Standard Operating Procedures, Sample

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Page D-1
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Appendix D
Example Standard Operating Procedures
Contents
A. Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Forms ............................................. D-1
Figures
Figure D-1
Figure D-2
Figure D-3
Figure D-4
Figure D-5
Figure D-6
Figure D-7
Figure D-8
Figure D-9
Figure D-10
Figure D-11
Figure D-12
Figure D-13
Figure D-14
Blank Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Form ............... D-2
Example SOP for a Process .................................................. D-3
Example SOP for Acrylamide Use ......................................... D-4
Example SOP for Benzene Use ............................................ D-5
Example SOP for Ethidium Bromide Use .............................. D-7
Example SOP for Flammable Solvents Use .......................... D-9
Example SOP for Formaldehyde Use ................................. D-10
Example SOP for Gas Cylinder Use .................................... D-12
Example SOP for Inorganic Acid Use .................................. D-13
Example SOP for Inorganic Base Use ................................ D-14
Example SOP for Mercury Use ........................................... D-15
Example SOP for Oxidizer Use ........................................... D-16
Example SOP for Peroxide-Forming Chemicals Use .......... D-17
Example SOP for Phenol Use ............................................. D-18
A. Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Forms
A blank Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) form is shown in Figure D-1.
The following pages contain example SOPs. They contain general safety information.
Please customize them to your unique situations.
We are looking to expand our collection of example SOPs. If you have an SOP that you
think other departments in the university would like to refer to, please send an electronic
copy to the UW Chemical Hygiene Officer at [email protected]
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-2
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Figure D-1
Laboratory Safety Manual
Blank Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Form
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
#2 Chemicals
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
#7 Waste Disposal
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
#10 Decontamination
#11 Designated Area
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-3
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-2
Example SOP for a Process
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processe s
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Solvent distillation (for recycling).
#2 Chemicals
Ethanol, xylene, paraffin wax. Ethanol is flammable and a reproductive toxicant.
Xylene is flammable, toxic and a suspected reproductive toxicant. Paraffin wax is not
hazardous.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Standard PPE: Lab coat, goggles, closed toe shoes.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Xylene and ethanol are volatile. Xylene distillation unit is vented to atmosphere.
Nearby walk-in fume hood can be used for chemical handling. Any other chemical
handling is done in the fume hood in the wet lab room (room 114). Limit any
handling of xylene and ethanol outside of the fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Chemicals are stored in 5 gallon HDPE carboys in a specially designed and
designated flammables storage room. No more than 10 gallons (two carboys) may be
stored out this storage room, even temporarily.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Spill kit is in cabinet next to distillation unit. Spill kit contains spill pads, gloves,
bags. In the event of a spill, remove any source of spark or flame. Try to move spill
toward walk in fume hood to ease cleanup. If spill is large and fumes are in the air,
leave the room and call the UW EH&S Spills Line at 206-543-0467. If exposed,
remove clothing and use the emergency shower located directly outside of room. If
someone is incapacitated, call 911 and initiate first aid if possible.
#7 Waste Disposal
This process produces a mixture of ethanol and paraffin wax that is hazardous waste.
This haz waste has the EH&S waste routine #4444. Use the online form at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/forms/epo/routinepickup.php to request pickup of
waste. Do not accumulate more than 55 gallons of this waste.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
N/A
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
x YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Supervisor training required on this SOP and supporting materials, as well as basic
lab emergency procedures.
#10 Decontamination
Decontaminate surfaces with soapy water as necessary.
#11 Designated Area
Flammables storage room, fume hood next to distillation unit, and fume hood in room
114.
Name: Megan Kogut
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Title: Supervisor
Date: 10.13.06
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-4
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Figure D-3
Laboratory Safety Manual
Example SOP for Acrylamide Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Use of Acrylamide. Use in polyacrylamide gels.
#2 Chemicals
Un-polymerized acrylamide is toxic (neurotoxin) and suspect carcinogen.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Double layers of nitrile gloves, lab coat, and goggles required when handling the
solid powder. Use diapers when pouring gels.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Handle powder inside the designated fume hood located in *
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Avoid getting the unpolymerized acrylamide on skin, gloves, clothing, etc.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
If skin contact is made, wash copiously with water. Call Poison Control Center if
necessary. Absorb spill with diatomaceous earth and call EH&S at 543-0467 for
further information.
