
(i).
Students should be able to understand the policies underlying human
settlement planning
(ii).
Should be able to use GIS and remote sensing to analyze demographic data and
plan for human settlement
Prerequisites:
There are no prerequisites for this course
Mode of delivery
40 Lecture Hours, 20 Tutorial hours, 20 Assignment hours, 20 Individual study hours per
Semester
Course content:
30
Introduction: the field of population study, basic concepts: mortality, fertility, nuptiality and
migration, sources of data and analysis
Characteristics of population composition: physical distribution, age-sex composition, social and
cultural characteristics, economic characteristics
Sociology of mortality: basic measurements of mortality, pattern and trend; differentials,
analytical frameworks: biological vs. Social, mortality and social issues: illness and death,
population aging and elderly
Sociology of fertility: basic measurements of fertility, pattern and trend; differentials, analytical
frameworks: bong arts, Davis, mason family planning and fertility
Sociology of nuptiality: determinants of nuptiality, age at first marriage and choice of marital
partner, analysis of married life and its length
Sociology of migration: basic measurements, typology, analytical frameworks: push-pull theories,
systems models, adaptation of migrants; problems and consequences
Population growth and optimal population: world population growth and projections, zero
population growth and optimal population
Malthusian theory on population:
Settlement: settlement patterns:
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
References
(i).
(ii).
(iii).
40%
10%
50%
Flowerdew, Robin; Martin, David (2005). Methods in human geography: a
guide for students doing a research project (2nd ed.). Harlow: Prentice Hall.
ISBN 978-0-582-47321-8.
Paul Demeny and Geoffrey McNicoll (Eds.). 2003. The Encyclopedia of
Population. New York, Macmillan Reference USA, vol.1, 32-37
Sven Kunisch, Stephan A. Boehm, Michael Boppel (eds) (2011). From Grey to
Silver: Managing the Demographic Change Successfully, Springer-Verlag,
Berlin Heidelberg, ISBN 978-3-642-15593-2
IS 0221: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS AND GEOGRAPHIC DATA ANALYSIS
(10 CREDITS)
Course description
This course will focus on data collection, data presentation, summarizing and describing data,
basic probability, and statistical inference. Students will use computer algebra systems and
spreadsheets as tools for performing statistical calculations, creating tables, and generating
graphical representations of information.
Learning outcomes
31
At the end of the course student should be able to:
(i).
State the meaning and use of statistical terms used in business statistics.
(ii).
Present and/or interpret data in tables and charts.
(iii). Apply descriptive statistical measures to GIS situations.
(iv). Apply basic probability distributions to model different types of business
processes.
(v).
Apply statistical inference techniques (including statistical estimation and
hypothesis testing) in business situations.
(vi). Understand and apply simple linear regression analysis
(vii). Use computer spreadsheet software to perform statistical analysis on data.
Mode of delivery
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent studies,
10 hrs practical hrs
Course content
Students should have cover the following topics:
Data collection: Students should be taught on aspects regarding to the scientific ways of
collecting data from a field of study
Statistical theory: measures of central tendency i.e. mean, median and mode, measures of
dispersion i.e. variance, range and standard deviation
Presenting data in tables and charts: Histograms, pie charts, frequency distribution
tables, etc.
Summarizing and describing numerical data:
Using probability distributions to model various types of GIS processes: Probability
terms and approaches, unions and intersections of events, addition rules on probability,
multiplication rules on probability, discrete probability distributions and continuous
probability distributions.
Statistical inference: Confidence intervals, Hypothesis testing, discrete data analysis
Analyzing variances
Statistical estimation
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignment & quizzes
University Exams
40%
10%
50%
References
(i).
Yates, D. S., Moore, D. S. and Starnes, D. S. The Practice of Statistics, TI83/84/89 Graphing Calculator Enhanced. Third Edition New York: W.H. Freeman
and Company, 2008
32
(ii).
Peck, R, Ohsen, C and Devore, J, Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis,
Third Edition. Australia: Thomson Brooks/Cole, 2008.
(iii).
Bluman, A. G, Elementary statistics, a step by step approach. Eighth Edition, New
York: McGraw-Hill, 2009
IS 0220: MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(10 CREDITS)
Course Description
Management information systems encompass a broad and complex topic. To make this topic
more manageable, boundaries will be defined.
Course Objectives:
(i).
To examine and be able to utilize the relationship between computers based
information systems,
Management and organizations.
(ii).
To review concepts of management and organizations in the context of
Information Technology.
(iii). To describe traditional information support systems for managers.
Learning outcomes
Upon completion of this course students should be able to:
(i).
To understand the major issues concerning the management, decision making and
computer based applications.
(ii).
Students will be able to analyze management issues and problems and how to
formulate realistic, practical plans to resolve them.
(iii). Describe your own view of management, values, ethics, and perception, and what
you bring to your role as manager.
