Teacher Induction Planning Participants

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Pennsylvania Department of Education

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Department of Education

333 Market Street

Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333

Teacher Induction Report

Thursday, October 01, 2009

(Last Last Approved: Tuesday, April 07, 2009)

Entity:

Mid Valley SD

Address:

52 Underwood Rd

Throop, PA 18512-1196

Phone:

(570) 307-2165

Contact Name:

Rose Ellen Skodacek

Teacher Induction Planning Participants

Name Affiliation Membership Category Appointed By

Brown, Wendy MVSD Administrator Administrators, Dr. Crotti, &

School Board

Educational Specialists Buckshon,

Robyn

Cesari, Rick

MVSD

MVSC - Driver's

Education

MVSD Crotti, Joseph,

Dr

Dolan, Donald

Esq

District Resident

Frank Mazur

Granville, Mary

Ellen

MVSD

MVSD

Heaton, Tara

Heil, Sandra

District Resident

MVSD

Ed Specialist - School

Counselor

Secondary School

Teacher

Administrator

Teachers

Higgins,

Michelle

MVSD

Holod, Sharon District Resident

Business

Representative

Administrator

Secondary School

Teacher

Parent

Ed Specialist - School

Counselor

Secondary School

Teacher

Business

Representative

Dr. Joseph Crotti, MVSD

Superintendent

MVSD Board of Directors

Superintendent

Teachers

MVSD School Board

Educational Specialists, Dr.

Crotti, MVSD School Board

Teachers

MVSD School Board

Horvath, John MVSD

Kaczmarek,

Thomas

Kropa, Ryan

MVSD

Kozloski, Lisa MVSD

MVSD

Community

Representative

Secondary School

Teacher

Ed Specialist - School

Psychologist

Ed Specialist - School

Counselor

MVSD School Board

Teachers & MVSD School

Board

Educational Specialists

Educational Specialists

Lopez, Carlos MVEC

Mazak, Mark MVSD

Mazak, Mark Jr. MVSD

Mazur,

Catherine

MVSD - Ed Specialist

- Librarian

Administrator

Administrator

Administrators

Administrators

Middle School Teacher Dr. Jospeh Crotti & Teachers

Elementary School

Teacher

Teacher

Mazur, Frank MVEC

Moskel, Rosann MVSD

Administrator

Administrator

Administrators

Administrators & MVSD School

Board

MVSD School Board O'Shea, Susan District Resident

Parry, Randy

Community

Representative

MVSD Superintendent Administrator

- 12/2008

MVSD

Administrators

Middle School Teacher Teachers Paulishak,

Elaine

Rinaldi, Patti District Resident Parent MVSD School Board

Runco, Danielle MVSD

Skodacek,

Rose Ellen

MVSD

Vinansky, Chad MVSC

Yanick, Michael MVSD

Elementary School

Teacher

Administrator

Administrator

Elementary School

Teacher

Teachers

Administrators, MVSD School

Board

Administrators

Teachers

Goals and Competencies

In order to develop the following Induction Plan for the Mid Valley School District, team members reviewed, discussed, and applied research-based findings. From the studies it was gleaned that a school district needs a viable and effective induction program to retain and support new teachers. From the reviewed literature, it was noted that education has one of the highest attrition rates of any profession. From their findings, researchers recommend that it is more economically and educationally sound for districts to expend energy and resources to retain promising teachers than in the recruitment of replacements

(

Smith & Ingersall, 2004; Ingersall &

Kralik, 2004; Heller, 2004.)

With regard to the length of the Induction process, research findings indicate that a three year plan appears to be the most effective approach. Researchers note that the first stage needs to focus on practical skills and information or the logistics of the institution - policies, procedures, duties and responsibilitites. During the second stage, mentors and "protégés" can concentrate more intently on the art and science of teaching, as well as, classroom management skills. In stage three, the focus should shift to a deeper understanding of instructional strategies and ongoing professional development that is based on the assessed needs of students. (The NEA

Foundation, 2001)

The goals and competencies of the Mid Valley School District's Induction Plan are therefore based on research-based, best practices to assist any new professional:

Overall Goals and Competencies

 use instructional practices that improve student achievement assign challenging work to diverse student populations use new state curriculum frameworks accomplish the goals of the curriculum

