School Direct Handbook - The St Helens Teaching Schools

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Faculty of Education
PGCE School Direct Primary
PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Master’s level University-based study
60 credits
Sue Cronin (Deputy Head - School of Teacher Education)
Office Location – EDEN111
Telephone Number – 0151 291 3393
Email Address – [email protected]
Elizabeth Parr (School Direct Course Leader)
Office Location – EDEN113A
Telephone Number – 0151 291 3359
Email Address – [email protected]
Ed Wright (School Direct Secondary)
Office Location – EDEN115A
Telephone Number – 0151 291 3207
Email Address – [email protected]
Victoria Bates (School Direct Administrator)
Office Location – EDEN120
Telephone Number – 0151 291 3658
Email Address – [email protected]
Module Handbook
2014-15
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Table of Contents
Welcome ........................................................................................................................................................................... 1
The Programme ................................................................................................................................................................ 2
Programme Synopsis..................................................................................................................................................... 2
Programme Aims........................................................................................................................................................... 2
Learning Outcomes ....................................................................................................................................................... 2
What will we do in the university sessions? ..................................................................................................................... 3
Programme Content ..................................................................................................................................................... 4
Assessment ....................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Presentation and Length of Assessments ..................................................................................................................... 7
Referencing ................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Submission Dates .......................................................................................................................................................... 8
Procedures for Submitting Assignments....................................................................................................................... 8
Requesting An Extension .............................................................................................................................................. 8
Marking and feedback .................................................................................................................................................. 9
Return / Collection of Assignments ............................................................................................................................ 10
Marking Criteria - M Level........................................................................................................................................... 11
Marking Criteria - P Level ............................................................................................................................................ 12
Reading Materials ........................................................................................................................................................... 13
Teaching and Learning ................................................................................................................................................ 13
Assessment ................................................................................................................................................................. 14
Curriculum................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Research-Informed Teaching ...................................................................................................................................... 15
Professional Development .......................................................................................................................................... 16
English Subject Knowledge ......................................................................................................................................... 16
Mathematics Subject Knowledge ............................................................................................................................... 16
Science Subject Knowledge......................................................................................................................................... 17
Online Resources ............................................................................................................................................................ 18
Sheppard-Worlock Library website ................................................................................................................................ 18
Moodle ........................................................................................................................................................................ 18
Professionalism ............................................................................................................................................................... 19
University Policies ........................................................................................................................................................... 19
Programme Evaluation and Quality Assurance .............................................................................................................. 20
Evaluations .................................................................................................................................................................. 20
Exit Survey ................................................................................................................................................................... 20
Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) ..................................................................................................................... 20
External Examiners...................................................................................................................................................... 20
Internal Examiners ...................................................................................................................................................... 21
Ofsted.......................................................................................................................................................................... 21
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
What support is available to me? ................................................................................................................................... 22
IT Services ................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Moodle ........................................................................................................................................................................ 22
Student Support and Wellbeing .................................................................................................................................. 22
Library Services ........................................................................................................................................................... 22
Chaplaincy ................................................................................................................................................................... 23
Your NQT Year ................................................................................................................................................................. 24
Appendices ...................................................................................................................................................................... 25
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Welcome
Welcome to the School Direct programme at the Faculty of Education, Liverpool Hope University. On
behalf of the University, the School of Education and our Partnership Schools we offer you a warm
welcome. We hope that you will find your time with us both challenging and rewarding and that you will
take away with you wonderful memories, both social and professional. Teacher Education at Liverpool
Hope University has a long and proud tradition of excellence and is currently an innovative and exciting
environment which is working hard to achieve the University’s stated goal of being a research-informed
teaching University of distinction. The tutors teaching in the faculty are outstanding practitioners within
their field and use research to inform and develop their teaching.
You have been recruited onto the School Direct programme because, together with our partner schools,
we have already recognised your academic capabilities and teaching potential. In partnership with
schools it is our aim to develop you as teachers who will have a high impact on students’ learning. The
Master’s level components of the School Direct programme will form a vital part of your teacher
education. Studying at Master’s level will give you the confidence and the ability to approach relevant
theory, with a robust analytical viewpoint and relate that knowledge to your practice. The course will
run alongside and complement your development in classroom practice, which takes place at your
home and related schools, and will aim to provide you with the skills to apply an academic lens to both
your teaching practice and relevant educational theory and policy. Through a combination of the
Master’s level sessions, your teaching experiences and your hard work and commitment we hope that
you will develop into outstanding teachers who are an inspiration to the children you teach. We also
hope that you go on to take advantage of further professional learning opportunities and thus enhance
the life chances of the children and young people that you teach over the course of your career.
You will be supported by a team of lecturers in the Faculty of Education. They bring together experience
and expertise from both the Master’s provision and initial teacher education (ITE).
Sue Cronin spent over 18 years teaching mathematics in a variety of schools across
Merseyside before working for Liverpool Authority as a school effectiveness
officer supporting schools’ mathematics departments and working with G&T
pupils across the city. Sue is currently deputy head of the School of Teacher
Education. Her research interests include teacher education and creativity in
education.
Elizabeth Parr has worked in primary schools in Spain, Manchester and Liverpool
across key stages one and two. In these roles, she was a subject leader and
worked as one of the lead teachers implementing the Communication, Language
and Literacy Development Programme. Elizabeth is currently studying for her
doctorate degree which focuses on a critical discourse analysis of professionals’
perceptions towards community-oriented schooling.
Ed Wright has been teaching for 25 years in a wide variety of secondary schools
on the Wirral and in Hertfordshire; as well as being Wirral’s MFL Advisory
Teacher. His areas of particular expertise are in teaching Modern Foreign
Languages, as well as whole-school Teaching and Learning and pastoral welfare.
As Assistant Head at Mosslands School Ed was responsible for Teaching and
Learning and Initial Teacher Training. As Wirral LA's Advisory Teacher Ed was also
responsible for the development of Modern Foreign Languages Teaching and
Learning in Wirral schools.
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PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
The Programme
Programme Synopsis
The module is designed to support students in developing their understanding of learning, teaching
and assessment strategies with the aim of improving practice and enabling all learners to achieve their
full potential as well as supporting the development of knowledge and understanding in the student’s
subject discipline or age phase specialism. Students will be helped to develop self-direction and
originality in problem-solving in relation to the module content, and to act autonomously in planning
and implementing change in their educational settings, taking account of current thinking and
literature in related areas. Students will be enabled to pursue their own professional and academic
interests, including, where relevant, a focus on the priorities of their educational settings. Students
will be guided in critiquing and drawing on a range of sources, both academic and policy related, and
in locating their own research in relation to these.
