Thematic Planning FLENJ 2013 copy

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Thematic Planning Responding to the Needs of the
Learner
(Handout available electronically at helenacurtainswiki.wikispaces.com)
Explanation for Creating a Thematic Unit
Using Backward Planning
Helena Curtain, Ph. D. [email protected]
Adapted from: Curtain, Helena and Carol Ann Dahlberg. (2010) Languages and Children Making the Match:
Bringing New Languages to Young Learners. New York: Pearson.
Identify sources of outcomes/ Resources you need for planning
The first step in thematic planning is to assemble the resources and guidelines available for the planning process. At a
minimum, this should include the following:
• Standards, local and state curriculum guides/frameworks
• Lists of language functions (language in use)
• Culture products, practices and perspectives
• Content guides for curriculum areas
Choose a thematic center/unit focus
The focal point for a thematic center may be a topic from the general school curriculum or it may be drawn from the
literature or culture of the target language. Some broadly based thematic units may be designed to last for weeks—
explorations, for example, or change. Other units may have more focused themes, based on a single story, a holiday, or a
special occasion like a birthday celebration, a curriculum concept, a cultural concept, a book , poem, or story, a school
or grade topic of emphasis, piece of art or music…
From Topic to Theme.
As you plan your unit, you want to be sure that you move from a topic to a theme. A theme is a richer basis for a unit,
one that has greater potential for meaning and purpose. While a topic usually involves just a loose collection of ideas, a
theme suggests a “big idea” and a focused collection of ideas. It provides a goal, or a destination for the learning, resulting in
a planned culminating activity. We often express this goal or destination by means of a focus question/essential question that
guides the activities of the unit.
Develop an enduring understanding and a focus question (See below)
Brainstorm/develop a web of potential outcomes, content and activities
As you brainstorm using the web as an organizer for putting down your ideas, you write down all the possible activities you
can think of related to your theme. Try to include at least two activities under each area of the web. Be sure to include
activities that balance the goals of language, culture and content
Once a theme has been established, the next step is to begin a brainstorming process that yields a web-like organization of
ideas related through meaning to one another and to the central theme. A web is a cognitive organizer, a visual representation
of concepts and their relationships that allows you to see how the ideas and activities relate to each other in a non-linear
fashion. Using a web allows you to extend the theme in many directions and to flesh out the topic with meaningful categories
and subcategories. Although not every element from the brainstorming web will be used in the final form of the unit, the
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ideas and activities gathered in this way can be used in the future as other thematic units are planned.
There are various ways to build a web, such as by subject content areas, by multiple intelligences or in a free form fashion.
Web: Subject Content and Standards
Subject Content Web Webbing by subject content areas, enables you to think of activities that might otherwise be
overlooked and provides a rich source of ideas for the unit. Of course, webbing around subject content topics also provides
valuable links to the regular curriculum and supports content-related instruction.
Physical
Education
Music
Fine
Science
Arts
Webbing
by
Content
Disciplines
Mathematics
Geography
Social
Studies
Language
Arts
Culture
Infused
throughout
Language
Infused
throughout
Standards Web
Webbing by Standards is similar but it ensures that all aspects of the standards are already included in the webbing process,
even before the unit plan inventory is filled out.
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Make selections for the unit from web and lay out on unit plan inventory.
Explanation of Unit Plan Inventory (UPI)
The Unit Plan Inventory serves as a chart for organizing information from the web. Below is a detailed explanation on how to
fill in the unit plan inventory.
Scenario
This is a short description in a few sentences summarizing the unit including the beginning and end.
Stage 1 What students should know and be able to do
Enduring Understanding(s)
An enduring understanding represents a “big idea” having enduring value beyond the classroom." They are umbrella-like
organizers of what you want your students to remember for a long time. The enduring understanding answers the question:
What do I want my students to understand about this topic? It is often stated in the form: “Students will understand that…”
Essential Question(s):
The essential question gives the unit focus. It is the question that students will be able to answer after they have completed
the unit.
Targeted Standards:
These can be the national foreign language standards and/or local standards.
Outcomes/Objectives
Here you will list what the students will be able to do at the end of the unit. The number of outcomes/objectives will depend
on the length of your unit. Remember that the outcomes must be measurable and observable and must specify what the
students will be able to do. Attached are lists of verbs to help you in this process .
Stage 2 How students will demonstrate what they know and can do
Performance Assessments
At various points in the unit (Some, but not all at the end) you will provide assessments for the students
that show that they have learned what you wanted them to learn. Be sure to assess language objectives
as well as content objectives. Provide an assessment for each of the three communication modes:
interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. Include the rubric for each of the assessments attached to
the unit
The Interpersonal Mode
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
two way  spontaneous communication that involves active negotiation of meaning between people