#7 Waste Disposal
Polymerized acrylamide is non-toxic and can be disposed in the trash. Unpolymerized
liquid is hazardous waste. Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according
to requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request,
both available online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
N/A
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Users must receive specific process training and information about acrylamide from
their supervisor before being authorized to perform procedures.
#10 Decontamination
Double nitrile gloves. Use copious amounts of soap and water.
#11 Designated Area
Inside fume hood between microscope and water bath.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-5
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-4 Example SOP for Benzene Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processe s
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Injections of Benzene Standards for Gas Chromatograph Calibrations and Sample
Analyses (Note: All use of benzene is strictly regulated by occupational health
regulation WAC 296-849.)
#2 Chemicals
Benzene, at known and unknown concentrations.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Chemical splash goggles, butyl or natural rubber gloves, and a lab coat or apron is
required.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Benzene-containing solutions should be dispensed and used only in a properly
operating fume hood. Syringe purging should also be done in the fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Mixing and dispensing done in an operating fume hood with all sources of ignition
turned off (hot plates, burners, etc.). Benzene stored in metal safety cans or glass
bottles (1 liter maximum) as much as possible. Transported in spill-proof carriers.
Benzene is stored in a flammable cabinet, separate from acids, bases, and oxidizers.
The flammable cabinet is located _______________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Try to stop the spill if it is on-going. Remove all sources of ignition from the spill
area. If splash on skin occurs, wash immediately with soap and water and remove any
contaminated apparel while washing. Call 911 in the event of a spill beyond lab staff
capabilities. Use absorbent pads or vermiculite to clean up small fume hood spills or
to dike larger spills. Absorbent pads are stored in ________________. If a spill of
more than ___ ml of benzene occurs outside the fume hood, vacate the room, close
the door and call 911. If the quantity of benzene is in solution and does not easily
evaporate, a spill cleanup by a contractor could be obtained by calling EH&S at 206543-0467. Otherwise, the benzene could be allowed to evaporate. After clean-up or
evaporation, room air must be monitored by EH&S prior to re-occupancy.
#7 Waste Disposal
For spills: place used absorbent in metal can with leak-proof lid. Over-pack with
additional absorbent. Seal can. For all waste, label with Hazardous Waste Label,
accumulate according to requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or
Routine Pickup request, both available online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Users must receive specific physical and health hazard information and safe
laboratory work practices training from their supervisor. Representative breathing
zone air sampling shall be taken to ensure that exposures do not exceed regulated
levels. (Contact EH&S for additional information.)
#10 Decontamination
Immediately wash with soap and water.
#11 Designated Area
Room _______________ . Special signage may be required depending on air
sampling results.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-6
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Additional Information about Benzene
Exposure Limits as Set by the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (at WAC 296849):
8-hour Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL):
15-minute Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL):
8-hour Action Level (AL):
1.0 ppm
5.0 ppm
0.5 ppm
Hazards:
Benzene liquid is highly flammable. It should be stored in tightly closed containers in a cool, well ventilated
area. Benzene vapor may form explosive mixtures in air. All sources of ignition must be controlled. Use
non-sparking tools when opening or closing benzene containers. Fire extinguishers, where provided, must
be readily available. Know where they are located and how to operate them. Smoking is prohibited in
areas where benzene is used or stored.
Benzene can affect your health if inhaled, if it contacts skin or eyes, or if ingested. The most frequent work
place route of entry is by inhalation, but benzene can be absorbed through the intact skin and will be
absorbed faster through abraded skin.
High, short-term (acute) exposures may result in feelings of breathlessness, irritability, euphoria,
giddiness, or irritation of the eyes, nose or respiratory tract. Also, headache, dizziness and feelings of
nausea or intoxication may occur. Severe exposures may lead to convulsions and loss of consciousness.
Periodic exposures at lower levels (chronic exposures) may result in various blood disorders, ranging from
anemia to leukemia (an irreversible, fatal disease). Many blood disorders associated with benzene
exposure may occur without symptoms.