Programme Aims
This module aims to:
 develop trainees’ understanding of a range of learning, teaching and assessment strategies for
the Primary phase;
 enhance and update trainees’ subject knowledge for teaching in their subject discipline or age
phase specialism, including phonics or early mathematics where appropriate;
 develop trainees’ interest in Education as an academic, research-informed study, enabling them
to review critically, consolidate and extend their pedagogical understanding, in the light of
theory and their own classroom practice.
 develop trainees’ ability to be innovative and reflective in terms of their professional practice;
 develop trainees’ informed and critical understanding of relevant, current education policy and
practice.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, students will be able to:
1. demonstrate a systematic knowledge of the curriculum in their age range or subject specialism
(T3.1 / 3.2);
2. demonstrate informed and critical understanding of current education policy and its impact on
their classroom practice (P3);
3. demonstrate a critical understanding of theory about how children learn and how this is
applied in the professional setting (T2.4);
4. understand formative and summative assessment theory, policy and practice; (6.1)
5. demonstrate self-direction and autonomy in adapting teaching strategies to the needs and
strengths of all pupils (T5);
6. reflect critically upon and evaluate the policy and practice in their placement schools with
regard to teaching and learning (T4.4).
The learning outcomes for this module do link to the Teaching Standards (as indicated above in
brackets) and therefore the assignments will provide evidence towards these Standards, though most
of your evidence for the Standards will come from your school-based study and teaching practice.
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PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Syllabus Outline
You must attend all sessions. Attendance and involvement in taught sessions is essential to achieving
the Teachers’ Standards.
You are expected to take an active part in all elements you are registered for and consequently you
need to ensure you are guided by the reading list and current educational press so that you are
positioned to make an informed contribution to all sessions. As with your own teaching experiences
you know that group work depends on its success on the participation and enthusiasm of all members.
Full day sessions take place in blocks during the year:
11th and 12th September 2014
2nd and 3rd October 2014
23rd and 24th October 2014
4th, 5th and 6th February 2015
20th, 21st and 22nd April 2015
What will we do in the university sessions?
The delivery of the programme will be through a blend of face to face lectures, seminars and tutorials
on focus days involving active participation. An emphasis will be on active enquiry both face to face
and through online engagement via Moodle between the teaching blocks.
The sessions will require critical reflective engagement as you develop an understanding of
professional practice, relating this to theoretical perspectives and relevant research. A community of
enquiry will be developed through seminar opportunities to discuss, compare and contrast practical,
professional working practices. During the sessions you will be also be supported in your preparations
towards the assignment. You will be guided towards relevant literature from a range of sources, both
academic and policy related, so that you can locate your own research and enquiry in relation to
these.
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Programme Content
Session
Topics
Indicative Reading List
Scott, D. and Usher, R. eds. (2002) Understanding Educational Research. Abingdon: Routledge.
Hargreaves, D. (1996) ‘Teaching as a research-based profession: possibilities and prospects’. London: TDA.
Hammersley, M. ed. (2007) Educational Research and Evidence-Based Practice. Milton Keynes: Open University.


1

Overview of the course
The importance and nature of
research informed teaching
Identity of a reflective
practitioner
Pollard, A. (2008) Reflective Teaching. London: Continuum
General Teaching Council for England (2009) Code of Conduct and Practice for Registered Teachers. UK: GTCE.
Hare, W. (2002) ‘Ideas for Teachers: Russells’ legacy’, Oxford Review of Education, 28(4) pp.491-507.
Hargreaves, A. (2002) Teaching in the Knowledge Society: Education in the Age of Insecurity. New York: Teachers College
Press.
Hoyle, E. and John, P.D. (1995) Professional Knowledge and Professional Practice. London: Cassell.
Myhill, D. (2008) Cambridge Assessment agency House of Commons Research seminar.

2
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
Assignment One Overview
and Literature reviews
Theories of mind and
Emotional intelligence
Critical analysis
Campbell, A., McNamara, O. and Gilroy, P. (2004) Reviewing and Managing Literature in Practitioner research and
professional development in education. London: Paul Chapman.
Hopkins, D. (2008) A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Research. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
Gini , G. Pozzoli, H., Hauser, M. (2011) ‘Bullies have enhanced moral competence to judge relative to victims, but lack
moral compassion’ in Personality and Individual Differences, 50 pp.603-608.
Chechi ,V.K. (2012) Emotional Intelligence and Teaching. IJRESS 2(2), pp.297-304.


3

Education in England today
What constitutes knowledge?
Hierarchies of Knowledge
Data collection –
questionnaires (pupil and
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Robinson, K. (2008) Changing paradigms in education. London: RSA.
Gove, M (2013) What does it mean to be an educated person? London: DfE
Lin, N., Cook, K. and Burt, R. (2001) Social Capital: Theory and Research. New York: Aldine DE Gruyter.
James, M. and Pollard, A. (2009) Principles for effective Pedagogy: International Responses to Evidence form the UK
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
teacher), observations and
interviews
Teaching and Learning Research Programme. Abingdon: Routledge.
Dumont, H., Instance, D.& Benavadies, F. eds. (2010) The nature of Learning using Research to inspire Practice. Paris: OECD
Publishing.
Mauthner, M. (1997) ‘Methodological Aspects of Collecting Data from Children: Lessons from Three Research Projects’,
Children and Society, 11 pp. 16-28.


4

Educational Data: Pisa tables
to SATs
National and International
curriculum
The research process and
methods
Sturman, L. (2012) ’Making the best use of international comparison data’. Research Intelligence, 119, Autumn/Winter, pp.
16-17
Brundrett, M., Duncan, D. and Rhodes, C. (2010) ‘Leading curriculum innovation in primary schools project: an interim
report on school leaders’ roles in curriculum development in England’. Education 3-13: International Journal of Primary,
Elementary and Early Years Education, 38 (4) pp.403 – 420.
Cohen, L., Manton, L. and Morrison, K. (2007) Research Methods in Education. Abingdon: Routledge.
Bell, J. (1999) Designing and administering questionnaires in Doing Your Research Project. Buckingham: Open University
Press.
Bruner, J. (1960) The Process of Education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
5



Learning theories
Approaches to teaching and
learning
Application of Constructivism
Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Piaget, J. (1976) The Child and Reality. London: Penguin.
Skinner, B. (1966) The Behaviour of Organisms; An Experimental Analysis. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts
Jarvis, P., Holford, J. and Griffin, C. (1988) The Theory and Practice of Learning. London: Kogan-Page.

6

Presentation of research to
date
Constructing action plans
Ofsted (2001) Action Planning for School Improvement. London: Crown.
Altrincher, H. Posch, P. and Somekh (1993) ‘Finding a starting point for your own research’ in Teachers investigate their
work: an introduction to the methods of Action Research. London: Routledge.
Assignment One Submission
7
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

Assignment Two Overview
Research Diaries
The role of interventions assessment
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Altrincher, H. Posch, P. and Somekh (1993) ‘Diaries’ in Teachers investigate their work: an introduction to the methods of
Action Research. London: Routledge.
Crosbie, T. (2006) Using activity diaries: some methodological lessons. Journal of Research Practice, 2 (1).
