Mood Disorders I - College of Public Health & Health Professions

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College of Public Health & Health Professions

Department of Clinical and Health Psychology

Course Syllabus

M, W (4 Credit Hours)

CLP 6476 Lifespan Psychopathology

Fall Semester 2007

Course Website Location: http://www.JamesHJohnson.com

Instructor Information

Instructor Name:

Address:

Phone Number

James H. Johnson, PhD, ABPP/

Child

Duane E. Dede, PhD

PO Box 100165 HSC

(352) 273 – 6455 (Johnson); (352) 273 – 5267 (Dede)

Email Address;

Office Hours [email protected]

; [email protected]

TBA

Course Overview or Purpose

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the range of child, adolescent, and adult psychological disorders seen in clinical practice across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on diagnostic issues, theoretical formulations, etiology, treatment, and research findings related to each of these conditions. Issues such as comorbidity (simultaneous presentation of two or more disorders), cultural influences on the expression of mental disorders, and psychological factors related to physical conditions will also be considered. The clinical manifestations of each of these conditions will be illustrated through the use of case examples and or video presentation.

PowerPoint presentations will be used for all lectures and will be made available prior to class time on the course website.

Course Objectives and/or Goals

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

 demonstrate knowledge of diagnostic criteria for various forms of psychopathology as these are reflected in children, adolescents, and adults

 demonstrate knowledge of etiological factors and theoretical perspectives relevant to these forms of psychopathology

 demonstrate knowledge the relevance of developmental factors as they are related to the manifestations of these disorders across the life span

 demonstrate knowledge of current research findings relevant to these disorders demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of cultural factors to the development, diagnosis, outcome and treatment of these conditions, and

 demonstrate knowledge of evidence-based treatments for the range of disorders considered.

Class Format

Over the course of the semester, the class will consist of one two-hour class dealing with various common forms of psychopathology as these are reflected in children and adolescents and a second two-hour class meeting focusing on various forms of psychopathology as they are reflected in adults of varying ages. Faculty members teaching the two sections of the class will be individuals with specific expertise in the areas of child/adolescent and adult psychopathology, respectively. Class format will consist of combinations of lectures, group discussions and demonstrations. In addition, adult psychopathology lectures will be supplemented by a brief

“movie night” (attendance is optional but encouraged) which will include viewing and discussions of cinematic depiction of psychopathology and its social context. A list of movies has been identified and additional ideas will be solicited from participants. Likewise, child/adolescent psychopathology lectures will be supplemented by an optional series of videotape presentations that depicts the clinical characteristics of a wide range of classic childhood disorder (as in the case of the adult movie series, attendance is optional). Attendance and active participation in class sessions is required.

Course Materials

Adult Related Readings

The following texts are required and may be purchased in the HSC Bookstore:

Sadock, B.J., & Sadock, V.A.. (Eds.) Kaplan and Sadock’s Synopsis of Psychiatry (9th Ed.).

New York: Williams & Wilkins, 2003.

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,

Fourth Edition (DSM-IV-TR). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association, 2000.

A listing of additional readings for the adult-focused portion of this course is provided in the

Addendum to this syllabus.

Additional readings, in the form of .pdf files are located on the student share drive in the

“Lifespan Psychopathology” Folder.

Child/Adolescent Related Readings

No text is required. A listing of required and recommended readings for the child/adolescentfocused portion of this course is provided in the Addendum to this syllabus.

Required and recommended readings will be provided in .pdf files located on the student share drive in the “Lifespan Psychopathology” Folder.

Course Requirements/Evaluation/Grading

Grades will be based on the results of mid-term and final examinations, related to material covered in both the child/adolescent and adult tracks of the course. Each of these four exams will

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be worth a total of 100 points (Total for the course = 400) and will consist of a mixture of short answer, listing, and essay questions related to research relevant to various disorders, assessment, diagnostic, treatment, or other issues relevant to a life span conceptualization of psychopathology. Exams will be based on information from readings, case examples, classroom video presentations, lectures, and class discussion. Grades will be determined based on the average of scores obtained on the four exams using the following scale for determining grades:

A = 90 - 100 points; B = 80 - 89 points; C = 70 - 79 points; D = 60 - 69 points; F = 60 points

Topical Outline

Week 1 (August 27

th

and 29

th

)

Introduction - Developmental Factors in Childhood Psychopathology: A lifespan perspective; A

Scientist-Practitioner Approach to Assessment, Intervention and clinical conceptualization.

Introduction - Lifespan Issues in Psychopathology, Diagnosis and Classification of

Psychological Disorders

Week 2 (September 5

th

ONLY)

Risk Factors in Developmental Psychopathology: Implications for psychopathology across the lifespan.