Exposure Monitoring
The supervisor must determine by breathing zone air monitoring if employees are over the AL or STEL. If
levels are below the AL and STEL, no further air sampling is required unless procedures change. Affected
employees must be informed of air monitoring results within 15 days of the supervisor receiving the
results.
Training Requirements:
The Principal Investigator or supervisor must provide initial training to all personnel using benzene. If
airborne levels reach or exceed the AL, annual benzene training is required. The training content must
include the hazards of benzene, safety information, regulatory requirements, signs and symptoms of
possible exposures to benzene, and medical surveillance requirements.
Medical Surveillance
Any employee who is exposed to benzene above the AL for more than 30 days per year, or exposed to
benzene above the PEL for more than 10 days per year, must be evaluated by the Occupational Health
Nurse. Based on the evaluation results, the nurse may recommend further evaluation, exposure
restrictions, or job reassignment. Contact EH&S at 206-543-7388 for safety information, guidance for air
monitoring strategies, equipment and analytical result interpretation.
Last revised on 09/06
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-7
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-5
Example SOP for Ethidium Bromide Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Ethidium bromide, used in staining DNA.
#2 Chemicals
Ethidium bromide (CAS Registry Number 1239-45-8).
The material fluoresces a red-orange color under ultraviolet light, with increased
fluorescence when the material is bound to double-stranded DNA. Ethidium bromide
is typically purchased in powder or solution form and is soluble in water. The crystal
or powder form is odorless and appears dark red in color.
The powder form is considered an irritant to the upper respiratory track, eyes and
skin. Ethidium bromide is strongly mutagenic, causing living cell mutations. Even
though there is no evidence at this time of human carcinogenicity or teratogenicity,
this material should be considered a possible carcinogen or teratogen.
SybrSafe is a safer alternative to ethidium bromide. While it should be handled and
disposed of as ethidium bromide, it is somewhat less mutagenic and therefore safer to
handle.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Lab coat, chemical splash goggles and nitrile gloves are required. Leave lab coats in
the lab when your work is complete to prevent the spread of this or other chemicals
outside of the lab.
When an ultraviolet light source is used in your work with ethidium bromide, added
caution is required. As a general rule, avoid exposing unprotected skin and eyes to
intense UV sources. If the UV light is aimed upwards, wear a UV protective face
shield when you are standing near the source. For prolonged work close to UV light
boxes or other intense sources, it may be useful to wrap the end of the lab coat sleeves
loosely with masking tape to prevent gaps where the wrist could be exposed. For lowintensity UV sources, the requirement for UV protection can be waived if the
exposure to personnel has been measured and shown to be within permissible
exposure levels. Contact Radiation Safety at 206-543-0463 if you need measurements
of the UV levels in your facility.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
All operations involving powder or mists of ethidium bromide must be done in a fume
hood. Check for proper operation of the fume hood prior to use.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Liquid: Store in the dark and the cold, preferably in a plastic container.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
When working with ethidium bromide, try to minimize the potential for spills. Where
practical, purchase ready-made stock solutions from chemical manufacturers in lieu
of mixing your own solutions. If you prefer to mix your own solutions of ethidium
bromide, protect yourself by doing this process in a fume hood. Perform all processes
that generate ethidium bromide dusts or mists inside the fume hood to minimize
inhalation exposures. Prevent accidents by transporting small quantities of ethidium
bromide in a secondary container instead of carrying large quantities.
Solid: Store at the designated area.
Spills of ethidium bromide solutions should be absorbed and decontaminated with
soap and water. Avoid raising dust when cleaning up solid spills by mixing with water
and then absorbing the solution. All spill cleanup materials and absorbents should be
UW Environmental Health and Safety
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February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
bagged or placed in a sealed container with a hazardous waste label.
Some facilities use a hand held UV lamp to check for residual ethidium bromide
contamination following spill cleanup. A reddish-orange fluorescence can be detected
under both "long" and "short" UV wavelengths. Users of the hand held lamps should
be aware that their ability to detect small spills is not guaranteed. The ease of
detection depends upon a variety of factors including the chemical composition of the
sample, the wavelength of the UV lamp, and the intensity of the lamp. Use of a hand
held UV lamp to detect traces of ethidium bromide may serve as an occasional check
of laboratory practices, but it cannot substitute for good cleanliness and careful
contamination control.