Course Prerequisite:
None
Mode of Delivery:
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent studies,
10 hrs practical hrs
Course Content:
Introduction to Information Systems;
Organizational Strategy, Competitive Advantage and Information Systems;
Ethics and Privacy;
Information Security;
Data and Knowledge Management;
Networks;
E.-Business and E-Commerce;
Wireless, Mobile Computing and Mobile Commerce;
Web 2.0 and Social Networks;
Information Systems within the Organization;
Customer Relationship Management and Supply Chain Management;
Business Intelligence;
33
Acquiring Information Systems and Applications;
References:
(i). Sadagopan, S (2004), Management Information Systems. 1st ed, PHI Learning Pvt.
Ltd,
(ii). Davis, G. & Olson, M. (1985) Management information systems: conceptual
foundations, structure and development. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill
(iii). Laudon, K. & Laudon, J. (2006) Management Information Systems: Managing the
Digital Firm, 9th ed. Prentice Hall
(iv). Terence, L (2004) Management information systems. 5th ed. Cengage Learning
EMEA.
CS 0223: PRINCIPLES OF REMOTE SENSING
(10 CREDITS)
Course description:
In this course, students learn the basic concepts and operational skills of remote sensing and
become familiar with the capabilities and limitations of current and future remote-sensing
systems. They also learn the techniques commonly used for interpreting aerial photographs,
satellite remote-sensing data, and thermal and radar imagery, and gain practical lab
experience in image interpretation. They are exposed to a wide variety of applications in
environmental mapping and monitoring, natural resource management, urban and regional
planning, and global change research.
Objectives:
(i).
To enable students acquire knowledge and skills necessary for successful
integration of remote sensing in any field of application
(ii).
To enable students use the skills of remote sensing techniques for acquiring
different types of geospatial information
(iii). To prepare students for more advanced studies in the areas of remote sensing and
GIS
Learning outcome:
At the end of the course, students should be able to:
(i).
(ii).
(iii).
Demonstrate understanding of the concepts related to remote sensing
Make visual image interpretations
Differentiate the different types of sensors as remote sensing is concerned
Prerequisites:
CD 0213 Introduction to Computer Graphics
Mode of delivery:
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent
studies, 10 hrs practical hrs
Course content:
34
Concepts and Foundations of Remote Sensing: Electromagnetic spectrum, apparent and
optical properties, electromagnetic quantities, physical interaction with surrounding
environment, radiance path
Sensors characteristics of various sensing systems: visual image interpretation i.e.
thermal and radar imagery, track scanners (along and across) radiometric calibration,
introduction to digital image processing techniques, spatial resolutions, spectral
resolutions, radiometric resolutions, temporal resolutions, images, aerial photography and
photo-grammetry, pixels, microwave
Image analysis: elements of image analysis, image preprocessing, radiometric correction,
geometric correction
Image enhancement: contrast enhancement, radiometric segmentation, pseudo-colour
enhancement, data merging, spatial filtering, arithmetic operations, vegetation indices,
Future developments of remote sensing
Image transformation: principal component analysis, minimum noise fractions, fourier
transform, image classification, unsupervised classification.
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignments & quizzes
University Exams
40%
10%
50%
References
(i).
Lillesand, T.M., Kiefer, R. W. and Chipman, J.W. 2007. Remote Sensing and
Image Interpretation (6th). New York: Wiley. 756p
TN 0231: PRINCIPLES OF REMOTE SENSING
(10 CREDITS)
Course description:
In this course, students learn the basic concepts and operational skills of remote sensing and
become familiar with the capabilities and limitations of current and future remote-sensing
systems. They also learn the techniques commonly used for interpreting aerial photographs,
satellite remote-sensing data, and thermal and radar imagery, and gain practical lab
experience in image interpretation. They are exposed to a wide variety of applications in
environmental mapping and monitoring, natural resource management, urban and regional
planning, and global change research.
Objectives:
(i) To enable students acquire knowledge and skills necessary for successful
integration of remote sensing in any field of application
(ii) To enable students use the skills of remote sensing techniques for acquiring
different types of geospatial information
(iii)To prepare students for more advanced studies in the areas of remote sensing and
GIS
Learning outcome:
At the end of the course, students should be able to:
35
(i) Understand concepts related to remote sensing should be able to make visual image
interpretations
(ii) Differentiate the different types of sensors as remote sensing is concerned
Prerequisites:
CD 0213 Introduction to Computer Graphics
Mode of delivery:
40 hrs lecture hours, 20 hrs tutorial/seminar, 10 hrs assignment, 20 hrs independent
studies, 10 hrs practical hrs
Course content:
Concepts and Foundations of Remote Sensing: Electromagnetic spectrum, apparent and
optical properties, electromagnetic quantities, physical interaction with surrounding
environment, radiance path
Sensors characteristics of various sensing systems: visual image interpretation i.e.
thermal and radar imagery, track scanners (along and across) radiometric calibration,
introduction to digital image processing techniques, spatial resolutions, spectral
resolutions, radiometric resolutions, temporal resolutions, images, aerial photography and
photo-grammetry, pixels, microwave
Image analysis: elements of image analysis, image preprocessing, radiometric correction,
geometric correction
Image enhancement: contrast enhancement, radiometric segmentation, pseudo-colour
enhancement, data merging, spatial filtering, arithmetic operations, vegetation indices,
Future developments of remote sensing
Image transformation: principal component analysis, minimum noise fractions, image
classification, unsupervised classification.
