1st-year-preliminary-reading-list-2014

advertisement
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON
DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY
FIRST YEAR PRELIMINARY READING LIST
At this time of year, when many of you have just finished exams, the last thing you might want is
more reading! However, it can be a good idea to think ahead and do some preparation for your
first year courses.
The books listed below are a preliminary reading list based on your first year modules plus some
study guides of a more general nature – full details of these will be available in the programmes
you will receive for each module at the beginning of term.
Please note that much of your reading at university will be based around international academic
journals, which you will have access to once you arrive, but academic and ‘popular science’ texts
such as those given here are useful for broad coverage of major topics.
University modules are not usually organised around one text and this means that only some parts
of a book might be relevant. Some of the ideas contained in these texts can appear complex
without the aid of lectures and tutorials to explore their significance. However, do not be put off
if you find the issues difficult – make a note of the problems you identify and raise them with the
tutor when you meet. Confronting challenging concepts and ideas is an essential part of learning
at university, and beginning this process early on is advantageous.
You may be tempted to buy some of these and as a matter of principle we would not dissuade
anyone from purchasing module texts. However, second and third year students sometimes sell
their old text books, and it is possible to pick up some of these in second-hand local bookshops,
or
by
visiting
the
Geography
Society
Facebook
page
www.facebook.com/KCLGeographySociety. Most of the recommended texts are also available
in bookshops in London.
Suggested books of general interest
The following titles are of general books recommended by members of staff to get you thinking
about some of the ‘big picture’ issues that you will encounter over the next three years. For the
most part, they are extremely readable and will hopefully give you some food for thought about
the kind of issues about which geographers and society as a whole need to be thinking about.
Many are easily obtainable second hand via websites such as Amazon or eBay.
Diamond, J. (2005) Guns, Germs and Steel, Vintage, London.
A book which traces the rise of European civilization and promotes a thesis that the natural
environment led to the divergent development trajectories of different regions.
Garfield, S. (2012) On the Map. London: Profile.
Easy-to-read, general science book on the importance and different dimensions of maps and
mapping.
Harvey, D. (2003) The New Imperialism, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
David Harvey is one of the world’s most prominent geographers and here he critically examines
US policy including US foreign military adventurism abroad and domestic political issues.
Harvey, D. (2010) The Enigma of Capital, Profile Books, London.
Harvey draw on a Marxist analysis of capitalism to provide an understanding what determines
flows of capital and the geographical movement of money. This enables us to understand the
disruption and destruction which accompany capitalist development
Hobsbawm, E. (1995) Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991, Abacus,
London.
Hobsbawm explores the dynamic changes of the 20th century. He writes from the combined
perspectives of a remarkably accomplished scholar and direct observer of events.
Klein, N. (2001) No Logo, Flamingo Press, London.
As the world faces a second economic depression, No Logo's analysis of our corporate and
branded world is as timely and powerful as ever. Food for thought!
The following may be useful as general study aids:
Studying at a world-leading university in a department that is central to an important academic
discipline will be a new, exciting and challenging experience for most students. Why not
familiarise yourself with some of the key knowledge and skills you will be expected to
demonstrate during your time as an undergraduate by reading one or two of the following texts
before you arrive?
Clifford, N.J., French, S. and Valentine G. (eds) (2010) Key Methods in Geography, 2nd ed. SAGE:
London.
Good all-round text book with information on a wide variety of methods and skills used by
undergraduate geographers.
Clifford, N.J., Holloway, S.L., Rice, S.P. and Valentine, G. (eds.) (2009) Key Concepts in Geography, 2nd
ed. SAGE: London.
Good all-round text book with information on a wide variety of concepts used by human and
physical geographers.
Gregory, D., Johnston, R., Pratt, G., Watts, M. and Whatmore, S., (eds.), (2009), The Dictionary
of Human Geography, 5th edition, Blackwell, Oxford.
Kneale, P. E. (2011) Study Skills for Geography, Earth and Environmental Science Students, 3rd ed.
Hodder Education: London.
Nayak, A. and Jeffrey, A. (2011) Geographical Thought: an introduction to ideas in human geography.
Pearson: Harlow.
Northedge, A. (2005) The Good Study Guide, 2nd ed. Open University: Milton Keynes, 392 p.
Rogers, A., Viles, H. and Goudie, A.S. (eds.) (2003) The Student’s Companion to Geography, 2nd ed.,
Blackwell, Oxford.
Venkatesh, S. (2009) Gang Leader for a Day, Penguin, London.
Venkatesh is an incredibly naive sociology student with a great deal of curiosity. Becoming
frustrated with the dryness of his chosen subject, he heads into the Chicago projects with a
backpack full of questionnaires to go through with gang members. He was lucky he wasn't killed.
