RECL 110-- LEISURE and HUMAN DEVELOPMENT-

advertisement
RECL 110 LEISURE and HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Spring 2006
Instructor: Ms. B.J. Grosvenor, M.S.
Office: SPXC 54
E-mail: [email protected]
Phone: (408) 924-3003
Office Hours: Mon & Wed - - 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon and by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The lifespan process of human/personal development is explored as the source of happiness associated with optimal leisure
experience. Students learn to apply concepts from developmental and flow theory to plan, facilitate, and evaluate opportunities for the
leisure state-of-mind to occur for people in every life-stage.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
1.0
To learn to define and facilitate leisure, play, and recreation from a developmental perspective for all groups of people,
understanding:
1.1
Leisure as an optimal developmental mental experience resulting from freely pursuing total conscious engagement.
1.2
Play as an inherent human capacity for seeking stimulation and delighting in one's self, an attitude that cannot resist the
fun of exploration, challenge, and discovery of unknowns.
1.3
Recreation as a medium chosen to restore one's self and uplifts the human spirit and provides both anticipated and
unanticipated beneficial outcomes.
2.0
To study the fundamental psychological, social psychological, and socio-cultural processes which define and shape human
development across the lifespan from all groups of people.
3.0
To examine the multiple roles of leisure, play, and recreation across the lifespan to individuals and to learn the developmental
needs to grow and change which can be met through recreation.
4.0
To develop ideas about providing interactive leisure opportunity which is based on goals for self-development through lifestage-appropriate, freely pursued, personally rewarding, and first-hand participation.
5.0
To advance in self-knowledge, in understanding of others, and toward one's own potential and responsibilities as a sensitive,
educated, and articulate professional in the field recreation and parks.
Advice to Students
* This is an upper division course and challenges students to grow in knowledge and in ability to put knowledge to use related
to leisure in direct relation to human development. Ask questions in class, apply study and learning techniques. Student will then
develop the necessary knowledge to do needs-based planning, programming, leadership, and supervision of clients/participants
throughout the lifespan.
* Personal concerns or learning disabilities or problems need to be taken care of as early as possible. Students can discuss
personal needs privately during my office hours.
2 REQUIRED COURSE TEXTS
1 SUPPLEMENTARY COURSE READER
Purchase both textbooks during the first week of the semester.
The Bookstore returns books to publishers early for credit.
1). Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. (1990 or 1991). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York, NY: Harper & Row.
2). Purchase supplementary course reader at Maple Press on San Carlos between 10th & 11th Streets. Purchase the reader by the 4th
week of class. The reader provides explanatory notes to expand on readings from texts, some lectures, and worksheets for inclass learning or independent study.
GRADED COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Professional Attitude & Contribution to Others' Development = (30% of total final grade)
1. Evidence of study of current reading assignment and willingness to assist the learning process of others by contributing to
discussion AKA Class Contribution (10% of grade)
2. Peer Teaching Subject = Human Development. This assignment relates to the human development course reader. The
Instructor will assign a section of a designated chapter to each student in class. (20% of grade)
 Peer teaching days are MANDATORY attendance days - ALL students must be present on both dates so peers have "students"
to teach!



Reading from the book is NOT permitted.
Peer teaching is graded using criteria: prepared notes, familiar with the information, a plan for teaching is evident, ready with
examples and illustrations, can interpret terminology, listens to students, and uses motivated body language.
Extra credit can be earned by preparing visual aids on paper or for the white board
Cognitive Mastery of Course Content = (70% of total final grade)
1. Oral Tests of Competence
(10% of grade).
Students will prepare in-depth analysis for discussion on:
 1 – Day focusing on Optimal Experience/Flow (3 points)
 1 – Day focusing on SJSU Pre-school Lab (4 points)
 1 – Day focusing on Young Adulthood Development/Monopoly (3 points)
The students are to provide examples of insightful observations linking text with real-life contributions.
2. Quizzes
(5% of grade).
Involve early memorization of basic facts needed for learning theories and creating an understanding of the knowledge Presented in
the 2 texts.
 Content areas: Flow (Csikszentmihalyi), Maslow, Erikson; Piaget; Kohlberg
 Each quiz given within the first 10 minutes of class. Any student arriving after the start of the quiz will NOT be given the
opportunity to take the quiz.
 Each quiz will be administered within 1 or 2 class periods after the instructor presents each major theory.
 Be ready! Read prior to the lecture and review your own notes prior to the quiz day.
3. Field Study and Oral Reports (10% of grade).
Observe a group “in action” and prepare verbal report to class for one assigned age group. This may be done individually or with
others with the same assignment. Present key points - relating the observed group in action - to specific developmental theory at the
groups life-stage. Each student will pick one of the following 4 developmental stages to observe and then report in class on a specific
designated day.
a. An adult hobby club (ex. electronic aircraft club, potter's guild, community theater...)
Purpose of observation – relate this group to the theory of Optimal Experience and the mind in flow to any age group.
The focus is to find a group where many participants are likely to be experiencing flow.
b. A children's group (ex. after school recreation, girl scouts, hobby club.) The children are to be in the age range of 7-12. Seek
permission from the group leader FIRST, prior to your observation. Do not put yourself at risk as an “uninvited”
observer.
Purpose of observation: relate to all theories in Human Development textbook related to children age 7-12.
c. A teen/adolescent group (ex. teen center or drop-in club, teen interest group like Debate Club, Scouts, a dance class, or AlaTeen)
Purpose of observation: relate to all theories and research for adolescents 13-19
d. An older adult group (ex. senior center program, senior class like line dancing, bridge club, or scrapbook making group, or
an Elderhostel program...
Purpose of Observation: relate to all theories and research for older adults (60+)
4. Middle Adulthood Interview - Type Written Paper 4-5 pages in length and Oral Presentation in class. (15% of grade)