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
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8
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9
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
10
11






12


Current Policy trends in
Assessment
Assessment - Formative
and Summative
Overcoming barriers to
learning
SEN
Behaviour
Role of technology in
supporting learning
Observations
Data Analysis – Qualitative,
Quantitative and Coding
Ofsted and Policy Updates
Validity and reliability in
assessment
Assignment Two Support
Black P and Wiliam D (1998) Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment. London: School of
Education, King’s College.
Clarke, S. (2005) Formative Assessment in Action: weaving the elements together. London: Hodder Murray
Black, P. and Wiliam, D. (1998) ‘Assessment and Classroom Learning’. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and
Practice. 5 (1).
DfES (2004) Removing Barriers to Achievement: The Government’s Strategy for SEN. London: Crown.
Graf, M. (2011) Including and Supporting Learners of English as an Additional Language. London: Continuum.
Donald, P., Gosling, S. and Hamilton, J. (1995). 'No problem here?' Children's attitudes to race in a mainly white area’. The
Scottish Council for Research in Education: Spotlights 54.
Somekh, B. (1995) ‘Analytical Methods’. Academic Development Journal of the South African Association for Academic
Development, 1(1), pp.65-67.
Campbell, A., McNamara, O. and Gilroy, P. (2004) Qualitative Data Analysis in Practitioner research and professional
development in education. London: Chapman.
Wiliam, D. (2000) ‘Validity, Reliability, and all that Jazz’. Education 3-13, 29(3)pp. 9-13.
Biggs, J. (2002) ‘Aligning the Curriculum to Promote Good Learning’, Constructive Alignment in Action: Imaginative
Curriculum Symposium, LTSN Generic Centre.
Spendlove, D. (2011) Putting Assessment for Learning into Practice. London: Continuum.
Griffiths, A. and Burns, M. (2012) Engaging Learners. Carmarthen: Crown House Publishing.
Remaining a research active
professional
Communities of Practice and
Enquiry
NQT Opportunities
Swann, M., Peacock, A., Hart, S. and Drummond, M. (2012) Creating Learning Without Limits. Maidenhead: Open University
Press.
Power, S. (2008) ‘The imaginative professional’, in Cunningham, B. ed. Exploring Professionalism. London: IoE Press.
Lave, J. and E. Wenger (1991) Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Assignment Two Submission
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PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Assessment
The whole process of assessment aims to engage you in critical reflection to promote professional
development. At the heart of your Initial Teacher Education are your classroom performance and
the wider development of professionalism within the subject, curricular, whole school, community
and physical contexts. Assessment of your achievement of the Teachers’ Standards (for QTS) is led
by our partner schools. No trainee can qualify for the award of PGCE with QTS unless they fulfil all
requirements of the programme. These requirements are as follows:
• Successful completion of written assignments
• Successful achievement against the Teachers’ Standards (for QTS)
• Attendance at all elements of the programme
The written assignments assessing your performance on this module will be essays which enable you
to apply your knowledge and understanding of policy, theory and research to your experiences in
the classroom. You will have a large degree of choice about the exact focus of each, within the broad
topics described below. Specific essay topics will be decided upon in discussion with your university
tutor and, where appropriate, your school mentor.
Implications for your PGCE award
There are two possible outcomes for students at the end of the PGCE year, depending on whether M
level academic requirements are met in the two assignments:
 Postgraduate Certificate in Education (Master’s (M) level pass)
 Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (Professional (H) level pass)
Our expectation is that all Liverpool Hope PGCE students are capable of achieving a postgraduate
PGCE award, and you are accepted for the programme on this basis; we do not offer a choice of
academic pathway. The assignments are an integral element of the programme, and must be
completed by all students in order to qualify with QTS. If you achieve a Professional Graduate
Certificate, you are in no way disadvantaged as a beginning teacher, and may equally choose to
complete a Master’s degree, the only difference being that you do not have the M level credits on
exit. However, we encourage all to aspire to the Postgraduate award, and to resubmit work where
necessary in order to do so.
Indicative Question
Assignment 1
(essay)
Assignment 2
(essay)
Investigate an aspect of teaching and
learning or curriculum development in your
subject or age phase specialism.
Investigate an aspect of current assessment
policy / theory / practice in your subject
and/or or age phase specialism
Word
count
Learning
Outcomes
Weighting
5000
1,2,3,6
50%
5000
4,5,6
50%
Presentation and Length of Assessments
All assignments should be word processed, using font equivalent to Times New Roman font size 12.
You should present your work in 1.5 line spacing.
It is important that you keep to the word length specified for each assignment to ensure your writing
is succinct and clear as well as ensuring equity for all trainees doing that assignment. Words within
the list of references and/or the appendices (if necessary) are not included in the word count. You
should state the word count at the end of each assignment.
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PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
Referencing
Information on how to reference your work along with several other writing related ‘How-to Guides’
is available via the Library webpages, simply look for ‘How to reference your work at the following
link (http://www.hope.ac.uk/gateway/library/helpandsupport/studenthowtoguides/). This is a PDF
document that you can download and refer to whenever you need to reference any work for any
Faculty of Education course.
Submission Dates
Deadline for Assignment One: 5th January 2015
Examination Board: February 2015
Deadline for Assignment Two: 5th May 2015
Examination Board: June 2015
Procedures for Submitting Assignments
An electronic copy of the assignment should be submitted via the Moodle on the submission
deadline, a link will be sent to all students before the submission point. Each assignment should be
accompanied by the relevant submission sheet. Each sheet of your assignment should be numbered
and have your ID number and name on top right of each page. The submission sheet must
downloaded from the information portal. You will need your University username and password to
logon to the portal. Once you are logged on, click on My Details (Academic) and then Coursework
Submission Sheets and then you will be able to download the relevant module assignment cover
sheet. This will already contain your details and a barcode linked to your student record. You must
only submit coursework accompanied by your personalised cover sheet.
 Your assignments must submitted electronically via Turnitin on the School Direct Moodle on
the date and at the time specified.
 Assignments may not be sent through the post or emailed to tutors
 If you have difficulty meeting a deadline you must see the School Direct Lead before the
deadline.
 Assignments which are submitted late, without an extension, will normally receive a mark of
zero.
 A preliminary indicative grade will normally be available four weeks after submission. This
indicative grade is subject to adjustment by the external examiners.
Feedback
Liverpool Hope University has a policy of returning feedback to all students within 4 working weeks
(i.e. excluding holiday weeks) of submission of any assessment.
Plagiarism or Collusion
You are strongly advised to bear in mind that over reliance upon or excessive use of previously
published materials is likely to be judged as plagiarism and could lead to failure. All sources must be
acknowledged. Close collaboration with a fellow trainee resulting in almost identical text will be
viewed as collusion. Both offences are liable to a maximum penalty of removal from the University
course – please refer to University student regulations at http://www.hope.ac.uk/registrarsoffice/guides-to-the-regulations.html.