Venkatesh meets the charismatic gang leader, JT, who takes him under his wing and gives him
privileged access to life in the projects and gang activity. Venkatesh documents his experience
with the gang. While not a ‘geography’ book as such, it raises some important questions about
field work and some interesting insights into the practice of urban research.
Human Geography - Geographical Ideas, Concepts and Methods:
The following books explore some key concepts, ideas and methods that relate to Geography as a
discipline, and which students will be expected to engage in intellectually.
Agnew, J. et al (1996) Human Geography: An Essential Anthology. London, Blackwell.
Cloke, P., Crang. P., and Goodwin, M., (eds.), (2014), Introducing Human Geographies, [third
edition], Routledge, London.
Daniels, P , et al (eds.) (2012) An Introduction to Human Geography. London, Pearson (4th
Edition)
Dicken, P., (2011), Global Shift: Mapping the changing contours of the world economy, Sage,
London.
Harvey, D. (2003) The New Imperialism, Oxford University Press.
David Harvey is one of the world’s most prominent geographers and here he critically examines
US policy including US foreign military adventurism abroad and domestic political issues.
Harvey, D. (2010) The Enigma of Capital, Profile Books, London.
Harvey draw on a Marxist analysis of capitalism to provide an understanding what determines
flows of capital and the geographical movement of money. This enables us to understand the
disruption and destruction which accompany capitalist development
Holt- Jensen, A (2009) Geography, History and Concepts: A Student’s Guide. London, Sage.
A relatively concise introduction to the main ways in which geography has changed in the past
100 or so years.
Livingstone, D (1992) The Geographical Tradition. London, Blackwell.
Wolf, E. (2010 2nd edition or earlier editions) Europe and The People Without History, University
of California Press, Berkeley.
The intention of this work is to show that European expansion not only transformed the historical
trajectory of non-European societies but also reconstituted the historical accounts of these
societies before European intervention. This book covers a huge topic and provides a good
understanding of how non-European societies have been transformed through their contacts with
Europe.
Physical Geography - The Changing Natural Environment
Understanding how the environment works and how it is changing is central to adressing many global
environmental and social issues. The texts below relate to this compulsory first year undergraduate
module, and further broadening of knowledge can be achieved by reading ‘popular’ periodicals such
as New Scientist or National Geographic.
Smithson P, Addison K and Atkinson K (2008) Fundamentals of the Physical Environment, 4th
edition. Routledge, Oxon.
This is a good overall text for physical geography as a whole, covering many of the fundamental
properties and processes of the physical environment which are discussed or implicit in The
Changing Natural Environment module. A good reference book.
Gaston KJ and Spicer JI (2004) Biodiversity: An Introduction. 2nd edition. Wiley-Blackwell,
Oxford.
This is a good, concise introduction to biodiversity, how and why it is valued, and why it is so
important for sustaining our species and civilisation. It is the most useful text for the ‘Biodiversity
Crisis’ section of The Changing Natural Environment.
Smith K and Petley D (2009) Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster, 5th
edition London: Routledge, 416 p.
An excellent large overview of natural hazards and the environment. Main textbook we will use
in 2nd year Natural Hazards but good background for 1st year Natural Hazards lectures.
Mapping and Statistics
Mapping is central to spatial analysis, which is an important element of all forms of geographical
study. Likewise, the ability to understand and statistically analyse both quantitative and qualitative
data is a crucial skill for geographers of all specialisms. The following texts provide a good grounding
in data mapping and analysis techniques, and will be useful throughout your time at university and
usually after, if you embark upon a professional career that requires such skills and knowledge.
Field, A. (2009) Discovering Statistics Using SPSS. 3rd Edition. London: SAGE.
Comprehensive textbook covering many aspects of (non-spatial) statistics used by undergraduate
geographers, with examples and implementation in SPSS program. Also see the more recent
(2012, Discovering Statistics Using R) version with implementation examples for statistics
program R (possibly more ‘advanced’ but provides greater range of transferable skills).
Harris, R. and Jarvis, C.(2011) Statistics for Geography and Environmental Science.
Harlow:Pearson Education Ltd.
Textbook on statistics methods specifically aimed at geographers. Contains introduction to spatial
analysis (which Field does not).
Krygier, J. and Wood D. (2011) Making maps: A visual guide to map design for GIS. New York:
The Guildford Press.
Good introduction to digital cartography with concepts conveyed through many illustrations.
Accompanying blog also useful to read: http://makingmaps.net/
Dr Andrew Brooks
Undergraduate Tutor
2014
Download