grade_12_english_fal_p2_september_2013

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1
School’s name
NATIONAL
SENIOR CERTIFICATE
GRADE 12
ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE P2
SEPTEMBER 2013
MARKS: 70
TIME: 2 hours
2
INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION
Please read this page carefully before you answer the questions.
1.
Do NOT attempt to read the entire question paper.
2.
This question paper consists of FOUR sections:
SECTION A: Novel (35)
SECTION B: Drama (35)
SECTION C: Short Stories (35)
SECTION D: Poetry (35)
3.
Answer questions from TWO sections as follows:
SECTION A: NOVEL
Answer ONE question on the novel you have studied.
SECTION B: DRAMA
Answer ONE question on the drama you have studied.
SECTION C: SHORT STORIES
Answer ONE question.
SECTION D: POETRY
Answer TWO questions.
4.
Follow the instructions at the beginning of each section carefully.
5.
Number your answers exactly as the questions are numbered in this question
paper.
6.
Start EACH section on a NEW page.
7.
Spend approximately 60 minutes on each section.
8.
Write neatly and legibly.
3
SECTION B: DRAMA
In this section, there is an essay question and contextual questions on the following
drama:

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH, by John Kani
Answer ONE question (EITHER the essay OR the contextual question) on the drama
you have studied.
QUESTION 9 (ESSAY QUESTION)
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH
Truth and forgiveness is an important theme in the drama. Do you agree
with this statement?
In your essay you may consider the following ideas, among others:



Sipho and his family
Sipho’s and his employers
Sipho and Mandisa
[35]
Length: 250 – 300 words
OR
4
QUESTION 10 (CONTEXTUAL QUESTION)
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH
Read the following extracts from the play and answer the set questions. The number of
marks allocated to each question serves as a guide to the expected length of your
answer.
NOTE: Answer the questions set on BOTH extracts, i.e. QUESTION 10.1 AND
QUESTION 10.2.
10.1
[Thando meets Mandisa.]
THANDO: He sure had the gift of the gab – that’s Uncle Themba. [She
finishes the salad.] Everybody remembers him for that. Bring the tray.
Tell me about your father and your mother and you, of course.
MANDISA: Who first? Well I was born in Camden Town, a kind of a
middle-class London suburb and went to the best schools, of course. 5
Father wanted me to study medicine – ‘There is a shortage of doctors
at home’, South Africa. But I went to college and studied fashion
design. That is why I have to be back in London by Monday or
Tuesday by the latest as the London fashion shows start soon. I’ve
brought some of my designs hoping to show them to some people in 10
the business. I’ve always felt that my designs could use some African
influence.
She puts the portfolio on the coffee table.
THANDO [looking at some of Mandisa’s sketches]: I know of someone
who could be of great help to you in that regard, but she lives in 15
Johannesburg. He name is Nandipa Madikiza. She’s the best in this
country.
MANDISA: Yeah, I’ve heard about her. You must introduce me to her
please.
THANDO: I don’t know her personally. I know of her work. But you say you 20
have to leave by Tuesday?
MANDISA: Yes. Why don’t you come with me to Johannesburg to meet
her?
THANDO: You are not staying a little longer … I mean to mourn?
MANDISA: My father died two weeks ago. I’ve done all the mourning …
I’ve got work to do now.
THANDO: My father would expect us to show some respect for at least a
month as children. Elderly people mourn much longer. He won’t
allow me to go with you to Jo’burg.
[Act 1,Scene 2]
25
5
10.1.1
Complete the following sentences by filling in the missing words.
Write down only the question numbers and the word(s).
Themba was in (a) … in London when Mandisa was born. Thando says
he has the gift of the gab because he was (b) … . People (c) … him
because he was a political (d) … .
(4)
10.1.2
In your OWN WORDS describe Mandisa’s standard of living in London.
(2)
10.1.3
State whether the following is TRUE or FALSE. Quote no more than eight
consecutive words from the extract to support your answer.
While Themba was living in London he was not concerned about his
people in South Africa.
10.1.4
(2)
Refer to lines 8 – 9, “I have to be back … by Monday or Tuesday”.
What do Mandisa’s words reveal about her knowledge of African
traditions.
(2)
10.1.5
Explain why Mandisa’s designs lack ‘African influence’. (lines 11 – 12)
(2)
10.1.6
Who is Nandipa Madikiza?
(1)
10.1.7
Refer to lines 25 – 26, “My father died … work to do now.”
