Generic Risk Assessment - Epilepsy

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Risk Assessment Guidance
The assessor can assign values for the hazard severity (a) and likelihood of occurrence (b)
(taking into account the frequency and duration of exposure) on a scale of 1 to 5,
then multiply them together to give the rating band:
Hazard Severity
(eg discomfort, slight bruising, self-help recovery)
(eg small cut, abrasion, basic first aid need)
(eg strain, sprain, incapacitation > 3 days)
(eg fracture, hospitalisation >24 hrs, incapacitation >4 weeks)
(single or multiple)
Serious
Fatal
1
Moderate
Remote
Likelihood of Occurrence
1 – Remote
2 – Unlikely
3 – Possible
4 – Likely
5 – Very likely
(b)
(almost never)
(occurs rarely)
(could occur, but uncommon)
(recurrent but not frequent)
(occurs frequently)
The risk rating (high, medium or low) indicates the level of
response required to be taken when designing the action plan.
Minor
Trivial
1 – Trivial
2 – Minor
3 – Moderate
4 – Serious
5 – Fatal
(a)
2
3
4
5
4
6
8
10
Rating Bands (a x b)
LOW RISK
(1 – 8)
MEDIUM RISK
(9 - 12)
HIGH RISK
(15 - 25)
Continue, but
implement
additional
reasonably
practicable
controls where
possible and
monitor regularly
-STOP THE
ACTIVITY-
Unlikely
2
Possible
3
6
9
12
15
4
8
12
16
20
5
10
15
20
25
Likely
Very
likely
UOB Risk Assessment
Continue, but
review
periodically to
ensure controls
remain effective
Identify new
controls. Activity
must not
proceed until
risks are
reduced to a low
or medium level
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
U:\safety\Working off site\Risk Assessment\Risk assessments generic\risk assessments drafts\epilepsy_staff_v3_2013.docx
Risk Assessment Record
Risk Assessment of:
Assessor(s):
Date:
Generic risk assessment for
epileptic members of staff.
Overview of activity / location /
equipment / conditions being
assessed:
This assessment is limited to staff with epilepsy whose condition may affect or be made worse by their work. It
is likely that the University population includes about 180 people with epilepsy. However, in the majority of
cases the condition is likely well controlled and will never be a work issue.
This assessment provides a starting point for completing a risk assessment for activities that involve a Member
of staff with epilepsy. The assessment includes prompts for line managers to gather further information to aid
the assessment and decision making process.
As each person will likely experience epileptic seizures in a unique way, each case must be considered
individually and a personalised assessment made. Some of the issues identified may be applicable only rarely
– the photo-epileptic section being a prime example. Issues that are not relevant to the final personalised
assessment should, after enquires and consideration, be deleted.
Generic or specific
assessment?
Generic risk assessment
UOB Risk Assessment
Context of assessment
Generic assessment / Starting point for a personalised assessment
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
PREAMBLE – GENERAL PRINCIPLES
For persons whose medical condition has a ‘substantial’ and
‘long-term’ negative effect on their ability to do normal daily
activities, their disability must be considered in the light of the
Equalities Act 2010 and the University has a legal duty to
make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to allow them to enter or
maintain employment. Further information about this can be
obtained from the HR Manager for your department.
Member of staff
with epilepsy
About 1 in 100 people have epilepsy. This equates to about
180 people with epilepsy in the University population.
SEIZURE EFFECTS
Each person affected will experience epilepsy in a way that is
unique to him or her. The seizures may manifest in different
ways, depending on the area of the brain affected.
1A
FOCAL SEIZURES (also called partial or local seizures).
The epileptic activity is in just part of the brain. The member
of staff may remain alert during the seizure or may not be
aware of what is happening. The member of staff may
experience uncontrolled movements or unusual sensations
and feelings. Onlookers may not be aware that they are
having a seizure. Focal seizures can escalate to generalised
seizures.
GENERALISED SEIZURES. The epileptic activity involves
large sections of the brain. The member of staff will probably
lose consciousness, may stiffen or jerk and may fall down.
Sometimes these types of seizure can be extremely brief.
UOB Risk Assessment
Member of staff
with epilepsy
Persons who
may be affected
by work
performed by
person with
epilepsey
Existing controls & measures
Employees should report if
they have epileptic condition
that may affect their work. The
purpose of reporting is to
enable the University to:
 Make a risk assessment;
 Make reasonable
adjustments; and

Make a personalised care
plan.
Employees should report
epileptic conditions / changes
in their condition to their line
managers.
If employees have uncontrolled
seizures, then some activities
will not be suitable for them on
health & safety grounds.
Examples include:





Work at height with
unprotected falls (eg ladder
work);
Work with high voltage
electricity or live electrical
work;
Work on or near moving
vehicles;
Work with unguarded fires,
ovens or hot plates; and
Work at isolated locations.
If seizures are well controlled /
activities are less hazardous, it
will be a matter of judgement
what precautions are needed.
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to take further action



Complete a personalised risk
assessment;
Identify and implement any
reasonable adjustments needed for
the workplace or job; and
Identify and implement a
personalised care plan.
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:








Do you have seizures?
What type of seizures do you
have?
How often do you have seizures?
What usually happens when you
have a seizure?
How long does it usually take you
to recover from a seizure?
What time of day do you usually
have seizures?
Do you get a warning before a
seizure starts?
Is there any part of your workplace
or job that concerns you?
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
SEIZURE EFFECTS
1B
Seizures may manifest in different ways. In some instances,
people nearby may not even realise that the member of staff
is having a seizure. In other instances, the effects may be
obvious and distressing.
Some staff members may be stressed by others suffering
seizures or the threat that they might suffer a seizure. Some
staff members may have difficulty coping with this. This may
be detrimental to the everyone. Difficulties arising from this
may increase seizure risks.
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS
2
Most people with epilepsy have a ‘seizure threshold’ - the
point at which the brain’s natural resistance to seizures is
passed, triggering a seizure. People with a low threshold
have frequent seizures, whereas people with a high threshold
experience less frequent seizures and triggers will have less
effect on them. Many people with epilepsy find certain
circumstances or substances can trigger a seizure. Common
triggers are:
 Stress;
 Lack of sleep;
 Alcohol consumption, particularly binge drinking and
during a hangover;
 Illegal drugs and some pharmaceuticals, especially
stimulants (amphetamines, cocaine, etc) and opiates
(heroin, methadone, codeine, etc);
 Illness or health conditions that cause a fever; and
 Flashing or flickering lights (photo-epilepsy).
Some women may be more prone to seizures just around the
time of their period.
Common epilepsy triggers that are within the control of the
University are considered below.
UOB Risk Assessment
Member of staff
with epilepsy
Persons
working in the
vicinity
Dependent upon the
personalised assessment
findings, consider providing
information, instruction &
training to staff & any other
support as might be needed.
Information and support can be
accessed via the HR web site.

Member of staff
with epilepsy

Most of the common
triggers are outside the
control of the University (eg
alcohol consumption,
illegal drugs, etc).
University to make
reasonable adjustments to
workplace and job to
remove or reduce known
triggers within its control.
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:



Are there any specific
circumstances or substances that
trigger your seizures?
Is there any part of your workplace
or job that exposes you to these
triggers?
What adjustments need to be
made to the workplace to eliminate
or control triggers?
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
2A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - STRESS &
EPILEPSY
Stress does not cause epilepsy, but it can causes changes to
the way nerve cells in the brain respond, making a seizure
more likely.
Stress can cause changes in lifestyle that make a seizure
more likely. For instance, stress may cause someone to miss
anti-epileptic mediations or suffer sleep disturbances.
Additionally, worrying about seizures can add to stress. This
can become a vicious circle, with stress causing seizures and
the seizures causing more stress.
A

Member of staff
with epilepsy
See University “Stress
Management” policy and
associated guidance - the
Universities arrangements
for assessing and
managing stress.



If the stress of a new job, or
significant changes to your role, is
an issue, are temporary
adjustments needed for the start
period?
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:


SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - LACK OF SLEEP
& EPILEPSY
2A Lack of sleep or irregular sleep patterns can lower
thresholds, making a seizure more likely. Irregular sleep
patterns may disturb anti-epileptic mediations regimes,
making a seizure more likely.

Member of staff
with epilepsy
University to make
reasonable adjustments to
workplace and job to allow
sufficient sleep / avoid
sleep disturbance.
Is stress a known trigger of your
seizures?
Is a stress assessment needed?


Is lack of sleep a known trigger of
your seizures?
Does your shift pattern interfere
with any anti-epileptic medication
regime?
Does your shift pattern interfere
with normal sleeping patterns?
Are there any disturbances in your
work-life balance that interferes
with sleep patterns (eg new baby,
change in travel arrangements,
etc)?
NOTE: An additional assessment may
be needed if the employee is involved
in any occasional activity that may
disturb normal sleep patterns eg
attendance on field trips, travelling for
business, being on call, etc.
UOB Risk Assessment
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
3
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - CEILING FANS
3A
A light seen through a fast-rotating ceiling fan may trigger a
seizure.
UOB Risk Assessment
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY
Photosensitive epilepsy is a type of epilepsy, in which all or
most seizures are triggered by flashing or flickering light. The
seizure will usually happen at the time or shortly after
exposure. The seizure may be focal or generalised.
The instance of photo epilepsy in the general population is
about 3 in 10,000. There are likely to be about 2 members of
the University population who are photo-epileptic.
Specific common photo-epilepsy triggers are considered
below.
A

Members of
staff with photoepilepsy
Members of
staff with photoepilepsy


University to make
reasonable adjustments to
workplace and job to
remove or reduce known
triggers within its control.


