English Language Handbook

advertisement
Photo: by kind permission of Elizabeth Carls, Blue Valentine Press.
English Language & Linguistics
Undergraduate Handbook
2015 Entry
An online version of this handbook is available at
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/forstudents/uginformation/ughandbooks
You can use this version to access the weblinks included.
2
Contents
Welcome from Head of School ................................................................................. 5
Contact and Welfare Information ............................................................................. 6
Attendance .............................................................................................................. 10
Frequently Asked Questions...................................................................................11
Your Degree: Aims and Objectives .......................................................................... 14
Your Degree: Curriculum Information..................................................................... 16
Table of Modules ..................................................................................................... 17
Assessment and Examination Information. ............................................................ 19
Teaching and Learning Methods ............................................................................. 25
First Year Module Outlines ...................................................................................... 26
Faculty Contact Details ............................................................................................ 31
Please Note:
Although every effort is made to ensure that all information contained in this handbook is
correct at the time of going to print (September 2015), the University cannot accept
responsibility for errors or omissions. The University also reserves the right to introduce
changes from the information given, including the addition, withdrawal or restructuring of
courses and/or modules. The terms and conditions on which the University makes offers of
places on its courses of study, including those covered in this handbook, may be found in the
University of Sussex Undergraduate Prospectus, copies of which can be obtained from the
Admissions Office in Sussex House.
3
4
….From Professor Tom Healy, Head of the School of English
A very warm welcome to the School of English. Through BA degrees
in English Literature, English Language & Linguistics, American
Studies, and Drama, we engage with the historical, creative,
performed, theoretical, and linguistic aspects of English as a world
language and literature. The School is committed to providing our
students with teaching of high quality, founded on the expertise of
over 40 members of academic faculty whose research has
overwhelmingly been celebrated as internationally excellent. Our
aim as a School is to provide you with a supportive and intellectually
stimulating environment as you work in your chosen degree course.
I hope that you will take full advantage of what Sussex University has
to offer you. All the School's staff wish to help you to make the most
of your time here. Studying in the School you become a part of an
academic community that explores how language, whether read or performed, is the foundation of
the investigations we undertake about the human place in the world. We want to work with you in
helping you further your development into independent, informed and questioning thinkers. Yet how
much you get out of your time here depends on how much you put in, and I encourage you to be an
enthusiastic participant in your degree course. Above all, studying with us should be rewarding and
enjoyable. If you feel at any point that is not the case, let us know and we will try to help.
I very much hope that you have a pleasurable and productive time with us at Sussex.
Tom Healy
Head of the School of English
5
Contact and Welfare Information
Where do I go for Information?
The English School Office is located in Arts B133 on the first floor of the Arts B Building and the staff
there are happy to help you with any queries you may have. The office is open 9am – 5pm Monday to
Friday. The office phone number is (01273) 877303 and the office e-mail is: [email protected]
English Faculty contact details and office hours can be found at:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/forstudents/schooloffice
Email
You will be registered for an email account here at the University of Sussex, and it is important that
you check this account regularly during the week in term times, as much communication is done by
email. University emails will automatically be sent to your University account rather than other
personal accounts, such as gmail.
The Web
The School of English website has lots of useful information including faculty contact details, module
and course information and up-to-date news and events in the School:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/
Study Direct
You will have access to Study Direct, our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) where you will be able to
engage with academic resources and activities created and shared by your tutors and peers. The main
page will give an overview of your course and provide links to individual module sites where you will
typically find module documents, library reading lists and (where available) lecture recordings. For
modules with on-line essay submission, Study Direct is the portal for submission.
You will find the links to Sussex Direct and Study Direct at www.sussex.ac.uk/students/
Sussex Direct
When you arrive you will be registered to Sussex Direct, which is your personalised online gateway to
university information. The system will provide you with your study timetable information, as well as
help you track your marks, assessment deadlines, exams timetable and attendance. Behind the scenes,
Sussex Direct helps your Academic Adviser, and Student Advisers, to support your studies.
You will also be able to access your library account and personal information pages, including; contact,
financial, printing and training course information.
Notice boards
Some key information may be displayed on student notice boards in the Arts B Building (in the lobby
area outside the English School Office, B133), so it’s important that you familiarise yourself with where
they are located and check them regularly.
6
Pigeonholes
Undergraduate pigeonholes for students in the School of English are located on level 2 of Arts B
opposite B237 and these should be checked regularly. The pigeonholes contain post and
coursework/feedback from assessments. Students will be emailed when coursework is ready to be
collected.
Undergraduate Examinations Handbook
There is some information about examinations and assessments in this handbook, but more detailed
information can be found in the Undergraduate Examinations Handbook, which is published on-line by
the University’s Academic Development and Quality Enhancement Office:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/documentsandpolicies/examinationandassessmenthandbo
oks/
Essay manuals
The School publishes manuals on the planning and writing of essays. While much of the information in
the manuals for different courses is the same, it is important for joint degree students to note that
there are differences, particularly In citation and referencing styles for English Language/Linguistics
and English Literature. So, for English Language modules, please use the English Language manual and
for Literature modules, please use the English Literature manuals. If you’re ever uncertain about
questions of essay-writing process, style or format for a module, be sure to ask your tutor for more
information. The manuals can be found on the School of English undergraduate handbooks page:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/forstudents/uginformation/ughandbooks
Event Booking System
The event booking system is used by the School Office to invite students to events within the School.
The event will appear in your Sussex Direct timetable as either compulsory or something that requires
a request of acceptance. Typical events include book launches, extra workshops and Drama
performances.
Whom can I talk to?