#7 Waste Disposal
EH&S recommends that ethidium bromide waste be treated using special filters.
These filters use ion-exchange resins and activated charcoal to remove the ethidium
bromide from solution. There are effective chemical treatments to destroy ethidium
bromide, but filtering is an easier and safer choice. See
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epohazreduce/index.shtm for more information.
Powders, concentrated solutions, and grossly contaminated items are hazardous
waste. Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to requirements,
and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request, both available
online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Approval from PI prior to first use.
#10 Decontamination
Use copious amounts of soap and water.
#11 Designated Area
Fume hood at __________________. Check that the fume hood is operating
properly before starting the procedure.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-9
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-6
Example SOP for Flammable Solvents Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Flammable Solvents- use and storage - including the following:*
#2 Chemicals
Flammable solvent vapors can travel and can produce fire and explosion if an ignition
source is contacted. Some flammable solvents are more hazardous than others. Many
solvents also have an effect on the central nervous system and at high concentrations
cause sedation, coma and death. Contact with solvents can de-fat skin and cause
irritation of skin and mucous membranes.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear chemical splash goggles, consult Appendix C for proper glove selection. Call
EH&S (3-7388) for further information. A lab coat or apron is recommended for
personal protection and is required when dispensing or cleaning up spill quantities
greater than 1 liter.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Solvents should be dispensed only in a fume hood or in a well-ventilated space which
has been approved and permitted by the Seattle Fire Department.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Mixing or dispensing should be done in a hood with all sources of ignition eliminated
(hot plates, burners, etc.). Store in metal safety cans whenever possible. Solvents
should be stored in appropriate flammable cabinets, separate from acids, bases, and
oxidizers. Flammable cabinets located ____________________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Remove all sources of ignition from the spill area if it is safe to do it. Small fires may
be extinguished if it is safe and the operator is trained to use the fire extinguisher.
Wipe down spill area with solvent absorbent pads. Solvent absorption pads are stored
in _____________________________.
#7 Waste Disposal
Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to requirements, and send
in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request, both available online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm. Do not evaporate
flammable solvents in the fume hood.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-10
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Figure D-7
Laboratory Safety Manual
Example SOP for Formaldehyde Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Formaldehyde-All use of formaldehyde and formaldehyde-containing solutions is
regulated under Occupational Health regulation WAC 296-62-07540.
#2 Chemicals
Formaldehyde: Flammable liquid, irritant, sensitizer and potential human carcinogen.
Permissible exposure limit (PEL) (8hrs.): 0.75 ppm, short term exposure limit (STEL)
(15 min.) 2 ppm, action level (8hrs.): 0.5 ppm. Any product capable of releasing
formaldehyde vapor of 0.1 to 0.5 ppm must be labeled that it contains formaldehyde,
the availability of physical and health hazard information, and the name and address
of the responsible party. For products capable of releasing formaldehyde vapor at
levels of 0.5 ppm or above, the label must include the physical and health hazards as
well as the warnings "respiratory sensitizer" and "potential cancer hazard".
Chemical splash goggles and nitrile gloves must be worn to prevent eye contact and
limit dermal exposure. A lab coat or apron is also required.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Formaldehyde-containing solutions and preserved samples should be dispensed and
used only in a properly operating fume hood. Routine use outside of a fume hood is
acceptable only when formaldehyde levels are monitored and are below 0.5 ppm.
Employers must determine by breathing zone air monitoring if employees are over
exposed to formaldehyde. If the result of 8 hour monitoring is below the action level
and the 15 minute monitoring is below the STEL, then no further air monitoring is
required. However, if the work procedure changes, then monitoring must be repeated
to ensure acceptable exposure levels. Affected employees must be informed of the
formaldehyde exposure levels within 15 days of receiving the monitoring results.
An employee reporting significant eye, nose, throat or dermal irritation or
sensitization which might be a result of occupational exposure to formaldehyde shall
be evaluated by the University's Occupational Health Professional. Based on the
medical evaluation results, the Occupational Health Professional may recommend
further evaluation, workplace exposure restrictions or reassignment.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Mixing or dispensing should be done in a hood. Store in a cool dry well ventilated
flammable liquid storage area or cabinet. Do not store with strong oxidizing or
reducing agents, strong acids or bases, alkalies, alkali metals, amines, ammonia or
phenol. Storage cabinet is located*
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
If skin is exposed, wash immediately with soap and water. Flush mucus membranes
with large amounts of water. Use drench shower in case of extensive contamination.