direct oral or written communication between individuals who are in personal contact
tasks are unrehearsed, unrefined, unscripted
Memorized material such as a skit is not an interpersonal mode task.
The Interpretive Mode
0ne way  receptive communication through listening to or viewing of oral or written messages involving print and
non-print material whose creator is absent.
there is no possibility for active negotiation of meaning with the writer or the speaker
involves comprehension of words, concepts, ideas, meaning
learners are exposed to a wide variety of culturally authentic materials such as texts, films, works of art, songs, poems,
advertisements, music videos.
Translation is not an interpretive mode task.
The Presentational Mode
One way  spoken or written productive communication between the creator and an audience
there is no immediate personal contact with the audience.
learners are able rehearse, revise, rewrite, consult sources, or otherwise prepare ahead of time.
Stage 3 Preparing students to demonstrate what they know and can do
This section of the UPI contains the inventory of functions, structures, vocabulary, materials, and major lesson topics and
performances.
As you work on your UPI, look at your web and begin to narrow down the ideas that you will actually use in this unit. Some
of the ideas that you brainstormed for the web might be useful in another unit. As you narrow down your outcomes and
assessments, you will begin to see what parts of the web you can use most successfully and what parts might not work so
well, or might take too long, or might not work for other reasons.
Functions:
List the language functions that you will have the students perform in the unit. Two or three is sufficient. Write in which
context the functions will be used. For example instead of just saying “identify” you would say “identify geographical areas
of Peru” or “describe foods available at the market.”
Structures
List the grammar the students will be using in the performances for this unit.
Vocabulary
List the vocabulary for the unit. You do not have to list every word, but be specific about the vocabulary so that the scope is
clear. For example say “adjectives such as tall, short, cold, hot” rather than simply “adjectives.” This column helps you to
identify the scope of the vocabulary for the unit.
Materials/Resources
What materials will you need to complete the unit? List books by name and author, name songs, and give web addresses. Be
as specific as possible. Remember others will be using your unit.
Major Lesson Topics/Performances
This is not a complete list of all the activities but a general framework for the unit. This shows the flow of the unit. In the
“Beginning” section list some ideas for how you will motivate your students at the beginning the unit. In the “End” section,
include how you will end the unit and what the culminating activity will be. In the “Middle” section, list the skill-building
activities that you will do in the middle of the unit
Adapted from: Curtain, Helena and Carol Ann Dahlberg. (2010) Languages and Children Making the Match, 4th Ed. New
York: Pearson Allyn & Bacon.
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Unit Plan Inventory
Unit Title:
Author(s):
Language/Level:
School:
Scenario/Unit Overview:
Stage 1 What students should know and be able to do
Enduring Understanding(s) (Big Idea) (Students will understand that…)
Essential Question(s):
Targeted Standards: (Local, State, National)
Outcomes/Objectives/Progress Indicators:
DO What will students be able to do and what kinds of things will they be able to say at the end of this unit? Please list here.
KNOW What vocab, grammar, culture and content must students know in order to meet the objectives of the unit? Please list in columns below.
Stage 2 How students will demonstrate what they know and can do: Performance-based Assessment
Interpretive Task and Rubric
Interpersonal Task and Rubric
Presentational Task and Rubric
(Use separate page for rubrics.)
Stage 3 Preparing students to demonstrate what they know and can do
Subject Content
Language/Communication
Language
Functions (Do)
Grammatical
Structures (Know)
Vocabulary
(Know)
Culture(s)
(Know)
Connections
(Know)
Essential
Materials
Learning Activities , Performances
(Formative Assessments)
(Do)
(Use separate page for this section)
Beginning
Middle
End
Comparisons:
Communities:
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Learning Activities , Performances (Formative Assessments)
Beginning
Middle
End
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Lesson Plan Format
Unit _______________________________ Lesson Number _______ of _________
Grade Level ________________
Time of Year to be Taught______________
Stage 1: What will students know and be able to do at the end of this lesson?
DO
KNOW
Stage 2: How will you know that students can do that?
Stage 3: What instructional activities will be used?
Opening/Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Closing/Activity 5
Materials needed for this lesson
Source: Greg Duncan
NOTES on the Lesson Plan
Stage 1
DO
What do you want students to be able to do at the end of the class? This should be a real-life use of language.
KNOW What vocabulary, structures and/or culture do students need to know in order to do what you have targeted?
Stage
How will you know that students can do what you targeted as a performance? What will they do to demonstrate
that to you?
Stage 3
Do the activities in the lesson …
 Provide sufficient opportunities for understanding new words before expecting production?
 Provide multiple, varied opportunities for students to hear new words/expressions used in highly visualized contexts that
make meaning transparent?
 Provide students with an authentic purpose for using words and phrases?
 Engage ALL students (VS. just one or two at a time)?
 Give students a reason for needing to/wanting to pay attention and be on task?
 Vary in the level of intensity and physical movement from one to the next?
 Represent the best possible use of instructional time?
 Take an appropriate amount of time considering the age of the learner?
 Make the learner the active participant and not the teacher?
Additional thoughts as each activity is envisioned . . .