Requesting An Extension
Extensions for coursework are only given for two reasons:
1. Medical reasons (where you must have medical evidence i.e. a doctor’s note).
2. Exceptional personal circumstances.
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The following examples are NOT exceptional circumstances:
 Having too many other assignments. All students have a lot of work to do and you are
expected to organise your time efficiently from the start of the module to cope with these
fluctuating demands;
 Computer problems. You are expected to work on your assignment so that it is finished at
least the day before the date of submission and thereby avoid last minute problems. You
are also advised to back-up your work every time you make changes, and are advised to save
your work in more than one place i.e. do not just keep your work on a pen drive, because
you could lose it;
 Having paid work commitments. Again it is your responsibility to organise your time so that
this does not become a problem.
If you need an extension for an assignment you must formally apply for one. The form can be
downloaded from the Moodle site. Please complete the form and send to the Programme
Administrator. In terms of extensions for pieces of assessment for this module or a number of
modules, you must formally apply to the Course leader (please cc to the School Direct Administrator)
who will ask for the reason, and may require evidence before granting an extension. Please
therefore do not leave it until the last minute to seek an extension.
If there is a medical reason why you cannot submit your assignment you MUST get a signed sickness
absence form from your doctor (in certain cases self-certification may be accepted). For exceptional
personal circumstances you do need to explain these. For further details, please see Liverpool Hope
University Universal Conventions and Procedures on:
http://www.hope.ac.uk/registrars-office/universal-conventions-procedures.html
You MUST photocopy any evidence (such as the sick note) and also ensure a photocopy is handed as
soon as possible to the Programme Administrator. You are also advised to keep a copy of any sick
note for your files. By ensuring these copies are delivered to the appropriate people, you ensure that
no submission is expected from you. This is important to ensure that you are given another
opportunity to submit to the assessment at a later date without incurring a non-submission penalty.
Please check the university guidelines for the penalty incurred. N.B: Assignments which are
submitted late, without an extension, will normally receive a mark of ZERO.
Marking and feedback
Your work is marked according to the marking criteria below. An overall mark is awarded based on
an overall ‘best-fit’ judgment, and written feedback is also given. The feedback form which is
available on Moodle will be used for all assignments and provides opportunity for formative
guidance to be given as to how to improve your future marks, and you are urged to use this to
improve subsequent marks. It is the University’s policy to aim to provide feedback after four weeks
following the submission date. This four week period will not include the holiday period.
A sample of assignments is second marked as part of our quality assurance procedures, and a further
sample sent to our external examiners whose role is to confirm our standards are in line with those
of comparable institutions.
Lecturers are not able to give feedback on assignment drafts, though you will have the opportunity
to discuss your plans beforehand. If you are concerned about the accuracy of the English you should
ask someone to help you check through before you submit. These guidelines help ensure fairness
and parity for all students.
40-49% (Professional level)
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If your mark is in the 40-49% bracket, your assignment passes at professional level but not at M
level, so does not carry credits. You have one opportunity, if you wish to use it, to resubmit your
assignment within a designated time scale. Good guidance is provided through your tutor’s feedback
as to how to resubmit successfully at M level, and your tutor will also discuss your work if you wish.
If your resubmission meets the M level requirements, your official mark is capped at 50%, but you
will also be notified as to the mark it would have received as a first submission.
Below 40% (Fail)
Assignments marked below 40% MUST be resubmitted within the designated time scale to achieve a
pass at 40%+ if you are to continue with the PGCE programme.
If after submitting a revised assignment, you have still failed to gain a pass mark in either module,
you will have been deemed to have failed the PGCE with no further opportunity for resubmission.
Return / Collection of Assignments
Students will be informed when to collect their work. The feedback and marked assignments will be
emailed to the students or, if submitted as hard copy, the marked scripts can be collected from the
Education Office. The University is not responsible for any students’ coursework that is not collected.
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Marking Criteria - M Level
Assessment
objectives
Distinction
Merit
Secure Pass
Pass
Narrow fail
70 - 100
60-69
50-59
40-49
35-39
AO1
Knowledge
and
understanding
Comprehensive
knowledge of
pertinent issues;
highly developed
understanding
theory and its
application in
practice.
Strong knowledge
of pertinent issues;
well-developed
understanding of
theory and its
application in
practice.
Secure knowledge
of main issues;
clear understanding
of key concepts,
and how they relate
to practice.
Adequate knowledge
and understanding of
main issues and
concepts, with links
to relevant examples
of practice.
Some reference made
to issues or concepts,
but more evidence of
knowledge and
understanding, or
better links to practice,
needed.
AO2
Analysis and
independent
thought
Consistently high
level of analysis
throughout, showing
critical awareness,
insight and
individual / creative
thinking.
Sustained critical
analysis, showing
well developed
independent
thinking and
evaluative skills.
Critical awareness
shown in analysis,
with evaluation /
reflection in
commentary and
generally sound
independent
judgments.
Some aspects
considered critically;
discussion includes
some reflection, or
independent
judgements and
comment.
The account tends
towards description
but some attempt at
analysis or reflection;
commentary needs
further development.
AO3
Quality, range
and use of
research
Extensive, in-depth
reading from a
range of appropriate
sources; wellchosen references
skilfully integrated
into commentary.
A wide range of
relevant and up to
date reading, used
effectively to
support
commentary.
A range of relevant
and up to date
reading used
regularly to support
commentary and
illustrate
understanding.
A range of relevant
reading, used at
times to support
commentary and
illustrate
understanding.
Limited range of
reading: additional /
more appropriate
reading needs to be
evidenced to support
commentary.
AO4
Synthesis,
presentation
and structure
Confident handling
and synthesis of
complex material;
skilled construction
and presentation of
thoughtful and
convincing
arguments /
conclusions.
Systematic
handling of
complex material,
presented
effectively, with
well-developed
arguments and
conclusions.
Secure handling of
complex material,
with clear structure
and sequence to
arguments.
Satisfactory handling
and presentation of
relevant material,
with some structure
and coherence to
arguments.
Relevant material has
been gathered, but
needs to be presented
more clearly / in a
more structured way.
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Marking Criteria - P Level
Assessment
Objectives
35-39
30-34
<30 (below the standard
required to pass)
Knowledge and
understanding
Secure knowledge of pedagogy
and understanding of subject
specialism / area of special
interest. References to issues
or ideas are generally linked to
examples of practice.
Adequate knowledge of
pedagogy and understanding of
subject specialism / area of
special interest. Some
reference made to issues or
ideas, with some reference to
examples of practice
Insufficient knowledge of
pedagogy or understanding of
subject specialism / area of
special interest.
Analysis and
independent
thought
Some evidence of analysis, eg
evaluation of observed
classroom practice, reflection
on own teaching, comment on
literature, critique of policy.
The account tends towards
description, but some attempt at
critical comment or reflection,
eg in evaluating observed
classroom practice, or reflecting
on own teaching.
Little evidence of analysis,
criticality or reflection with
regard to either reading or
observed practice.
Quality, range and
use of reading
Evidence of a core of
appropriate reading, with some
use to support and illustrate
understanding.
Evidence of reading a selection
of policy documents and/or
websites, at least partly related
to discussion.
Little evidence of relevant
reading in relation to the topic
/ reading not linked to
discussion.
Synthesis,
presentation and
structure
Relevant material has been
gathered, and presented in a
mainly structured way.
