MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management

advertisement
A GUIDE TO YOUR COURSE - MSc TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE
MANAGEMENT
Section 1: Course Specific Information
About this guide
Welcome
About the Course
Course Structure
Module Descriptions
Course Management
Staff Involved with the Programme
Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Health and Safety Issues
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)
Career Opportunities and Future Study
Academic Regulations
Additional Information specific to your course
Section 2: School Specific Information
School Charter for Students
Where to get help with your course
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
Learning, Teaching & Assessment
1
Section 1: Course Specific Information
About this guide
This Guide will help you plan your MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management, or MSc
Transport and Environmental Management course. It tells you which modules you must
study and pass, and lists the optional ones which contribute to your award. The Guide also
offers you brief descriptions of each module, including general information about
assessment tasks, and an overview of how the Course can be used for future career
choices.
You should read this Guide to your Course in conjunction with the Postgraduate Scheme
Guide; the University’s Principles and Regulations; and, if you are studying a Joint award,
the Guide to your course of the subject that forms the other part of your named award.
Together these documents should provide you with all the basic information that we think
you will need for your period of study here.
You are encouraged to read this Guide through now. It will be a considerable advantage
to you to be familiar from the outset with the various aspects of your studies that are
described. It may be that the relevance of some of the sections will not be immediately
obvious. Keep it somewhere accessible, so that you can refer to it as needed. The
answers to many of the questions that you will want to ask are contained in it.
Obviously even in a document like this we have not covered every query and problem that
you might have about the course. If you find that there is something you need to know,
please do not hesitate to approach the School of Engineering and the Built Environment or
your award tutor. You can also consult the University’s Student Support and Guidance
Services as appropriate. We are pleased to hear your views and welcome suggestions for
ways of improving the operation of the Course.
Please enter the contact
details for your Personal Tutor
for your future reference:
Your local Academic School
Office is:
Your Student Office is:
Your Student Support Adviser
is:
School of Engineering and the Built
Environment
MI155
City Campus
01902 518536
MI024
City Campus
01902 321102
Natalie Horne
MI158
City Campus
01902 321183
Please note that in order to develop and improve the Course, it may be necessary on
occasions to amend or revise the details given in this Guide to your course.
2
Welcome
This award guide contains all of the information you should need to gain the most from
your course of study.
MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management and is one of many postgraduate courses
run by the School of Engineering and the Built Environment.
The following sections in the handbook provide information of the programme aims, design
and content, on the assessment process and on the arrangements for the management of
the award.
On behalf of the Course Management Team I should like to extend to you a very warm
welcome and we would like to take this opportunity to wish you every success in your
studies and hope that your time at the University Of Wolverhampton School Of
Engineering and the Built Environment (SEBE) will prove to be enjoyable, stimulating and
rewarding.
Dr. Panos Georgakis, Course Leader
MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management
3
About the Programme
The MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management course is designed for graduates and
professionals that aim to develop skills in transportation related technological, managerial,
environmental and economical subjects, in order to seek a career in public or private
sector as transport and infrastructure engineers, or transport and environmental
managers, transport planners and other relative disciplines.
The award comprises of individual modules that build together into a comprehensive
programme of advanced study covering traditional and emerging areas of transportation
as well as permitting specialisation through the selection of elective modules and
dissertation topic.
The awards have been designed with an emphasis on the practical application of theory to
transport engineering and planning and infrastructure or environmental management. The
award is strongly internationalist in outlook, reflecting the growing impact of globalisation
on the transportation and environmental sectors. Providing the concepts, theory and
understanding necessary to practice as a transportation specialist through a rigorous and
clearly focused academic programme of study.
Widely varied teaching and learning strategies are employed on the course, including the
delivery of formal taught content, case study analysis, laboratory work, video presentation
and simulation with both individual and team work.
Participants, normally drawn from many countries and cultures, are encouraged to
contribute to the course and this rich mix of experience adds substantially to the learning
experience.
The general aims of the awards are to develop a body of knowledge under the broad
headings of: investigation, analysis and design in the context of a highly dynamic global
environment where a complexity of factors including sustainability and environmental
impact, have a significant impact on engineering processes.
By the end of the award, students will have advanced their knowledge of established key
areas of Transportation beyond first-degree level to a state concomitant with professional
engineer, or manager. In addition they will demonstrate self-direction and originality in
dealing with complex open-ended non conventional problems and undertake critical
analysis to provide substantive conclusions in the Transportation field.