Mode of assessment
2 Tests
Assignments & quizzes
University Exams
40%
10%
50%
References
(ii).
Lillesand, T.M., Kiefer, R. W. and Chipman, J.W. 2007. Remote Sensing and
Image Interpretation (6 th ). New York: Wiley. 756p
CN 0223: INTRODUCTION TO CLOUD COMPUTING (10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
Cloud computing is one of the emerging technology in the world of information technology.
Cloud computing promises to increase the velocity with which applications are deployed,
increase innovation, and lower cost, all while increasing business agility.
36
Course Objectives
The goal of this course is to introduce the students to the principles, foundations, and
applications of cloud computing, and the way it presents significant technology trends to
reshape information technology processes and the IT marketplace. In this course the different
types of features, standards, services, and security issues in cloud computing will be
discussed. This course offers students the opportunity to study this new paradigm of
computing in which dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources are offered as
services over the internet. The course will also cover some of the autonomic computing
aspects which provide solutions to the challenges of cloud management.
Learning Outcomes
After completion of this course students should be able to:
 Describe fundamentals, technologies, systems and application of cloud computing

Describe the types of cloud computing

Describe the role of grid computing in cloud computing
Prerequisites
None
Delivery Mode
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per Semester
Course Contents
The course will cover material related to, but not limited to the following wide spectrum of
topics:
 Cloud computing fundamentals, technologies, systems, and applications.
 Adaptive agent based scheduling of service oriented workflows in Clouds.
 Role of grid computing technologies in cloud computing.
 Integration of high performance computing into cloud computing services.
 Cloud types and services: scientific services on the cloud.
 Hybrid grid/cloud computing technologies: provisioning, processing, and data elastic
storage.
 Scientific clouds and HPC on competitive cloud resources
 Fault tolerance strategies used in cloud computing.
 Ongoing widely known projects - strengths and limitations.
Recommended References/Textbooks
1. Borko. F and Armando. E,(2010) “Handbook of Cloud Computing”, Springer.
2. Richard Murch (2004) “Autonomous Computing”, IBM Press.
TN 0114: INTRODUCTION
INSTRUMENTATION
TO
ELECTRONICS
MEASUREMENT AND
(10.0 CREDITS)
Course Description
This course introduce the students to principles of electronics measurement and
instrumentation
Course Objectives
37
This course aims at introducing the students to the techniques used in measurement of
electronic parameters and how to use different measuring instruments.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
(i) Explain basic concepts and definitions in measurement.
(ii) Explain the operation and design of electronic instruments for parameter measurement
(iii)Explain the operation of oscilloscopes and the basic circuit blocks in the design of an
oscilloscope. •Explain the circuitry and design of various function generators.
(iv) Explain the techniques used in signal analysis in time domain and frequency domain.
(v) Explain the operation and design of counters.
(vi) Compare different ADC and DAC techniques and explain various circuits for
conversion.
(vii) Explain the transmission line effects pertaining to linear and non-linear loads in the
context of bounce diagrams.
Prerequisites
None
Delivery Mode
40 hours lectures + 20 hours tutorials/seminars + 10 hours assignment + 20 hours independent
studies, 10 hours practical per Semester
Course Contents
 Introduction to Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation
 Basic Concepts in Measurement
 Electronic Instruments for Parameter Measurement: AC/DC voltmeters, multimeters
 Electronic Instruments for Parameter Measurement: digital voltmeter, component
measurement
 Electronic Instruments for Parameter Measurement: Q-meter, vector impedance meter
 Oscilloscopes: CRT’s, deflection systems, probes
 Function Generators: sine-wave generators
 Function Generators: frequency synthesis, pulse generators
 Signal Analysis: Wave analysis, harmonic distortion analyzer
 Signal Analysis: spectrum analyzer
 Counters
 A/D and D/A Conversion
 Measurement of Transmission Line Effects, Bounce diagrams, linear and non-linear loads.
Recommended References/Textbooks
1. A. D. Helfrick and W.D. Cooper (1990), “Modern Electronic Instrumentation and
Measurement Techniques”, Prentice-Hall.
2. D. Buchla and W. McLachen (1992), “Applied Electronic Instrumentation and
Measurement, Maxwell Macmillan, Int. Publishing Group.
38
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