Historic Preservation - Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

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HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
970:521:47848
762:448:01:47840
COURSE SYLLABUS
(Spring 2012)
Room 261 CSB
—
Historic Preservation:
History,
Programs, and Policy
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
Urban Planning and Policy Development
David Listokin, Ph.D.
Item
1.
Historic Preservation: Background and Course Scope
2.
Course Organization
3.
Class Topics, Readings, and Dates
4.
Course Requirements
5.
Academic Integrity
6.
Office Hours/Communication
7.
Paper Objective / Outline

Page
2
3, 5-9
3
3-4
4
4
10–13
course number for Urban Planning and Policy Development (access Sakai on this number)
course number for Planning and Public Policy

LISTOKIN
Professor
1
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
COURSE SYLLABUS
—
Historic Preservation:
History, Programs, and Policy
I.
HISTORIC PRESERVATION:
BACKGROUND AND COURSE SCOPE
The purview and scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly.
Whereas it once focused on nationally significant places of history and
architectural achievement, today a wide variety of resources deemed important to
the nation, state, and local community—from archaeology to engineering—are
being preserved. Historic preservation was once mainly a private activity; today,
although the private emphasis remains, there are many public programs and
regulations. The “numbers” of preservation reflect the expansion of the field. In
1970, there were about 2,500 listings on the federal National Register of Historic
Places and roughly 200 local historic district commissions; as of 2011, National
Register listings exceed 80,000, and there were more than 2,000 local historic
commissions.
Although many applaud historic preservation as a long overdue strategy
essential for revitalizing urban areas and beyond, critics charge that preservation
is too broadly applied and that preservation regulations are an unwarranted
public intervention into, and taking of, property. Proponents and antagonists of
preservation are working on legislative, legal, and other fronts to support their
respective positions. There are also design considerations. How can design
respect historical motifs while creating anew?
This introductory course overviews the theory and practice of historic
preservation. The class presents (1) the background and context of the historic
preservation movement; (2) historic preservation theory, mechanisms, and
policies, ranging from landmark designation to tax incentives; and (3) economic,
social, and other impacts of preservation.
LISTOKIN
Professor
2
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
2.
SYLLABUS
COURSE ORGANIZATION
The course objectives, organization, and requirements are discussed in class
one. An overview and history of historic preservation is presented in class two.
Federal, state, and local preservation programs are considered in classes three
through six. Legal issues from the government preservation regulations are
briefly reviewed in class seven. Because of their significance, property and income
tax incentives (e.g., historic preservation tax credits and property tax
abatements) are reviewed separately in classes eight through ten. Class eleven
considers the relationship between preservation, housing and economic
development. Classes twelve and thirteen consist of student presentations of
their paper research.
There are a number of Sunday walking tours in both New Jersey (February
12 and March 25) and New York City (April 15). (March and April dates are
tentative.) While optional, extra credit will be given for attendance. Most
important, the walking tours are enjoyable outings, so we encourage you to
attend.
3.
CLASS TOPICS, READINGS, and DATES
The date and subject matter of each class and associated readings are detailed in
Tables 1 – 3 on pages 5 through 9.
4.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Requirements include two take-home examinations and completing a
preservation paper. Extra credit will be given for presenting a brief PowerPoint
on your paper research at either class 12 or 13 (April 19 and April 26).
The first take-home examination will cover historic preservation history and
federal, state and local preservation programs (the subjects and related readings
covered in classes 2 through 6). The second take-home examination will cover
legal, financial and other aspects of preservation (the subjects and related
readings covered in classes 7 through 11.). Both take-home examinations will
consists predominately of brief and basic identifications and one short essay. In