We offer two specialist programmes in the MSc award. These programmes are:
 Transport and Infrastructure Management
 Transport and Environmental Management
4
Course Structure for the MSc Transport and Infrastructure Management Specialist
Degree
PG Academic Regulations
Students studying Postgraduate Courses will study:
 60 credits for the award of Postgraduate Certificate
 120 credits for the award of Postgraduate Diploma
 180 credits for a Masters degree
 540 credits for a professional doctorate with a minimum of 360 credits at level 5
 The minimum credit requirements may be exceeded in professionally accredited
courses. However, this must be approved at validation.
 The majority of credits for a Masters degree are awarded at level 4, but it is possible to
include one 15 credit level 3 module for a PgCert and two 15 credit or one 30 credit level 3
module for PgDip/Masters if there is an academic rationale for their inclusion.
Semester One
Semester Two
You must study and pass:
You must study and pass:
CN4040 Advanced Project
Planning and Control
CN4044 Research Methods
CN4048 Intelligent Transport and
Infrastructure Systems
Core
CN4047 Transport Planning and
Management
CN4046 Transport Systems
Engineering
You must study and pass:
CN4045 Post Graduate Dissertation (60 credits)
Transport Related Thematic Area
Students will be advised to select up to three and at least two of the following elective modules. However,
students can select up to two appropriate elective modules from postgraduate programmes or
undergraduate level 3 modules, available at the University of Wolverhampton, subject to these being
approved by the Award Leader.
The balance of electives must be chosen from the following:
Semester One
Semester Two
CN4042 Construction Finance
CV4001 Ground Engineering
CN4016 Forms of Contract
CV4004 Advanced Structural
Analysis
CN4005 Construction Project
Management (A)
Electives
CV4005 Design for Construction
AT4000 Computer Aided
Architectural Visualisation
CV3003 Structural Engineering
CN4013 Construction
Technology and Management for
non-cognate graduates
CN3000 Leadership
Development
AT4001 Virtual Reality in Design
5
Module Descriptions
CN4040
Advanced Project Planning and Control
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr Subashini Suresh
Telephone
01902 323582
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI144
Rationale
This module aims to develop a critical awareness of the principles and practice of
construction project planning and control.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Assignment 1
Examination
40%
60%
6
CN4044
Research Methods
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
Satisfactory completion of postgraduate dissertation
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr Rod Gameson
Telephone
01902 322253
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI144
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to provide postgraduate engineering and built
environment students with appropriate skills and knowledge to successfully carry out a
postgraduate research project in their relevant field of study.
The final outcome from the module is a detailed proposal (including critique of relevant
literature, intended methodology and analysis and expected findings) of the research to be
undertaken for the postgraduate dissertation module.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Literature Review Paper Assignment
Research Proposal Assignment
7
30%
70%
CN4045
Postgraduate Dissertation
Credit value
60
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr Rod Gameson
Telephone
01902 322253
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI144
Rationale
Professionals in engineering and the built environment need to be capable of basing their
decision-making and intervention strategies on information and knowledge derived from
good evidenced based research. The module aims to build on the participant’s knowledge,
skills and experience of research and / or project work gained from their Diploma stage
studies to enable them to produce a research project at Masters level.
The aim is to present a dissertation demonstrating a range of intellectual and practical
research skills used for conducting an academically rigorous, relevant and practically
oriented research project, and analysing / identifying the implications of the findings.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Oral Presentation
Dissertation
10%
90%
8
CN4046
Transport Systems Engineering
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. Panos Georgakis
Telephone
01902 323845
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI147
Rationale
The aims of this module are:
1. To provide students from a variety of backgrounds a firm grounding in the main
principles, techniques and issues in transport systems engineering, thus
equipping them for a progressional career.
2. To provide students with the essential background knowledge of transport
systems design with safety and operation placed in context.
3. To provide learners with a systematic understanding of the causes and
motivation for people and goods mobility.