Remove all sources of ignition from the spill area.
Spills in fume hood - use absorbent pads or vermiculite to clean up small fume hood
spills or to dike spill area. Clean up spill area with additional pads or paper towels.
Absorbent pads can be found in __________________.
Spills in room - respiratory protection is required to clean up spills of formaldehyde
greater than ___ ml outside an operating fume hood. If you are not certified to wear a
respirator, call 206-543-0467 for the EH&S spill hotline for assistance in contacting a
spill cleanup contractor. If it is an emergency (risk of fire or exposure to others) call
911. After cleanup, room air must be monitored by EH&S prior to occupancy.
#7 Waste Disposal
EH&S has a treatment program for formaldehyde; for more information see
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epohazreduce/index.shtm. If disposing of as
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-11
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
hazardous waste, label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to
requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request,
both available online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
Disposal of sample tissues or material soaked in formaldehyde should be disposed of
by *___________________________________.
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Users must receive specified physical and health hazard information and safe
laboratory work practices training from their supervisor. Lab supervisors must ensure
that at least two representative breathing zone air samples have been taken for
evaluation. Personnel using respirators must be enrolled in University's Respiratory
Protection Program. For further information, air sampling guidelines, or a copy of the
formaldehyde regulations contact EH&S at (206-543-7388).
#10 Decontamination
Wash affected area with soap and water.
#11 Designated Area
Room # *________. Special signage may be required depending on air sampling
results (see #4 above). Contact EH&S (3-7388) for further information.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-12
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Figure D-8
Laboratory Safety Manual
Example SOP for Gas Cylinder Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Gas cylinders (Inert)
Use of compressed gas cylinders
#2 Chemicals
Compressed gas cylinder present hazards because of the volume of gas and the
pressures involved. Leaking or vented inert gas can displace breathing air. This SOP
is for N2, Ar, Air, CO2, SF6, and ________________________________.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear goggles. Gloves, face shield, lab coat or apron and/or respirator may be
required for personal protection depending on the gas and use.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Fittings and connections must be properly tested for leaks using a soapy water,
'Snoop' or other appropriate test system or meter. Do not use an open flame.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
All cylinders should be properly identified and the specific hazards of each cylinder
should be known. Cylinders must be fastened securely at all times whether in use,
transit, or storage. Cylinder safety caps must be in place whenever cylinders are not in
use for an extended period of time or during transport. Proper valves and/or
regulators for the specific gas must be used. Store and use cylinders in ventilated
areas away from heat or ignition sources. When not in use, separate flammables and
oxidizers. Transport large cylinders only on an approved dolly or cart. A dolly or cart
is located ______________________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
If safe, turn the gas valve off. For cylinders that continue to leak, refer to th e
Laboratory Safety Manual section 9 or contact EH&S at 206-543-0467.
#7 Waste Disposal
Empty nontoxic or non-corrosive gas cylinders should be marked 'empty' and returned
to ________________. Empty gas cylinders that contained toxic or corrosive gases
must be stored in a fume hood or well ventilated space for pickup by the supplier. For
more information, see the Laboratory Safety Manual, section 3 Waste Management.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-13
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-9
Example SOP for Inorganic Acid Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Inorganic Acids - handling, dispensing, and diluting acids including:
*___________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________.
#2 Chemicals
Acids cause burns to skin and eyes upon contact and to mucous membranes if inhaled
or ingested.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear chemical splash goggles and heavy-duty neoprene gloves for concentrated
acids. For diluted acids greater than pH 2, use nitrile gloves. A lab coat or apron is
recommended for personal protection.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Concentrated acids should be dispensed in a fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
When diluting acids, small amounts should be added gradually to water and mixed
thoroughly to dissipate any heat generated. Inorganic and organic acids should be
stored in separate bins in the acid storage cabinets. Acids should be stored separately
from bases, oxidizers and flammable solvents. Acids in glass bottles over 1 liter
should be transported in spill proof carriers. Acids are stored
*______________________________________________________________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
In case of skin contact, flush affected areas with copious amounts of water for 15
minutes. Obtain medical attention. Neutralize any spilled acids with sodium
bicarbonate or spill pads to clean up. Spill kit can be found*_________________.