No Class (Labor Day)

Week 3 (September 10

th

and 12

th

)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Childhood and Adolescence (with a brief consideration of adult ADHD)

Delirium, Dementia and other Cognitive Disorders

Week 4 (September 17

th

and 19

th

)

Anxiety Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence

Anxiety Disorders in early, middle, and later adulthood

Week 5 (September 24

th

and 26

th

)

Anxiety Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence (Cont.)

Substance Disorders

Week 6 (October 1

st

and 3

rd

)

Pervasive Developmental Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence

Schizophrenia

3

Week 7 (October 8

th

and 10

th

)

Pervasive Developmental Disorders (with a commentary on schizophrenia in childhood and adolescence)

Other Psychotic Disorders, Dissociative Disorders and Impulse Disorders

Week 8 (October 15

Mid-Term Exam

th

and 17

th

)

Somataform Disorders, Factitious Disorders & Sleep Disorders

Week 9 (October 22

nd

and 24

th

)

Eliminative Disorders: Enuresis and Encopresis

Mid-Term Exam

Week 10 (October 29

th

and 31

st

)

Childhood and Adolescent Depression

Mood Disorders I

Week 11 (November 5

Childhood Bipolar Disorder

th

and 7

th

)

Mood Disorders (Continued)

Week 12 (November 12th and 14

th

)

Oppositional Deviant, Conduct Disorder and Juvenile Delinquency

Personality Disorders

Week 13 (November 19

th

and 21

st

)

Pediatric Psychology

Eating Disorders

Week 14 (November 26

th

and 28

th

)

Pediatric Psychology (Continued)

Student Presentations

Week 15

Final Exams

(week of December 3

rd

)

Statement of University’s Honesty Policy (cheating and use of copyrighted materials)

4

Academic Integrity –

Students are expected to act in accordance with the University of Florida policy on academic integrity (see Student Conduct Code, the Graduate Student Handbook or this web site for more details:

www.dso.ufl.edu/judicial/procedures/academicguide.php

).

Cheating, lying, misrepresentation, or plagiarism in any form is unacceptable and inexcusable behavior.

We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity.

Policy Related to Class Attendance

Attendance is expected as a part of the student’s professional training. Students are expected to arrive for class on time and to remain for the full class period. Please silence or turn off cell phones or pagers. Students needing to miss class should make prior arrangements with the instruction.

Policy Related to Make-up Exams or Other Work

Students who must miss an exam or paper deadline because of conflicting professional or personal commitment must make prior arrangements with the instructor. If an examination must be missed because of illness, a doctor’s note is required.

Statement Related to Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

If you require classroom accommodation because of a disability, you must first register with the

Dean of Students Office ( http://oss.ufl.edu/ ). The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to you, which you then give to the instructor when requesting accommodation.

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to assist students in their coursework.

Counseling and Student Health

Students may occasionally have personal issues that arise in the course of pursuing higher education or that may interfere with their academic performance. If you find yourself facing problems affecting your coursework, you are encouraged to talk with an instructor and to seek confidential assistance at the University of Florida Counseling Center, 352-392-1575, or Student

Mental Health Services, 352-392-1171. Visit their web sites for more information: http://www.counsel.ufl.edu/ or http://www.health.ufl.edu/shcc/smhs/index.htm#urgent

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The Student Health Care Center at Shands is a satellite clinic of the main Student Health Care

Center located on Fletcher Drive on campus. Student Health at Shands offers a variety of clinical services, including primary care, women's health care, immunizations, mental health care, and pharmacy services. The clinic is located on the second floor of the Dental Tower in the Health

Science Center. For more information, contact the clinic at 392-0627 or check out the web site at: www.health.ufl.edu/shcc

Crisis intervention is always available 24/7 from: Alachua County Crisis Center: (352) 264-

6789.

Posting of Syllabus

The course syllabus will be posted on the course website and will be submitted to the departmental office to document compliance.

Addendum

Required Adult Psychopathology Readings

Introduction: Life Span issues in Psychopathology, Diagnosis and Classification –

Week 1

Gottesman, I. (2001). Psychopathology through a life span-genetic prism. American

Psychologist, 56 (11), 867 - 878.

Achenbach, T.M. & Rescorla, L.A. (2006). Developmental issues in assessment, taxonomy, and diagnosis of psychopathology. In D. Chicchetti and D. Cohen (Eds.) Developmental

Psychopathology, Volume 1: Theory and Method (2 nd

Edition), Hoboken, NJ, Wiley, 139 – 180.