What will the teacher be doing during the activity?
What will the student be doing?
How long will the activity take?
What materials / resources does the teacher need to have available?
Developed by Greg Duncan and Mimi Met, 2008
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Communicative Functions
Ways language is used for communicative purposes
Listed below in boldface are five major language functions.
Under each basic function are listed some examples of how these functions can be used in various ways.
(involving both initiating and
reacting)
Socializing
using different modes of address
inquiring about health
greeting
introducing
thanking
attending to cultural differences
Exchanging information
identifying
asking for/giving information
describing
narrating personal experiences
inquiring about or expressing
knowledge
inquiring about or expressing
opinions
asking for/giving permission
stating necessity and need
inquiring about or expressing
wishes
Getting things done
requesting
suggesting
making arrangements
reacting to offers, requests,
suggestions, invitations
inviting
instructing
Expressing attitudes
expressing admiration
expressing approval/disapproval
expressing interest/disinterest
expressing friendship
expressing regret
expressing apology
expressing likes, dislikes,
preferences
Organizing and maintaining
communication
attracting attention
expressing lack of comprehension
asking for repetition or rephrasing
asking how to say something in
the target language
asking how to spell something
mentioned
asking someone to explain what
they just said
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Unit Plan Inventory
Unit Title:
Author(s):
Language/Level:
School:
Scenario/Unit Overview:
Stage 1 What students should know and be able to do
Enduring Understanding(s) (Big Idea) (Students will understand that…)
Essential Question(s):
Targeted Standards: (Local, State, National)
Outcomes/Objectives/Progress Indicators:
DO What will students be able to do and what kinds of things will they be able to say at the end of this unit? Please list here.
KNOW What vocab, grammar, culture and content must students know in order to meet the objectives of the unit? Please list in columns below.
Stage 2 How students will demonstrate what they know and can do: Performance-based Assessment
Interpretive Task and Rubric
Interpersonal Task and Rubric
Presentational Task and Rubric
(Use separate page for rubrics.)
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 9
Stage 3 Preparing students to demonstrate what they know and can do
Subject Content
Language/Communication
Language
Functions (Do)
Grammatical
Structures (Know)
Vocabulary
(Know)
Culture(s)
(Know)
Connections (Know)
Essential
Materials
Learning Activities ,
Performances
(Formative
Assessments)
(Do)
(Use separate page
for this section)
Beginning
Middle
End
Comparisons:
Communities:
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Lesson Plan Format
Unit _______________________________ Lesson Number _______ of _________
Grade Level ________________
Time of Year to be Taught______________
Stage 1: What will students know and be able to do at the end of this lesson?
DO
KNOW
Stage 2: How will you know that students can do that?
Stage 3: What instructional activities will be used?
Opening/Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
Activity 4
Closing/Activity 5
(Note: there can be many more activities The lesson plan is not limited to five activities.)
Materials needed for this lesson
Source: Greg Duncan
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 11
Brainstorming Web for Exchange Student Unit (Sample)
Leisure
Activities
Money
Family
Relationshi
ps
Physical
and
personality
traits
Describing