Do you suffer from photosensitive
epilepsy?
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might trigger
a photo epileptic seizure?
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might
increase the risk of having a photo
epileptic seizure?
If ceiling fans are installed,
they must be slow rotating.
(Any flickering should be
<=4Hz)
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - IT EQUIPMENT
3B
Flashing or flickering lights on the screen may trigger
seizures.
Rapidly changing images on the screen may trigger seizures.
Members of
staff with photoepilepsy
Contrasting or moving patterns on the screen may trigger
seizures
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - LIGHTING
3C
Fluorescent strip lighting and bulbs may trigger seizures if
they flicker because they are faulty.
UOB Risk Assessment
Members of
staff with photoepilepsy
Existing controls & measures
COMPUTER SCREENS
 Make sure the workroom is
well lit and provide a desk
lamp near to the screen (to
lessen high contrast
patterns).
 If possible, use a LCD or
Plasma screen. If you use
a CRT screen make sure
that the refresh rate is set
to >70 Hz.
 Most business applications
(eg word processing) are
unlikely to generate
flashing lights or high
contrast patterns.
INTERACTIVE
WHITEBOARDS
 Interactive whiteboards are
unlikely to cause problems
unless they are used to
project flashing or flickering
lights or contrasting
patterns
 Faulty lighting to be
reported and replaced in
the work area.
 Whilst awaiting repair of
the light, persons with
photo-epilepsy should work
elsewhere.
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:


Is using a computer screen with
business applications likely to
trigger an epileptic seizure?
Is using an interactive white board
with business applications likely to
trigger an epileptic seizure?
Photo epileptics who experience any
discomfort, such as dizziness, blurred
vision, loss of awareness, or muscle
twitching while using IT equipment
should stop looking at the screen
immediately and leave the area. The
problem should be reported to the
manager and the risk assessment
updated accordingly.
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
ENTERTAINMENT VENUES
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - STROBE LIGHTING
Strobe lights in places such as nightclubs may trigger
3D seizures.
Members of
staff with photoepilepsy
Strobe lights used during the course of research may trigger
seizures.
Follow HSE guidelines1 and
any conditions imposed by
Local Authority Licensing
Authority. In brief:
 Warning at entrance
 Flicker rates =< 4Hz
 Synchronised flashing
 Mount above head height
 Diffuse strobe light
 Not in corridors / stairs
 Limit period of use
RESEARCH VENUES
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:



Follow HSE guidelines where
possible. Where not, produce a
separate assessment to control
use and exposure.
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - HIGH CONTRAST
PATTERNS
3E
Some high contrast or moving patterns can trigger seizures in
some people. Some examples would be:




1
Black and white stripes;
Some patterned materials and wallpaper;
Large areas of floor and ceiling tiles with high contrast
lines; and
Looking down a moving escalator.
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might trigger
a photo epileptic seizure?
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might
increase the risk of having a photo
epileptic seizure?
What measures need to be taken
to eliminate triggers or control
exposure?

Members of
staff with photoepilepsy


Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might trigger
a photo epileptic seizure?
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might
increase the risk of having a photo
epileptic seizure?
What measures need to be taken
to eliminate triggers or control
exposure?
The Event Safety Guide. A guide to health, safety and welfare at music and similar events. HSG195. See Chapter 17 special effects, fireworks and pyrotechnics, paragraphs
614-616
UOB Risk Assessment
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS PHOTOSENSITIVE EPILEPSY - SUNLIGHT EFFECTS
3F
Sunlight alone is unlikely to trigger photosensitivity. However,
sunlight interacting with the workplace can create patterns or
flickering light sources that can trigger a seizure. Examples
might be:
 Sunlight coming through slatted blinds
 Sunlight coming through railings as you walk past them

Members of
staff with photoepilepsy

SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - ANTI-EPILEPTIC
MEDICATIONS (AED) - MAINTAINING REGIME
4
The Member of staff with epilepsy may take AED; these will
not cure epilepsy, but can reduce or prevent seizures.
Generally, AED are taken one – three times per day. It is
important that AED are taken as prescribed as missing a
dose can sometimes trigger a seizure.
Some users of AED may have regular blood tests at their
Doctors to monitor AED levels or other indicators.
UOB Risk Assessment