Delerium, Dementia and other Cognitive Disorders – Week 3

Collins, M., Grindell, S., Lovell, M.R., Dede, D.E, Moser, D.J., Phalin, B.R., Nogle, S.,

Wasik, M., Cordry, D., Daugherty, M.K., Sears, S.F., Nicolette, G., Indelicato, P. & McKeag.,

D.B. (1999) Relationship between concussion and neuropsychological performance in college football players. JAMA, 282: 964-970.

Roman, G.C., Sachdev, P., Royal, D.R., Bullock, R.A., Orgogozo, J., Lopea-Pousa, S., Arizaga,

R., and Wallin, A. (2004). Vascular cognitive disorder: a new diagnostic category updating vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. Journal of Neurological Sciences, 226:

81-87.

Satz, P. (1993). Brain reserve capacity on symptom onset after brain injury: A formulation and review of evidence for threshold theory. Neuropsychology, 7: 273-295.

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Substance Disorders - Week 5

Mintzer, M.Z., Copersino, M.L. and Stitzer, M.L. (2005). Opiod abuse and cognitive performance. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 78: 225-230.

Mood Disorders - Week 11

Baune, B. T., Suslow, T., Arolt., V. and Berger, K. (2007). The relationship between psychological dimensions of depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in the elderly: The

MEMO-Study. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 41: 247-254.

Miklowitz, D.J. and Cicchetti, D. (2006). Toward a life span developmental psychopathology perspective on bipolar disorder. Development and psychopathology, 18, 935 – 938.

Required Child/Adolescent Psychopathology Readings

Introduction to Child Psychopathology - Week 1

Rutter, M, Kim-Cohen, J & Maughan, B (2006). Continuities and discontinuities in psychopathology between childhood and adult life. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry,

47, 276 – 295.

Schroeder, C.S. & Gordon, B.N. (2002). Development of psychopathology. In C. S. Schoeder and B. N. Gordon (2002). Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems: A Clinician’s guide (2 nd

ED), New York: Guilford, 1 – 39.

Mash, E. J. & Hunsley, J (2005). Evidence-based assessment of child and adolescent disorders:

Issues and challenge, Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 363 – 379.

Kazdin, A. E. (2005). Evidence-based assessment for children and adolescents: Issue in measurement, development and clinical application. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychology, 34, 548 – 558.

Risk Factors in Developmental Psychopathology - Week 2

Hall, H, (2004). Psychopathology across the life span: How important is genetics: In S. Luthar, J.

Burack, D. Cicchetti & J. Weisz (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on

Adjustment, Risk, and Disorder, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Muris, P. & Ollendick, T. H. (2005). The role of temperament in the etiology of child psychopathology. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 8 (4), 271- 89.

Kitzmann, K., Gaylord, N.K., Holt, A., & Kenny, E. (2003). Child witnesses to domestic violence: A meta-analytic review, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 339 - 352.

Putnam, F. (2003). Ten year research update review: Child sexual abuse. Journal of the

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 42, 269 - 278

.

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Fremont, W.P. (2004). Childhood reactions to terror-induced trauma: A review of the past 10 years. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 381 - 392.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – Week 3

Pelham, W.E., Fabiano, G.A., and Massetti, G.M. (2005). Evidence-based assessment of

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 449 – 476.

Wolraich, M. Charles J. Wibbelsman, C. J., Brown, T. E., Evans, S.W., Gotlieb, E. M., Knight, J.

R., Ross, E. C., Shubiner, H. H., Wender, E. H., and Wilens, T. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among adolescents: a review of the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical implications, Pediatrics 2005; 115:1734-1746.

Brown, R. T., Amler, R. W., Freeman, W. S., Perrin, J. M., Stein, M . T., Feldman, H. M.,

Pierce , K., and Wolraich, M. (2005). Treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: overview of the evidence (clinical trial), Pediatrics, 115, 749-757

Chronis, A.M., Jones, H.A. and , Raggi, V.I. (2006). Evidence-based psychosocial treatments for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Clinical Psychology

Review, 26, 486-502.

Livingston, R. (1999). Cultural issues in diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. Journal of the

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38, 1591 - 1594.

Barkley, R., Fischer, M., Smallish, L., and Kenneth Fletcher, K. (2006). Young adult outcome of hyperactive children: Adaptive functioning in major life activities. Journal of the American

Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(2):192-202.

Wilens, T.E., Biederman, J. & Spencer, T.J. (2002). Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder across the lifespan, Annual Review of Medicine, 53, 113 – 131.

Child/Adolescent Anxiety Disorders – Week 4 and Week 5

Silverman, W.K. & Ollenick, T.H. (2005). Evidence-based assessment of anxiety and its disorders in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34,

380 – 411.

