How to Cite for Bibliographies and Footnotes

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How to Cite for Bibliographies and Footnotes
Sample Bibliographic and Footnote Entries in the Chicago/Turabian style (Based on the
Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition)
The Bunn Library is providing examples of the most frequently used entries for both bibliographies and
footnotes. Students should confirm with their teachers that Turabian is an acceptable format to use. If you are unable
to find what you need on this page ask for help at the reference desk. The complete Chicago Manual of Style, 16th
edition is available at the reference desk.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: Your bibliography should contain all sources that were used in the development of your paper. Please
note that all indentation is 5 spaces.
Basic Citation for a book
Last name, First name. Title of Book. Where Published: Who Published, Date
Published.
Book, one author
Allen, Robert C. British Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective.
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
Book, more than one author
Wright, Robert E., and David J. Cowen. Financial Founding Fathers: the Men
Who Made America Rich. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.
Book, editor
Valelly, Richard, ed. Voting Rights Act: Securing the Ballot. Washington, D.C.:
CQ Press, 2006.
Short Work in an online anthologySource Within a Source
Franklin, Benjamin. “Problems of Colonial Union.” 1754. In Annals of
America, edited by Mortimer Adler, 525-526. Vol. 1. Chicago: Encyclopaedia
Britannica, 1968. Accessed November 17, 2010. The URL.
Encyclopedia, signed article
Schrecker, Ellen. “McCarthyism.” In Dictionary of American History, 3rd ed.,
edited by Stanley Kutler. New York: Charles Scribner, 2003.
Encyclopedia, article from an online
database
Pletcher, Kenneth. “One-Child Policy.” In Encyclopaedia Britannica Online.
Accessed December 9, 2010. The URL.
Reference document from an online
database
Dolan, Brian. “Enlightenment.” In Encyclopedia of European Social History,
edited by Peter Stearns. Detroit: Charles Scribner, 2002. Accessed February
26, 2011. The URL.
Item from a course packet/anthology
Thucydides. “Pericles Funeral Oration.” In Cultural Studies Reader, 52-57.
Lawrenceville, N.J.: Lawrenceville School, History Department, 2010.
Newspaper article from an online
database
Krock, Arthur. "Capital Dissensions Fade Out in Necessities of Common Cause.”
New York Times, December 8, 1941. Accessed December 16, 2010. The URL.
Article, magazine (no volume #)
Pollmann, Judith. "Countering the Reformation in France and the Netherlands.”
Past and Present, no. 190 (February 2006): 83-120. Accessed December 15,
2010. http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/past_and_present/v190/190.1pollmann.html
Article, journal or magazine
Makovsky, David. "Middle East Peace Through Partition." Foreign Affairs 80,
no. 2 (March-April 2001): 28-45.
Article from online database
Tackett, Timothy. "Interpreting the Terror." French Historical Studies 24, no. 4
(Fall 2001): 569-79. Accessed February 19, 2010. http://search.ebscohost.com/
login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=5695650&site=ehost-live.
Book Review from online database
Taylor, Alan. “American Abyss.” Review of American Sphinx: the Character of
Thomas Jefferson, by Joseph J. Ellis. Reviews in American History 25, no. 3
(September 1997): 390-395. Accessed Feb 19, 2010.
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/30030806.pdf
Film
Olivier, Laurence, dir. Hamlet. 1948. DVD. Irvington, N.Y.: Criterion Collection,
2000.
Internet site
“Background Note: China.” United States Department of State. Accessed
November 18, 2010. http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/18902.html.
Interview
Taylor, Robert William. “Oral History Interview.” Interview by William Aspray.
February 28, 1989. Charles Babbage Institute Collections, University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis. Accessed February 16, 2011. The URL.
Revised March 2011
FOOTNOTES: are arranged numerically at the bottom of each page and are used to cite a direct quote or an uncommon fact
or opinion. The number for the note follows the passage to which it refers and is typed slightly above the line. Again,
indentation is 5 spaces.
Book, one author
1. Robert C. Allen, British Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (New
York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 286.
Book, more than one author
2. Robert E. Wright and David J. Cowen, Financial Founding Fathers: the
Men Who Made America Rich (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), 145.
Book, editor
3. Richard Valelly, ed., Voting Rights Act: Securing the Ballot (Washington
D.C.: CQ Press, 2006), 100.
Short work in an online anthologySource Within a Source
4. Benjamin Franklin, “Problems of Colonial Union” (1754), in Annals of
America, ed. Mortimer Adler (Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1968), 1:525,
accessed November 15, 2010, the URL.
Encyclopedia, signed article
5. Ellen Schrecker, “McCarthyism,” in Dictionary of American History, 3rd ed.,
ed. Stanley Kutler (New York: Charles Scribner, 2003), 181.
Encyclopedia, article from an online
database
6. Kenneth Pletcher, “One Child Policy,” in Encyclopaedia Britannica
Online, accessed December 9, 2010, the URL.
Reference document from an online
database
7. Brian Dolan, “Enlightenment,” in Encyclopedia of European Social History,
ed. Peter Stearns (Detroit: Charles Scribner, 2002), 180, accessed February 25,
2011, the URL.
Item from a course packet/anthology
8. Thucydides, “Pericles Funeral Oration,” in Cultural Studies Reader
(Lawrenceville, N.J.: Lawrenceville School, History Department, 2010), 53.
Newspaper article from an online
database
9. Arthur Krock, "Capital Dissensions Fade Out in Necessities of Common
Cause," New York Times, December 8, 1941, accessed May 16, 2010, the URL.
Article, magazine (no volume #)
10. Judith Pollmann, "Countering the Reformation in France and the
Netherlands,” Past and Present, no. 190 (February 2006): 96, accessed December
15, 2010, the URL.
Article, journal or magazine
11. David Makovsky, "Middle East Peace Through Partition," Foreign Affairs
80, no. 2 (March-April 2001): 30.
Article from online database
12. Timothy Tackett, "Interpreting the Terror," French Historical Studies 24,
no. 4 (Fall 2001): 572, accessed February 19, 2011, the URL.
Book Review from online database
13. Alan Taylor, “American Abyss,” review of American Sphinx: the
Character of Thomas Jefferson, by Joseph J. Ellis, Reviews in American History
25, no. 3 (September 1997): 393, accessed February 16, 2011, the URL.
Film
14. Laurence Olivier, dir., Hamlet, DVD (1948; Irvington, N.Y.: Criterion
Collection, 2000).
Internet site
15. “Background Note: China,” United States Department of State, accessed
November 18, 2010, http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/18902.html.
Interview
16. Robert William Taylor, “Oral History Interview,” interview by William
Aspray, February 28, 1989, Charles Babbage Institute Collections, University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis. 10, accessed February 16, 2011, the URL.
SUBSEQUENT REFERENCES Once a work has been fully cited, you may use a shorter format for additional citations from the same
source. Ibid (meaning “in the same place”) is used if you are citing from the same source directly following the original citation. The
shortened reference can be used once the source has been fully cited elsewhere in the paper. For an Internet site you need the author- be it
personal or corporate.
First full citation
1. Robert C. Allen, British Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (New
York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 286.
Citing the same source directly after the
first citation
2. Ibid., 335.
Citing a source later cited work
4. Allen, British, 250.
Shortened reference for Internet source
5. Background Note China, under “History”.
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