Specific MVSD Goals and Competencies

 to fulfill the Mid Valley School District Mission Statement to be knowledgeable of the Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators (22

Pa. Code 235) to be knowledgeable of the resources and services offered by the community, PDE,

Intermediate Units, Mid Valley School District, and MV schools to be knowledgeable of the roles and services provided by the MV School District' s personnel to be knowledgeable of the district and assigned school facilities, resources, calendar, school hours, emergency procedures, and professional obligations to be knowledgeable of and implement policies, procedures, responsibilities, programs, curricula, duties, and expectations at each of the following levels: o district

 o o o o school grade classroom subject and/or department to participate in the Teacher Preparation In-services provided by IU 19 o

The Behavior and Instruction Link o o o

Poitive Behavior Support

Instructional Strategies and Tehnology Integration

Enhancing Teaching Through Creative Resources to develop skills needed to successfully transition from an Instructional I Certificate to an

Instructional II Certificate to develop skills associated with planning and preparation of instruction o knowledge of content and pedagogy o o o o knowledge of Pennsylvania Academic Standards, and Anchors use of state curricula frameworks selection of instructional goals knowledge of students and needs o o o designing coherent instruction assessment of student learning knowledge of resources, materials and technology to develop skills associated with establishing and maintaining a purposeful and equitable learning environment o classroom management skills and techniques o o behavior management skills organizing physical space o fostering a culture of learning to develop skills associated with instructional delivery o use instructional practices that improve student achievement o questioning and discussion techniques o communicating clearly and accurately o o o o o o engaging students in learning providing feedback demonstration of flexibility and responsiveness differentiated instruction assign challenging work to diverse student populations use of accommodations, modifications and adaptations for special needs students to develop skills associated with professionalism o maintaining records o communication skills with parents/guardians, students, staff, and faculty o o o accessing resources contributing to the school and district growing and developing professionally

Heller, D. (2004).

Teachers Wanted: Attracting and Retaining Good Teachers

. Alexandria, VA:

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Ingersoll, R. M., & Kralik, J. (2004). The impact of mentoring on teacher retention: What the research says. Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States. 1

—23.

Lipton, L. & Wellman, B. (2003).

Mentoring Matters: A Practical Guide to Learning-Focused

Relationships

. Sherman, CT: Mira Via, LLC

NEA Foundation (2001).

Creating a Teacher Mentoring

Program. http://www.neafoundation.org/publications/mentoring.htm

Rutherford, P. (2005).

The 21st Century Mentor's Handbook: Creating a Culture for Learning

.

Alexandria, VA: Just ASK Publications.

Smith, T. M., & Ingersoll, R. M. (2004). What are the effects of induction and mentoring on beginning teacher turnover?

American Educational Research Journal, 41

(3), 681

—714.

Assessment Processes

The needs of inductees will be assessed on an on-going basis through a wide variety of methods which may include the following.

 surveys o self-assessment o mentor o o principal committee members checklists o self-assessment o o o mentor principal committee members inventories o self-assessment o o o mentor principal committee members review of lesson plans/books observations of lessons/instruction review of professional portfolio/journal review of grade book review of grading procedures review of assessments review of assigned projects observations of conferences o student o o mentor parents/guardians observations of classroom management

Mentor Selection

Induction Council Organization

District Coordination/Organization o

MVSD Superintendent or Designee will coordinate the district-wide Induction

Program

Selection of an Induction Coordinator

Form an Induction Council, which is responsible for the development and operation of the induction program. o

The council must include:

 teacher or educational specialist representatives, or both, chosen by teachers and educational specialists administrative representatives chosen by the administrative personnel.

Teacher preparation programs (IU 19) may also be represented on the committee to enable institutions to meet the requirement that they provide ongoing support for novice educators in partnership with local education agencies during their induction period, including observation, consultation and assessment (Pa. Code 49.14(4)(ix)).

Induction Council Responsibilities

Develop and implement a plan and program that meets the state requirements

Develop goals, objectives and competencies for the induction program

Determine the needs of inductees

Plan and oversee the program

Evaluate and monitor the program

Provide resources

Building Level Induction Teams

Members: o principal or designee o o o mentors inductees other support people as needed.