Do you agree that Mandisa is being insensitive to her father’s death?
Discuss your views.
10.1.8
(2)
Refer to lines 28 – 29, “He won’t allow me to go with you to Jo’burg”.
(a) What characteristic of Sipho is shown here?
(1)
(b) In your opinion, is Sipho treating his daughter fairly? Discuss your
views.
(2)
6
10.2
[Mandisa views the TRC process with much cynicism.]
THANDO: We have a country to rebuild. A nation to take care of. An
economy to grow, jobs to create, houses to build, clinics,
hospitals, schools and our lives. Where would revenge get us
except more violence? Besides we did not want to give those
bastards the honour of taking up arms against us in their defence
and calling it a legitimate struggle. There was one Struggle, the
struggle for liberation, our Struggle.
5
MANDISA: Then why is Craig Williamson a free man? He committed
murder.
THANDO: Because according to rules and requirements for amnesty
…
10
MANDISA: He disclosed all? Yes. He told us nothing new except that
he sent the parcel bombs. Who gave the order? Do we know
that? Does that make him innocent?
THANDO: No, it does not. He met the conditions set for amnesty.
15
MANDISA: Then why was there an outcry against him receiving
amnesty? Why was everybody angry?
THANDO: Not everybody was.
MANDISA: Joe Slovo is. Ruth’s children are. I am.
THANDO: How do we know that Joe Slovo is?
20
MANDISA: Let’s dig up his grave shall we. Let’s open the coffin and
see if that skull is smiling.
THANDO: Joe Slovo said before he died he would never accept the
granting of general amnesty. He wanted to know who killed his
wife and why. It was personal to him. Now he knows. Now we all
know.
25
MANDISA: But somebody must be made to pay.
THANDO: Typical of someone sitting 6 000 miles away. In a
comfortable house in London, observing the whole situation with
a pair of binoculars.
[Act2, Scene1]
30
7
10.2.1
Refer to lines 1 – 7, “We have a country … liberation, our Struggle.”
(a) According to Thando, what are the consequences of taking
revenge?
(b) What does the word ‘bastard’ reveal about Thando’s attitude
towards the apartheid government?
10.2.2
10.2.3
(a) What is ‘amnesty’? (line 10)
(b) According to the extract, how does Mandisa feel about people
being granted amnesty?
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
Explain what Craig Williamson has done when he ‘disclosed all’
(line 12)
(2)
10.2.4
What is 6000 miles away? (line 28)
(1)
10.2.5
Refer to lines 28 – 30, “Typical of someone … a pair of binoculars.”
(a) Who is Thando referring to in these lines?
(b) What does Thando mean when she says this person has been
‘observing the whole situation with a pair of binoculars’?
10.2.6
Do you agree that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has
played an important role in building a new South Africa? Discuss
your views.
(1)
(2)
(3)
[35]
TOTAL SECTION C:
35
8
SECTION C: SHORT STORIES
In this section, questions have been set on the following stories:


THE SISTERS, by Pauline Smith
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY by James Thurber
Choose ONE of the short stories and answer the set questions.
QUESTION 11 (ESSAY QUESTION)
THE SISTERS – Pauline Smith
In the story, The Sisters, the writer shows how greed affects people’s lives.
Write an essay in which you discuss this statement. In your answer refer to
specific incidents in the story.
In your essay you may consider the following ideas, among others:



The difficulties faced by Burgert de Jager’s family
Jan Redlinghuis’ manipulative nature and actions
The consequence of greed and the effect it has on the family.
Length: 250 – 300 words
[35]
OR
9
QUESTION 12 (CONTEXTUAL QUESTION)
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY – James Thurber
Read the following extracts from the short story and answer the set questions. The
number of marks allocated to each question serves as a guide to the expected length
of your answer.
NOTE: Answer the questions set on BOTH extracts, i.e. QUESTION 12.1 AND QUESTION
12.2.
12.1
[Walter Mitty drives with his wife to the hairdresser.]
"Not so fast! You're driving too fast!" said Mrs. Mitty. "What are you
driving so fast for?"
"Hmm?" said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside
him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a
strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. "You were up to fifty- 5
five," she said. "You know I don't like to go more than forty. You were up
to fifty-five." Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the
roaring of the SN202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy
flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. "You're tensed
up again," said Mrs. Mitty. "It's one of your days. I wish you'd let Dr. 10
Renshaw look you over."