Relevant material has been
gathered and presented with
some evidence of structure.
Insufficient material has been
gathered to be able to present
an adequate response to the
topic.
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Reading Materials
Library Support
Your reading list can be accessed online via Moodle. This allows you a quick and easy link to the
Library Catalogue where you can instantly see availability of stock. If it is an online resource you will
be able to link directly to the item. If you need any help or support such as effective searching of the
online resources or advanced help for research, please contact our Faculty Librarian:
Philippa Williams on 0151 291 2079 or [email protected]
There are full details of all library services, facilities and support available from the Library Services
web pages www.hope.ac.uk/library
Teaching and Learning
Bruner, J. (1960) The Process of Education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Demos (2004) About Learning: Report of Learning Working Group. London: Demos.
Freire, P. (1970) Pedagogy of the Oppressed. London: Continuum.
General Teaching Council for England (2009) Code of Conduct and Practice for Registered Teachers.
UK: GTCE.
Gordon, M. (2009) ‘The misuses and effective uses of constructivist teaching‘ in Teachers and
Teaching: theory and practice. 15(6) pp.737–746.
Gove, M (2013) What does it mean to be an educated person? London: DfE
James, M. and Pollard, A. (2009) Principles for effective Pedagogy: International Responses to
Evidence from the UK Teaching and Learning Research Programme. Abingdon: Routledge.
Jarvis, P., Holford, J. and Griffin, C. (1988) The Theory and Practice of Learning. London: Kogan-Page.
Hare, W. (2002) ‘Ideas for Teachers: Russells’ legacy’, Oxford Review of Education, 28(4) pp.491-507.
Hargreaves, A. (2002) Teaching in the Knowledge Society: Education in the Age of Insecurity. New
York: Teachers College Press.
Hoyle, E. and John, P.D. (1995) Professional Knowledge and Professional Practice. London: Cassell.
Lin, N., Cook, K. and Burt, R. (2001) Social Capital: Theory and Research. New York: Aldine DE
Gruyter.
Myhill, D. (2008) Cambridge Assessment agency House of Commons Research seminar.
Ofsted (2001) Action Planning for School Improvement. London: Crown.
Piaget, J. (1976) The Child and Reality. London: Penguin.
Pollard, A. (2008) Reflective Teaching. London: Continuum
Power, S. (2008) ‘The imaginative professional’, in Cunningham, B. ed. Exploring Professionalism.
London: IoE Press.
Robinson, K. (2008) Changing paradigms in education. London: RSA.
Skinner, B. (1966) The Behaviour of Organisms; An Experimental Analysis. New York: AppletonCentury-Crofts
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Vygotsky, L. (1978) Mind in Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Assessment
Assessment Reform Group (1999) Assessment for Learning: Beyond the Black Box. Cambridge:
University of Cambridge School of Education.
Assessment Reform Group (2009) Assessment in schools: fit for purpose? Cambridge: University of
Cambridge School of Education.
Black P and Wiliam D (1998) Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment.
London: School of Education, King’s College.
Black, P. and Wiliam, D. (1998) ‘Assessment and Classroom Learning’. Assessment in Education:
Principles, Policy and Practice. 5 (1).
Black P and Wiliam D (2006) ‘The Reliability of Assessments’ in Gardner, J.Ed. (2006) Assessment and
Learning. London: Sage
Clarke, S. (2005) Formative Assessment in Action: weaving the elements together. London: Hodder
Murray.
OFSTED (2008) Assessment for Learning: Impact of Strategy Support. London: Crown.
Sainsbury, M. and Sizmur, S. (1998) ‘Level descriptions in the National Curriculum: What kind of
criterion-referencing is this?’ Oxford Review of Education, 24(2) pp. 181-193.
Spendlove, D. (2011) Putting Assessment for Learning into Practice. London: Continuum.
Sturman, L. (2012) ’Making the best use of international comparison data’. Research Intelligence,
119, Autumn/Winter, pp. 16-17
Tienken, C. Goldberg, S. and Dirocco, D. (2009) ‘Questioning the Questions’. Kappa Delta Pi Record.
Kappa Delta Pi.
Wiliam, D. (1993) Technical issues in the development and implementation of a system of criterion
referenced age-independent levels of attainment in the National Curriculum of England and Wales.
London: KCL.
Wiliam, D. (2000) ‘The meanings and consequences of educational assessments’. Critical Quarterly.
42(1) pp. 105-127.
Wiliam, D. (2000) ‘Reliability, validity and all that jazz’. Education 29 (3) pp. 9-13.
Wiliam, D. (2001) Level best? Levels of attainment in national curriculum assessment. London: ATL.
Curriculum
Alexander, R. (2001) Culture and Pedagogy: International comparisons in primary education. Oxford:
Blackwell.
Biggs, J. (2002) ‘Aligning the Curriculum to Promote Good Learning’, Constructive Alignment in
Action: Imaginative Curriculum Symposium, LTSN Generic Centre.
Brundrett, M., Duncan, D. and Rhodes, C. (2010) ‘Leading curriculum innovation in primary schools
project: an interim report on school leaders’ roles in curriculum development in England’. Education
3-13: International Journal of Primary, Elementary and Early Years Education, 38 (4) pp.403 – 420.
DfE (2013) The National Curriculum in England: Key Stages 1 and 2. London: Crown.
Dillon, J.T. (2009) ‘The questions of curriculum’. Journal of Curriculum Studies 41(3) pp.343–359.
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Kelly, A. (2009) The Curriculum: Theory and Practice. London: Sage.
Marsh, C. (2004) Key Concepts for Understanding Curriculum. London: Routledge.
Martin, J. (1976) ‘What Should We Do with a Hidden Curriculum When We Find One?’ Curriculum
Inquiry 6(2) pp. 135-151.
Moon, B. and Murphy, P. ed. (1999) Curriculum in Context. London: Paul Chapman.
Moore, A. (2006) Schooling, Society and Curriculum. London: Routledge.
INCA (2011) Curriculum specification in seven countries. Dublin: NCCA.
NFER (2011) Review of the National Curriculum in England: Report on subject breadth in
international jurisdictions. Slough: NFER.
Oates, T. (2010) Could do better: Using international comparisons to refine the National Curriculum
in England. Cambridge: University of Cambridge.
OECD (2010) PISA 2009 Results: What Makes a School Successful?: Resources, Policies and Practices
(Volume IV), PISA, OECD.
Westbury, I. and Millburn, G. (2007) Rethinking Schooling: Twenty five years of the Journal of
Curriculum Studies. London: Routledge.
Research-Informed Teaching
Altrincher, H. Posch, P. and Somekh (1993) Teachers investigate their work: an introduction to the
methods of Action Research. London: Routledge.
Bell, J. (1999) Designing and administering questionnaires in Doing Your Research Project.
Buckingham: Open University Press.
Campbell, A., McNamara, O. and Gilroy, P. (2004) Practitioner research and professional
development in education. London: Paul Chapman.
Cohen, L., Manton, L. and Morrison, K. (2007) Research Methods in Education. Abingdon: Routledge.