Your Academic Adviser
The role of your Academic Adviser is to monitor your academic progress and to give you advice and
help on academic or personal issues that may be affecting your studies. You will meet your Academic
Adviser during the first term, and they will be available during their office hours for you to talk to
should you need their help and advice. You will also meet with them each year to review together how
your studies are progressing.
7
Student Life Centre
The Student Life Centre is based in Bramber House, and is open every weekday 9am – 5pm. The
Student Life Team are there to help with the following issues:








Personal concerns
Student funding: Access to Learning Fund, all scholarships, bursaries and Vice Chancellors
loans.
Student mentoring
Information about taking a temporary break (temporary withdrawal) or withdrawing from
the University.
Student complaints
Student discipline
Submission of mitigating evidence
Help with understanding University procedures
Specialist financial advice services are provided by the Student Union Advice and Representation
Centre.
You can contact the Student Life Centre by: telephoning 01273 87 6767;
emailing [email protected] ; or texting ‘slcentre’ to 88020.
Further details about the Centre are available at: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre
Student Mentors
Student mentors are current students who are here to help you settle into university life. They can
show you how different systems work (e.g. Sussex Direct), advise you on time management and
revision skills and a range of other issues – no question is too small. Drop-in sessions are open to
anyone or you can e-mail one of the mentors and they will arrange a time to see you. See the website:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre/academic/mentors for more information on Student
Mentors or contact the Student Life Centre.
Student Representatives and the School Student Experience Group
The Student Representative Scheme is run jointly by the Students Union (USSU) and the University.
Student reps provide an essential link between students, the University and the Students' Union.
Because reps are themselves students, fellow students are happy to seek assistance from them when
they have concerns or opinions about their education and experience at the University.
Each student cohort year elects both subject-area reps and School-level reps. Subject-area reps liaise
with and represent students at the local level. School-level reps take forward relevant issues to Schooland University-level committees. All reps meet once a term at the School Student Experience Group
to exchange information and ideas.
Further information on the student representation scheme including voting dates can be found at:
http://www.sussexstudent.com/student-reps/
8
The University of Sussex Students’ Union (USSU)
The Students’ Union offers a wealth of resources to help you during your time at Sussex, as well as
numerous clubs and societies that cater for your extra-curricular interests. The Union’s Student Advice
Centre offers free, confidential advice on a range of academic and non-academic issues, including
housing, finance, counselling and sexual health. The USSU is located in Falmer House.
http://www.sussexstudent.com/
The Careers and Employability Centre
To help you with your academic development, the Library and the Careers and Employability Centre
have created the Skills Hub. It brings together all the workshops, web resources and services at
Sussex to help you develop a wide range of skills including:
 Writing and Referencing
 Library and Research
 IT Skills
 Employability
 Exams and Assessments
 Personal Development
The Skills Hub also has a live event feed so you can find out about workshops and events to help you
develop your skills: www.sussex.ac.uk/skillshub
The Careers and Employability Centre is located in the Library and is there to help you with all
aspects of career development and employment, both during your studies and after you have
graduated. They offer study skills support, such as workshops and individual tutorials for more
effective learning and developing better study habits and have online resources such as Study
Success at Sussex. http://www.sussex.ac.uk/s3/
They can also help with finding a part-time job during your studies or in the vacation, putting
together a CV, finding work experience, information about postgraduate opportunities, and a range
of other career related areas. Don’t wait till your final year to visit — they have services for students
at every level of study. www.sussex.ac.uk/careers/
9
Attendance
The School of English takes your attendance at seminars, workshops and lectures seriously. Our
overwhelming experience is that a casual approach to preparation for, attendance at, and participation
in, these classes leads both to a far poorer result in your degree than you are capable of achieving and
to poor preparation for your future after university. Poor attendance and preparation is also unfair on
your fellow students who are working to make these classes stimulating and effective.
We expect a minimum of 80% attendance at seminars and workshops. Attendance is also taken in
some lectures.
If you are ill or cannot attend classes for any other reason you should email
[email protected] If you find that ill health or other circumstances are affecting your
studies we strongly recommend you drop into the Student Life Centre and speak to one of the team.
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre
If your attendance becomes poor without notified good cause, the School’s progress boards may
withdraw you from your degree course and you will have to leave the University. The School’s
Director of Student Experience and the School Office monitor attendance registers and will warn you
if your attendance starts to become unsatisfactory. Failure to rectify this may result in you not being
able to complete your modules and your degree.
10
Frequently Asked Questions

What are the University’s term dates?
2015-16
Arrival Weekend
Freshers' induction
Autumn Term#
New Undergraduates attend
Sat 12 Sep 2015
Mon 14 Sep 2015
Teaching induction (all attend)
Thur 17 Sep 2015
Teaching starts
Mon 21 Sep 2015
Teaching finishes
Fri 11 Dec 2015
Sat 12 Dec 2015 – Sun 03 Jan
2016
Christmas vacation
Private study period
Attendance only if required*
Mon 04 Jan - Wed 06 Jan 2016
Mid-year assessment period
starts
Attendance only if required*
Thu 07 Jan 2016
Mid-year assessment period
ends
Attendance only if required*
Fri 22 Jan 2016
Inter-session week
Spring Term#
Sat 23 - Sun 31 Jan 2016
Teaching starts
Mon 01 Feb 2016
Teaching finishes
Fri 06 May 2016
Winter Graduation
Tue 19 - Fri 22 Jan 2016
Easter teaching break and Spring Vacation
Private study period
Summer Term#
Attendance only if required*
Mon 09 - Wed 11 May 2016
Year-end assessment period
starts
Thur 12 May 2016
Year-end assessment period
ends
Fri 10 Jun 2016
Summer vacation
Sat 11 Jun 2016
Summer Graduation
Resit period
Sat 19 Mar – Sun 03 Apr 2016
Mon 18 - Fri 22 July 2016
Attendance only if required
# Term dates for all students:- UG, PGT and PGR
Late August - early Sep: tbc
* exams may be scheduled on Saturdays
Where can I see my timetable?