Walter Mitty stopped the car in front of the building where his wife
went to have her hair done. "Remember to get those overshoes while I'm
having my hair done," she said. "I don't need overshoes," said Mitty. She
put her mirror back into her bag. "We've been all through that," she said, 15
getting out of the car. "You're not a young man any longer." He raced
the engine a little. "Why don't you wear your gloves? Have you lost your
gloves?"
12.1.1
Refer the title: “The secret life of Walter Mitty.”
(a)
(b)
12.1.2
What is Walter Mitty’s “secret life”?
How does his personality in his “secret life” differ from his
personality in his normal life?
(1)
(2)
Refer to lines 1 – 2: “Not so fast … driving so fast for?.”
(a)
Relate the incident that occurred earlier resulting in Walter Mitty
driving so fast at this point in the story.
(2)
(b)
Write down ONE word to describe Mrs Mitty’s character.
(1)
(c)
State whether the following is TRUE or FALSE:
Support your answer by referring to an incident in the story.
Walter Mitty is emotionally strong.
(2)
10
12.1.3
Explain why Walter looks at his wife with ‘shocked astonishment’? (line 4)
12.1.4
Refer to lines 4 – 5: “She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman
who had yelled at him in a crowd.”
(a)
(b)
12.1.5
12.1.6
12.1.7
Identify the figure of speech in these lines.
Explain why the writer has used this figure of speech.
(2)
(1)
(2)
Refer to line 9, “… the remote, intimate airways of his mind”.
(a) What ‘airways’ is the writer referring to?
(b) Why are these ‘airways’ in his mind?
(1)
(1)
In the context of the story, what type of doctor would Dr Renshaw be?
(lines 10 – 11)
(1)
Refer to paragraph 3 (lines 12 – 18), “Walter Mitty stopped … lost your
gloves?”
(a)
(b)
Choose the correct answer to complete the following sentence:
Mrs Mitty treats Walter ...
A. with respect.
B. politely.
C. as a child.
D. indifferently.
(1)
Do you approve of Mrs Mitty’s attitude towards her husband?
Discuss your views.
(2)
AND
11
12.2
[Walter Mitty remains captivated by his secret life.]
"Things close in," said Walter Mitty vaguely. "What?" Mrs. Mitty
said. "Did you get the what's-its-name? The puppy biscuit? What's in
that box?" "Overshoes," said Mitty. "Couldn't you have put them on
in the store?" 'I was thinking," said Walter Mitty. "Does it ever occur to
you that I am sometimes thinking?" She looked at him. "I'm going to 5
take your temperature when I get you home," she said.
They went out through the revolving doors that made a faintly
derisive whistling sound when you pushed them. It was two blocks to
the parking lot. At the drugstore on the corner she said, "Wait here
for me. I forgot something. I won't be a minute." She was more than 10
a minute. Walter Mitty lighted a cigarette. It began to rain, rain with
sleet in it. He stood up against the wall of the drugstore, smoking . . .
He put his shoulders back and his heels together. "To hell with the
handkerchief," said Walter Mitty scornfully. He took one last drag on
his cigarette and snapped it away. Then, with that faint, fleeting 15
smile playing about his lips, he faced the firing squad; erect and
motionless, proud and disdainful, Walter Mitty the Undefeated,
inscrutable to the last.
12.2.1
Refer to line 1 – 2: “Things close in.”
What ‘things’ could Walter possibly be referring to? State TWO
points.
12.2.2
Refer to lines 2 – 3: “Did you get … in the store”.
In your view how do you think Walter feels when being asked all
these questions? State a reason for your answer.
12.2.3
(2)
(2)
Refer to lines 4 – 5: “Does it ever occur to you that I am sometimes
thinking?”
(a) What do you think Walter’s face would express while saying
these words?
(b) How does Mrs Mitty respond to Walter’s question?
(c) What does her response tell us about her attitude towards
Walter?
(1)
(2)
(2)
12.2.4
Explain why the writer has used ellipses (…) in line 12.
(2)
12.2.5
(a) Quote TWO separate words from the extract that portray the
two contrasting character traits of Walter.
(2)
(b) Which of these two character traits appeals to you? Give a
reason for your answer.
(3)
[35]
TOTAL SECTION C: 35
12
SECTION D: POETRY
In this section, questions have been set on the following poems:
‘The serf’ by Roy Campbell
‘Cheetah' by Charles Eglington
‘Mementos’ by W.D. Snodgrass
‘A prayer for all my countrymen’ by Guy Butler
Answer questions on ANY TWO of the prescribed poems set. Read each poem
carefully and then answer the questions which follow. The number of marks
allocated to each question serves as a guide to the expected length of your
answer.
