Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky (1865)

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12 A.P.
Mrs. Todd
Name __________________________
Crime and Punishment (1865)
B-block
A novel in six parts with an epilogue
by Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
Assignment for Parts II, III, IV, V and VI:
For each assigned reading (see schedule on the back):
A.
Title the chapters.
B.
As you read, note for textual examples of the following concepts:
 suffering (is there a need for suffering?)
 sacrifice (who?, for what?, to what effect?)
 crime (definitions, justifications)
 confession
 redemption/resurrection
C.
Choose an aspect of the reading you think is most crucial to that particular section
(theme, plot, characterization, style, setting, imagery, symbolism, point of view, motif*,
etc.). Write a one-sentence analytical statement about it (a thesis statement!).
Provide 2 - 4 pieces of evidence (quotations/examples) to support your point.
Vary the topics, so you use each one at least once during the novel.
NOTE: Keep potential final essay topics in mind!
If you notice a symbol, you might continue to follow it in your notes, for example.
Discussion Leaders
 Complete the above for your section. Be the expert on your chapters (including
explaining allusions, if applicable).
 Prepare a two-part discussion. The first day will be a Socratic discussion on the whole
section. Frame the discussion with overarching question(s) to give a clear analytical
focus. The second day will focus on a close reading passage you select.
 Choose a passage for close reading. Make a handout (1 page preferably) with the passage
and 3-5 close reading questions for the passage. Bring enough copies for the class.
(You can cut and paste the passage from an on-line version of the text:
http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/235/1029/frameset.html
or search www.bibliomania.com for Crime and Punishment)
 Prepare probing discussion questions to guide the class through the reading (use
assignment above to guide your choices).
*Motif
“A unifying element in an artistic work, especially any recurrent image, symbol, theme, character type, subject, or
narrative detail. Although scholars have variously traced the term motif back to French, Italian and medieval Latin
sources, the root words typically mean “motive.” A given motif may be unique to a work or it may appear in
numerous works (by the same author or different authors). In face, a motif may be so widespread that it serves as
the kernel for works typically associated with different genres or fields, such as literature, art, music, architecture,
myth and folklore.” (Murfin, Ross. The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, 2nd ed.)
“A motif is a conspicuous element, such as a type of event, device, reference, or formula, which occurs frequently in
worlds of literature….The term “motif” or else the German leitmotif (a guiding motif), is also applied to the
frequent repetition, within a single work, of a significant verbal or musical phrase, or set description, or complex of
images, as in the operas of Richard Wagner or in novels by Thomas Mann, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and
William Faulkner.” (Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms, 8th ed.)
Crime and Punishment Reading Schedule 2011-12 (B-block)
Please sign up to be a discussion leader (see AP links on www.mrstodd.com)
Part
I
II
III
IV
V
VI and
epilogue
Date*
December 21-22
January 2-3, 2012
January 4, 9
January 10-11
January 13, 17
Discussion Leaders
January 18, 20
*Discussion leaders will lead an initial discussion of their assigned part on the first date.
They will assign a close reading with questions due the next class. The discussion leaders will
also facilitate the close reading discussion (on the second date).
picture of Dostoevsky
12 A.P.
Mrs. Todd
Name __________________________
Crime and Punishment (1865)
A novel in six parts with an epilogue
by Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky
Assignment for Parts II, III, IV, V, VI and epilogue:
For each assigned reading (see schedule on the back):
[F-block]
A.
Title the chapters.
B.
As you read, note for textual examples of the following concepts:
 suffering (is there a need for suffering?)
 sacrifice (who?, for what?, to what effect?)
 crime (definitions, justifications)
 confession
 redemption/resurrection
C.
Choose an aspect of the reading you think is most crucial to that particular section
(theme, plot, characterization, style, setting, imagery, symbolism, point of view, motif*,
etc.). Write a one-sentence analytical statement about it (a thesis statement!).
Provide 2 - 4 pieces of evidence (quotations/examples) to support your point.
Vary the topics, so you use each one at least once during the novel.
NOTE: Keep potential final essay topics in mind!
If you notice a symbol, you might continue to follow it in your notes, for example.
Section Socratic Discussion Leaders


Complete the above for your section. Be the expert on your chapters (including explaining
allusions, if applicable).
Prepare probing discussion questions to guide the class through the section (use above assignment
as a guide). Frame the discussion with overarching question(s) to give a clear analytical focus.
Close-Reading Discussion Leaders




Complete the above for your section.
Choose a passage, crucial to the section and rich for discussion, for close reading. Make a
handout (one page preferably) with the passage and three to five (3-5) close reading questions for
the passage. Bring enough copies for the class the first day we discuss the section.
(You can cut and paste the passage from an on-line version of the text:
http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/235/1029/frameset.html or search www.bibliomania.com for
Crime and Punishment)
Prepare probing discussion questions to guide the class through the reading (use assignment
above to guide your choices). Refer to and extend the Socratic discussion held the prior class.
Turn in questions and a brief explanation of why you chose the passage.
*Motif
“A unifying element in an artistic work, especially any recurrent image, symbol, theme, character type, subject, or
narrative detail. Although scholars have variously traced the term motif back to French, Italian and medieval Latin
sources, the root words typically mean “motive.” A given motif may be unique to a work or it may appear in
numerous works (by the same author or different authors). In face, a motif may be so widespread that it serves as
the kernel for works typically associated with different genres or fields, such as literature, art, music, architecture,
myth and folklore.” (Murfin, Ross. The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, 2nd ed.)
“A motif is a conspicuous element, such as a type of event, device, reference, or formula, which occurs frequently in
worlds of literature….The term “motif” or else the German leitmotif (a guiding motif), is also applied to the
frequent repetition, within a single work, of a significant verbal or musical phrase, or set description, or complex of
images, as in the operas of Richard Wagner or in novels by Thomas Mann, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and
William Faulkner.” (Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms, 8th ed.)
Crime and Punishment Reading Schedule 2011-12 (F-block)
Please sign up to be a discussion leader (see link in Crime and Punishment section) on
www.mrstodd.org)
Part
I
II
II close read
III
III close read
IV
IV close read
V
V close read
VI & epilogue
VI & epilogue
close read
Date
December 22, 23
January 2, 2012!
January 4
January 5
January 9
January 11
January 12
January 13
January 18
January 19
Discussion Leaders
class (group effort)
January 20
picture of Dostoevsky
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