4. To enable the students to learn and appreciate the development of major
transport projects in developed and underdeveloped countries.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Individual Report (2,500 – 3000 words) 50%
Computer aided system design and
50%
analysis, Individual Report (3,500
words)
9
CN4047
Transport Planning and Management
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. Panos Georgakis
Telephone
01902 323845
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI147
Rationale
This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and approaches to
transport planning and management. The module focuses on developing the student’s
ability to contribute to the development of transport policy and evaluation. It will provide the
participants of the module, the ability to evaluate the design and impact of the different
transport modes within the context of transport planning and management.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Component 2
Individual Report (2,500 – 3,000
words)
Group Report (3,000 words)
15 minute group presentation
10
50%
40%
10%
CN4048
Intelligent Transport and Infrastructure Systems
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Prof. Chris Nwagboso
Telephone
01902 323845
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA211a
Rationale
This module aims to present the different types of intelligent transport systems (ITS),
together with their application in different infrastructure projects. It will provide the students
with the necessary knowledge to understand the benefits of ITS towards a number of
existing transport related problems, such as high levels of congestion, increased number
of accidents and environmental pollution. The module will develop a deep understanding
of the technological components involved in ITS applications, together with the
infrastructure requirements for their deployment. This module is also intended to develop
the student’s ability to carry out systems design methods applicable to the development
and deployment of ITS.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Component 2
Individual Report (2,500 to 3,000
words)
Group Report (3,000 words)
15 minute group presentation
11
50%
40%
10%
AT4000
Computer Aided Architectural Visualisation
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. David Heesom
Telephone
01902 322724
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA 109
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to make students who are proficient in 2D drafting
production develop 3D modelling using computer-aided design and visualisation technology.
This involves creating high-end architectural visualisations using advanced modelling and
animation tools. Students are familiarised with texturing, lighting and animation techniques.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Written assignment
Practical Assignment
35%
65%
12
AT4001
Virtual Reality in Design
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. David Heesom
Telephone
01902 322724
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA 110
Rationale
The purpose of this module is to provide students with a theoretical, practical knowledge and
understanding of virtual reality applications in design. The study of the current and emerging
VR systems and applications in constructions will present students with a realistic view of this
technology and enables them to identify its potential as well as its limitations.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Produce a report to discuss the theory
and application of computer generated
architectural visualisation issues.
Produce computer-generated real time
architectural visualisation
demonstrating a thorough knowledge
of theoretical issues. Justify the
rationale for selecting the design
solution.
13
40%
60%
CN3000
Leadership Development
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Anthony Hatfield
Telephone
01902 518581
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI147
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to:
Develop and assess management leadership skills by exploring the qualities necessary for an
individual to be an effective manager. To understand the styles and cultures that an
organisation develops in its mission to remain profitable. This module includes a 4-day
residential element which attracts an additional fee.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 1
Component 2
Assessment 1: Organisational Culture
Assessment 2: participation record in
activities
Presentation at Field Centre
14
40%
40%
20%
CN4005
Construction Project Management (A)
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Keith Potts
Telephone
01902 322257
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA 115
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to explore the principles and practice of project
management in a construction/property context with particular emphasis on the precontract stage of the project cycle.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Assignment
Exam
50%
50%
CN4013
Construction Technology and Management for
non cognate graduates
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Keith Potts
Telephone
01902 322257
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA 115
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to develop a critical awareness of the principles and
practice of construction technology, quantity surveying and construction management in
students from a non-cognate background.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Assignment 1
Assignment 2
50%
50%
15
CN4016
Forms of Contract
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Keith Potts
Telephone
01902 322257
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MA 115
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to underpin the financial analysis and decision making
needs of senior management in construction companies with particular reference to
assessing financial performance, cash flow for construction projects, budgetary control,
costing and investment appraisal with particular reference to development projects.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Assignment
Exam
50%
50%
CN4042
Construction Finance
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Paul Havell
Telephone
01902 322284
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 149