#7 Waste Disposal
EH&S has a treatment program for acids and bases; for more information see
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epohazreduce/index.shtm. If disposing of as
hazardous waste, label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to
requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request,
both available online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-14
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-10 Example SOP for Inorganic Base Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Inorganic Bases - handling, dispensing, and diluting including: ___________.
#2 Chemicals
Bases cause burns to skin and eyes upon contact and to mucous membranes if inhaled
or ingested.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear chemical splash goggles. For concentrated bases use heavy duty neoprene
gloves or natural rubber gloves. A lab coat or apron is recommended for personal
protection and is required when dispensing quantities greater than 1 liter or when
cleaning up a spill of a quantity greater than 1 liter.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Concentrated bases should be dispensed in a fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
When diluting bases, small amounts should be added gradually to water and mixed
thoroughly to dissipate any heat generated. Bases should be stored separately from
acids, oxidizers, and flammable solvents. Bases in glass bottles over 1 liter should be
transported in spill proof carriers. Bases are stored __________________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
In case of skin contact, flush affected areas with copious amounts of water for 15
minutes. Obtain medical attention. Neutralize any spilled base with citric acid. Spill
kit can be found ___________________.
#7 Waste Disposal
EH&S has a treatment program for acids and bases; for more information see
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epohazreduce/index.shtm. If disposing of as
hazardous waste, label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to
requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request,
both available online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-15
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-11 Example SOP for Mercury Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Mercury - handling (lab use, thermometers, etc) including: __________________
(The state of Washington has a ban on mercury products as described at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/eporecycle/hg.shtm. All mercury thermometers
should be replaced with alcohol thermometers as soon as possible ).
#2 Chemicals
Metallic mercury at elevated temperatures (e.g., drying ovens, water baths,
incubators) will vaporize and may reach concentrations which will adversely affect
worker health.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Safety glasses, gloves and a lab coat or apron are recommended for personal
protection and are required during dispensing and spill cleanup activities.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
If working with elemental mercury, the mercury should be in an enclosed vessel.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Use an unbreakable container when transporting thermometers or other mercury
containing equipment. Dispense mercury in a pan with raised edges to contain spills.
If possible place a plastic tub under equipment containing large amounts of mercury.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Prevent others from entering the area of the spill. Do not allow any mercury to
contact shoes or be tracked into a wider area. Spills less than 5 ml (e.g. thermometer)
should be cleaned up according to the instructions in the mercury spill cleanup kit
which is located ___________________. A mercury vacuum may also be used. User
instructions should be attached to the machine. Users should receive specialized
training regarding proper use of the unit prior to their first use. The mercury vacuum
is located _______________________. or borrow a mercury vacuum from EH&S.
For more information about mercury spills, see
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epo/spills/hgspills.shtm. Call EH&S at 206-543-0467
for help with mercury spills.
#7 Waste Disposal
Place mercury and contaminated materials, such as broken glass, into a screw capped
plastic container. Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to
requirements, and send in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request,
both available online at http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
_ NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
The PI must train staff on procedures and observe the first procedure of a new
employee prior to allowing independent work.
#10 Decontamination
Request EH&S monitor the area for mercury after clean-up and before allowing unrestricted access to the area.
#11 Designated Area
Mercury which is not in an enclosed device (such as a thermometer) can only be used
in the fume hood in room ____. Check to ensure it’s operating before starting the
procedure.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-16
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-12 Example SOP for Oxidizer Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Oxidizers - use and storage - including the following: (This SOP is not suitable for
Perchlorate acid or HF acid.)