QUESTION 13
Read the following poem and then answer the questions set on it.
The serf – Roy Campbell
His naked skin clothed in the torrid mist
That puffs in smoke around the patient hooves,
The ploughman drives, a slow somnambulist,
And through the green his crimson furrow grooves.
His heart, more deeply than he wounds the plain,
Long by the rasping share of insult torn,
Red clod, to which the war-cry once was rain
And tribal spears the fatal sheaves of corn,
Lies fallow now. But as the turf divides
I see in the slow progress of his strides
Over the toppled clods and falling flowers,
The timeless, surly patience of the serf
That moves the nearest to the naked earth
And ploughs down palaces, and thrones, and towers.
13.1
5
10
Complete the following sentences by using the words provided in
the list below. Write only the words next to the question number
(13.1.1–13.1.3) in the ANSWER BOOK.
reassured; revolt; oppressed; democratic; racist
13.2
13.3
In this poem the serf who has been (13.1.1) … by a (13.1.2) …
government decides to (13.1.3) … .
(1½)
What does the word ‘naked’ tell us about the working conditions of
the serf?
(1)
Find evidence in the poem to prove that it was written in South
Africa in the early 1900s. State TWO points. DO NOT QUOTE.
(2)
13
13.4
What do the following words in line 3 tell you about the serf:
13.4.1 ‘drives’
13.4.2 ‘somnambulist’ ?
(2)
(2)
13.5
What do the words ‘green’ and ‘crimson’ refer to in line 4?
(2)
13.6
To what does the poet compare his heart in the poem?
(1)
13.7
Quote TWO separate words from the poem which predict the future
downfall of the oppressive system of government.
(2)
What actions would you have taken if you were in the same
situation as the serf?
(2)
In your view, is this poem still relevant for today? Give a reason for
your answer.
(2)
13.8
13.9
[17½]
OR
14
QUESTION 14
Read the following poem and then answer the questions set on it.
Cheetah – Charles Eglington
Indolent and kitten-eyed,
This is the bushveld's innocent
The stealthy leopard parodied
With grinning, gangling pup-content.
Slouching through the tawny grass
Or loose-limbed lolling in the shade,
Purring for the sun to pass
And build a twilight barricade
Around the vast arena where;
In scattered herds, his grazing prey
Do not suspect in what wild fear
They'll join with him in fatal play;
Till hunger draws slack sinews tight
And vibrant as a hunter's bow;
Then, like a fleck of mottled light,
He slides across the still plateau.
A tremor rakes the herds: they scent
The pungent breeze of his advance;
Heads rear and jerk in vigilant
Compliance with the game of chance
5
10
15
20
In which, of thousands, only one
Is centred in the cheetah's eye;
They wheel and then stampede, for none
Knows which it is that has to die.
His stealth and swiftness fling a noose
And as his loping strides begin
To blur with speed, he ropes the loose
Buck on the red horizon in.
14.1
25
Complete the following sentences by using the words provided in
the list below. Write only the words next to the question number
(14.1.1–14.1.3) in the ANSWER BOOK.
wild; blameless; sneaky; lazy; lively
The poet portrays the cheetah as (14.1.1) … and (14.1.2) … in
comparison to the leopard which is (14.1.3) … .
(1½)
15
14.2
How does the “tawny grass” help to disguise the cheetah?
(1)
14.3
14.3.1 Identify the sound device used in line 6.
14.3.2 Explain why the poet uses this sound device.
(1)
(2)
14.4
What will happen when the sun passes? (line 6)
(1)
14.5
How could the ‘twilight barricade’ (line 8) be advantageous to the
cheetah?
(2)
14.6
What is the cheetah’s ‘grazing prey’? (line 10)
(1)
14.7
What characteristic of the cheetah does the simile in line 15
emphasize?
(1)
Why is the cheetah’s hunting being referred to as a ‘game of
chance’? (line 20)
(2)
Quote TWO CONSECUTIVE WORDS from stanza 7 that suggest the
cheetah hunts in the evening.
(1)
Do you agree with the poet’s view that the leopard is better than
the cheetah? Discuss your view.
(2)
14.8
14.9
14.10
14.11
In your view is the cheetah’s attack on its prey acceptable to you?
Give a reason for your answer.