Building Level Induction Team Responsibilities

The principal or designee will: o organize building orientation activities

 including a thorough introduction to the school and staff, policies and procedures, and students o o o o facilitate the mentor- inductee relationship ensure reasonable working conditions formally evaluate inductees provide opportunities for mentor and inductee to mee

Other administrators or support personnel will provide: o resources o information o o directives materials

Overall Goals of Induction Plan is for new teachers/educational specialists to:

Participate in the Teacher Preparation In-services provided by IU 19 o

The Behavior and Instruction Link o o o

Poitive Behavior Support

Instructional Strategies and Tehnology Integration

Enhancing Teaching Through Creative Resources

Use instructional practices that improve student achievement

Assign challenging work to diverse student populations

Use new state curriculum frameworks

Accomplish the goals of the curriculum.

Achieve Goals and Competencies Specific to MVSD (see Goals and Competencies)

Program Length

Three years

For the 1 st

year of the Induction process, formal meetings will be held prior to the start of the school year with Principal (or designee)and Mentor. During the initial school year the mentor and inductee will meet formally at least once each quarter. Informal meetings will be on an "as needs basis."

In the second year of the induction process, formal meetings will be held at least once during each quarter with informal meetings held on an "as needs basis."

In the third year of the induction process, formal meetings will be held at least at twice during the school year with informal meetings on an "as needs basis."

Mentors

Selection

o o o

Recommendation of the District Induction Council/Committee/Team

Tenured and holds Instructional II Certificate

Recommended criteria:

Similar certification and assignments

Outstanding work performance

Models continuous learning and reflection

Knowledge of district/school policies, procedures and resources

Ability to work with students and other adults

Willingness to accept additional responsibility

Mentor training or previous experience

Compatible schedules so the mentor and inductee can meet regularly

Responsibilities

of mentors may include: o

Facilitate a good start to the year o o

Meet with the inductee regularly

Model good instructional practices o o o o o

Observe the inductee

Offer suggestions for improvement

Provide professional and personal support

Maintain a confidential relationship with the inductee

Serve as a liaison

Training

of mentors o

Mentors will have the opportunity to meet with other mentors and the Induction

Committee/Team Members to discuss mentoring issues and may receive training in:

The purpose of the induction program and the role of a mentor

Communication skills

Listening skills

Coaching and conferencing skills

Effective teaching/specialist skills

Problem solving

Knowledge of adult learning and development

Activities and Topics

Timeline of Activities/Topics

During the three year process, acquisition of the goals and competencies of the Mid

Valley School District Induction Plan will be the major focus.

For the 1 st

year of the Induction process, formal meetings will be held prior to the start of the school year with the school Principal or designee, Mentor and other support personnel. During the initial school year the mentor and inductee will meet formally at

least once each quarter. Informal meetings will be on an "as needs basis." In the first year, the induction program will focus on the inductee's:

knowledge of district and school operations, resources, facilities, and personnel knowledge and implementation of district and school policies, procedures, and programs performance of duties, responsibilities, obligations, and professional practices attendance at IU 19 Induction In-services - 4 meetings

In the second year of the induction process, formal meetings will be held at least once during each quarter with informal meetings held on an "as needs basis." During the second year, the induction program will focus on the inductee's ability to

accomplish the goals of the curriculum develop instructional practices that improve student achievement implement instructional strategies with diverse student populations use new state curriculum frameworks

In the third year of the induction process, formal meetings will be held at least at twice during the school year with informal meetings on an "as needs basis." During the third year, the induction program will continue the process of developing the inductee's ability to

develop skills associated with planning and preparation of instruction develop skills associated with establishing and maintaining a purposeful and equitable learning environment develop skills associated with instructional delivery develop skills associated with professionalism

The Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators

Section 1. Mission

The Professional Standards and Practices Commission is committed to providing leadership for improving the quality of education in this Commonwealth by establishing high standards for preparation, certification, practice and ethical conduct in the teaching profession.

Section 2. Introduction

(a) Professional conduct defines interactions between the individual educator and students, the employing agencies and other professionals. Generally, the responsibility for professional conduct rests with the individual professional educator. However, in this Commonwealth, a Code of Professional Practice and Conduct (Code) for certificated educators is required by statute and violation of specified sections of the Code may constitute a basis for public or private reprimand.

