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NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 1 of 6
Assessment Schedule – 2009
History: Examine evidence in historical sources (90467)
Evidence Statement
Notes:
(1) Candidates are not necessarily expected to use the same style or language as used here, but their ideas
should be in line with what is given in the Schedule. Responses could include, but are not necessarily limited
to, all or some of the following.
(2) The bolded parts of the Excellence response provide an indication of ways in which candidates may have
demonstrated “perception”.
Question One
Explain how the experiences of the Britain’s National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) in Source
A1 might have led to the actions taken by the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) in Source A2. Provide
evidence from both sources to support your answer.
Achievement
In Source A1 it says that despite the actions of the NUWSS (petitions, etc) the government and media had no real
interest in women’s suffrage. In Source A2 a new, more radical group (the WSPU) took more direct actions to gain
publicity for the cause. These included breaking government officials’ windows and burning down buildings.
Achievement with Merit
In Source A1 it says that the NUWSS was dedicated to using legal means to gain women’s suffrage (petitions etc).
They hoped the Liberal government would support them if it came to power, but it didn’t. Even the newspapers
stopped publicising their cause. By the time of the WSPU in Source A2, the NUWSS had been unsuccessful for
nearly twenty years. From 1905, a new, more radical group (the WSPU) began to take more direct actions to gain
publicity, such as shouting slogans at public meetings, committing arson, and breaking windows on government
buildings, out of frustration at the lack of change.
Achievement with Excellence
In Source A1 it says that the NUWSS was dedicated to using legal means to gain women’s suffrage, some aimed
at the wider public (meetings, distributing literature, writing letters to newspapers) and some directly at
politicians (petitions, writing letters to politicians). The NUWSS believed that progress would come with the
election of a Liberal government. Not only did this not happen, but the new leader (Herbert Asquith) was a strong
opponent of women’s suffrage, showing how unimportant the issue was to the party. Even the newspapers
stopped publicising their cause, showing how they thought it had ceased to be an issue. With nearly twenty
years of failure of these legal means, Source A2 shows a new, more shocking approach to gaining publicity:
the radical WSPU from 1905 clearly rejected the failed legal approach. “The case shocked the nation” shows
how successful they were in getting the suffrage issue back into the news. Where once there had been
letters to politicians, now there were stones through windows. The WSPU also realised that they needed a
sustained campaign, for, nine years after starting it, over 1000 had been imprisoned.
NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 2 of 6
Question Two
With referral to the points of view expressed in Sources B1 and B2, explain why a student of history might still
consider Sources A1 and A2 (from the Spartacus Educational website) to be reliable. Provide evidence from
Source B1 and / or Source B2 to support your answer.
Achievement
Simkin has been teaching history for over 20 years and he also has important University qualifications. He probably
knows a lot about history! He cites a number of easily verifiable facts. Even Bohning acknowledges that Google
says Spartacus is “one of the most established and popular history sites on the world wide web,” which suggests
that it is reliable.
Achievement with Merit
Simkin has been teaching history for over 20 years and he also has important University qualifications (Bachelor of
Arts, Master of Arts, and Master of Philosophy) which took at least nine years of University study. He probably
knows a lot about history! He cites a number of easily verifiable facts (dates, statistics, and a quote). Even Bohning
acknowledges that Google says Spartacus is “one of the most established and popular history sites on the world
wide web,” which suggests that it is reliable. Bohning may be right that Simkin has got some facts wrong about
Bohning’s own South American speciality, but that doesn’t mean everything else is wrong too.