Crosbie, T. (2006) ‘Using activity diaries: some methodological lessons’. Journal of Research Practice,
2 (1).
Dumont, H., Instance, D. and Benavides, F. Eds. (2010) The nature of learning: Using research to
inspire practice. Center for Educational Research and Innovation: OCDE.
Hargreaves, D. (1996) Teaching as a research-based profession: possibilities and prospects. London:
TDA.
Hammersley, M. ed. (2007) Educational Research and Evidence-Based Practice. Milton Keynes: Open
University.
Hoyle, E., and John, P. D. (1995) Professional knowledge and professional practice. London: Cassell.
Hopkins, D. (2008) A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Research. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
Scott, D. and Usher, R. eds. (2002) Understanding Educational Research. Abingdon: Routledge.
Somekh, B. (1995) ‘Analytical Methods’. Academic Development Journal of the South African
Association for Academic Development, 1(1), pp.65-67.
Wiliam, D. (2000) ‘Validity, Reliability, and all that Jazz’. Education 3-13, 29(3) pp.9-13.
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Professional Development
Arthur, J. and Cremin, T. (2010) Learning to teach in the Primary School. London: Routledge.
Chechi ,V. K. (2012) ‘Emotional Intelligence and Teaching’. IJRESS 2(2) pp.297-304.
DfES (2004) Removing Barriers to Achievement: The Government’s Strategy for SEN. London: Crown.
Donald, P., Gosling, S. and Hamilton, J. (1995). 'No problem here?' Children's attitudes to race in a
mainly white area’. The Scottish Council for Research in Education: Spotlights 54.
Dumont, H., Instance, D. and Benavadies, F. eds. (2010) The nature of Learning using Research to
inspire Practice. Paris: OECD Publishing.
Gini , G. Pozzoli, H., Hauser, M. (2011) ‘Bullies have enhanced moral competence to judge relative
to victims, but lack moral compassion’ Personality and Individual Differences, 50 pp.603-608.
Graf, M. (2011) Including and Supporting Learners of English as an Additional Language. London:
Continuum.
Griffiths, A. and Burns, M. (2012) Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners. Carmarthen: Crown
House.
Hayes, D. (2008) Foundations of Primary Teaching. London: Routledge
Mauthner, M. (1997) ‘Methodological Aspects of Collecting Data from Children: Lessons from Three
Research Projects’, Children and Society, 11 pp. 16-28.
Swann, M., Peacock, A., Hart, S. and Drummond, M. (2012) Creating Learning Without Limits.
Maidenhead: OUP.
Woolfolk, A., Hughes, M. and Walkup, V. (2007) Psychology in Education. London: Pearson.
English Subject Knowledge
Gamble, N. Yates, S. (2008) Understanding Children's Literature. London: Sage.
Johnston, R. & Watson, J. (2007) Teaching Synthetic Phonics. Exeter: Learning Matters.
Ofsted (2010) Reading by Six. London: Crown.
Medwell, J. et al (2012) Primary English Knowledge and Understanding. Exeter: Learning Matters Ltd.
Rose, J. (2009) Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum. Nottingham: DCSF.
Waugh, D., Warner, C. and Waugh R. (2013) Teaching Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling in Primary
Schools. Exeter: Learning Matters.
Whitehead, M. (2007) Developing Language and Literacy with Young Children. London; Paul
Chapman.
Mathematics Subject Knowledge
Askew, M. (1998) Teaching Primary Mathematics; a guide for newly qualified and student teachers.
London: Hodder and Stoughton.
Cotton, T. (2010) Understanding and Teaching Primary Mathematics. Longman.
Haylock, D. (2006) Mathematics Explained for Primary Teachers. (Third Edition) London: Sage.
Mooney, C. et al. (2007) Primary Mathematics, Teaching Theory and Practice. (Third Edition). Exeter:
Learning Matters.
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Suggate, J. et al. (2006) Mathematical Knowledge for Primary Teachers. London: David Fulton.
https://www.ncetm.org.uk/ Register (free) and explore the audit in the Personal Learning Section
Science Subject Knowledge
Allen, M. (2010) Misconceptions in Primary Science. Buckingham: Open University Press.
ASE (2010) Be Safe! (4th Edition) Hatfield: ASE
Goldsworthy, A. and Feasey, R. (1997, revised Bell, S.) Making Sense of Primary Science
Investigations. Hatfield: ASE.
Harlen, W. (2005) Teaching, Learning and Assessing Science 5 – 12. London: SAGE.
Sharp, J. et al. (2009) Achieving QTS, Primary Science Knowledge and Understanding. Exeter:
Learning Matters.
Ward H., Roden J., Hewlett C., Foreman J., (2009) The teaching of science in the primary classroom; A
Practical Guide. London: SAGE.
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Online Resources
Sheppard-Worlock Library website
The study of Education is very well supported by a number of online collections which you can
access via your login to the Hope portal. In addition to those containing newspapers and books,
there are many large collections of journal articles. The most useful databases for your online journal
searches have been gathered together for you by your Faculty Librarian and are listed within
Metalib. Metalib is a commonly used platform for organising the library’s Online Resources. It allows
cross-searching of multiple collections, and makes it possible to find out with one search whether
Hope has online access to a particular journal title.
Moodle
Moodle is intended to support you through your programme of study and enhance your learning
experience. Moodle provides a space in which additional resources can be stored and/or signposted
and some tutors may create activities for you to carry out online to help you measure your own
progress. For some groups tutors may want to use the collaborative forums in which you can
communicate with each other and work on joint projects.
From the University website home page select ‘Student/Staff Gateway’ from the very top right-hand
side navigation, you will then see a link to Students, select this and then choose 'My Hope' from the
left hand navigation. Click on the link to ‘Moodle’ (http://moodle.hope.ac.uk/). Use your university
network login details to access the system.
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Professionalism
The University requires ALL students to attend ALL teaching sessions unless there are significant
mitigating circumstances. You are expected to arrive on time to your scheduled sessions (and any
other pre-arranged meetings you may arranged with tutors). If you miss any sessions you should
expect to be contacted by your tutor to find out why you have been absent.
If you are unable to attend a session (or pre-arranged meeting) you should contact your tutor as
soon as possible to inform them and explain your absence. You must also notify the School Direct
Administrator – Victoria Bates in EDEN120 as soon as possible;
Victoria Bates
Tel: 0151 291 3658
Email: [email protected]
If you miss a scheduled session it is your responsibility to catch up on what you have missed.
If you are late arriving to a session please enter the teaching room, please make your apology to the
tutor, and quietly take a seat without disturbing any other students.
If you arrive any later than 15 minutes after the start of a session your tutor may refuse to allow
you to join the class. If your tutor refuses entry on the grounds of being late you must follow their
decision. They may allow you to come in after the break. If they refuse entry due to lateness, you are
advised to ask if you can join after the break. If they will allow this, ensure you find out what time
the session is due to start back after the break (and be on time). All students are expected to be
punctual, professional and courteous with staff and fellow students at all times.
