University of Kent

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UNIVERSITY OF KENT
Confirmation that this version of the module specification has been approved by the School
Learning and Teaching Committee: 13/5/2015
MODULE SPECIFICATION
1.
Title of the module
SP608: Motivation
2.
School or partner institution which will be responsible for management of the
module
School of Psychology
3.
Start date of the module
Spring 2010, Revised here for academic year 2015-16 onwards
4.
The number of students expected to take the module
100
5.
Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and
consultation with other relevant Schools and Faculties regarding the withdrawal
None
6.
The level of the module (e.g. Certificate [C], Intermediate [I], Honours [H] or
Postgraduate [M])
H
7.
The number of credits and the ECTS value which the module represents
15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
8.
Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern)
Autumn or Spring
9.
Prerequisite and co-requisite modules
SP300; SP301; SP302; SP500
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Module Specification Template (v.October 2014)
UNIVERSITY OF KENT
10. The programmes of study to which the module contributes
BSc in :
 Applied Psychology,
 Applied Psychology with Clinical Psychology,
 Psychology,
 Psychology with Clinical Psychology,
 Psychology (with Studies in Europe),
 Social Psychology,
 Psychology and Social Anthropology,
 Psychology and Sociology,
 Psychology and Law
Not available as a wild module.
11. The intended subject specific learning outcomes
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
11.1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of core concepts, theories and
findings in the study of experimental existential psychology and human motivation
11.2 Critically evaluate the theoretical and empirical literature on motivation and
experimental existential psychology
11.3 Apply theory and existing research on motivation to real life situations/ events
both in written and oral formats.
11.4 Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and conceptual issues in the study of
motivation
12. The intended generic learning outcomes
On successfully completing the module students will be able to:
12.1 Demonstrate literacy, writing and oral skills to present, interpret and discuss
concepts, theories, and findings based on the use of the relevant literature
12.2 Demonstrate the ability to work in a team to achieve a common objective.
12.3 Critically evaluate the quality of theories, methods and findings in published
research
12.4 Demonstrate generic research skills which include; the ability to synthesize
theories, identify gaps in existing research, identify and locate appropriate resources,
and develop novel research hypotheses.
12.5 Demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate, work independently and undertake
problem solving tasks.
13. A synopsis of the curriculum
This module provides an opportunity to study the literature on motivation, inspired by
a wide range of psychological perspectives (e.g., Evolutionary Psychology, Social
Psychology, and Existential Experimental Psychology). In this, we will consider what
motivates human cognition and behaviour. Specifically we will consider; (a) General
Theories of Human Motivation(b) Evolution and Biological Perspectives (c) The self
and Self-regulation (d) Human Mating Strategies, (e) Relationships, (f) Threat
Management, (g) Emotion, (h) Religion and Illusion, (i) The Modern Unconscious (j),
Curiosity. Moreover, the module will introduce students to methods and measures
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Module Specification Template (v.October 2014)
UNIVERSITY OF KENT
applied in the field of research on human motivation. Finally, applications of theory
and findings on human motivation to applied settings (e.g., daily life) are discussed
14. Indicative Reading List
Recommended Reading *
Ryan, R. M. (Ed.). (2012). The Oxford handbook of human motivation. Oxford
University Press.
Baumeister, R.F. The cultural animal. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
Leary, M.R. The curse of the self. Oxford: University Press, 2004
Pinker, S. The blank slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature, Penguin Putnam,
2002
* Note; these are optional text books – mandatory readings will be provided.
15. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours
and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to
achievement of the intended module learning outcomes
22 contact hours taking place within a framework of 11 hourly lectures and 11 seminars.
The latter will require the participation of students in presentations and discussions as part
of the teaching method. These methods provide students with the opportunity to develop
knowledge and understanding in applied psychology, plus key intellectual and transferable
skills such as critical evaluation and proficiency in oral discussion. Participation in seminars,
together with presentation preparation and private study will result in a total of 150 hours of
study.
L&T Method
Hours
Learning Outcome
Lecture
11hrs
11.1, 11.4
12.1, 12.3, 12.4
Seminars
11hrs
11.1 to 11.4
12.1 to 12.5
Total Contact Hrs
22hrs
Independent Study Hours
128hrs 11.1 to 11.4
12.1 to 12.5
TOTAL
150hrs
16. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended
module learning outcomes
Assessment Method
Weight
Learning Outcomes
Essay (3,000 words)
60%
11.1 to 11.4
12.1, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5
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Module Specification Template (v.October 2014)
UNIVERSITY OF KENT
Group Presentation (within small
20%
groups and moderated by recording
via KentPlayer, each taking approx. 10
mins, subject to topic)
11.1 to 11.4
12.1 to 12.5
10 x weekly quizzes. These will be
conducted via Moodle based upon
each week’s readings. They each
consist of 10 MCQ questions.
11.1, 11.4
12.3, 12.5
20%
17. Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space
None (Existing module)
18. The School recognises and has embedded the expectations of current disability
equality legislation, and supports students with a declared disability or special
educational need in its teaching. Within this module we will make reasonable
adjustments wherever necessary, including additional or substitute materials,
teaching modes or assessment methods for students who have declared and
discussed their learning support needs. Arrangements for students with declared
disabilities will be made on an individual basis, in consultation with the University’s
disability/dyslexia support service, and specialist support will be provided where
needed.
19. Campus(es) or Centre(s) where module will be delivered:
Canterbury
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Module Specification Template (v.October 2014)
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