Member of staff
with epilepsy on
AED regime
University to make reasonable
adjustments to workplace and
job to permit AED regime to be
adhered too. This includes:
 Ensuring the person has
sufficient time to adhere to
AED regime during the
working day;
 Ensuring the persons
working patterns are
conducive to adhering to
the AED regime; and
 Ensuring that the person
can attend AED monitoring
session as required.
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might trigger
a photo epileptic seizure?
Is there anything within your
workplace or job that might
increase the risk of having a photo
epileptic seizure?
What measures need to be taken
to eliminate triggers or control
exposure?
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:


Are you able to maintain your AED
regime with your current working
arrangements?
What measures need to be taken
to enable you to maintain your
current AED regime?
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - ANTI-EPILEPTIC
MEDICATIONS (AED) - CHANGING REGIME
4A
A doctor may occasionally suggest a different dosage or
dosing pattern to improve seizure control or reduce side
effects.
For medical reasons, the member of staff may have to switch
from one AED to another (eg side effects, change in epilepsy,
etc). The staff member may be more prone to seizures during
the transition. Changing regime may also cause side effects,
although these may reduce or disappear with time.
Member of staff
with epilepsy on
AED regime
Existing controls & measures
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Employees should report if
they are changing their AED
regime / AED medication if this
is may affect their work. The
purpose of reporting is to
enable the University to:
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:




Update the health & safety
risk assessment;
Update any reasonable
adjustments are made; and
Update the personalised
care plan.

Are temporary adjustments needed
for the transition period?
Are permanent adjustments
needed for the new AED regime?
See 4 for instance
Employees should report
changes to their line manager.
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - ANTI-EPILEPTIC
MEDICATIONS (AED) -INTERACTION WITH OTHER
DRUGS
Some medications may increase the seizure risk. These
4B medicines include many of the antidepressants, some types
of anti-histamine, some antibiotics and some anti-malarial
treatment. The increased risk may arise because the
medications interact with AED or they may lower the seizure
threshold.
Member of staff
with epilepsy on
AED regime
This will normally be outside
the control of the University.
The interaction of some medications
with the AED / seizure threshold may
cause problems for some activities (eg
travelling on a field trip to an area
where malaria is prevalent). Medical
advice will be required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - ANTI-EPILEPTIC
MEDICATIONS (AED) - SIDE EFFECTS
Some AED may interfere with memory functioning as they
4C affect the speed at which the brain can process information.
This may be worse during changes between different AED
regimes.
The risk of side effects will depend on a number of things,
including the AED taken and any other medications.
UOB Risk Assessment

Member of staff
with epilepsy on
AED regime
How can information and
instructions be presented to be of
most use?
 If you suffer from AED side effects,
what adjustments need to be made
to your workplace or job to enable
you to cope with them?
The Epilepsy Action pamphlet Memory
and epilepsy presents some strategies
for coping with this aspect of epilepsy.
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
5
6
Enabling and assisting a person with learning difficulties can
be stressful if the enabler/assistant/line manager has not
been trained in how to do it, or is unable to understand or
carry out the training
Without support and enabling by knowledgeable colleagues,
a person with epilepsy and a learning difficulty might find it
disadvantageous to their employment.
UOB Risk Assessment
A
x
B
Additional controls required


Member of staff
with epilepsy
with VNS device

Magnetic fields (eg around an NMR unit) may interfere with
the VNS unit.
LEARNING DIFFICULTIES
Around one in every four people with epilepsy has learning
difficulties. Therefore, of the potential 180 employees with
epilepsy, 45 may have some form of learning difficulty.
B
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:
SEIZURE THRESHOLDS & TRIGGERS - ANTI-EPILEPTIC
TREATMENT – VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION
Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for epilepsy
where a small device is implanted under the skin, near the
collarbone. This device stimulates the vagus nerve at regular
intervals during the day, helping to prevent seizures.
A

Member of staff
with epilepsy
Person
supervising /
managing
member of staff
with epilepsy
Dependent upon the
personalised assessment
findings, consider providing
information, instruction &
training to staff & any other
support as might be needed.
Information and support can be
accessed via the HR web site.
Do you use a VNS unit?
What advice have you been given
regarding working in or around
strong magnetic fields?
Does your VNS trigger
automatically?
Should we trigger your VNS
manually if you have a seizure?
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:

How can information and
instructions be presented to be of
most use?
The Epilepsy Action pamphlet Memory
and epilepsy presents some strategies
for coping with this aspect of epilepsy
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
PROVISION OF FIRST AID - FOCAL SEIZURES
7A
Member of staff may suffer a focal seizure and require first
aid assistance.
Likely symptoms are: The person is not aware of their
surroundings or of what they are doing, this may manifest as
 Plucking at their clothes
 Smacking their lips
 Swallowing repeatedly
 Wandering around
UOB Risk Assessment
Member of staff
with epilepsy
First aid
providers
Colleagues in
the vicinity.
Existing controls & measures
Provide first aid treatment as
recommended – see first aid
information sheet
 Guide the person away
from danger
 Stay with the person until
recovery is complete
 Be calmly reassuring
 Explain anything that they
have missed
During a seizure do not
 Restrain the person
 Act in a way that could
frighten them (such as
shouting or being overly
forceful)
 Assume the person is
aware of what is happening
or what has happened
 Give them anything to eat
or drink until they are fully
recovered
 Attempt to bring them
around
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
First Aid at Work qualified first aiders
are unlikely to be routinely trained in
epilepsy awareness. It is advisable for
the person with epilepsy to contact
their local first aiders to make them
aware of possible need for action.
(Managers can do this on behalf of a
staff member if they so wish).
The person’s regular work colleagues
would also benefit from having
information about what to do in case of
a seizure.
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
PROVISION OF FIRST AID - GENERALISED SEIZURES
7B
Member of staff may suffer a generalised seizure and require
first aid assistance.
The member of staff will probably lose consciousness, may
stiffen or jerk and may fall down. Sometimes these types of
seizure can be extremely brief.
UOB Risk Assessment
Persons affected
Member of staff
with epilepsy
First aid
providers
Colleagues in
the vicinity.
Existing controls & measures
Provide first aid treatment as
recommended – see first aid
information sheet
 Protect the person from
injury (remove harmful
objects from nearby etc)
 Cushion their head
 Aid breathing by placing
them in the recovery
position when the seizure
has finished
 Stay with them until
recovery is complete
 Be calm and reassuring
During a seizure do not
 Restrain the persons
movements
 Put anything in their mouth
 Try to move them unless
they are in imminent
danger
 Give them anything to eat
or drink until they are fully
recovered
 Attempt to bring them
around
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
First Aid at Work qualified first aiders
are unlikely to be routinely trained in
epilepsy awareness. It is advisable for
the person with epilepsy to contact
their local first aiders to make them
aware of possible need for action.
(Managers can do this on behalf of a
staff member if they so wish).
The person’s regular work colleagues
would also benefit from having
information about what to do in case of
a seizure.
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
#
Hazard(s) identified
Persons affected
Existing controls & measures
CONTACT SECURITY TO
SUMMON AMBULANCE
At the University, Security
are responsible for
requesting an ambulance
and managing its arrival.
PROVISION OF ASSISTANCE AFTER A SEIZURE – CARE
PLAN
7C
The University may need to summon an ambulance following
a seizure. To prevent unnecessary emergency calls, a care
plan should be formulated that outlines normal seizure
patterns and what response should be made.
Note that some persons with epilepsy may become
incontinent during a seizure. The care plan should address
any need for providing privacy during recovery.
Member of staff
with epilepsy
Generally, an ambulance will
be summoned if:


First aid
providers
Colleagues in
the vicinity
Security Officers


Persons first seizure;
Seizure continues for more
than five minutes;
One seizure follows
another without the person
regaining consciousness;
or
The person is injured
during the seizure.
PERSONALISED RESPONSE
Personalised care plans to be
identified between the epileptic
staff member and manager.
A
B
A
x
B
Additional controls required
Manager to make further enquires.
Possible avenues for investigation are:

What happens when the employee
has a seizure?
 What assistance might be needed
during a seizure?
 What assistance might be needed
after a seizure?
 Will you need privacy after a
seizure?
Seizures are usually the same for a
person each time they happen.
If recovery time is brief, the person may
just need a quiet place to rest before
returning to work. Decide in advance a
suitable resting place(s).
If recovery is lengthy and the person
needs to go home, decide how they will
get there. Bear in mind that some
people may be dazed and confused
after a seizure and may not be safe to
travel alone.
Information sources consulted:
Epilepsy Action publications available from www.epilepsy.org.uk
Assessor signature:
UOB Risk Assessment
Print name:
Review date:
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
Risk Assessment Action Plan
Action Plan in respect of:
Ref
no.
Prepared by:
Action to be taken, incl. Cost
Responsible manager’s signature:
Print name:
UOB Risk Assessment
By whom
Target
date
Review
date
Outcome at review date
Responsible manager’s signature:
Date:
Print name:
Date
University Health, Safety & Environment Unit
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