doing the examination, you can access your class readings, notes, and any other
resources.
The first take-home examination will be distributed in class 6 (February 23)
and is due back in class 7 (March 1). The second take-home examination will be
distributed in class 11 (April 12) and is due back in class 13 (April 26). Details on
LISTOKIN
Professor
3
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
the preservation paper are contained in the syllabus in section 7 (syllabus pages
10-13). Note: There are two possible preservation paper topics — I and II. The
preservation paper is due back to me (email and hard copy) by 11 A.M. on May 7.
The course requirements relate as follows with respect to the final grade:
two take-home examinations (25 percent each and 50 percent total) and
preservation paper (50 percent). Late submission of the take-home examinations
or preservation paper will result in a full grade penalty (e.g., a “B+” instead of an
“A”). As indicated earlier, extra credit is given for participating in the student
presentations and class trips. While attendance will not formally affect the final
grade, you need to attend classes to do well in the course.
The learning goals of the course are to enhance knowledge of:
•
History of the American preservation movement
•
Preservation regulations and financial mechanisms
•
Impacts of preservation
5. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
I expect the highest level of academic integrity. Please see me if you have any
issues or questions in this regard (e.g., citation and attribution). Also review the
University’s Academic Integrity Policy here:
http://academicintegrity.rutgers.edu/integrity.shtml
6.
OFFICE HOURS/COMMUNICATION
I will have office hours before class (and by appointment) in Room 487. My office
phone is 848-932-2148; fax is 732-932-2363. My email address is
[email protected]
Feel free to contact me at any time on any matter.
LISTOKIN
Professor
4
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
Table 1
HISTORIC PRESERVATION: HISTORY, PROGRAMS, AND POLICY
— CLASS SESSIONS, DATES, AND TOPICS —
Class
Date
Topic
1
January 19
Course overview
2
January 26
Historic Preservation Background: Definition, Scope, Basis, and
History
3
February 2
Historic Preservation Implementation: Federal Programs and
Regulations
4
February 9
Historic Preservation Implementation: Federal Programs and
Regulations (continued)
February 12
Sunday Preservation Walking Tour – East Jersey Olde Towne
(Piscataway)
5
February 16
Historic Preservation Implementation: State Programs and Regulations
6
February 23
Historic Preservation Implementation: Local Programs and
Regulations (Exam 1 distributed)
7
March 1
Legal Preservation Issues (Exam 1 due)
8
March 8
Historic Preservation Financing and Tax Incentives: Theory
March 15
No class – Spring Break
March 22
Historic Preservation Financing and Tax Incentives: Practical
Application
March 25
Sunday Preservation Walking Tour – Newark (tentative)
March 29
Historic Preservation, Public Finance and the Property Tax
April 5
No class
April 12
Historic Preservation: Housing, Economic Development, and Social
Dimensions (Exam 2 distributed)
April 15
Sunday Preservation Walking Tour – New York City (tentative)
12
April 19
Preservation Student Presentations
13
April 26
Preservation Student Presentations (Exam 2 due)
May 7 at
11A.M.
– Preservation paper due–
9
10
11
LISTOKIN
Professor
5
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
Table 2
HISTORIC PRESERVATION: HISTORY, PROGRAMS, AND POLICY
— CLASS READINGS BY CLASS NUMBER (see Tables 1 and 3) —
Class (see Table 1)
2
(Historic Preservation
Basis and History)
3 and 4
(Federal Preservation
Programs)
5
(State Preservation
Programs)
6
(Local Preservation
Programs)
7
(Legal Preservation
Issues)
LISTOKIN
Professor
Reading Number
(see Table 3)
Page
1
Preface - 34
3
1-10
6a
1-4
1
35-80
6a
5-27
6c
29-35
9
1-16 (omit state/local at 8-12)
10
For reference only
1
81-116
2
45 - 86
6a
28-38
6c
35-38
14a
For reference only
1
117-156; 313-352
6a
38-45
12
all
14b
For reference only
9
17-44
11
all
11a
all
6
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
Class (see Table 1)
SYLLABUS
Number
Page
8 - 10
(Financing and Tax
1
279-351
4
skim
6c
Tax credits – 1-24; 38-43; Appendix
Resource X-2, 10-16; Appendix Resource
X-3, 17-27 (skim appendix)
6c
Property Tax – 24-29; Appendix Resource
X-4, 20-27 (skim appendix)
13
all (skim)
1
353-493
3
10-38
5
all
6b
All (skim)
6c
Appendix Resource X-5, 28-81 (skim)
7
All (skim)
8
All (skim)
Incentives)
11
(Housing, Economic
Development, and Social
Issues)
14c
LISTOKIN
Professor
skim
7
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