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to encourage the development of a critical awareness in
the selection, use and interpretation of standard forms of construction contracts within the
changing procurement environment.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Assignment
Exam
50%
50%
16
CV3003
Structural Engineering
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Jamal Khatib
Telephone
01902 518858
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 148
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to extend the understanding of structural analysis and
design into statically indeterminate structures, beyond those covered at levels 1 and 2. the
module develops the analysis and design of continuous beams, portal frames, sub-frames
and the development of overall scheme design.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Component 3
Lab Report
Design Project
Examination
20%
20%
60%
17
CV4001
Ground Engineering
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
A level 3 recognised Geotechnics module
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Prof. Bob Sarsby
Telephone
01902 322263
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 150
Rationale
The module aims to provide the basic theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for
understanding common ground engineering works such as slopes, retaining systems and
groundwater control. The module also aims to make participants aware of ground
treatment techniques and geo-materials. Participants will be involved in ‘hands-on’ usage
of commercial software packages relating to areas of ground engineering so that they can
use appropriate analytical tools in a correct manner.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Log book of outline solutions
In class exercises and report
18
50%
50%
CV4002
Environmental Geotechnics
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Prof. Bob Sarsby
Telephone
01902 322263
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 150
Rationale
This module aims to describe how ground engineering impinges on the environment in a
variety of ways, such as contaminated land remediation, waste disposal by engineered
landfilling and subsequent site rehabilitation, tailings dam erection and resultant seepage,
etc. The module identifies key aspects of the major topics within environmental
geotechnology and demonstrates world-wide socio-economic aspects of Environmental
Geotechnics through case histories.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Case Histories Portfolio
Open-Book Phase Test (3 hours)
19
60%
40%
CV4004
Advanced Structural Analysis
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
A level 3 structural analysis module or equivalent or
auditable, corresponding, industrial practice
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. Jamal Khatib
Telephone
01902 518588
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 147
Rationale
This module aims to give students advanced knowledge and skills in structural engineering
and to provide a sound approach to the analysis, design and assessment of engineering
structures. The module will develop a deep understanding and awareness of the physical
properties, advantages and limitations of a variety of structural materials. Appropriate
analytical skills will be developed through consideration and application of the Finite
Element Method-general concept and procedures, FEM formulation, analysis of structural
systems using a commercial FEM package.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Report (5000 words)
Report (5000 words)
50%
50%
20
CV4004
Advanced Structural Analysis
Credit value
15
Pre-requisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Prohibited
combinations
None
Module Leader
Dr. Jamal Khatib
Telephone
01902 518588
Email
[email protected]
Staff Room Number
MI 147
Rationale
The principal aim of this module is to demonstrate the components of the design process
and their interrelation. The module is intended to develop a student’s ability to create an
overall methodology for creating a ‘product’ which satisfies a Client’s requirements. It will
give participants direct, hands-on experience of the integration of various strands of
academic knowledge to derive an engineering solution to a realistic practical problem.
Assessment
Component 1
Component 2
Individual design
Group design
50%
50%
21
Course Management
CONSTRUCTION AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEPT (COIN)
Telephone
Name
Room
Email
3581
1085
8562
2108
1043
2678
2155
Nii Ankrah
John Billingham
Colin Booth
Ray Bradley
Ezekiel Chinyio
Sammy Chung
Geoff Cooper (Technical
Resources Manager)
Pauline Corbett
Rod Gameson
Panos Georgakis
Felix Hammond
Paul Hampton
Philip Harris - Director of
Recruitment and Lifelong
Learning
Peter Harris (LLN & EPU)
Anthony Hatfield
Paul Havell
Neil Hingorani
Jamal Khatib
Bryan Kite
Jessica Lamond
Mick Lloyd (Technician)
Peter Mills
Angela Nash
Issaka Ndekugri
Christopher Nwagboso
Keith Potts
David Proverbs
John Reynolds
Bob Sarsby
David Searle
Paul Smith
Subashini Suresh
Chris Williams - Academic
Director of Course Provision
MA115d
MI148
MI149
MI038b
MA115g
MI143
MI037b
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
MIA115b
MI144
MI147
MA115e
MA115g
MI159
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
MI159
MA115f
MI149
MI115e
MI150
MI148
MI202
MI037b
MI149
MA115c
MA212a
MA211a
MA115d
MA211b
MA115c
MI150
MI142
MA115f
MI143
MI144
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
2261
2253
2286
2179
2256
2279
07813 045142
3504
8581
2284
3582
8588
2708
8745
8777
1723
2622
2280
3845/6471
2257
2786/6257
2276
2263
2109
8589
1710
2275
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Key Resource Rooms within the School of Engineering and the Built Environment
City Campus
School Office
Deanery
Workshop/Laboratory
Workshop/Laboratory
Teaching Facilities
Design Studio
Virtual Reality Suite
Drawing Rooms
MI154
MI310
MI035/MI036
MI037/MI038
MI101
MI216
MI215
MA212c
Telford campus
School Office
Workshop/Laboratory
Workshop/Laboratory
SC002
SC121
SC126
22
Health and Safety
SEBE operates over two university campuses – City Campus and Telford Campus, but
also delivers teaching in Singapore, Hong Kong and Biarritz in France. It also has staff
offices at the Wolverhampton Science Park and in Central Birmingham.