On Sussex Direct (which you are automatically registered to when you are registered at the university);
go to the Study page and click on Study Timetable.
What happens if I can’t hand my work in due to illness/other circumstances?
If you believe you have a good reason why you cannot hand in work on time you can submit Mitigating
Evidence (MEC). Information on how you can do this can be accessed here:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/studentlifecentre/mitigation
11
Your MEC statement should be completed as early as possible, either before or normally within 7 days
of the assessment deadline. This should be supported by independent documented MEC evidence
submitted within 21 days of the assessment deadline. An early submission of your claim may also
speed up an assessment of entitlement to additional support should your circumstances indicate ongoing health or support issues.
Where do I hand in my work?
Your Sussex Direct webpages will give all assessment details, including whether the assessment is to
be submitted via e-submission through Study Direct or in hard copy via the School Office.

Electronic submissions
For assignments that need to be submitted electronically, please refer to the frequently
asked questions available on the following webpage for further information:
www.sussex.ac.uk/adqe/standards/examsandassessment/esubmission
You are encouraged to use the internet-based text-matching service, Turnitin, prior to
submitting your assessments. This may help you identify problems with your referencing.
Turnitin is also used during the marking process as a means of checking the originality of
submitted work.

School Office submissions
If your assignment needs to be handed in to the School Office, please make sure that you
submit 2 copies of your assessed work. The two copies must be individually stapled and one
cover sheet stapled to one copy. Cover sheets are available from the School Office throughout
the year. Please include your candidate number and the module code at the top of each page
of all work submitted.
What happens if my work is late?
Work submitted late will be subject to the following penalties:



up to 24 hours after the deadline - a penalty deduction of 5 percentage points, so, for example,
an original mark of 65% will be reduced to 60%.
after 24 hours and up to 7 days (1 week) late - a penalty deduction of 10 percentage points
Work will not be accepted more than 7 days after the original deadline. A mark of 0 and a nonsubmission will be recorded.
It is extremely important therefore, that you do hand all of your work in on time. Losing marks for
lateness can have a significant impact on your degree classification.
Where do I collect marked work?
Marked work that has been electronically submitted will be returned by the same method. Work that
has been handed in to the School Office will be returned by the tutor.
Where can I see my marks?
Your marks can be viewed on Sussex Direct, along with progress reports written by your tutors. Marks
and feedback will be returned within 15 working term time days.
12
Where do I get a photocopy card from, and where is the nearest photocopier?
You can purchase a photocopy card (and recharge it) in the Library. The nearest photocopiers and
printers are in the Library.
Where is the nearest computer cluster?
A small number of computers are available off the English Social Space (B274) on the second floor in
Arts B. Computers are also available in the Shawcross Building and in the Library.
Where do I update my contact details?
If your contact details change you should update them on your Sussex Direct account.
Where can I find information about modules?
Information about modules that you are registered in can be found on Sussex Direct, including the
modes of assessment, assessment deadlines, weightings and credit details. For modules that you are
not currently taking, please see the School of English website:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/coursesandmodules/ugcourses
What is Study Direct?
Study Direct has a range of on-line academic resources to help you with your studies. Each of your
modules has its own site on Study Direct, and it is the chief means by which your tutors will interact
with you outside classroom time. Some modules also have readers and lecture outlines which will be
available for you to download and print.
I want to transfer to a different degree course – what should I do?
You should talk it through with your Academic Adviser if you want to change your degree course. If
you decide to transfer to a different degree course this is only possible at certain times of the year,
and you should contact Anne Woodbridge, Curriculum and Assessment Officer, Arts B138 (opposite
the School Office). She will give you a transfer form and explain the procedure to you.
What do I do in an emergency?
If there is an accident or emergency you should phone the campus emergency hotline on 3333 (from
a mobile or external line call 01273 873333). Do not dial 999. If you hear a fire alarm, leave the building
straight away by the nearest exit and go to the local building assembly point.
…and remember, the staff in the English School Office (Arts B133) are here to help you with
any queries you may have.
13
Your English Language & Linguistics Degree: Aims and Objectives
Why English Language & Linguistics at Sussex?
The BA courses English Language & Linguistics and English Language & Literature offer you an
interdisciplinary higher education experience that involves systematic analysis of data, the
sophisticated manipulation of theoretical concepts, and the careful use of argument. These skills are
transferable to a wide range of contexts.
In the English Language & Linguistics courses, you develop a comprehensive understanding of modern
English within a general framework for the discussion of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. In
the second year in particular you acquire knowledge of regional and social varieties of English and how
they relate to Standard English. Considerations of the communicative functions of language,
particularly interactions of language and power and language and style, are central to your course.
You are involved in substantial experience of linguistic analysis, to enable you to make sense of
language and discourse structure and to evaluate the analyses of others. More generally, you develop
your intellectual confidence, which comes with experience in selecting, evaluating and marshalling
concepts, arguments and evidence, and in expounding these effectively, whether in writing or orally.