Violations of the Code may also be used as supporting evidence, though may not constitute an independent basis, for the suspension or revocation of a certificate. The Professional Standards and Practices Commission (PSPC) was charged by the act of December 12, 1973 (P. L. 397, No.

141) (2

4 P. S. § § 12-1251 - 12-1268), known as the Teacher Certification Law, with adopting a

Code by July 1, 1991. See 24 P. S. § 12-1255(a)(10).

(b) This chapter makes explicit the values of the education profession. When individuals become educators in this Commonwealth, they make a moral commitment to uphold these values.

Section 3. Purpose

(a) Professional educators in this Commonwealth believe that the quality of their services directly influences the Nation and its citizens. Professional educators recognize their obligation to provide services and to conduct themselves in a manner which places the highest esteem on human rights and dignity. Professional educators seek to ensure that every student receives the highest quality of service and that every professional maintains a high level of competence from entry through ongoing professional development. Professional educators are responsible for the development of sound educational policy and obligated to implement that policy and its programs to the public.

(b) Professional educators recognize their primary responsibility to the student and the development of the student's potential. Central to that development is the professional educator's valuing the worth and dignity of every person, student and colleague alike; the pursuit of truth; devotion to excellence; acquisition of knowledge; and democratic principles. To those ends, the educator engages in continuing professional development and keeps current with research and technology. Educators encourage and support the use of resources that best serve the interests and needs of students. Within the context of professional excellence, the educator and student together explore the challenge and the dignity of the human experience.

Section 4. Practices

(a) Professional practices are behaviors and attitudes that are based on a set of values that the professional education community believes and accepts. These values are evidenced by the professional educator's conduct toward students and colleagues, and the educator's employer and community. When teacher candidates become professional educators in this

Commonwealth, they are expected to abide by this section.

(b) Professional educators are expected to abide by the following:

(1) Professional educators shall abide by the Public School Code of 1949 (24 P. S. § § 1-101 -

27-2702), other school laws of the Commonwealth, sections 1201(a)(1), (2) and (4) and (b)(1), (2) and (4) of the Public Employe Relations Act (43 P. S. § § 1101.1201(a)(1), (2) and (4) and (b)(1),

(2) and (4)) and this chapter.

(2) Professional educators shall be prepared, and legally certified, in their areas of assignment.

Educators may not be assigned or willingly accept assignments they are not certified to fulfill.

Educators may be assigned to or accept assignments outside their certification area on a temporary, short-term, emergency basis. Examples: a teacher certified in English filling in a class period for a physical education teacher who has that day become ill; a substitute teacher certified in elementary education employed as a librarian for several days until the district can locate and employ a permanent substitute teacher certified in library science.

(3) Professional educators shall maintain high levels of competence throughout their careers.

(4) Professional educators shall exhibit consistent and equitable treatment of students, fellow educators and parents. They shall respect the civil rights of all and not discriminate on the basis of race, national or ethnic origin, culture, religion, sex or sexual orientation, marital status, age, political beliefs, socioeconomic status, disabling condition or vocational interest. This list of bases or discrimination is not all-inclusive.

(5) Professional educators shall accept the value of diversity in educational practice. Diversity requires educators to have a range of methodologies and to request the necessary tools for effective teaching and learning.

(6) Professional educators shall impart to their students principles of good citizenship and societal responsibility.

(7) Professional educators shall exhibit acceptable and professional language and communication skills. Their verbal and written communications with parents, students and staff shall reflect sensitivity to the fundamental human rights of dignity, privacy and respect.

(8) Professional educators shall be open-minded, knowledgeable and use appropriate judgment and communication skills when responding to an issue within the educational environment.

(9) Professional educators shall keep in confidence information obtained in confidence in the course of professional service unless required to be disclosed by law or by clear and compelling professional necessity as determined by the professional educator.

(10) Professional educators shall exert reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions which interfere with learning or are harmful to the student's health and safety.

Section 5. Conduct

Individual professional conduct reflects upon the practices, values, integrity and reputation of the profession. Violation of § § 235.6-235.11 may constitute an independent basis for private or public reprimand, and may be used as supporting evidence in cases of certification suspension and revocation.

