IV. To Delete or Change an Existing Course – check X all that apply

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Course Form
I. Summary of Proposed Changes
Dept / Program
Philosophy
Prefix and Course #
Course Title
History of Moral and Political Philosophy
Short Title (max. 26 characters incl. spaces)
Moral and Political Phil
Summarize the change(s) proposed
New, Permanent Course
II. Endorsement/Approvals
Complete the form and obtain signatures before submitting to Faculty Senate Office
Please type / print name Signature
Requestor:
Paul Muench
Phone/ email :
x2351
Program Chair/Director:
Paul Muench
Other affected programs
Paul Haber,
Political Science
Dean:
PHL 449
Date
Chris Comer, CAS
Are other departments/programs affected by this
Please obtain signature(s) from the
modification because of
Chair/Director of any such department/
(a) required courses incl. prerequisites or corequisites,
program (above) before submission
(b) perceived overlap in content areas
(c) cross-listing of coursework
III: To Add a New Course Syllabus and assessment information is required (paste syllabus into
section V or attach). Course should have internal coherence and clear focus.
Common Course Numbering Review (Department Chair Must Initial):
YES
NO
Does an equivalent course exist elsewhere in the MUS? Check all relevant disciplines if
x
course is interdisciplinary. (http://www.mus.edu/Qtools/CCN/ccn_default.asp)
If YES: Do the proposed abbreviation, number, title and credits align with existing course(s)? Please indicate
equivalent course/campus. 
If NO: Course may be unique, but is subject to common course review. Be sure to include learning outcomes
on syllabus or paste below. The course number may be changed at the system level.
See attached sample syllabus. The requested course number is presently not being used in the MUS.
Exact entry to appear in the next catalog (Specify course abbreviation, level, number, title, credits,
repeatability (if applicable), frequency of offering, prerequisites, and a brief description.) 
U PHL 449 History of Moral and Political Philosophy 3 cr. Offered intermittently. Prereq., upper-division
standing and PHL 210E (PHIL 300E), or consent of instr. Reading and interpretation of selected writings in
the history of moral philosophy and/or political philosophy.
Justification: How does the course fit with the existing curriculum? Why is it needed?
This course will complement an existing course, PHL 450 (Contemporary Moral and Political Theory),
allowing faculty to address significant figures and texts in the history of moral and political philosophy.
Are there curricular adjustments to accommodate teaching this course?
N/A. This will be rotated into the department’s regular schedule of courses.
Complete for UG courses (UG courses should be assigned a 400 number).
Describe graduate increment - see procedure 301.30
http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx
Complete for Co-convented courses
Companion course number, title, and description (include syllabus of companion course in section V)
See procedure 301.20 http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx.
New fees and changes to existing fees are only approved once each biennium by the
Board of Regents. The coordination of fee submission is administered by
Administration and Finance. Fees may be requested only for courses meeting specific
conditions according to Policy 940.12.1 http://mus.edu/borpol/bor900/940-121.pdf . Please indicate whether this course will be considered for a fee.
If YES, what is the proposed amount of the fee?
Justification:
IV. To Delete or Change an Existing Course – check X all that apply
Deletion
Title
Course Number Change
From:
Level U, UG, G
Co-convened
To:
Description Change
Change in Credits
From:
To:
Prerequisites
1. Current course information at it appears in catalog
(http://www.umt.edu/catalog) 
YES
NO
x
From:
To:
Repeatability
Cross Listing
(primary
program initiates
form)
Is there a fee associated with the
course?
2. Full and exact entry (as proposed) 
3. If cross-listed course: secondary program & course
number
4. If co-convened course: companion course number, title, and description
(include syllabus of companion course in section V) See procedure 301.20
http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/grad_council/procedures/default.aspx.
5. Is this a course with MUS Common Course Numbering?
http://www.mus.edu/Qtools/CCN/ccn_default.asp
If yes, please explain below whether this change will eliminate the course’s common course
status.
YES NO
6. Graduate increment if level of course is changed to UG. Have you reviewed the graduate
Reference procedure 301.30:
increment guidelines? Please check (X)
space provided.
http://umt.edu/facultysenate/committees/
grad_council/procedures/default.aspx
(syllabus required in section V)
7. Other programs affected by the change
8. Justification for proposed change
V. Syllabus/Assessment Information (must include learning outcomes)
Required for new courses and course change from U to UG. Paste syllabus in field below or attach and send
digital copy with form.
See attached sample syllabus.
VI Department Summary (Required if several forms are submitted) In a separate document list course
number, title, and proposed change for all proposals.
VII Copies and Electronic Submission. After approval, submit original, one copy, summary of
proposals and electronic file to the Faculty Senate Office, UH 221, [email protected]
Revised 8-23-11
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHIES OF KANT AND HEGEL
PHL 449, SECTION 01
LIBERAL ARTS BUILDING, ROOM 146
TR 3:40-5:00
SPRING SEMESTER 2013
Professor: David Sherman
Office: LA 159, ext. 2607
Office Hours: TR: 2-3 and by appointment
E-Mail: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The political writings of Kant and Hegel are not infrequently given short shrift in comparison
with the remainder of their formidable works, albeit for different reasons.