Core skills
While at Sussex you will acquire and develop many skills. Below is a list of core skills used in our
modules. The language may be unfamiliar now, but it can help you to express the skills you learn
through academic study when you apply for employment or further study. The aim for the present is
to help you to:






take control of your self-development
be clear about what you like doing and what you're good at
set yourself ambitious goals for your study at Sussex
plan how you will manage your time to achieve these goals
develop a critical awareness of your work and your working methods
make connections between your life at Sussex and your future beyond it.
Interpersonal skills
Communication
Writing clearly and cogently
Listening to others
Preparing and delivering presentations
Negotiating and cooperating
Contributing to seminar discussion
Social
Building on the ideas of others
Working in a group, delegating tasks
Encouraging and motivating others
14
Academic Skills
Learning Skills
Contributing effectively in seminars
Evaluating evidence, developing an
argument
Revising drafts and proof-reading
Reviewing progress
Essay planning, writing effectively
Research Skills
Independent research
Using resources (from the library and on-line)
Making use of a reading list
Applying critical theories
Developing critical awareness
Intellectual Development
Formulating and testing hypotheses
Synthesising disparate ideas
Evaluating evidence, developing an
argument
Ability to analyse
Applying judgement and discrimination
Reviewing progress
Personal skills
Managing Yourself
Being assertive
Setting and achieving goals
Persistence
Developing self confidence
Self-motivation
Coping with and managing stress
Managing Time
Organising your work
Establishing priorities
The aim for the future is that you will be able to:
 develop a critical and cultural awareness that will remain with you for life
 find and develop your own distinctive voice
 make well-informed decisions about the world in which you live
 articulate your strengths to employers
 take control of your own career development.
15
Your English Language & Linguistics Degree: Curriculum Information
The following English Language & Linguistics degree courses are run by the School of English:
Single Honours Degree:
BA English Language & Linguistics
Joint Honours Degree:
BA English Language & Literature
These courses offer English Language degrees that concentrate on the modern language at home and
abroad in its many varieties. They provide you with a comprehensive understanding of modern English
within a general framework for the discussion of vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation (that is, one
that is equally applicable to other languages), derived from traditional approaches and modern
linguistics.
You learn about the significance of Standard English in its present social setting in Britain and other
English-speaking countries, and especially about the way in which it has changed and developed in the
modern era. You also examine the present state of other varieties such as regional dialects, the English
of countries other than the UK and the special ‘dialects’ of particular groups (including ethnic
minorities, men and women and adolescent subcultures). You will also have the opportunity to study
changes in English over the 1400 years of its recorded history.
These courses are both theoretical and practical, as you get experience of handling and analysing real
language data. They encourage you to reflect in new ways on your everyday experience of the English
language and to become sensitive to differences of linguistic form and their social and cultural
implications. They are also suitable as a means of deepening the knowledge of overseas students who
are already proficient in English.
These degree modules are designed to be of special interest if you are intending to work in a languagerelated profession such as school teaching (where English language work has recently been allocated
a much more important role by the government), the teaching of English as a foreign or second
language in Britain or abroad, speech therapy, media, journalism or counselling (and other professions
relying on language skills).
16
What Modules will I take during my degree course?
PLEASE NOTE: Whilst the following course tables are accurate at the time of printing (September
2015), the curriculum may have changed by the time you are in your second and final years – i.e.
some new modules may be running and some modules may not be offered. The English website will
always have the most up-to-date degree course structures – go to
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/coursesandmodules/ugcourses
BA English Language & Linguistics (Single Honours)
Year
1 (core)
1 (core)
1 (core)
Term
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Module
Approaches to Meaning
Approaches to Pronunciation
Elective*
1 (core)
1 (core)
1 (core)
Spring
Spring
Spring
Approaches to Grammar
Investigating Language in Context
Elective
2 (core)
2 (option) choose 2
2 (option)
2 (option)
2 (core)
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Great Ideas about Language
History of English I
Regional Variation in English
Translating Cultures
Elective
2
2
2
2
2
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
History of English II
Social Variation in English
Approaches to Discourse
Pidgins & Creoles
Elective
3 (core)
3 (option) choose 3
3 (option)
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
3 (option)
3 (option)
3 (option
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Research Proposal
Child Language Acquisition
Discourse of Social and Personal
Identity
Forensic Linguistics
Intercultural Communication
Syntactic Theory
3 (core)
3 (option) choose 2
3 (option)
3 (option)
3 (option)
3 (option)
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Research Dissertation
Contemporary Stylistics
Language and Gender
Phonology
Semantics
Linguistic Typology
(option) choose 3
(option)
(option)
(option)
(core)
* Elective means that you choose an option from a range of subjects.
17
Credits
30
15
15
30
15
15
120
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
120
15
15
15
15
15
15
30
15
15
15
15
15
120
BA English Language & Literature (Joint Honours)
Year
1 (core)
1 (core)
1 (core)
Term
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Module
Approaches to Meaning
Critical Approaches I
Lit module: Reading Genre I
1 (core)
1 (core)
1 (core)
1 (core)
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Structure of English
Investigating Language in Context
Critical Approaches II
Lit module: Reading Genre II
2 (core)
2 (option) choose 1
2 (option)
2 (option)
2 (core)
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Translating Cultures
History of English I
Great Ideas about Language
Regional Variation in English
Lit modules
2 (option) choose 2
2 (option)
2 (option)
2 (option)
2 (core)
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
History of English II
Social Variation in English
Approaches to Discourse
Pidgins & Creoles
Lit modules
3 (option) choose 2
3 (option)
3 (option)
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
3 (option)
3 (option)
3 (core)
Autumn
Autumn
Autumn
Research Proposal
Child Language Acquisition
Discourse of Social and Personal
Identity
Forensic Linguistics
Intercultural Communication
Lit Modules
3 (option) either
3 (option) or choose 2
3 (option)
3 (option)
3 (core)
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Spring
Research Dissertation
Contemporary Stylistics
Language and Gender
Semantics
Lit modules
Credits
30
15
15
15
15
15
15
120
15
15
15
15
30
15
15
15
15
30
120
15
15
15
15
15
30
30
15
15
15
30
120
For further information on English Literature modules please refer to the English Literature Student
Handbook or the course structures detailed on the web:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/coursesandmodules/ugcourses
18
Your English Language & Linguistics Degree: Assessment and Examination
The Credit System
Each module has a certain number of credits with academic year containing at least 120 credits. These
credits are divided amongst the modules. By knowing the number of credits for each module, you will
have a guide to the relative amount of work required - i.e. a 15-credit module should require only half
the total amount of work needed for a 30-credit module. If you find yourself spending much more, or
much less, time on a module than is appropriate for that module’s credit loading, then you should talk
to your module tutor and your academic adviser to make sure that you are spending your time
effectively.