Achievement with Excellence
Simkin has a lot of experience teaching history (over 20 years). He also has important University qualifications
(Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Master of Philosophy) that took at least nine years to earn. Although he
might not know a lot about all of his subject areas, he would have learned the skills necessary to create critical
resources. Also, Sources A1 and A2 are on English history, so he probably knows a reasonable amount (his
book Making of the United Kingdom might well include something on women’s suffrage). He also cites a
number of easily verifiable facts (dates, statistics, and a quote). Bohning seems to think that self-published books
are unreliable, but presents no evidence to show that this is the case. In addition to the Spartacus website (which
has been running for almost 20 years at the time of writing), which even Bohning acknowledges that Google says
is “one of the most established and popular history sites on the world wide web,” Simkin has what seems like
extensive online experience (websites are very exposed to online critiques) eg Electronic Telegraph, the
European Virtual School and the Guardian newspaper’s educational website, Learn. Bohning may be right that
Simkin has got some facts wrong about Bohning’s own South American speciality, but that doesn’t mean
everything else is wrong too. Furthermore, Bohning does not provide any evidence to back up his claim about
Simkin’s political views. Bohning is right to criticise the lack of weblinks that would allow students to check his
sources, but in Simkin’s defence he may well be trying to keep things simple for student usage.
NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 3 of 6
Question Three
Explain how there is continuity over time between the idea shown in Source C1, and the ideas in Sources C2 and
C3. Provide evidence from all three sources to support your answer.
Achievement
(Note: Evidence should come from Source C1 and at least one other source. Identification of continuity over ‘time’
may be implicit.)
Source C1 shows the woman’s vote cleaning up politicians; Source C2 says how women have greater moral
virtue; [examples could be given to illustrate this] OR Source C3 shows that women will help men with [social]
issues.
Achievement with Merit
(Note: evidence should come from all of the sources. Identification of continuity over time needs to be more
explicit.)
Source C1 shows the woman’s vote cleaning up New Zealand politics in the early 1890s, as the title “Purification”
and the bucket and soap show; Source C2 says how women in New York / America in 1906 supposedly have
greater moral virtue; [examples should be given to illustrate this], therefore they too will ‘clean up politics’; AND /
OR Source C3 shows that women in England in 1909 will help men with social issues (especially those related to
the ‘women’s sphere’). Thus, similar ideas of women voters ‘purifying’ politics run through these sources over time.
Achievement with Excellence
(Note: evidence that helps ‘perceptively explain’ the historical relationship should come from all of the sources.
Identification of continuity over time needs to be explicit.)
Similar ideas of women voters ‘purifying’ politics run through these sources over time (nearly 20 years) and
different places (NZ, USA, UK). Source C1 shows the woman’s vote cleaning up New Zealand politics in the early
1890s, as the title “Purification” and the woman with the bucket and soap (“woman’s vote”) show; Source C2 says
how women in New York / America in 1906 supposedly have greater moral virtue and wisdom than men (“… better
personal habits … drink far less rum … They pay more attention to character-building, say their prayers more often,
go to church more, and try somewhat harder to be good.”) This source also points out a possible cause of
problems in politics: “financial considerations” and notes that women by virtue of being less involved in
business will be less swayed by only financial considerations and possibly would focus more broadly on
social issues; therefore their vote too will “clean up politics”; AND / OR Source C3 shows that women in England in
1909 will help men with social issues (especially those related to the ‘women’s sphere’), including those that need
‘cleaning up’, eg alcohol, barmaids, poverty etc. The man’s anxiety over his responsibilities as he faces up to
the trumpet blasts of the issues contrasts to the woman’s calmness.
NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 4 of 6
Question Four
Explain in your own words how useful Sources D1 and D2 are for the historian studying views in the early 1890s
on the granting of women’s suffrage in New Zealand. Provide evidence from BOTH sources to support your
answer.
Achievement
Source D1 is quite useful for giving us the view of a male politician, who says that women would lose their
‘womanly’ qualities and men would be neglected. Source D2 is a newspaper cartoon showing a similar idea; the
husband is at home while the wife has been out (working) and dinner is not ready. These are two sources with a
similar idea, so would be useful.
Achievement with Merit
Source D1 is quite useful for giving us the view of a male politician in New Zealand’s parliament, which says that
women would lose their ‘womanly’ qualities and men would be neglected. It shows a view that existed at the time:
women should be in the domestic sphere. Henry Fish is just one politician and others may not have agreed.
Source D2 is a newspaper cartoon showing a similar but more exaggerated idea as per Source D1; the husband is
at home as a house-husband while the wife has been out; dinner is not ready and the result is, apparently, chaos.