Table 3
HISTORIC PRESERVATION: HISTORY, PROGRAMS AND POLICY
—COURSE READINGS —
REQUIRED READINGS –
PURCHASE (Available at
Bookstore)
1. Stipe, Robert E. 2003. A Richer Heritage. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
REQUIRED READINGS –
ON SAKAI
2. Beaumont, Constance. 1996. Smart States, Better Communities : How State Governments can
Help Citizens Preserve Their Communities. National Trust for Historic Preservation.
3. Conde, Sarah. 2007. “Striking a Match in the Historic District: Opposition to Historic
Preservation and Responsive Community Building.” Georgetown University Law Center.
4. General Accounting Office. 2012. Limited Information on the Use and Enforcement of Tax
Effectiveness of Tax Expenditures Could be Mitigated by Congressional Action.
5. Listokin, David, Barbara Listokin and Michael Lahr. 1998. “The Contribution of Historic
Preservation to Housing and Economic Development.” Housing Policy Debate 9(3), 43-478.
6. Listokin, David. Draft Chapters:
a) Chapter 3 – “The Regulatory Framework”
b) Chapter 4 – “Historic and Economic Development”
c) Chapter 5 – “Financing Historic Preservation”
7. Listokin, David, Michael Lahr, Charles Heydt and David Stanek. 2010. First Annual Report of
the Economic Impact of the Federal Historic Tax Credit.
8. Mason, Randall. 2005. Economics and Historic Preservation. Brookings Institution Discussion
Paper
9. Miller, Julia. 2004. A Layperson’s Guide to Historical Preservation Law. Washington D.C.
National Trust for Historic Preservation.
10. National Park Service, Cultural Resources. 2006. Federal Historic Preservation Laws. The
Office Compilation of U.S. Cultural Heritage Statues.
11. Penn Central Transportation Co. v. City of New York 438. U.S. 104 57
11a. Reap, James and Melvin Hill. 2005. “Law and the Historic Preservation Commission: What
Every Member Needs to Know.” Cultural Resources Partnership Notes, National Park
Service Heritage Preservation Services, Cultural Resources.
LISTOKIN
Professor
8
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
12. Roddewig, Richard 2000. Preparing a Historic Preservation Ordinance. Chicago, IL:
American Planning Association, Planning Advisory Service, Report Number 374.
13. Schwartz, Harry. 2010. “State Tax Credits for Historic Preservation.”
14a. Appendix Compilation – New Jersey Preservation Resources .
14b. Appendix Compilation – New York City Preservation Resources.
14c. Preservation Critiques and Commentary
LISTOKIN
Professor
9
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
7A OBJECTIVE AND OUTLINE FOR HISOTRIC
PRESERVATION PAPER – I
Paper Objective
Select a neighborhood (“target neighborhood”) in a New Jersey community or other
location (“case study community”) that you think merits preservation (because of its
history, architecture, cultural value, etc.) The target neighborhood should not already
be listed /designated on a national, state, or local register.
Write a 15-20 page paper (double spaced) identifying the historic resources in the target
neighborhood and develop strategies for the preservation of these resources.
Paper Outline
Section
Content/Guide
Page #s
I. Executive Summary
Use bullet points and short paragraphs to
synopsize findings
1-2
II. Overview of Community
and Target Historic
Neighborhood
Briefly identify your case study community
(name, location, and a few socioeconomic
characteristics); synopsize its history; and
then briefly describe (history, notable
buildings, etc.) the target neighborhood you
are analyzing. Good to include images from
the target neighborhood.
2-3
III. Challenges to
Preservation of Historic
Resources in CommunityTarget Neighborhood
Briefly describe challenges, including
governmental actions (e.g., highway
construction) and private-sector challenges
(e.g., limited funds and interest)
2
IV. Recommended
Preservation Actions for
Community-Target
Neighborhood (Using
Existing Programs)
A. Historic Designation. Referring to Section
II and other sources, briefly present case for
federal/state/local historic designation
2-3
B. Preservation Strategies and Program.
Discuss application of varied preservation
“tools” as appropriate. These can include
Section 106, NEPA, and 4(f) review and
subsidies from property tax abatement, and
SAFTEA – LU. See syllabus pages 11-12 for
further details.
5-8
Briefly propose changes to existing
preservation “tools” and/or propose new
programs. See syllabus page 12 for further
details.
2-3
V. Future Preservation
Policies
LISTOKIN
Professor
10
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
POTENTIAL COMPONENTS OF PRESERVATION ACTIONS FOR PRESERVATION PAPER—I
RECOMMENDED ACTIONS (FOR PAPER SECTIONS IV)
I.
Federal Tools