Modes of Assessment
English Language & Linguistic modules are assessed by a variety of means. Unseen examinations test
your assimilated knowledge and understanding and the ability to write succinctly at short notice. Twoday or three-day take-away papers allow you to display your skills in linguistic analysis without relying
exclusively on memory. Essays of 4000 words and the 8000-word project allow you, by choosing your
own topics, to develop expertise in areas of particular interest to you or to conduct individual research,
and to test your skills in using sources and organising and presenting an effective and scholarly piece
of discursive writing. In addition many modules include coursework components that is, term-time
work, in their assessment. Assessed coursework may include shorter essays exercises, presentations,
or poster presentations. These contribute to your final result, and demands continuing commitment
and effort. Your degree course includes a balance of assessment modes of these types.
Please Note:
Do not rely solely on tutors’ information about assessment modes and timing or other formal module
requirements: such information is not authoritative and occasionally may be mistaken. Refer to your
Sussex Direct Study Pages for all assessment information.
Useful assessment information
Writing well and avoiding academic misconduct
Plagiarism, collusion, and cheating in exams are all forms of academic misconduct which the University
takes very seriously. Every year, some students commit academic misconduct unintentionally because
they did not know what was expected of them. The consequences for committing academic
misconduct can be severe, so it is important that you familiarise yourself with what it is and how to
avoid it.
The University's S3 guide to study skills gives advice on writing well, including hints and tips on how to
avoid making serious mistakes. Visit http://sussex.ac.uk/s3/writingwell and make use of the resources
there. The ELL guide to planning and writing essays and dissertations contains guidance on referencing
properly and improving your critical writing skills. It is available on module Study Direct sites and the
School website:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/forstudents/uginformation/ughandbooks
19
If you are dealing with difficult circumstances, such as illness or bereavement, do not try to rush your
work or hand in something which may be in breach of the rules. Instead you should seek confidential
advice from the Student Life Centre.
The full University rules on academic misconduct are set out in the Undergraduate Examination and
Assessment Handbook; see
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/documentsandpolicies/examinationandassessmenthandbo
oks/
End-of-year results
At the end of each academic year, the English Undergraduate Exam Board meets to determine your
progression to the next year of your course, or, in the case of final year students, the degree class you
will be awarded. Details of your results, including examination results, will be available on your Sussex
Direct study pages following the meeting of the exam board, and a ‘pass list’ will be published on the
notice board in Arts B listing the students who have progressed to the next year. If at the end of year
1 or year 2 you have not passed all of your modules, you will be required to take resits in September.
You will be contacted by letter if this is the case. More detailed information regarding examinations
and resits is in the Undergraduate Examination Handbook, which will be available in the autumn term,
and is on the web:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/documentsandpolicies/examinationandassessmenthandbo
oks/
The pass mark for all undergraduate modules is 40%.
At the end of the year, you must have achieved at least 120 credits worth of modules in order to
progress to the next year of your degree course. Marks for the 1st year do not contribute towards your
degree classification (final degree result), but you must pass the first year in order to progress to the
second year. For a three-year degree course your 2nd year marks contribute 40% to your degree
classification, and the final year contributes 60% to your degree classification.
20
Assessment Criteria
On English Language & Linguistics modules, all tutors mark with reference to the same set of marking
criteria. On the one hand, we do so in order to make our marking as precise and transparent as
possible; on the other hand, we do so in order to provide very detailed feedback so that you can see
where your strengths and weaknesses are and where you need to do further work in order to improve
your performance.
We consider up to four main elements when marking your work: 1) subject knowledge, 2) data
methodology, 3) analysis, and 4) communication and presentation. For any particular assessment,
your tutor will let you know the relative weighting of these elements. In order to perform at the
highest level, you will need to meet the criteria set out below in all of the areas indicated by your tutor.
Your tutor will give you guidance on the ways in which these categories apply to the marking of your
written work on a particular module.
Subject knowledge: Your work should demonstrate close familiarity with the theories, concepts, and
facts that are relevant to your topic. In addition to showing mastery of material discussed in lectures
and seminars, you should make use of relevant published literature that is suitably advanced for the
level of the module. Your use of technical vocabulary and other forms of linguistic representation (e.g.
diagrams, transcription conventions) should be appropriate and accurate. The work should have no
obvious gaps in coverage of the material, and all of the presented material should be strictly relevant
to the task at hand.