OR
(2)
[17½]
16
QUESTION 15
Read the following poem and then answer the questions set on it.
Mementos, 1 – WD Snodgrass
Sorting out letters and piles of my old
Canceled checks, old clippings, and yellow note cards
That meant something once, I happened to find
Your picture. That picture. I stopped there cold,
Like a man raking piles of dead leaves in his yard
Who has turned up a severed hand.
Still, that first second, I was glad: you stand
Just as you stood – shy, delicate, slender,
In that long gown of green lace netting and daisies
That you wore to our first dance. The sight of you stunned
Us all. Well, our needs were different, then,
And our ideals came easy.
Then through the war and those two long years
Overseas, the Japanese dead in their shacks
Among dishes, dolls, and lost shoes; I carried
This glimpse of you, there, to choke down my fear,
Prove it had been, that it might come back.
That was before we got married.
– Before we drained out one another's force
With lies, self-denial, unspoken regret
And the sick eyes that blame; before the divorce
And the treachery. Say it: before we met. Still,
I put back your picture. Someday, in due course,
I will find that it's still there.
15.1
5
10
15
20
Complete the following sentences by using the words provided in
the list below. Write only the words next to the question number
(15.1.1–15.1.3) in the ANSWER BOOK.
insults; hurts; memory; discovery; photograph
The poem reveals how the (15.1.1) … of a (15.1.2) … brings to mind
past (15.1.3) … .
15.2
15.3
(1½)
Refer to line 4, “I stopped there cold”.
15.2.1 What emotion is the speaker experiencing?
15.2.2 Explain why the speaker experiences this emotion.
(1)
(2)
15.3.1 Identify the figure of speech used in lines 5 - 6.
15.3.2 Explain why the poet uses this figure of speech.
(1)
(2)
17
15.4
State whether the following is TRUE or FALSE. Quote THREE
consecutive words from the poem to support your answer.
The picture only triggers bad memories of the speaker’s wife.
15.5
(2)
Refer to line 11, “Well, our needs were different, then”.
What needs could the speaker possibly be referring to?
(1)
Refer to stanza 3.
How did the picture help the speaker during the war?
(2)
How do we know the speaker is still unable to deal with his past
hurts?
(1)
15.8
Do past emotional hurts influence one’s future? Discuss your views.
(2)
15.9
In your view, is divorce the best practical solution to a couple’s
marriage problems? Give a reason for your answer.
(2)
15.6
15.7
[17½]
OR
18
QUESTION 16
Read the following poem and then answer the questions set on it.
A prayer for all my countrymen – Guy Butler
Though now few eyes
can see beyond
this tragic time's
complexities,
dear God, ordain
such deed be done,
such words be said,
that men will praise
Your image yet
when all these terrors
and hates are dead:
5
10
Through rotting days,
beaten, broken,
some stayed pure;
others learnt how
to grin and endure;
and here and there
a heart stayed warm,
a head grew clear.
16.1
15
Complete the following sentences by using the words provided in
the list below. Write only the words next to the question number
(16.1.1–16.1.3) in the ANSWER BOOK.
anthem; prayer; the State; God; save
The poem is a (16.1.1) … to (16.1.2) … to (16.1.3) … South Africa’s
countrymen.
16.2
(1½)
State whether the following is TRUE or FALSE. Give a reason for your
answer.
The ‘few eyes’ (line 1) refer to the government officials.
(2)
16.3
16.3.1 Identify the sound device used in line 3.
16.3.2 Explain why the poet uses this sound device.
(1)
(2)
16.4
Quote TWO CONSECUTIVE WORDS from stanza 1 that expresses the
speaker’s desperation.
(1)
Whose ‘image’ is the speaker referring to in line 9?
(1)
16.5
19
16.6
Refer to line13, “beaten, broken”.
16.7
16.6.1 Who has been “beaten, broken”?
16.6.2 Who was responsible for ill-treating these people?
Refer to lines 17 – 19, “and here and … head grew clear.”
(1)
(1)
16.7.1 Choose the correct answer to complete the following
sentence. Write only the answer (A–D) in the ANSWER BOOK.
In lines 17 - 19 the speaker's tone shows that he feels ...
A desperate
B hopeful
C depressed
D angry
16.8
16.9
(1)
16.7.2 Give a reason for your answer in 16.7.1 above.
(2)
Do you feel sorry for those who ‘learnt how to grin and endure’?
Discuss your views.