*___________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
#2 Chemicals
Oxidizers such as dichromates, permanganates, sulfurics, or perchlorates may cause
skin irritation or sensitization. Besides these hazardous properties, many oxidizers
may present fire and explosion hazards.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear chemical splash gloves and heavy duty nitrile or neoprene gloves. Call EH&S
(3-0467) for further information if needed. A lab coat or apron is recommended for
personal protection and is required when dispensing or cleaning up a spill of a
quantity greater than 1 liter of liquid or 0.5 kg of a solid.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Volatile oxidizers should be dispensed in a fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Store separate from organic compounds, flammable materials, metals, and other
easily oxidizable materials; do not use metal containers. Do not use metal containers
for oxidizer storage. Storage location * ___________________________________
_________________________________________________________________.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Absorb a liquid spill with suitable diatomaceous earth or universal spill pads, except
for concentrated nitric acid. Neutralize concentrated nitric acid with copious amounts
of baking soda. Place used absorbent materials in plastic containers.
#7 Waste Disposal
Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to requirements, and send
in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request, both available online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Page D-17
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-13 Example SOP for Peroxide-Forming Chemicals Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Peroxide forming chemicals - use and storage including: ______________________
___________________________________________________________________.
#2 Chemicals
These chemicals can form highly explosive peroxide compounds as impurities when
exposed to air over a period of time. Peroxide formation is prevented by strict
inventory control of opened peroxidizable chemicals. Most compounds are also
flammable and toxic.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Wear goggles and butyl gloves unless other hazards indicate another selection. A lab
coat or apron is recommended for personal protection.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
Peroxidizable compounds should be dispensed in a fume hood.
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Store separate from acids, bases, and oxidizers. Store in metal safety cans if possible.
Label all containers with the date the original container was opened. If transferred to
another container, label with the date the original container was opened. Discard any
remaining chemical at the end of the time limit. Do not open jars that show any sign
of aging or crystal formation8. Peroxidizable chemicals are stored
__________________. For more information, please refer to the Peroxide Forming
Chemicals Management and Assessment Guidelines, online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/forms/epo/peroxideguidelines.pdf.
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Remove all sources of ignition from the spill area. Wipe down spill area with solvent
absorbent pads.
#7 Waste Disposal
Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to requirements, and send
in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request, both available online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
#9 Approval Required
N/A
#10 Decontamination
N/A
#11 Designated Area
N/A
YES:
X NO:
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
UW Environmental Health and Safety
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
Page D-18
February 2007
Appendix D – Example Standard Operating Procedures
Laboratory Safety Manual
Figure D-14 Example SOP for Phenol Use
University of Washington
Standard Operating Procedures for Chemicals or Processes
#1 Process
(if applicable)
Phenol
Use in molecular biology.
#2 Chemicals
Causes severe burns, toxic if inhaled or skin contact, poison, readily absorbed by
skin.
#3 Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE)
Neoprene or natural rubber gloves, double gloves; lab coat: chemical goggles. A
rubber or neoprene apron must be worn when pouring liquids and splashes may
occur.
#4 Environmental /
Ventilation Controls
A protective shield is required around all pressurized systems handling phenol. Use
phenol only in the fume hood at*
#5 Special Handling
Procedures & Storage
Requirements
Store saturated phenol in the cold (4ºC)
#6 Spill and Accident
Procedures
Use drench shower or eyewash immediately if any contact with skin/eyes, and seek
medical attention. Personnel in this lab are only allowed to clean up spills inside the
fume hood of _______ ml or less using absorbent. For spills outside the fume hood
or larger spills, evacuate the laboratory, prevent re-entry by un-authorized personnel,
and call the EH&S spills line at 206-543-0467 for help.
#7 Waste Disposal
Label with Hazardous Waste Label, accumulate according to requirements, and send
in Chemical Collection Request or Routine Pickup request, both available online at
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/epowaste/chemwaste.shtm.
#8 Special Precautions
for Animal Use
(if applicable)
*
Particularly hazardous
substance involved?
X YES:
NO:
Blocks #9 to #11 are Mandatory
Blocks #9 to #11 are Optional.
#9 Approval Required
Approval by PI before first use.
#10 Decontamination
Wear face shied to protect face and eyes from splatters, rubber gloves, boots and
apron. Flood area with water and cover with caustic soda ash to neutralize any unabsorbed phenol.
#11 Designated Area
Inside fume hood only.
Name:
Signature:
Environmental Health and Safety, Box 354400
Title:
Date:
*to be filled in by PI or Supervisor
UW Environmental Health and Safety
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