As reflected in the positions of certain influential commentators, Kant’s political philosophy
seems to be at odds with his moral philosophy—indeed, ultimately, the very ground of his moral
philosophy, the categorical imperative itself—which, it would seem, should supersede our
obligations to the state. (It does not.) Given the importance of Kant’s moral philosophy, there is
a tendency to see the political philosophy as superfluous (at best). Alternatively, there are those
who contend that Kant underwrites our obligations to the state with a rather uninteresting
variation on social contractarianism (he does not), which, again, seems to auger in favor of
seeing his political philosophy as superfluous.
Although The Philosophy of Right is often seen as an important political work (especially by the
so-called “Right Hegelians”), it is not infrequently seen as the work of an exhausted philosopher.
Instead of exhibiting the radicality of his earlier works, with their emphasis on the imperatives of
reason in history (which would facilitate a genuine form of social reconciliation), The Philosophy
of Right seems to cash out in favor of a rather contrived reconciliation that would justify our
obligations to the state in general (perhaps), and, what’s worse, to the reactionary Prussian State
(circa 1820) in particular (much less likely, although nominally so).
In this course, we shall consider anew the political writings of these two powerful philosophers,
which, I shall try to show, are not only still relevant within the present context, but, with their
different underlying conceptions of freedom, actually tend to delineate the framework within
which much of contemporary political debate takes place.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, you should be able to think and write critically about the central
political writings of Kant and Hegel. You will become conversant with their philosophical
vocabularies and conceptions, including notably their conceptions of freedom, and will acquire
the ability to delineate the framework within which much of contemporary political debate takes
place.
REQUIRED TEXTS
Immanuel Kant, Metaphysics of Morals, Cambridge University Press
Immanuel Kant, Political Writings, Cambridge University Press
G.W.F. Hegel, Elements of the Philosophy of Right, Cambridge University Press
Additional Readings will be on reserve in the Boyce Library.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION
Your evaluation for the course will be based on two exams, one paper, class participation, and
attendance. Each exam constitutes 30% of your final grade. (I reserve the right to change the
date of the first exam, depending on the speed with which we move through the materials.) The
paper is worth 40% of your final grade. For undergraduate students, the paper must be no less
than 2000 words, while, for graduate students, it must be no less than 3000 words. Based on
your class participation and attendance, I reserve the right to adjust your grade by one increment.
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
WEEK OF: READINGS:
KANT
Jan 26:
Background: Relevant Aspects of Kant’s Moral and Theoretical Philosophy
From FMM (Autonomy) (Boyce)
From CPR: The Canon of Pure Reason (The Highest Good) (Boyce)
From CPrR: The Dialectic of Pure Practical Reason (Boyce)
Feb 2
The Virtues
Preface and Introduction to the Metaphysics of Morals (MM 3-22)
Introduction to the Doctrine of Virtue (MM 145-170)
Doctrine of the Elements of Ethics (MM 173-218)
Feb 9
Teleology, History, and External Freedom
Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose (PW 41-53)
Conjectures on the Beginning of Human History (PW 221-234)
Theory and Practice (International Right)(PW 87-92)
Perpetual Peace (On the Guarantee of Perpetual Peace) (PW 108-114)
Feb 16
Teleology, History, and External Freedom (continued)
From CJ: Sections 75 and 82-84 (Boyce)
Introduction to the Doctrine of Right (MM 23-28)
Division of the Doctrine of Right (MM 29-34)
Feb 23
Private Right, Property, and Public Right
MM: Sections 1-17 (37-56) and 41-42 (84-86)
Mar 1
Rights in Oneself, Public Right, and Internationalism
MM: Sections 43-44 (89-90), 53-62 (114-122) and Conclusion (123-124)
Perpetual Peace (PW 93-108)
Theory and Practice (Political Right: Against Hobbes) (PW 73-79)
Mar 8
The Social Contract, Legitimate Law, and Resistance
MM: Sections 45-47 (90-93), 49, General Remark A (95-98), 52 (111113), and Doctrine of Right, Appendix/Conclusion (136-138)
Theory and Practice (Political Right: Conclusion) (PW 79-87)
An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment (PW 54-60)
Perpetual Peace (PW 114-15 and 125-130)
Mar 15
FIRST TEST
HEGEL
Mar 22
Hegel’s Speculative Philosophy
EPR: Preface (9-23), Introduction (25-64)
Mar 29
Abstract Right
EPR: The Person (67-72), Property (73-103) and Contract (104-114)
Apr 5
SPRING BREAK
Apr 12
Abstract Right/Morality
EPR: Wrong (115-132)/Subject, Purpose and Responsibility (135-146)
Apr 19
Morality
EPR: Intention and Welfare (147-156) and The Good and the Conscience
(157-186)
Ethical Life
EPR: Introduction (189-198), The Family (199-219) and Civil Society
(220-274)
Ethical Life
EPR: The State (275-365)
Apr 26
May 3
May 10
Ethical Life
EPR: The State (366-380)
Marx, Contribution to the Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right
May 15
SECOND TEST/PAPER DUE
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