(2)
Do you agree with the view that there was no easy solution to the
problem of apartheid in South Africa? Give a reason for your
answer.
(2)
[17½]
TOTAL SECTION D: 35
GRAND TOTAL: 70
20
MEMORANDUM
QUESTION 9
NOTE: Use the 35-mark assessment rubric to assess candidates’ essays.
Accept alternative views which are relevant and well-substantiated.
The following points may be included in the essay, among others:

Sipho and his family:
o Sipho felt unloved as a child.
o His parents favoured Themba. Themba always got his way.
o Sipho was punished for Themba's mistakes.
o His only toy (the wire bus) was taken away from him. When he
complained to his parents, they always took Themba's side.
o He never forgave his brother for these childhood events. This leads to a lot
of pain and anguish for Sipho.
o As a young man, Themba was popular with women. He was also popular
in the struggle against apartheid. This made Sipho jealous and hate his
brother.
o Sipho was not allowed to further his studies, yet his parents found the
o money to put Themba through university. Sipho had to support his brother
while he was at university. This causes Sipho much pain.
o When Sipho married, Themba had an affair with his wife. There is a great
possibility that Themba is the father of Thando.
o Sipho's son Luvuyo idolised Themba. He blames Themba for his son's
death.
o Their father's funeral was turned into a political rally and Sipho blamed
Themba for this.
o He kept all this heartache to himself.
o He could not forgive Themba or the government for his loss.

Sipho and his employers:
o Sipho started working in a law firm as a clerk. On two occasions, he was
promised that he could complete his articles, yet it was always given to
young white boys entering the law firm.
o He worked at the library for 33 years. He was regarded as the most
suitable candidate for the post as Chief Librarian. The post was given to a
younger person who had just returned from exile. This caused Sipho to
become bitter and very angry.

Sipho and Mandisa:
o Mandisa forces Sipho to face his demons.
o She forces him to speak about her father.
o She constantly questions him and so makes him very angry. This causes
him to drink heavily. It is in this drunken state that he actually reveals the
truth about Thando's mother and Themba.
o He eventually faces the truth and realises that he cannot blame Themba
for his son's death or his wife's affair.
o He accepts that he was somewhat jealous of his younger brother. He
21
o
accepts that it was because of his age that he was not appointed as the
Chief Librarian.
So, it is through the constant questioning of Mandisa that Sipho is able to
forgive and free himself of all pain and heartache.
[35]
22
QUESTION 10
10.1.1
(a) exile (1)
(b) talkative/ persuasive (1)
(c) loved (1)
(d) activist (1)
10.1.2
She has an average status and income. She is neither rich nor poor. (2)
10.1.3
False (1)
“There is a shortage of doctors at home” (1)
10.1.4
She has no knowledge of African traditions. (1) She does not realize how
import it is for Africans to mourn the death of a loved one. (1)
10.1.5
She was raised in London. (1)
She is westernized. (1)
She has no knowledge of African fashion. (1)
She has never been to Africa before. (1)
Accept any TWO of the above.
10.1.6
She is an African fashion designer. (1)
10.1.7
Open-ended, e.g.
Yes. She is more concerned about her work than her father’s death. She
should mourn for a longer period. (2)
OR
No. She is an independent career woman who has not been raised to
observe African traditions. (2)
10.1.8
(a) He is overprotective/ strict/ traditional (1)
Open-ended, e.g.
No, Thando is an adult and should be allowed to make her own
decisions. (2)
OR
Yes, according to African customs she should be an obedient and
respectful daughter. He protects her because he only has her best interests
at heart. (2)
23
10.2.1
(a) It would lead to more violence. (1) The whites would shoot at blacks. (1)
(b) She dislikes (1) the apartheid government who all the atrocities (1) they
have been responsible for.
10.2.2
(a) It means to pardon (1) someone for the crimes they have committed,
especially political crimes. (1)
(b) She is not in favour of amnesty. (1) She feels people should pay for their
crimes. (1)
10.2.3
He confessed his crimes and told the truth. (2)
10.2.4
England/ London (1)
10.2.5
(a) Mandisa/ Themba (1)
(b) This person was not directly involved/ did not suffer under apartheid. (1)
He/She does not understand what the South African black experienced
during the apartheid era. (1)
10.2.6
Open-ended, e.g.
Yes, people need to forgive and move on. The TRC provided a platform to
address political crimes of the past and settle differences.