self/others
Geography
Countries
Capitals
Nationalities
What’s it
like to be
me/you?
School Life
Classes
Schedule
Identity
Applying for
exchange
Filling out
forms
Food
What we
eat/they eat
Recipes
Numbers
Cultural
Art –Artists
Colors-forms
History,
Music
Film
Sample Unit Plan Inventory
Eleanor Flores. Wilson High School Portland Public Schools
Unit Title: What’s it like to be me/you? (Being an exchange student)
September – Spanish 3rd year
Language Level: Novice High/Intermediate
low
School: Wilson High School
After adding (from previous years) new and detailed vocabulary about the self (physical descriptions/
personality/identity) and others (countries/nationalities), students at the end of the unit will be able to do such tasks as
filling out forms (ie. applications to study abroad programs in Spanish); and describe the self to an organization such as
Rotary; by writing a letter to a host family; going through customs; writing a recipe and cooking it for their family; and by
being a witness to a crime and describing the criminal in a panel.
Scenario:
Stage 1: What students should know and be able to do
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_
Enduring Understanding: How people are different from us, how we are similar, and how we’re becoming more alike
(music, television and technology.
Essential Question:
What’s it like to be me/you? (Exchange students)
Students will be able to talk about self and about a Spanish-speaking country of their choice through topics such
as family, school, daily life, and fun. Students will be able to compare and contrast adolescent life here and in Spanishspeaking countries.
Outcomes:
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Stage 2: How students will demonstrate what they know and can do:
Performance –based Assessment
Interpretive Task and Rubric
Presentational Task and Rubric
Interpersonal Task and Rubric
“En la aduana”
“Un robo en la plaza”
Each student will take the role of a
customs officer or tourist.
“El retrato”
Students will write a letter to a friend or
grandparent describing a host family
member from the country they are visiting.
They will cut out a picture from a
magazine and attach it to the letter
Students will be on a panel of 3
witness of a crime and describe the
criminal to the detective.
Stage 3 Preparing students to demonstrate what they know and can do.
Language
Functions
Grammatical
Structures
Key
Vocabulary
Culture (s)
Subject Content
Greeting and
introducing
Use of ser vs. estar
tener, hay
Identity (for forms like
birthdate, age)
Countries, capitals,
nationalities
Geography
Capitals and
Nationalities
Using different
modes of address
Reviewing regular
verbs –ar, -er, -ir
Class schedules and
student life
Physical/Personality
traits
Describe people
and places
Introducing imperfect
Physical Description
expanding from
previous years
Foods, recipes,
meal times
Fine Arts
Artists- Painting
Museums
Compare and contrast
school
schedules/classes
between US and host
country
Ask for and giving
personal info
Stating necessity and
need
Essential Materials
Maps
Realia
Customs Forms
Applications
Photos/Drawings
People and faces
Art Prints/Power point
presentation
Pluralization of
nouns, adjectives
Masc. vs. Fem
agreement
Review preterito as
needed
Reviewing/expanding,
class subjects, numbers,
time
Artists, paintings,
Museums
Food, recipes
Art- colors, forms,
shapes
Addresses, phone
numbers, money
Music
Intro imperfect for
description
Foods around the world,
learning a recipe,
making a menu
Numbers:
measurements,
money exchange
Family
Stories and poems
Major Learning Activities, Performances
(Formative Assessments)
BEGINNING
Fantasy (Virtual) Trips to various Spanish-speaking countries (cities)
MIDDLE