The management of Health and Safety across the School has been devolved to the
School Health and Safety committee, which is chaired by an Associate Dean and the
members are representative of its staff and students. The day-to-day responsibility for
Health and Safety in the School lies with its three Technical Resource Managers.
Each Year the School is required to report on the following issues: Codes of Practice; Risk
assessments; Fire Risk Assessment; First Aid; Occupational Health; Portable Appliance
Testing; In-house inspection; Health & Safety Needs Analysis; Fire Marshalling;
Dissemination; H&S Training; and Accidents.
The School works closely with the Department of Risk, Safety and Health to ensure its
practices align with the University’s policies and guidelines. Staff and Students alike
should familiarise themselves with these policies and adhere to the guidelines provided by
visiting the Department of Risk, Safety and Health’s website.
http://asp.wlv.ac.uk/Level2.asp?UserType=6&Subsection=23
23
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)
What is ‘Employability’?
‘Employability’ is concerned with the development of skills aimed at enhancing your
employment prospects throughout your time here at the University of Wolverhampton.
Developing specialist subject and academic knowledge is important for employers but
they also want to employ individuals who are able to:

Communicate effectively,

Work in a team and have good interpersonal skills.

Solve problems

Work on their own using their own initiative and are able to adapt to changing
situations

Be self-confident
How Will You Develop Your Employment Skills?
At the School of Engineering and the Built Environment we aim to provide you with the
opportunity to develop these through the modules you will be studying. The assessments
you do for your modules are designed to help you develop Subject specific skills through
the research you undertake for the assignments. In addition, they are also designed to
help you develop other key skills such as your written communication skills. Where you
have formal presentations, this will build your self-confidence in addition to helping you
develop your skills of verbal communication. Working as part of a team will develop vital
group-work skills. Attending your classes regularly will further ensure that you have the
opportunity to develop other skills.
Throughout your time at the University, you will develop and be able to demonstrate a
number of skills, some of which are listed below:










Working as part of a group
Demonstrating teamwork skills and leadership skills
Effective communication
Written (via reports etc.)
Oral (through formal presentations)
Problem-solving
IT skills (which include use of basic packages for word processing,
spreadsheets, use of email etc.)
Time management
Attending classes on time
Handing in your assignments by the deadline date
You may also be working part-time. The experience you gain within a work
environment is a very worthwhile one and also helps you to develop key skills. This
is another good way of developing skills which are valued by employers.
24
Career opportunities and Future Study
Graduates from the MSc in Transport and Infrastructure Management course will have
employment opportunities under a variety of transport and built environment related
disciplines, such as transportation engineers, transport planners, Traffic Engineers Traffic
Managers, transport system designers, urban planners, civil engineers, Highway
Engineers, Transport Modeller, Regeneration Manager and Infrastructure Project
Managers. Transport safety Manager, Infrastructure Design Engineers, Infrastructure
Managers, Intelligent Transport Systems Consultant
Graduates from the MSc in Transport and Environmental Management course will have
employment opportunities under a variety of transport and environmental related
disciplines, such as climate change professionals, environmental managers, transportation
engineers, transport planners, transport system designers, environmental audit,
environmental impact assessment, environmental planning, and the management of
particular environments.
25
Academic Regulations
This course adheres to the University’s academic regulations for students undertaking an
undergraduate degree, commencing after October 2002. A full version of these
regulations can be found on the University web site: www.wlv.ac.uk/polsregs. These
regulations govern your course and will be binding on you. It is, therefore, important that
you read and become familiar with them.
26
Section 2: School Specific Information
School Charter for Students
SEBE Student Code for Behaviour and Attendance
We ask that all students in SEBE:
o
Attend regularly and punctually
o
If you are unable to attend, make arrangements with fellow students to collect/copy handouts and
lecture notes
o
Show courtesy and respect to staff and other students
o
Ensure you understand the requirements of your award/pathway
o
Ensure you understand the requirements of each module you are studying (sessions to attend,
assessment procedures, exam procedures)
o
Respect and abide by the University Regulations, e.g. Equal Opportunities Policy, ID Cards, quiet
areas,
o
Bring all necessary equipment to classes/workshops
o
Give in assessments on time (or they will not be marked)
o
Switch off mobile phones when in class
o
Do not come to the University if you are under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol
o
Behave considerately in lectures, listen attentively and participate in class activities
o
Keep your tutor informed if you have personal problems that affect your work; if these problems
make it necessary to seek extensions, to do so before the deadline.