During taught sessions you must turn off your mobile phone (unless there is a very good reason
why you cannot e.g. childcare issues or sick family member). If you do need to leave your phone on
please be courteous and inform your tutor before the start of the session. If you do not comply with
these courteous requests your tutor may ask you to leave the class as taking calls or texting in class
is very disruptive.
If you email your tutors please do so in a courteous fashion which reflects the professional nature of
your relationship and your expectations of a graduate career.
University Policies
You can access University Policies on:
 The academic responsibility of students;
 The progression and award regulations associated with your degree
 Plagiarism
 The provision of assessment arrangements for students with a disability, illness, injury or
adverse personal circumstances
 Academic appeals
By looking at the University website:
http://www.hope.ac.uk/gateway/supportandwellbeing/studentadministration/policiesandprocedur
es/ You can access information on support services at: http://www.hope.ac.uk/gateway/students/
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Programme Evaluation and Quality Assurance
All aspects of the School Direct programme are subject to annual review. We rely on schools,
university, tutors and trainees for help in maintaining the quality of the Liverpool Hope University
programme. The University is committed to placing students at the heart of its education mission.
We welcome constructive feedback at any stage on any aspect of the course, and encourage you to
voice any concerns, should they arise, sooner rather than later so we can act wherever possible to
improve matters for you, other trainees and subsequent cohorts. Equally we hope you will find much
to celebrate within the course and it is also helpful to hear about this. As well as the formal
procedures outline below, we encourage you to talk with us; Curriculum Tutors, the Programme
Lead and Deputy Head of School will always be interested to hear about relevant points. The
following sections outline ways in which you are asked to contribute to the overall picture.
Evaluations
Throughout the year, you will be asked to complete evaluations of the course. The responses
gathered from these evaluations are collated and fed back to tutors, the Programme Lead and the
head and deputy head of the School of Education to inform and improve the services and processes
relating to the School Direct programme. This in turn feeds into the University’s Annual Programme
Monitoring process where all programmes have to consider student evaluation as part of their
annual review process.
Exit Survey
In addition, the NCTL (National College of Teaching and Leadership) may ask you to complete an
anonymous exit survey towards the end of the PGCE year and during the spring term following your
completion this will be followed up with the NQT survey, a national survey of all newly qualified
teachers.
Student Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC)
The SSLC is made up of two trainees from each school alliance group who volunteer for the role, and
who are then elected by their peers. The role of the SSLC is to gather the views and comments of all
trainees who attend a particular programme and to feedback those views and comments at SSLC
meetings. The SSLC meetings are attended by the Programme Director and other appropriate staff
from the University. The committee aim to collectively discuss and refine our provision and the
student experience. SSLC members are then asked to feedback to the other trainees. SSLC meetings
occur at least three times every year and are held at the University, usually during lunch-time. At the
end of the year SSLC members are asked to meet with the External Examiners.
External Examiners
Students often ask questions about how we know that their degree is broadly of the same standard
as degrees awarded for similar courses by other universities. In the UK we have a system called
external examining which is one of several ways that we confirm that standards are met. An
external examiner is generally an experienced lecturer from another university who is appointed by
Liverpool Hope to offer an independent view as to whether the work of Hope students on a course is
of the correct standard. The external examiner does this by looking at a sample of work (e.g.
assignments, exam answers, dissertations), discussing the work with your lecturers and attending
the assessment boards to endorse results. They then produce an annual report which tells us about
any concerns they have and any good practice they have identified. The external examiners’ reports
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are made available to student representatives and school representatives via Moodle and are also
discussed in Staff Student Committees.
Internal Examiners
The Internal Examiners (usually the academic team in your Department) are specifically responsible
for:
a) the preparation of coursework assessment requirements and ensuring that they are
appropriate to the level, syllabus content and learning outcomes;
b) the initial assessment, and internal moderation*, of coursework assignments and
examination scripts;
c) ensuring that the Assessment Co-ordinator is able to make available to External Examiners
an agreed range of internally moderated coursework assignments in good time to enable the
External Examiners to undertake external moderation before the meeting of the Panel of
Examiners or Assessment, Progression & Award Board.
*In the Department of Teacher Education assessments are internally moderated in line with
university guidelines. You can view these at
http://www.hope.ac.uk/gateway/supportandwellbeing/studentadministration/understandingyourd
egree/assessmentofstudentsguidelines/ document AG16.
Ofsted
As with schools, ITE courses are subject to Ofsted inspections. Should this happen during the year we
will inform you of all arrangements by email.
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What support is available to me?
For any concerns or issues please contact your curriculum tutor in the first instance (Elizabeth Parr
for Primary School Direct and Ed Wright for Secondary School Direct). They may suggest you contact
a Senior Faculty Academic Advisor if your concern is related to your academic study. If it is a pastoral
issue they may seek further support from Student Support and Wellbeing team. As tutors have
extensive teaching commitments and may often not be available during the day so an immediate
response to messages left may not always be possible. However, the tutors have voicemail and email facilities and they can therefore leave a message for them at any time. If necessary, or you are
not satisfied with the support offered, you should contact the deputy head of the School of Teacher
Education, Sue Cronin.
IT Services
The I.T. Service Desk staff are here to offer help and guidance on the whole range of I.T. facilities
available at Liverpool Hope from emails, photocopying and printing to password resets and access
issues. If you have any problem / query, please visit us on the first floor of the Sheppard Worlock
Library or on 0151 291-2100 - Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Alternatively email:
[email protected]
There is a wireless network covering most of the University including all open access, teaching areas
and Halls of Residence. Your normal username and password will allow you to log onto the service.
A laptop loan service operates from the Student Success Zone (1st floor of the Gateway Building).
You will need your student ID card to use this service. Please be aware that you are responsible for
the laptop issued to you until it's return. Fines do operate for late return of machines.
Moodle
Liverpool Hope’s online learning environment is called ‘Moodle’. This resource is accessible via the
Liverpool Hope website by clicking on ‘Student/Staff Gateway’ from the very top right-hand side
navigation; you will then see a link to Students, select this and then choose 'My Hope' from the left
hand navigation. Click on the link to ‘Moodle’ (http://moodle.hope.ac.uk/). Use your university
network login details to access the system. If you have any issues with accessing Moodle please
contact IT Helpdesk on 0151 291 2100.
Student Support and Wellbeing
The Student Support and Wellbeing team are on hand to offer advice and help with everything from
financial support to careers advice and health concerns. They provide a one-stop service and will
address all aspects of your pastoral care in an integrated way without passing you between different
departments.
There
are
full
details
about
the
support
available
at
http://www.hope.ac.uk/lifeathope/studentsupport/
The Student Support and Wellbeing services are located in the Gateway Building and can be
contacted on 0151 291 3427 or [email protected]
Library Services
Liverpool Hope’s Library Service provides access to a wide ranging collection of physical and online
resources to support learning and research. The service also provides different types of study space
across both campuses to support the wide range of learning styles and needs, from individual study
rooms to group spaces, and from silent study to more relaxed social learning.