OR
No, the TRC only brought back and stirred up past hurts. Many crimes were
committed under the guise of ‘politically-motivated’ crimes. Everyone has
to pay for the crime they have committed.
TOTAL SECTION C: 35
24
QUESTION 11
NOTE: Use the 35-mark assessment rubric to assess candidates’ essays.
Accept alternative views which are relevant and well-substantiated.
The following points may be included in the essay, among others:

The difficulties faced by Burgert de Jager’s family:
o Burgert’s obsessive greed to keep his lands and water rights
o Burgert’s obsession blinds him to the effect his actions have on his
daughters.
o His wife dies as a result of the water cases
o Loss of land to Jan Redlinghuis

Jan Redlinghuis’ manipulative nature and actions:
o Cruel – manipulates Burgert – bargains with him to marry Martha in
exchange for water rights
o Refuses Sukey’s offer to marry him instead of Martha
o Obsessive pride in his possessions – the new tent-cart
o Jan Redlinghuis’s greed to possess Marta deJager & to display her
around the district in the end killed both her and him

The consequences of greed and effect it has on the family:
o Matha sold in marriage to Jan Redlinghuis to save the farm
o Conflict in the family – between Sukey and her father
o Sukey offers herself in marriage to Jan Redlinghuis to save Martha
o Matha has no power against Jan Redlinghuis – becomes ill and dies
o The women in the story suffer as a result of the greed and power of men
o Jan Redlinghuis’ remorse over his treatment of Martha
o Jan Redlinghuis commits suicide
o Burget de Jager also expresses remorse for “selling” Marta and for her
consequent death.
o To show his remorse, he closes up the furrow that had been leading
water from the river onto his lands.
[35]
25
QUESTION 12
12.1.1
(a) His fantasy world (1)
(b) In real life he is an elderly man doing boing chores. /He is treated as a
child by his wife. (1)
In his fantasy world he is a brave hero. (1)
12.1.2
(a) Walter imagines he is the commander of a navy hydroplane(1), flying
bravely through a storm. (1)
(b) Manipulative/ persuasive/ domineering (1)
(c) False (1). He is hen-pecked by his wife. (1)
12.1.3
He didn’t realize she was driving with him. (1) He had just woken up from a
fantasy. (1)
12.1.4
(a) Simile (1)
(b) He emphasises that Walter had been fantasizing. His wife did not form
part of his fantasies/ He was not controlled by her in his fantasies. (2)
12.1.5
(a) The navy’s airline (1)
(b) He is not a navy commander in real life/ he had been fantasizing (1)
12.1.6
A psychiatrist (1)
12.1.7
(a) (C/ as a child (1)
(b) Open-ended, e.g.
No, Walter is an adult. He should be allowed to make his own decisions.
OR
Yes, Walter has an emotional problem. He is insecure and needs his
wife’s support. (2)
12.2.1
Fear (1)
Emotional problems (1)
Feeling of inadequacy (1)
Responsibilities (1)
Expectations (1)
Accept any TWO of the above.
12.2.2
Open-ended, e.g.
Inadequate; intimidated; humiliated (2)
26
12.2.3
(a) Anger/ frustration/ upset/ annoyance (1)
[Accept other suitable responses.]
(b) She doesn’t answer
just looks at him
continues to treat him as a child (2)
Accept any TWO of the above.
(c) She despises him; regards him as incapable of taking care of himself. (2)
12.2.4
It indicates the transition between Walter’s real world and his fantasy
world. (2)
12.2.5
(a) “vaguely”/ “faint”/ “fleeting” (1)
“hell”/ “scornfully”/ “drag”/ “snapped”/ “erect”/ “proud”/ “disdainful”/
“Undefeated”/ “inscrutable” (1)
(b) Open-ended, e.g.
Heroic; brave – He should stand up for what he believes and not be
manipulated by his wife. She is taking advantage of his inadequacies.
OR
Timid – Arrogance and boastfulness is never admirable. One can impact
people’s lives more successfully with a gentle character. (3)
TOTAL SECTION C: 35
27
QUESTION 13
13.1
13.1.1 oppressed (½)
13.1.2 racist (½)
13.1.3 revolt (½)
[1½]
Working conditions are harsh/ hard manual labour/ hot weather
conditions (1)
[1]
Horse-drawn ploughs are used. (1)
Labourers are being treated as slaves. (1)
[2]
13.4.1 He is hard working. He is being forced to work by the
landowners. (2)
13.4.2 He does the work automatically. He doesn’t have a passion
for his work. (2)
[4]
Green refers to the field/ crop. (1)
Crimson refers to the red soil being ploughed/ the bloodshed of the
impending revolt. (1)
[2]
13.6
He compares his heart to the land being ploughed (wounded).