o
Use the advertised times (or make an appointment by email) to seek advice from your
tutors/lecturers.
o
Confirm your programme of study when asked to do so
o
Seek approval for and record any change of programme within the deadlines
o
Inform the Registry and Finance if your address or other contact details change
27
SEBE
School of Engineering and the Built Environment
The Centre of Excellence for Construction, Design and Technology Education in the West Midlands
Attendance Policy
The University wants all students to achieve their best performance. It offers students carefully prepared
learning experiences that will enable them to meet the learning outcomes of their modules. The School
believes students will perform best if they regularly attend and participate in these learning experiences;
students should not be concentrating solely on the completion of assessment tasks. It therefore expects all
students to participate fully in the learning experience. Where students are unable to attend for good reason
(e.g. illness, hospital appointment, unavoidable work commitments, religious festivals etc) they are required
to discuss this with their tutor who will make reasonable efforts to provide alternative arrangements. Where
students do not attend they cannot expect their tutor to devote additional time and resources to their
learning. If students are unhappy with the learning experiences provided they should make their views
known through the normal channels.
The School, particularly on level 1 modules, keeps records of attendance at taught sessions and students
who do not attend regularly may be contacted to establish if there are any issues that need resolving.
Students are encouraged to discuss any non-attendance with either their module leader or personal tutor,
both of whom may be reached either directly (e.g. in person, email and telephone) or via a message left with
the School office.
Prof. P. Olomolaiye
Dean of School
February 2005
28
Student Support
If you encounter any issues (personal or academic) the following diagram directs you
to the appropriate department or staff member.
Academic & Programme
related queries:
Study Issues
Award Leader
General Queries:
All UG Admin staff
Room MI155 City
r
Room SC002 Telford
Study Skills Advisor LRC
or
wlv.ac.uk/skills
Student Gateway
Careers & Employment
Services Ext 1414
Employability & Placement
Unit
Ext 1457
Module Related queries:
Who to Contact
Module Leader/Tutor
or Student
.
Support
Adviser
Extensions /Mitigating
Circumstances /Course
Transfer
Personal Issues:
Personal Tutor or
Student Gateway
Ext 2572
Student Office
Room MI024 City or
Room SB003 Telford
Special Needs
Natalie Horne 1183
29
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
All entrants onto programmes of study within the School of Engineering and the Built
Environment (SEBE) may apply to have prior learning accredited. Claims may be based
upon either certificated or experiential prior learning.
Where prior learning is found to be of an appropriate standard, recently acquired and in
relevant areas covered by the programme, then credit may be awarded against modules
(note that all SEBE modules carry a specific credit rating) or programmes of study (general
credit).
If a student wants to gain credits he/she must follow the SEBE guidelines. An academic
judgment on level, number and module coverage of any credits is the responsibility of the
Award Leader and the SEBE APA Team.
Applications for APA will not normally be considered after a student has started a
programme. Mid-programme claims will only be considered in exceptional circumstances.
All individuals interested in making a claim for APA are advised to consult either the
Pathway Manager or Learning and Teaching Co-ordinator before submitting any claim for
accreditation.
Should you require further information or help concerning the APA procedure please call
or write to:
SEBE School Office
School of Engineering and the Built Environment
University of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
WV1 1SB
Telephone: 01902 518530
Fax:
01902 322743
Cost of Accreditation for Postgraduate and Undergraduate Awards
The APA service involves a mixture of counselling and advice, assessment of submitted
materials and administrative procedures. The cost of such accreditation reflects resource
usage in these respects and applications are currently charged at the following rates:
Application Fee
A non-refundable application fee of £25 will be levied and must be paid by the student, on
application. This fee is deductible from the accreditation fee (shown in the table below).
Specific Credit
Certified Claims:
Experiential Claims:
£3 per credit
£20 per credit
General Credit
Claim (certified and/or experiential):
£10 per credit awarded
30
You should note that a minimum fee of £50 will be levied and that all of the above charges
are subject to VAT @ 17.5%
All claims MUST be accompanied by the appropriate remittance. Cheques should be
made payable to the University of Wolverhampton and clearly show the student’s name
and course on the reverse.
31
Download
Related flashcards
Create flashcards