Data methodology: For assignments in which you are responsible for collecting your own data, you
must present a clearly stated and appropriate means of data collection and analysis. You should make
it clear that you are aware of the strengths and weaknesses of your data-collection methods, your data
set and its sources, and your means for analysing it. You are responsible for collecting and presenting
data in a way that meets disciplinary and University ethical standards. The data should be made
available to readers of the assignment—either by including the data with your submission (in a
dedicated section or an appendix) or by referring the reader to the source of the data (e.g. corpus,
literary work). For assessments in which original data collection is not necessary, this element may be
omitted from the tutor’s marking regime or may be applied in a different way.
Analysis: Your work should reveal a clear and accurate defining of a topic for discussion and a clear,
accurate, and original handling of the matter you discuss. The work must present a coherent argument
leading to a clearly stated conclusion. The evidence supporting your argument must be clearly and
critically presented and sufficient for the conclusion. Ample description and exemplification of your
evidence should be given. There should be no gaps in logic.
Communication and presentation: Written/presented work must take a reader/audience-oriented
perspective in that it is organised in an efficient way and the connections between points their
relevance to the conclusion are always clear. You should always use clear, precise language, written
with attention to academic/standard English norms. The sources of information should always be clear
to the reader and the bibliographic standards outlined in the English Language Essay Handbook must
be followed for all types of assessment except unseen exams. The work should follow any other
instructions for the presentation of the work specified by the tutor.
21
DATA METHODOLOGY
SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE
Marking Criteria
0-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-74
75-79
80-85
86-100
Misunderstanding of
major
concepts.
Failure to
engage with
the source
materials or to
follow the
main
instructions
for the
assignment.
Data is absent,
unethically
obtained, or
other than
what was
required for
the work.
Insufficient
knowledge
of relevant
theoretical /
technical
concepts;
uses them
rarely and
seldom
accurately.
Little use of
relevant
sources.
Insufficient
explanation
of the
methodology
for collecting
/ analysing
data; data is
not
completely
fit for
purpose.
A basic
knowledge of
the concepts
under
discussion;
uses basic
sources aptly.
A sound
knowledge of
the concepts
under
discussion;
source
materials well
used to
support
argument.
Detailed and
accurate
knowledge and
use of concepts
and appreciation
of the complexity
of the topic and
approach.
Excellent
background
research/use of
sources.
Precise and
detailed
knowledge and
use of concepts
appreciation of
the complexity of
the topic and
approach. High
level of expertise
in using primary
academic
sources.
Precise and detailed
knowledge of
concepts, with
outstanding level of
expertise in the
material that raises the
work far above that
which is expected at
this level. Outstanding
use of primary
academic sources.
Some, but not
enough,
description of
data collection
/ analysis
methods;
original data is
generally fit
for purpose.
Sound data
collection /
analysis
methods, wellexecuted;
sufficient
appropriate
data. Critical
awareness of
strengths &
weaknesses.
Sophisticated,
sound data
collection
methods that
provide sufficient
excellent data.
Collection,
presentation,
and/or analysis of
data show
creativity and
critical
awareness.
Very
sophisticated,
sound data
collection
methods that
provide ample
excellent data.
Collection,
presentation,
and/or analysis of
data show
marked creativity
and critical
awareness.
Precise and detailed
knowledge of
concepts, with
striking level of
expertise in the
material that raises
the work noticeably
above that which
would expected at
this level.
Outstanding use of
primary academic
sources.
Highly sound,
sophisticated data
collection methods
that provide
excellent data that
exceeds the bare
requirements of the
assignment.
Collection,
presentation, and/or
analysis of data show
great creativity and
critical awareness.
22
As for 80-85, but with a
practically unimpeachable
methodology.
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-74
75-79
80-85
86-100
Inadequate
evidence of
analysis;
below the
standard
required at
the current
level of
course.
An
elementary
or
incomplete
argument
that is prone
to small
logical
errors, strays
from point or
loses focus.
An adequate
understanding
of the
material;
maintains
focus on
topic[s]
addressed; the
argument is
generally
successful but
some of the
evidence may
be insufficient.
A sound
understanding
of the
material, with
some
awareness of
the complexity
of the issues
discussed; the
argument is
successfully
executed.
An original
approach to the
material that
advances a wellconsidered and
subtle analysis.
A fresh and
original approach
to the material
that manifests a
developed and
striking approach
to the problem.
A fresh and original
approach to the
material manifesting
an outstanding
analysis of some
complexity.
As for 70-85: analysis
transcends the
expectation of the task
at this level.
The work is
poorly
structured and
below the
level required
at the current
level of the
course.
Inadequate
expression;
inadequate
presentation.
Writing
which is
sometimes
muddled or
incoherent.
Frequent
errors in
using
standard
English.
Presentation
does not
follow
guidelines.
Writing that
shows a basic
but limited
command of
expression.
Observes the
rules of
standard
English.
Presentation
in line with
guidelines.
Shows a sure
command of
expression.
Sound and
accurate prose
in standard
English.
Presentation
in line with
guidelines.
Coherently
organised in a
very readerfriendly way.
Flawlessly
expressed and
presented.
As for 70-4:
writing
distinguished by
nuance,
complexity, and
regard for the
reader.
As for 70-79:
writing distinguished
by a sense of
assurance associated
with a higher level.
As for 70-85:
writing distinguished
by a command of style
and exposition
associated with a
higher level.
COMMUNICATION & PRESENTATION
ANALYSIS
0-39
23
Marking Criteria, Performance Levels and Classification
Fail 0-39; Third Class Degree 40-49; Lower Second Class Degree 50-59; Upper Second Class Degree
60-69; First Class Degree 70-100
0-19 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is far below the standard required level of
your degree course.
20-39 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is below, but at the upper end is approaching,
the standard required at the current level of your degree course.
40-49 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of an acceptable standard at the current
level of your degree course.