Because this is in a newspaper that may have wide circulation it might well represent the views of its readership;
this would then make it quite useful as a source. These are two sources with a similar idea, so overall would be
useful.
Achievement with Excellence
Source D1 is quite useful for giving us the view of a male politician in New Zealand’s parliament in 1890 (three
years before the granting of woman’s suffrage in New Zealand), who says that women would lose their
‘womanly’ qualities and men would be neglected. It shows the rather sexist view that existed at the time: women
should be in the domestic sphere. Although Henry Fish is just one politician and others may not have agreed,
women were not granted the vote for another three years, so this may well reflect the view more generally
of politicians (in an all-male parliament). Still, he may just being saying things from political rather than
personal convictions. Source D2 is a newspaper cartoon showing a similar but more exaggerated idea as per
Source D1; the husband (the cartoonist!) is at home as a house-husband while the wife has been out [perhaps
working? or at a political meeting?]; dinner is not ready and the result is, apparently, as Fish three years earlier
said it would be: “domestic discomfort”. Because this is in a newspaper that may have wide circulation it might
well represent the views of its readership; this would then make it quite useful as a source. Together the sources
span three years and could show that, at least for some, views on women’s suffrage hadn’t changed over that time.
However, the cartoon in particular may be ironic, in which case it may not really reflect reality.
NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 5 of 6
Question Five
An important historical relationship exists between past events or situations and present events or situations.
Provide evidence from Source D1 and Source E to help explain this relationship.
Achievement
Overall there has been, according to Dell in Source E, little real change in women’s and men’s roles in the 100
years since women’s suffrage. In Source D1 it is clear that a woman’s role is in the household eg “their love and
care of the children”. [Dell notes that there are some households where women are supported in their careers by
their husbands but suggests that this is unusual.]
Achievement with Merit
In Source D1 it is clear that a woman’s role is in the household eg “their attention to the household”; as noted in
Source E, it is still the norm 100 years later. Miriam Dell also suggests that women are still seeking equal rights.
Thus, according to Dell, the roles have not changed much since Henry Fish said in parliament in the early 1890s
that womanly virtues included: “their love and care of their children.” Dell notes that there are some households
where women are supported in their careers by their husbands but suggests that this is unusual. Thus, overall
there has been, according to Dell, little real progress in the 100 years since women’s suffrage.
Achievement with Excellence
In Source D1 it is clear that a woman’s role is in the household eg “their attention to the household”, presumably
with the husband as bread-winner; as noted in Source E it is still the norm 100 years later. Miriam Dell also
suggests that women are still seeking “equality of opportunity, equal rights, equal pay for work of equal value”, with
their roles still generally as wives and mothers. This directly reflects what Henry Fish said in parliament in the
early 1890s prior to enfranchisement when he spoke of womanly virtues: “their love and care of their children,
their attention to their domestic duties, and the devotion and love they bear their husbands.” Dell notes that there
are some households where women are supported in their careers by their husbands, but suggests that is
uncommon. Thus, overall there has been, according to Dell, little real progress in the 100 years since women’s
suffrage. She looks to the next hundred years for some more improvements.
NCEA Level 2 History (90467) 2009 — page 6 of 6
Judgement Statement
Note: Candidates will be assessed to meet the requirements of the first Achievement Standard criterion (A, M, or
E) by satisfying the bold descriptors.
Achievement
Achievement with Merit
Achievement with Excellence
The historical relationships in two
out of the three questions (1, 3, 5)
are described (with some
supporting evidence).
The historical relationships in two
out of the three questions (1, 3, 5)
are explained (with a range of
supporting evidence).
The historical relationships in two
out of the three questions (1, 3, 5)
are perceptively explained (with a
comprehensive range of
supporting evidence).
The usefulness / reliability in one out
of the two questions (2, 4) is
described (with some supporting
evidence).
The usefulness / reliability in one out
of the two questions (2, 4) is
explained (with a range of
supporting evidence).
The usefulness / reliability in one out
of the two questions (2, 4) is
perceptively explained (with a
comprehensive range of
supporting evidence).
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