[1]
13.7
“toppled” (1)
“falling” (1)
“ploughs” (1)
“down” (1)
Accept any TWO of the above.
[2]
Open-ended, e.g.
I would become an activist/ joined a group of activist to revolt
against the oppressive government. (2)
[2]
Open-ended, e.g.
Yes, racism is still rife in South Africa as well as in many countries
around the globe. (2)
OR
No, racist laws were abolished in 1994 and we are now living in a
democratic South Africa. (2)
[2]
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
13.8
13.9
[17½]
28
QUESTION 14
14.1
14.1.1 lazy/ blameless (½)
14.1.2 blameless/ lazy (½)
14.1.3 sneaky (½)
[1½]
14.2
The cheetah’s coat and the grass are similar in colour.
[1]
14.3
14.3.1 alliteration (1)
14.3.2 It emphasizes the clumsy/ relaxed/ lazy nature of the cheetah
during the day. (2)
[3]
14.4
The cheetah will hunt.
[1]
14.5
The prey will not be able to see the cheetah approaching in the
darkness. (1) It will be easier to catch its prey. (1)
[2]
14.6
The animal which the cheetah will hunt for food.
[1]
14.7
The cheetah’s speed.
[1]
14.8
The prey is not sure which one of them will die, but they know one of
them will die./ There are two opponents in this game (hunt), the
predator and the prey.
[2]
14.9
“red horizon”
[1]
14.10
Open-ended, e.g.
No, the cheetah is much faster than the leopard. (2)
OR
Yes, the cheetah only hunts at night. It is not as strong as the
leopard. (2)
[2]
Open-ended, e.g.
Yes, the prey is part of the food chain. Cheetah’s are natural
hunters. (2)
OR
No, their method of hunting is cruel. No form of killing is
acceptable. (2)
[2]
14.11
[17½]
29
QUESTION 15
15.1
14.1.4 discovery (½)
14.1.5 photograph (½)
14.1.6 hurts (½)
[1½]
15.2.1 shock (1)
15.2.2 He discovers the photograph unexpectedly. It triggers bad
memories of his ex-wife. (2)
[3]
15.3.1 Simile (1)
15.3.2 It emphasizes the extent of his shock at the discovery of the
photograph. (2)
[3]
False (1)
“shy, delicate, slender” (1)
[2]
Love (1)
Acceptance (1)
Security (1)
Accept any ONE of the above as well as other suitable responses.
[1]
15.6
It helped him to cope with his fear of the war.
[2]
15.7
He did not discard the photograph.
[1]
15.8
Open-ended, e.g.
Yes, emotional hurts are not easily forgotten. It shapes one’s future
both negatively and positively. (2)
OR
No, if one receives counselling one can overcome one’s emotional
hurts and fears. (2)
[2]
Open-ended, e.g.
No, divorce has a negative effect on the children. The couple could
consult a marriage counsellor. (2)
OR
Yes, if the marriage relationship has broken down there is no point in
remaining in the relationship. (2)
[2]
15.2
15.3
15.4
15.5
15.9
[17½]
30
QUESTION 16
16.1
16.1.1 prayer (½)
16.1.2 God (½)
16.1.3 save (½)
[1½]
False(1)
It refers to the few oppressed people who have not lost hope to
attain freedom. (1)
[2]
16.3.1 alliteration (1)
16.3.2 It creates the sound or dismay or anguish. (2)
[3]
16.4
“dear God”
[1]
16.5
God
[1]
16.6
16.6.1 Blacks/ Non-whites (1)
16.6.2 The apartheid government/ racist whites (1)
[2]
16.7.1 B/ hopeful (1)
16.7.2 Signs of human dignity and goodness still remain. (2)
[3]
Open-ended e.g.
Yes, they suffered under the oppressive government, yet they still
fought for freedom. (2)
OR
No, they brought it upon themselves. They could have left the
country. (2)
[2]
Open-ended, e.g.
No, the apartheid government used every excuse possible to delay
change. They could simply step down. (2)
OR
Yes, the transition needed to be planned carefully to avoid
bloodshed. Future leaders needed to be prepared for the
responsibility of government. (2)
[2]
16.2
16.3
16.7
16.8
16.9
[17½]
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