Section 6. Legal obligations

(a)The professional educator may not engage in conduct prohibited by the act of December 12,

1973 (P. L. 397, No. 141) (24 P. S. § § 12-1251-12-1268), known as the Teacher Certification

Law.

(b)The professional educator may not engage in conduct prohibited by:

(1) The Public Sc hool Code of 1949 (24 P. S. § § 1-101-27-2702) and other laws relating to the schools or the education of children.

(2) The applicable laws of the Commonwealth establishing ethics of public officials and public employes, including the act of October 4, 197

8 (P. L. 883, No. 170) (65 P. S. § § 401-413), known as the Public Official and Employee Ethics Law.

(c) Violation of subsection (b) shall have been found to exist by an agency of proper jurisdiction to be considered an independent basis for discipline.

Section 7. Certification

The professional educator may not:

(1) Accept employment, when not properly certificated, in a position for which certification is required.

(2) Assist entry into or continuance in the education profession of an unqualified person.

(3) Employ, or recommend for employment, a person who is not certificated appropriately for the position.

Section 8. Civil Rights

The professional educator may not:

(1) Discriminate on the basis of race, National or ethnic origin, culture, religion, sex or sexual orientation, marital status, age, political beliefs, socioeconomic status; disabling condition or vocational interest against a student or fellow professional. This list of bases of discrimination is not all-inclusive. This discrimination shall be found to exist by an agency of proper jurisdiction to be considered an independent basis for discipline.

(2) Interfere with a student's or colleague's exercise of political and civil rights and responsibilities.

Section 9. Improper personal or financial gain

(1) Accept gratuities, gifts or favors that might impair or appear to impair professional judgment.

(2) Exploit a professional relationship for personal gain or advantage.

Section 10. Relationships with students

The professional educator may not:

(1) Knowingly and intentionally distort or misrepresent evaluations of students.

(2) Knowingly and intentionally misrepresent subject matter or curriculum.

(3) Sexually harass or engage in sexual relationships with students.

(4) Knowingly and intentionally withhold evidence from the proper authorities about violations of the legal obligations as defined within this section.

Section 11. Professional relationships

The professional educator may not:

(1) Knowingly and intentionally deny or impede a colleague in the exercise or enjoyment of a professional right or privilege in being an educator.

(2) Knowingly and intentionally distort evaluations of colleagues.

(3) Sexually harass a fellow employe.

(4) Use coercive means or promise special treatment to influence professional decisions of colleagues.

(5) Threaten, coerce or discriminate against a colleague who in good faith reports or discloses to a governing agency actual or suspected violations of law, agency regulations or standards.

The Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators can be found at

22 Pa. Code §§235.1 - 235.11.

All questions should be directed to the Professional Standards and Practices Commission at

(717) 787-6576.

Evaluation and Monitoring

The Induction process will be monitored

quarterly o inventories o o needs assessments and/or checklists, as well as, mid-year and end of year evaluations

Inductees will also maintain:

 a professional portfolio.

Mentors will maintain:

 a log/journal of meetings and topics covered.

The Intermediate Unit will maintain

 sign-in sheets to document attendance by inductees at in-services.

The building principal or designee will

 monitor and maintain the records of the induction process o

The building principal or designee will maintain a file for each inductee and mentor review the Inductee's portfolio; mentor's log/journal; as well as, the results of surveys, inventories, needs assessments and/or checklists.

The Induction Council will yearly

 review and evaluate the effectiveness of the induction program through o o o

interviews review of the bi-annual induction program evaluations

induction protocols

o

portfolios.

Participation and Completion

Participation and completion of the induction program will be monitored by the each building principal of designee. The reports and evidence of the program will be given to the principal or designee by the inductee and mentor at least quarterly in the first and second years and biannually in the third year. The principal or designee will submit copies of the reports to the

MVSD Office for inclusion in the inductees personnel file. The MVSD Superintendent or designee will be responsible for checking an approving evidence. New teachers will attend New Teacher

Induction In-services through the IU19. Proof and records of attendance and completion of IU inservices will be gathered by IU 19 and sent to the Mid Valley School District Office.

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