Several activities describing people to partner

Sing songs (authentic pop, folk and those for learning structure written by teacher or colleagues)

Recite poems related to describing people and about other cultures

Participate in reciprocal interviews

Play games like CONGA (oral Bingo), four corners

Fill out forms for travel (customs form), applications (student exchange
Program

Describe artists/paintings

Make an travel itinerary

Describe a typical day at school in their host country

Investigate popular recipes in their host country and cook one

Exchange students will share their experiences
END
Apply to a travel abroad/student exchange program; speak to same program about self and reasons for wanting to
travel abroad; get through customs, write to host family describing self; write to a friend/relative describing host
family member.
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 13
Sample Brainstorming Web According to Subject Content Areas
Science
Animal habitats
Animal food
How animals move
Food chain?
Endangered animals?
Geography
Locations of animal
habitats
Continents
Countries
Landforms
Language Arts
Stories
Poems
Chants
Rhymes
Animal sayings
Social Studies
Animals as symbols
Importance of animal to the culture
Pets
Physical Education
Animal locomotion
charades/pantomime
Where do
Animals Live?
Art
Animals in art works
Making animal masks
Drawing picture from an
animal’s perspective
Music
Animal songs
Mathematics
Measuring animal sizes in metric system
Graphing favorite animals of class
Comparing sizes
Plotting animal populations on a graph
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Sample Unit Plan Inventory (UPI)
Unit Plan Inventory
: Where do Animals Live?
Unit Title
Teacher(s): _________________________
Language Level: Novice Grade Level:_____
School: ___________________
Unit Overview: After learning details about animals and their various homes, students at the end of the unit show that they have integrated their learning by creating an imaginary animal and
describing it from various aspects.
Stage 1 What students should know and be able to do
Enduring Understanding: Understand that all living things need a place to live.
Essential Question(s): Where do animals live?
Standards: (Local and or National)
Outcomes/Objectives/Progress Indicators:
DO:
Students will be able to compare and contrast selected animals based on specific criteria such as habitat, size, movement, color and cultural connections
KNOW: (See columns below)
Stage 2 How students will demonstrate what they know and can do: Performance Assessment
Interpersonal Task and Rubric
Each student will take on the role of one of the animals and
interview another student.
Interpretive Task and Rubric
Students will answer questions based on a reading at the end of
the unit.
Presentational Task and Rubric
Create an original product relating to animals and present it to
the class or another audience.
For example:
• Create an imaginary animal and describe its appearance and
habitat
• make a diorama with accompanying text and oral
presentation
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Stage 3 Preparing students to demonstrate what they know and can do
Language
Functions
Grammatical
Structures
Key Vocabulary
Culture(s)
Comparisons
Describe animal
appearance and
characteristics
Identify animals by
name and habitat
Express likes and
dislikes
1., 2., 3. person
singular of verbs:
like
live
eat
be
see
Verb to be
is , are
Animals sounds
Adjectives
describe:
to
color
speed
size
texture
personality
Nouns for
animals
habitats
geographical regions
continents
Verbs for
animal movement
Symbolic animals
Cultural
importance of
animals
Animal sayings
Animal stories
Animal songs
Artists and animals
Essential
Materials
Subject
Content
(Connections)
• Science
habitats
animal food
locomotion
• Mathematics
Measuring animal sizes,
Comparing sizes graphing
favorite animals of class
• Geography
locations of habitats
• Fine Arts
Animal Paintings
Make animals masks
• Language Arts
animal stories
Pattern poems about
animals such as Diamante
Maps
Animal pictures
Art prints
Art supplies
Pattern poem
examples
Major Learning Activities
Performances
(Assessments)
BEGINNING
Fantasy (Virtual) Trip to various
habitats
MIDDLE
•Name animals using culturally related
art prints
•Match animal with habitat
•Rhymes, songs and games related to
animals
•Graph animals according to attributes,
habitats
•Take on animal identity and
participate in interviews
•Move like an animal
•Make and describe animal masks
END
•Create a story about favorite animal
describing it and telling about its
habitat.
or
•Create fantasy animal and describe it
and its habitat
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Sample Enduring Understandings -1
Greece Central School District Office of World Languages LOTE Levels I - IV topics matched to grades 6-12 additional ELA themes and corresponding essential questions Created July 2004
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 17
Sample Enduring Understandings -2
Greece Central School District Office of World Languages LOTE Levels I - IV topics matched to grades 6-12 additional ELA themes and corresponding essential questions Created July 2004
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 18
Sample Enduring Understandings -3
Greece Central School District Office of World Languages LOTE Levels I - IV topics matched to grades 6-12 additional ELA themes and corresponding essential questions Created July 2004
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 19
Thematic Topics LOTE Greece School District (Adapted & Reformatted)
http://www.greece.k12.ny.us/district.cfm?subpage=846 Retrieved January 29, 2012