50-59 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of a satisfactory to very satisfactory
standard at the current level of your degree course.
60-69 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of a good to very good standard at the
current level of your degree course.
70-74 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of an excellent standard at the current
level of your degree course.
75-79 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of an outstanding standard at the current
level of your degree course.
80-85 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of an exceptional standard at the current
level of your degree course.
86-100 A mark in this range is indicative that your work is of a standard that transcends the
expectation of the task at the current level of your degree course.
24
Teaching and Learning Methods
Our emphasis is on student participation, to encourage you to develop research and writing skills,
and to be self-confident and articulate both in writing and in speech. Because we want you to be an
active learner, much of our teaching/learning contact experience is the student-led seminar, in which
one or more students lead the discussion or give an oral presentation on an aspect of the week’s
topic. Through giving presentations, you develop the skills of selecting and organising points, and
explaining them orally to a group of peers, using examples and visual/auditory aids when appropriate.
Tips for Oral Presentations
In most cases, the topic of your presentation will be assigned to you, but you should consult with your
tutor for advice on how to focus the presentation in a way that is appropriate to the needs of the
seminar group. Your presentation should consist of an introduction (in which you tell the group what
your presentation is about and outline what is to follow), a development of your argument, with
references to the sources used, and a conclusion.
Organise the main points of your argument one after another and signpost the main points clearly.
Illustrate your points with examples whenever possible. Use appropriate language for the occasion.
[Do not start by saying "I'm really nervous, but here goes/ I'm not very good at this/ I haven't got a
lot to say."] Try not to speak too fast or too slowly and do not use over-long sentences. In your
conclusion you should emphasise the main points of your presentation to make sure your audience
has understood them.
Most modules are underpinned by lectures (usually one a week per module). Lectures are used (a) to
assist in the introduction of unfamiliar material, and (b) to assist in the assimilation of technically
demanding or conceptually difficult material.
Each module has a module-information document, specifying objectives, teaching methods, reading
requirements, presentation and essay/exercise requirements with deadlines, and assessment modes.
This document, published on Study Direct, gives you a sense of the shape and direction of the module,
allows you to focus your efforts and to manage your time, and enables the Library to anticipate
demand.
On most modules, tutors direct you to a wide range of reading, both to expose you to a variety of
perspectives, and to make the most effective use of the Library’s resources. In some cases, a single
textbook is specified, to be supplemented by other reading each week.
Module Evaluations (online)
At the end of every module, you will be asked to give your views, anonymously, on the teaching,
module content, organisation, etc., usually by questionnaire. Make sure you fill these in! The answers
are considered in School Committees and if they show that something is not quite right, we will do
our best to fix it.
25
First-Year Module Outlines
The following pages give brief outlines and learning outcomes for Year One modules in the
English Language & Linguistics degree courses. The information is only a summary and will
be supplemented by module-specific materials.
Q1029 Approaches to Meaning
Module Outline
In this module, exploration of word meaning introduces you to general linguistic concepts,
terminology, methods and resources, while developing skills in linguistic analysis, research and
argumentation. You will investigate meaning from psychological, social, historical, theoretical, and
descriptive perspectives, using a variety of research methods, including corpus methods. Questions
that may be considered include: what do you know when you know a word? Where is meaning
located (in the word, society, or the mind)? How many meanings can a word have? How do meanings
change? How do words/meanings differ among dialects and social situations? How do we learn
meanings? You will explore such questions in small, individual research projects.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, a successful student should be able to demonstrate:




An understanding of distinct levels of linguistic description (sound, meaning, grammar, etc.)
An understanding of basic concepts relating to words and meaning (lexicon,
semantics/pragmatics, reference, denotation/connotation, prototype, compositionality,
lexicalisation, lexicography, necessary & sufficient conditions, etc.)
An understanding of some of the applications of linguistic analysis (social, historical,
psychological, pedagogical, lexicographical)
Discipline-specific skills in linguistic definition and analysis, the use of linguistic reference
tools (dictionaries, corpora), finding linguistic resources in the library (beyond the reading
list), accessing linguistic data resources and collecting linguistic data, and representing
linguistic data in writing.
Weighting, timing, assessment
Credits 30. Level 1, Autumn term. Please refer to your Sussex Direct Study Pages for all
assessment details.
26
Q1073 Approaches to Pronunciation
Module Outline
The module introduces single-honours students to central themes relating to sound patterns and
pronunciation in languages, with a focus on English. Students will be given the opportunity to
acquire knowledge and understanding of the production of sounds, and to acquire the skills
necessary to describe, define and transcribe consonants, vowels and certain non-segmental
features such as stress and rhythm, using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Students are also
introduced to fundamental concepts related to contrast and meaning in sound structures and to
fundamental concepts in phonology that go beyond the description of individual sounds, such as
syllable structure, stress, and phonological processes.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, a successful student should be able to:




Describe and classify speech sounds; transcribe speech, using the International Phonetic
Alphabet (IPA).
Demonstrate factual knowledge of the sound pattern of English.
Demonstrate linguistic understanding of the fundamental principles of phonology.
Demonstrate an awareness of variation in accents and the skills to describe and analyse this
variation.
Weighting, timing and assessment
Credits 15. Level 1, Autumn term. Please refer to your Sussex Direct Study Pages for all
assessment details.
27
Q1074 Approaches to Grammar
Module Outline
This module introduces single-honours students to descriptive grammar. We will explore questions
such as: What do speakers know about the grammar of their language consciously and unconsciously?
How can we use speakers' knowledge to uncover the 'hidden' rules of language? What is the internal
structure of words and how can we go about grouping words into categories so that we can label
them and describe their general properties? How are words grouped together within a sentence?