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Library staff work close to the materials and students within the libraries so are very accessible to
provide support and advice on resources and services where and when you need it. Support can also
be obtained virtually via our chat and email services.
If you need any help or support such as effective searching of the online resources or advanced help
for research, please contact our Faculty Librarian:
Philippa Williams
Phone number: 0151 291 2079
Email address: [email protected]
Support is also available from the Subject Support Points, pop along to get some advice and help
from a librarian.
Alternatively you can email [email protected] from within this email you can also invite us to
chat. There are full details of all library services, facilities and support available from the Library
Services web pages www.hope.ac.uk/library
Chaplaincy
The motto of Hope University is "Faith, Hope and Love". These are words taken from St Paul's letter
to the Corinthians. The University strives to lives by these three virtues. The chaplaincy team works
with students and staff to try and live these out in daily life. The Chaplaincy is at the rear of the EDEN
Building, Hope Park, but the team are to be found around the campuses, as well as in Hope Chapel
every day. Come into the chaplaincy for tea and coffee whenever you want.
If something is really getting you down then it might be a good idea to talk to someone. The
chaplains are always here to talk to. We are open-minded and non-judgemental. There is a small
room in the chaplaincy which is a great place to talk to one of the chaplains in a more private setting.
To contact the listening service you can email us, call us on the number below or drop in. Chaplains
are available Monday to Friday all day and some evenings.
Contact us at [email protected] or call 0151 291 3545
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Your NQT Year
We realise that your first year as a teacher can be both exciting and daunting with many challenges
ahead. This is why our commitment to you as a Liverpool Hope student does not stop once you have
graduated. We feel it is crucial to continue to support and encourage you during your first year of
teaching to ensure you have a strong foundation to become outstanding practitioners.
Liverpool Hope is offering to all NQTs the opportunity to engage in a support programme that will
help you to update your knowledge, skills and ability in key areas that are essential in becoming an
effective and competent teaching practitioner. Even if you have not secured a teaching position,
you will have access to a range of conferences, twilight sessions, online resources and tutor support.
The Primary NQT Enhancement Programme will provide an opportunity for you to engage critically
with your own professional practice during your induction year and equip you with the knowledge,
skills and understanding essential to become effective and competent teaching practitioners.
The programme aims to provide you with:
 The support to successfully engage with, and complete, your NQT induction year
 The knowledge, skills and understanding essential to become an effective and competent
teaching practitioner
 The skills to critically reflect so that you can improve on your own practice and make a
significant contribution to improving your classroom practice and raising achievement
 The opportunity, and context, to engage critically with your own professional experiences.
What will the programme include?
 Four NQT Conferences that will take place at significant points throughout the academic
year. Workshops and lectures will be led by guest speakers and experts in the field of
education
 Free CPD opportunities throughout the year
 Student email account, library access (borrowing rights for up to 3 books) and NQT Moodle
account.
Cost:
FREE to Liverpool Hope NQTs
£160 for Non Liverpool Hope Graduates (or £50 per conference if purchased separately)
For further information please see www.hope.ac.uk/nqtalumni or email [email protected]
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Appendices
Planning & Teaching
Differentiation
Assessment
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Knowledge
give pupils regular feedback, both orally and through accurate marking, and encourage pupils to
respond to the feedback
Pupil Progress
6.4
Expectations
TEACHERS' STANDARDS 2012
PART ONE: TEACHING
T1 Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
1.1 establish a safe and stimulating environment for pupils, rooted in mutual respect
1.2 set goals that stretch and challenge pupils of all backgrounds, abilities and dispositions
1.3 demonstrate consistently the positive attitudes, values and behaviour which are expected of pupils
T2 Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
2.1 be accountable for pupils’ attainment, progress and outcomes
2.2 plan teaching to build on pupils’ capabilities and prior knowledge
2.3 guide pupils to reflect on the progress they have made and their emerging needs
2.4 demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn and how this impacts on teaching
2.5 encourage pupils to take a responsible and conscientious attitude to their own work and study
T3 Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas, foster and maintain pupils’
3.1
interest in the subject, and address misunderstandings
demonstrate a critical understanding of developments in the subject and curriculum areas, and
3.2
promote the value of scholarship
demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy,
3.3
articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject
PRIMARY ONLY: if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic synthetic
3.4
phonics
PRIMARY ONLY: if teaching early mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate
3.5
teaching strategies
T4 Plan and teach well-structured lessons
4.1 impart knowledge and develop understanding through effective use of lesson time
4.2 promote a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity
set homework and plan other out-of-class activities to consolidate and extend the knowledge and
4.3
understanding pupils have acquired
4.4 reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching
4.5 contribute to the design and provision of an engaging curriculum within the relevant subject area(s)
T5 Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
know when and how to differentiate appropriately, using approaches which enable pupils to be taught
5.1
effectively
have a secure understanding of how a range of factors can inhibit pupils’ ability to learn, and how best
5.2
to overcome these
demonstrate an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of children, and know
5.3
how to adapt teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development
have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils, including those with special educational needs;
5.4 those of high ability; those with English as an additional language; those with disabilities; and be able to
use and evaluate distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support them
T6 Make accurate and productive use of assessment
know and understand how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas, including statutory
6.1
assessment requirements
6.2 make use of formative and summative assessment to secure pupils’ progress
6.3 use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons
PGCE School Direct Primary PRIPPM001AZ2014/15
T7
7.1
7.3
7.4
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
TEACHERS' STANDARDS 2012
P1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
P2
P3
PART TWO: PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
Teachers uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour,
within and outside school, by:
treating pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect, and at all times observing
proper boundaries appropriate to a teacher’s professional position
having regard for the need to safeguard pupils’ well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions
showing tolerance of and respect for the rights of others
not undermining fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and
mutual respect, and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs
ensuring that personal beliefs are not expressed in ways which exploit pupils’ vulnerability or might lead
them to break the law
Teachers must have proper and professional regard for the ethos, policies and practices of the school
in which they teach, and maintain high standards in their own attendance and punctuality.
Teachers must have an understanding of, and always act within, the statutory frameworks which set
out their professional duties and responsibilities.
26 | P a g e
Professional Conduct
1.1
Responsibilities
T8
8.1
Behaviour
7.2
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
have clear rules and routines for behaviour in classrooms, and take responsibility for promoting good
and courteous behaviour both in classrooms and around the school, in accordance with the school’s
behaviour policy
have high expectations of behaviour, and establish a framework for discipline with a range of strategies,
using praise, sanctions and rewards consistently and fairly
manage classes effectively, using approaches which are appropriate to pupils’ needs in order to involve
and motivate them
maintain good relationships with pupils, exercise appropriate authority, and act decisively when
necessary.
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
make a positive contribution to the wider life and ethos of the school
develop effective professional relationships with colleagues, knowing how and when to draw on advice
and specialist support
deploy support staff effectively
take responsibility for improving teaching through appropriate professional development, responding
to advice and feedback from colleagues
communicate effectively with parents with regard to pupils’ achievements and well-being
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