Masi, G., Millepiedi, S., Mucci, M. Poli, P., Bertini, N. and Milantoni, L. (2004). Generalized anxiety disorder in referred children and adolescents, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 752 - 760.

Compton, et al (2004). Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for anxiety and depressive disorders in children and adolescents: An evidence-bases medicine review. Journal of the American

Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 930 - 959.

Rapoport, J. L. & Inoff-Germain, G. (2000). Practitioner review: Treatment of obsessivecompulsive disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry,

41, 419 - 431.

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Pervasive Developmental Disorders (and Schizophrenia) - Weeks 6 and 7

Ozonoff, S., Goodlin-Jones, B.L. and Solomon, M. (2005) Evidence-based assessment for autistic spectrum disorders in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychology, 34, 523-540.

Macintosh, K. E., & Dissanayake, C. (2004) The similarities and differences between autistic disorder and Asperger's disorder: A review of the empirical evidence. Journal of Child psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 421 - 434.

Charman, T., & Baird, G. (2002). Practitioner review: Diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders in

2 and 3-year old children, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 289 - 305.

Howlin, P., Goode, S., Hutton, J. and Rutter, M. (2004). Adult outcome for children with autism.

Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 212 - 229.

Eliminative Disorders: Enuresis and Encopresis - Week 9

Fritz, G., Rockney, R., et al (2004) Summary of the practice parameters for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with enuresis, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 123 - 125.

Child/Adolescent Depressive Disorder – Week 10

Hankin, B. & Abela, J. (2005). Depresson from childhood, through adolescence and Adulthood,

In B. Hankin & J. Abels (Eds.) Development of Psychopathology: A Vulnerability-stress

Perspective, Thousand Oaks, CA, Sage, 245 – 288.

Klein, D.N., Dougherty, L.R., and Olino, T.M. (2005). Toward guidelines for evidence-based assessment of depression in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychology, 34, 412-432.

Compton, et al (2004). Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for anxiety and depressive disorders in children and adolescents: An evidence-bases medicine review. Journal of the American

Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43, 930 - 959.

Child and Adolescent Bipolar Disorder – Week 11

Pavuluri, M. N., Birmaher, B., and Naylor, M. W. (2006). Pediatric bipolar disorder: a review of the past 10 years. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,

44(9):846-871.

Carlson, G.A. (2005). Early onset bipolar disorder: clinical and research considerations. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 333-43.

Youngstrom, E.A., Findling, R.L., Youngstrom, J.K. and Calabrese, J. R. (2005). Toward an evidence-based assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder. Journal of Clinical Child and

Adolescent Psychology, 34, 433-448.

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Asarnow, J. R., Thompson, M. C., and McGrath, E. P., Annotation: Childhood-onset schizophrenia: Clinical and treatment issues (2004). Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry,

45, 180 - 194.

Oppositional Defiant/Conduct Disorder/Juvenile Delinquency - Week 12

McMahon, R.J. & Frick, P.J. (2005). Evidence-based assessment of conduct problems in children and adolescents, Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 34, 477-505.

Thomas, C.R. (2006). Evidence-based practice for conduct disordered symptoms. American

Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 45(1), 109 - 114.

Loeber, R., Burke, J.D., Lahey, B.B., Winters, B.A., and Zera, M. (2000). Oppositional defiant and conduct disorder: A review of the past 10 years, Part I. Journal of the American Academy of

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39, 1468 - 1480.

Buurke, J., Loeber, R., and Birmaher, B. (2002). Oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder: A review of the past 10 years, Part II. Journal of the American Academy of Child and

Adolescent Psychiatry, 41, 1275 - 1293.

Overview of Pediatric Psychology – Weeks 13 and 14

Mullins, L. & Chaney,, J. M. (2001). Pediatric psychology: Contemporary issues. In E. Walker

& M. Roberts (Eds.), Handbook of Clinical Child Psychology (Third Edition), New York: Wiley.

Beale, I. L. (2005). Scholarly literature review: Efficacy of psychological interventions for

Pediatric Chronic Illnesses. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 31: 437-451

Recommended Child Treatment Articles

McLellan, J.P. & Werry, J.S. (2003). Evidence-based treatments in child and adolescent psychiatry, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 42, 1388 -

1400.

Grave, J. & Blissett (2004). Is cognitive behavior therapy developmentally appropriate for young children: A critical review of the evidence. Clinical Psychology Review, 24, 399 - 420.

Diamond, G. & Josephson, A. (2005). Family-based treatment research: a 10-year update.

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 44.9 872 - 888.

Nock, M. K., Goldman, J., Wang, Y, and Albano, A.M., From science to practice: The flexible use of evidence-based treatments in clinical settings. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent

Psychiatry, 43, 777 - 780.

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