What sorts of tests can we use to uncover and describe this internal structure of sentences? What
does it mean to describe something as 'subject' or 'object'? What kinds of grammatical differences
distinguish a statement from a question or a command? What's the difference between verbs like
must and love? How are complex noun phrases structured? How can we identify clauses inside
sentences, and what are they doing there? This module will provide students with an understanding
of the way in which words and sentences are constructed, and will equip them with the skills to break
sentences down into their constituent parts, to construct and test hypotheses, and to represent
sentence structure by means of tree diagrams. The module will be based on data from English and
other languages.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, a successful student should be able to:




Define and explain basic concepts in (a) morphological analysis (with particular reference to
word classes and the distinction between derivational and inflectional morphology) and (b)
syntactic analysis (with particular reference to constituent structure, phrase structure,
grammatical functions, clause types, and main and embedded clause structure).
Implement their knowledge of morphosyntax in the analysis of natural language data.
Compare and contrast Modern Standard English with other dialects and languages (with
particular reference to morphosyntactic properties) and demonstrate a critical approach to
the development of a descriptive grammar.
Form hypotheses, use evidence to test hypotheses, demonstrate research skills, produce a
coherent written argument, and respect deadlines.
Weighting, timing, assessment
Credits 30. Level 1, Spring term. Please refer to your Sussex Direct Study Pages for all assessment
details.
28
Q1076 Investigating Language in Context
Module Outline
This module is an introduction to the study of language beyond sentence and clause level in real-life
and fictional contexts. Following an introduction to the features of spoken language, the module
centres on Conversation Analysis, as the approach to discourse as structured interaction, and on the
discussion of some theoretical models for the investigation of contextualized exchanges, e.g. Grice's
Cooperative Principle and Politeness Theory. In this module the students are presented with the
methodological issues of language transcription and data collection. Aiming to introduce the notion
of variation in discourse, the module shows how in different contexts different conversational
patterns are produced (e.g. question-answer pairs in trials v. TV interviews) and how such factors as
gender, class or status can affect conversation. The module also offers a reflection on the difference
between authentic v. fictional or represented conversation in drama and film from a conversation
analysis perspective and encourages an insight into issues of characterisation and point of view
through discourse representation.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, a successful student should be able to:




Understand what verbal interaction as a social practice involves and demonstrate factual
knowledge of the different social and linguistic contexts which affect the nature of
language.
Identify core issues in the representation of interaction in fictional contexts.
Synthesise ideas from a number of sources and follow an argument.
Transcribe and analyse conversational data and formulate basic research hypotheses.
Weighting, timing, assessment
Credits: 15. Level 1, Spring term. Please refer to your Sussex Direct Study Pages for all assessment
details.
29
Q1083 Structure of English
Module Outline
This module introduces joint-honours students to descriptive English grammar and to central themes
relating to sound patterns and pronunciation in English. The first part of the module, which focuses
on grammar, provides students with an understanding of the way in which phrases and sentences are
constructed, and equips them with the skills to break sentences down into their constituent parts, to
describe the category and grammatical function of those parts, to distinguish clause types, to
distinguish the parts of the English verb group, to construct and test hypotheses, and to represent
sentence structure by means of tree diagrams. In the second part of the module, which focuses on
phonetics and phonology, students acquire knowledge and understanding of the production of
sounds, and the skills necessary to describe, define and transcribe consonants and vowels using the
International Phonetic Alphabet. Students are also introduced to fundamental concepts related to
contrast and meaning in sound structures, and to fundamental concepts in phonology that go beyond
the description of individual sounds, such as syllable structure, stress, and phonological processes
and the relationship between pronunciation and spelling.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module, a successful student should be able to:




Define and explain basic concepts in the syntactic analysis of English (with particular
reference to constituent structure, phrase structure, grammatical functions, clause types,
and main and embedded clause structure).
Parse natural language texts.
Describe and classify English speech sounds and transcribe speech using the International
Phonetic Alphabet.
Demonstrate linguistic understanding of the fundamental principles of English Phonology.
Weighting, timing, assessment
Credits: 15. Level 1, Spring term. Please refer to your Sussex Direct Study Pages for all assessment
details.
30
Second and Final Year Modules
The tables on pages 17-18 of this handbook show you which English Language & Linguistics modules
you will take in the second and final years of your degree course. Where you have a choice of options
in your second and final years you will be sent information and module outlines in advance to help
you make an informed choice regarding what options you would like to study.
You can view details of all the modules run by the School of English, as well as the structure of each
degree course, on the website: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english Or go to the link:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/internal/coursesandmodules/ugcourses
English Language & Linguistics Faculty Contact Details
English School Office: Arts B133, University of Sussex, Falmer BN1 9QN
Tel: (01273) 877303
E-mail: [email protected]
Name
Tel Number
Room
E-mail
Faculty members
Dr Charlotte Taylor – Head of
English Language & Linguistics
(01273) 873173
Arts B245
[email protected]
Dr Lynne Cahill
(01273) 678975
Arts B243
[email protected]
Dr Thomas Devlin
(01273) 876547
Arts B247
[email protected]
Dr Melanie Green
(01273) 877167
Arts B250
[email protected]
Dr Lynne Murphy
(01273) 678844
Arts B348
[email protected]
Dr Roberta Piazza
(01273) 872569
Arts B248
[email protected]
Dr Justyna Robinson
(01273) 873653
Arts B246
[email protected]
N.B. Office hours will be confirmed at the start of each term and will be noted on the faculty
member’s office door.
31
Download