Essay documenting and analyzing a middle-aged adult's self-reported experience in terms of life-stage development.
Write an overall summary of the interview from the perspective of this adult's developmental adjustment in their current
life-stage (middle adulthood), explaining your reasoning (what is the basis for your judgment...justify your observations).
Close your paper with a lengthy prescription of various ways this person could increase flow in daily life. No matter how
much flow s/he experiences.
5. Exams
a) Mid-Term Exam (10% of grade).
Short Answer Essay covering: Optimal Experience (entire book), Developmental Theories: Early Childhood and Later Childhood.
b) Final Exam (20% of grade)
Short Answer Essay covering: Optimal Experience with specific application to Developmental Theory. Assessment of your
knowledge and professional judgment related to Adolescence, Young Adulthood, Middle Adulthood, and Later Adulthood.
GRADED ELEMENTS IN BRIEF - The semester grade = 100% to receive A+
30% of grade is contributed by: Professional Attitude & Contribution to Others' Development:
 Class Contributions
10 %
 Peer Teaching
20 %
70% of grade is contributed by Cognitive Mastery:
 Oral Competence
10 %
 Quizzes
5%
 Field Study and Verbal Report
 Middle Adult Case Study (Paper)
 Mid-Term Exam
 Final Exam
TOTAL
10 %
15 %
10 %
20 %
100 %
Suggestions for Maximizing YOUR Involvement to enhance your learning.
 Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge and grasp of the concepts of Human Development in conjunction with
Flow and the provision of recreation.
 You will present material verbally through peer teaching and oral tests.
 You will be asked to recall material and answer question on tests and quizzes.
 One written paper will be required, the topic Middle Adulthood.
 You will also demonstrate your commitment to this class and to your peers by attending and fully participating in the activities
on the required attendance days.
Key to Grades
1.) Outstanding – demonstrate a high-level of knowledge and unusual ability to articulate examples in the classroom with peers.
Excellent writing skills (spelling, punctuation, grammar, organization, and citing reference), oral speaking skills, and
demonstrated professional dependability (on-time, complete, authoritative use of resources) A + = 97-100%, A = 93-96%, A = 90-92%.
2.) Well above-average knowledge and good capability to use it the knowledge. Some weakness in organization or presentation or
failure to use authoritative resources (cited reading & theories) or provide specific information (clear not vague/general): B +
= 87-89%;
B = 83-86%; B - = 80-82%.
3.) Acceptable, entry-level professional knowledge and some ability to use it and authoritative resources and information: writing,
speaking, and organization weakness does not limit overall communication of ideas but does represent lack of sophistication:
C+ = 77-79%; C = 73-76%; C - =70-72%.
4.) Incomplete or weak level of knowledge and questionable ability to use it; writing standard not met; unable to present information
orally in a cogent and authoritative manner; serious limits in communication ability: D+ =67-69%, D = 63-66%, D- = 60~62%;
5.) Insufficient knowledge and undependable ability to use knowledge, unable to communicate in an organized and uninterrupted
fashion: F = 59.4% and lower.
UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE, or DEPARTMENT POLICY INFORMATION:
Academic Integrity Statement (from Office of Judicial Affairs):
“Your own commitment to learning, as evidenced by your enrollment at San José State University and the University’s Academic
Integrity Policy requires you to be honest in all your academic course work. Faculty are required to report all infractions to the Office
of Judicial Affairs. The policy on can be found at http://www2.sjsu.edu/senate/S04-12.pdf
Campus Policy in Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act:
“If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, or if you need special arrangements in case the building
must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible, or see me during office hours. Presidential Directive 9703 requires that students with disabilities register with DRC to establish a record of their disability.”
Cell Phones:
Students will turn their cell phones off or put them on vibrate mode while in class. They will not answer their phones in class.
Students whose phones disrupt the course and do not stop when requested by the instructor will be referred to the Judicial Affairs