LOTE
Topics
Social Studies Conceptual Themes
*Required for grades 6-12
ELA Themes
*Additional
Personal
Identification
* ***
House &Home
***
Family Life
*
**
***
Community
and
Neighborhood
**
***
Physical
Environment
* ** ***
Meal Taking
-Global Connections Culture
-Time, Continuity and Change
-Individual Development and Identity
-Constructing Identities -Creation
-Our View of Ourselves and the World
-Heroes and Sheroes
-The Pursuit of Happiness
-Culture
-People, places, and environment
-Global Connections -Culture
-Time, Continuity and Change
-Individual Development and Identity
-Individuals, Groups and Institutions
Freedom and Responsibility
-Global Connections
-People, Places and -Environments
-Science, Technology and Society
-Individual Development and Identity
-Civil Ideals and Practices
-Creation
-Constructing Identities
-Human Condition-Good and Evil in the World
-Freedom and Responsibility
-Relationship to Community
-The Pursuit of Happiness
-Global Connections
-People, Places and Environment
-Culture
-Nature in Balance
-Chaos and Order
-Our View of Ourselves and the World
Health & Welfare
-Culture
-Individual Development and Identity
-Science, Technology and Society
-Individuals, Groups and Institutions
-Culture -Global Connections
-Love and Sacrifice
-The Human condition
-Creation
-Culture
-Individual development and identity
-People, places and environment
-The Human Condition -Love and Sacrifice
-The Pursuit of Happiness
-Our View of Ourselves and the World
* ** ***
Education
* **
***
Earning a
Living
* ** ***
Leisure
***
Public &
Private
Services
-Constructing Identities
-Creation
-Human Condition
-Chaos and Order
-Freedom and Responsibility
-Love and Sacrifice
-Relationships and Community
-Global Connections -Culture
-People, Places and Environment
-Culture
-Shades of Truth -Language and Literature
-Constructing Identities -Past, Present and Future
-Culture
-Civic Ideals and Practices
-Power, Authority and Governance
-The Human Condition
-Love and Sacrifice
-Freedom and Responsibility
Shopping
-Production, Distribution and Consumption
-Culture -Global Connections
-Creation
-Freedom and Responsibility
-The Pursuit of Happiness -Love and Sacrifice
Travel *
** ***
Current
Events
**
-Global Connections -Culture
-People, places and environment
-People, Places and Environment
-Science, Technology and Society
-Production, Distribution and Consumption -Power, Authority and Governance
-Civic Ideals and Practices
-Culture
*
**
***
Fits with Grade 9 ELA theme
Fits with Grade 10 ELA theme
Fits with Grade 11 ELA theme
Decisions, Actions and Consequences
Utopia and Dystopia
The American Dream
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Advanced Placement (AP) Themes
Global Challenges
Science and Technology
Contemporary Life
Personal and Public Identities
Families and Communities
Beauty and Aesthetics
1. Global Challenges
 Diversity Issues – tolerance
 Economic Issues
 Environmental Issues
 Health Issues
 Human Rights
 Nutrition and Food Safety
 Peace and War
4. Personal and Public Identities
 Alienation and Assimilation
 Beliefs and Values
 Gender and Sexuality
 Language and Identity
 Multiculturalism
 Nationalism and Patriotism
2. Beauty and Aesthetics
 Architecture
 Contributions to World Artistic
Heritage
 Ideals of Beauty
 Literature
 Music
 Performing Arts
 Visual Arts
5. Science and Technology
 Current Research Topics
 Discoveries and Inventions
 Ethical Questions
 Future Technologies
 Intellectual Property
 The New Media
 Social Impact of Technology
3. Families and Communities
 Age and Class
 Childhood and Adolescence
 Citizenship
 Customs and Ceremonies
 Family Structures
 Friendship and Love
6. Contemporary Life
 Advertising and Marketing
 Education
 Holidays and Celebrations
 Housing and Shelter
 Leisure and Sports
 Professions
 Rites of Passage
 Travel
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 21
Resources
Backward Design and Standards Based Instruction Powerpoint by Jennifer Eddy, Queens College
http://nclrc.org/about_teaching/related_docs/eddy2009.htm
Greece NY School District World Languages
Enduring Understandings, Essential Questions:
http://web001.greece.k12.ny.us/files/874/ELA%20Add%27l%20themes%20Chkpts%20A%2CB%2CC.pdf
Handouts on Thematic Teaching
http://helenacurtainswiki.wikispaces.com
Languages and Children: Making the Match
Curtain, Helena and Carol Ann Dahlberg. (2010) Languages and Children Making the Match, 4th Ed. New
York: Pearson.
New Jersey FLENJ Live Healthy Unit Vive Sano URL http://www.state.nj.us/education/cccs/21cu/7/
Live Healthy/Vive Sano Unit Overview
Live Healthy/Vive Sano (NH) - Files Compressed for Download [zip format] (Download size: 28.5 MB)
This excellent unit is ready to Teach!! This unit is fully complete with all lessons and materials. It is available
in Spanish but can be converted to other languages.
Pennsylvania Department of Education Standards Aligned System (SAS)
(Select World Language Subject area ) Lists essential questions according to Cultures, Communities,
Connections, Comparison and Interpretive, Interpersonal and Presentational Communication
http://www.pdesas.org/module/sas/curriculumframework/
Presentation on Content-based Instruction (Including Thematic Teaching)
Wendy Brownell http://wendybrownell.wikispaces.com
World Languages Framework Project Homepage
www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/wl/frameworks/wlo
World Languages Framework Learning Scenarios Project consists of learning scenarios (thematic
units) containing lessons and activities.
FLENJ, March 15, 2013, Helena Curtain, [email protected] , Page 22
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