“Sketch” National Register nomination (required)

Consider any potential National Historic Landmarks (NHLs)

Consider any potential 106, 4(f) and NEPA reviews

Consider application of Main Street, TEA, NHL, HUD, and other federal agency
monies (e.g. CDBG and HOME)
II.
State Tools

Consider eligibility for state register and attendant regulations (e.g. state-level 106
and NEPA reviews)

Consider application of financing from the New Jersey Historic Trust

Consider state policies for state government use of urban or historic properties

Consider state-influenced regulations as they may affect historic preservation (e.g.
building codes, road standards, school standards, and brownfields)

III.
Consider NJ State Plan implications for historic preservation
Local Tools

Analyze local ordinance (in, or near, your case study community) against
perspective of “model ordinance” and example local ordinances, (e.g. NYC,
Chicago, or other New Jersey)

Consider eligibility of your study area for local designation and discuss the
implications of that designation.
IV.
Tax Credit and Property Tax

Consider application of federal historic rehabilitation tax credit (HRTC)

Consider application of state HRTC (pick a state)

Consider application of property tax reduction program (NJ or other state)

Consider application of tax increment finance (TIF) program
LISTOKIN
Professor
11
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012

V.
SYLLABUS
Consider easement donation
Other Considerations

Consider the provisions of the “Secretary of the Interior Standards” as it might
affect your preservation planning
FUTURE PRESERVATION POLICIES (FOR PAPER SECTION V)

Based on readings, class materials and discussions, as well as your own research,
briefly propose changes to current federal and state-local (New Jersey) preservation
policies. You can mention funding, but the emphasis should be on new or revised
policies. Examples include: NJSHPO should do an annual report on —; the state
Section 106 review should be changed by —; a Kansas style state 4f review should be
incorporated; the state surplus property disposition policy should be changed by —;
the state-federal registers should be graded; the HRTC-LIHTC programs should be
revised by —.
MISCELLANEOUS

Do many of the above-recommended actions, but you don’t have to do them all
LISTOKIN
Professor
12
HISTORIC PRESERVATION – 2012
SYLLABUS
7B OBJECTIVE AND OUTLINE FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION
PAPER—II
Students will write a major paper (15-25 page, double space) on “Historic Preservation
and Preservation- Development Conflicts and Resolution” in a major American city
(other than New York City). Possible candidates include Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles,
Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco, or Washington D.C. For the case study city (CSC)
selected, the major paper will comprise the following sections:
Section
Content/Guide
1. Executive Summary
Use bullet points and
short paragraphs to
synopsize findings
2. Overview of the Case
Study City (CSC)
Present brief history of the CSC and
summarize key population and
socioeconomic characteristics over time
3. CSC Historic
Preservation History
Overview the history of historic
preservation in the CSC and briefly
compare/contrast to the preservation
history nationally and in New York City
4. CSC Historic
Preservation System
Describe in detail the CSC’s historic
preservation regulatory and financial
mechanisms and compare/contrast to
a) federal preservation mechanisms and
b) New York City preservation
mechanisms. What is the relationship
between the CSC’s preservation
mechanisms and the CSC’s planning and
land use system?
5. CSC Preservation
Development Tensions
Present 1-2 case studies of preservation
development challenges in your CSC and
compare/contrast to the cases presented
nationally and in New York City
6. Recommended Future
CSC Preservation
Changes and
Mechanisms
How would you improve the CSC’s
preservation regulations and financial
mechanisms (as well as its planning/land
use system) and how would this alleviate
preservation versus development
tensions. Draw on New York City, and
other cases as appropriate
LISTOKIN
Professor
# of pages(approximate)
1-2
2-3
3-4
4-6
3–5
3–5
13
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