Officer of the University.
Personal Computer Use:
In the classroom, faculty allows students to use computers only for class-related activities. These include activities such as taking
notes on the lecture underway, following the lecture on Web-based PowerPoint slides that the instructor has posted, and finding Web
sites to which the instructor directs students at the time of the lecture. Students who use their computers for other activities or who
abuse the equipment in any way, at a minimum, will be asked to leave the class and will lose participation points for the day, and, at a
maximum, will be referred to the Judicial Affairs Officer of the University for disrupting the course. (Such referral can lead to
suspension from the University.) Students are urged to report to their instructors computer use that they regard as inappropriate (i.e.,
used for activities that are not class related).
Library and Online Research Requirement
Library and online research are encouraged to complete this course.
Rebecca Feind - Reference Librarian and Outreach Coordinator
[email protected]
408 – 808 – 2007
King Library Office #4020
Student Rights and Responsibilities
http://www2.sjsu.edu/senate/s90-5.htm
TENTATIVE COURSE CALENDAR
Recl 110 - Leisure & Human Development
Day Date Topic
Course Calendar
Flow Text
Spring 2006
Kleiber ?’s
Instructor: B.J. Grosvenor, M.S.
H.D. Reader
Notes & Deadlines
Thur
1/26
Overview of Major Assignments
Purchase Books
Tues
1/31
Happiness Revisited
The Anatomy of Consciousness
Chapter 1 – p. 1 - 22
Chapter 2 – p. 23 - 42
Read ALL chapters PRIOR to class
Sign Up for Field Study Groups
Thur
2/02
Enjoyment & The Quality of Life
The Conditions of Flow
Chapter 3 – p. 43 – 70
Chapter 4 – p. 71 - 93
Points awarded for speaking in class
Tues
2/07
The Body in Flow
Flow of Thought
Chapter 5 – p. 94 – 116
Chapter 6 – p. 117 – 142
Thur
2/09
Work as Flow
Enjoying Solitude and Other People
Chapter7 – p. 143 – 162
Chapter 8 – p. 164 - 191
Tues
2/14
The Making of Meaning
Chapter 10 – p. 214 - 240
Thur
2/16
Assessment of Flow Competence
Tues
2/21
Human Development Theories
Maslow / Erikson/Freud
Thur
2/23
Human Development Theories
Piaget / Kohlberg
Tues
2/28
The Many Faces of Leisure
Ch 1 – questions in reader
Quiz # 3 - Erikson
Thur
3/02
Development, Motivation and Leisure
Ch 2 – questions in reader
Quiz # 4 - Kohlberg
Tues
3/07
Changes in Leisure Behavior Over
the Life Span
Ch 3 – questions in reader
Quiz # 5 – Piaget
Thur
3/09
Childhood – Neural, Cognitive, Emerging Self and Socialization
Tues
3/14
Socialization through Play and Leisure
Thur
3/16
CPRS CONFERENCE IN ONTARIO CA – Extra Credit
Tues
3/21
SJSU Pre-school Lab Visitation in C.C.B.
Quiz # 1
Elements of Flow
AND[ Field Study Group ] Adult Hobby Group
Student Verbal Reports
Quiz # 2 Maslow
Ch’s - 3 & 5 - Reader
Ch 4 – questions in reader
OR
Meet @ BBQ Pits
Middle Adulthood Case Study Interviews
TAKE NOTES for in-class reporting
Thur
3/23
Discuss Visitation to SJSU pre-school Lab and SPECIFIC quantifiable findings based on material from course reader Competence Assessed – Orally
Tues
Thur
3/28
3/30
SPRING BREAK
SPRING BREAK
Tues
4/04
Realms of Cognition in Middle Childhood & Developmental Assets
Ch’s 6 & Assets Handout – Reader
Thur
4/06
Middle Childhood
Ch’s 7 & 8 - Reader
Tues
4/11
Student Verbal Reports
Thur
4/13
Demonstration of Knowledge Gained
TEST – Early and Middle Childhood
Tues
4/18
Adolescence – Physical, Cognitive, Identity and Social
Ch’s 9 & 10 – Reader
Thur
4/20
Leisure Experience and the Formation of Identity
Tues
4/25
Early Adulthood – Physical, Cognitive, Emotional and Social Dev
Thur
4/27
Monopoly Day
Tues
5/02
Middle Adulthood – Cognitive, Personality and Social Dev
Thur
5/04
Middle Adult Case Study Verbal Reports
Tues
5/09
Middle Adult Case Study Verbal Reports
Thur
5/11
Later Adulthood – Gains and Losses
Ch 15 - Reader
Tues
5/16
Later Adulthood Field Study Group
[ Field Study Group ]
Final Examination – Comprehensive
Enjoy a little leisure
Enjoy a little more leisure
Peer Teaching
[ Field Study Group ] Children 7 – 12 yrs of age
AND
Ch 5 – questions in reader
Peer Teaching
[ Field Study Group ] Teens
Ch’s 11 & 12 - Reader
Peer Teaching
Materials provided by Instructor
Ch’s 13 & 14 – Reader
Monopoly HW Due
ALL STUDENT PAPERS DUE on May 4
Friday May 19 12:15 – 2:30 p.m.
Later Adulthood
Essay Format
Topics, Assignments, Quizzes, and Tests etc . . . subject to change at the discretion of the Instructor
Download
Related flashcards

Occupations

49 cards

Childhood

31 cards

Social psychology

27 cards

Create Flashcards