The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Web Quest Carmelina Buffa

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The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Web Quest
Carmelina Buffa
Webquest title: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Web Quest
Grade level: 6
Subject Area: English Language Arts
INTRODUCTION
Sets the stage and provides some background information on the topic. Explain the real-life or
imaginative scenario and problem.
- Disney, 2005
Imagine that you are able to travel in time. You have been transported to London, England during World
War II. Can you imagine what your life would be like as a child in London during World War II? Now,
imagine that you are a character in the book The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
The four main characters, Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie were sent away from their parents
in London to live in an old country house with the professor during World War II. They soon discover the
land of Narnia where the White Witch has made it always winter and never Christmas. The Pevensie
children will go on an adventure to battle the White Witch and restore all that is good to Narnia.
Have you ever wondered where authors get their ideas for their books? Are there any connections
between the life of the author of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis, and life in London,
England during World War II?
TASK
Explains the research task and the graded assignment task.
atschool.eduweb.co.uk
1. Imagine that you were living in London England during World War II. Write a diary or journal
describing what your life was like, what your experiences were, and what your thoughts and
feelings would have been. You must include at least three entries. Use the links listed below to
help collect information about that particular time period.
2. Write a biography about C.S. Lewis. Please utilize the links below for research. Explain how the
author’s personal life is reflected in the novel. The biography should be between 1-2 pages typed
using one inch margins and size 12 Times New Roman font in MLA style format.
Use these links for activity #1: (Please conduct additional research utilizing other websites, if necessary)
Children and World War II
Images of London during WWII
Food Rationing During WWII
World War II London Blitz Video
Evacuation of Children
Use these links for activity #2: (Please conduct additional research utilizing other websites, if necessary)
C.S. Lewis Biography
C.S. Lewis - Biography Online
C.S. Lewis Web Site
RESEARCH RESOURCES
Lists the Internet web sites needed to complete the research task.
- Deborah Maze (Harper Collins, 2004)
Use these links for activity #1: (Please conduct additional research utilizing other websites, if necessary)
Children and World War II
Images of London during WWII
Food Rationing During WWII
World War II London Blitz Video
Evacuation of Children
Use these links for activity #2: (Please conduct additional research utilizing other websites, if necessary)
C.S. Lewis Biography
C.S. Lewis - Biography Online
C.S. Lewis Web Site
Some questions you may want to think about:
* What makes C.S. Lewis special or interesting?
* What kind of effect did his life have on his writing or stories?
* What are the adjectives you would most use to describe the C.S. Lewis?
* What examples from his life illustrate those qualities in the novel, The Lion, the Witch, and the
Wardrobe?
* What events shaped or changed his life?
* Did he overcome any obstacles?
PROCESS
Provides step-by-step instructions for how to do the research and assignment tasks.
en.wikipedia.org
C. S. Lewis as a boy in Belfast, Ireland, prior to his mother's death in 1908.
cslewis.com (Harper Collins, 2008)
Activity #1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Please click on the Children and World War II link to begin activity #1.
Take notes as you read about the children and why they were evacuated.
Click on the Images of London during WWII link.
Try to imagine yourself there and jot down things that you see.
Click on the Food Rationing During WWII link.
Write down information about you and your family members. Who would receive what and how
often?
7. Click on the World War II London Blitz Video and the Evacuation of Children videos.
8. Watch these short YouTube videos and envision yourself during this time. What would you be
feeling and/or thinking? Write down your thoughts. Why were children evacuated?
9. Utilize your notes to create a diary/journal (with at least 3 entries) describing what your life was
like, what your experiences were, and what your thoughts and feelings would have been had you
lived as a child during World War II.
Activity #2
Please click on the links C.S. Lewis Biography, C.S. Lewis - Biography Online, C.S. Lewis Web Site, to
collect all necessary information for your biography. Please take notes from all of the links you utilize.
Please consider these questions as you gather information:
* What makes him special or interesting?
* What kind of effect did his life have on his writing or stories?
* What are the adjectives you would most use to describe the C.S. Lewis?
* What examples from his life illustrate those qualities in the novel, The Lion, the Witch, and the
Wardrobe?
* What events shaped or changed his life?
* Did he overcome any obstacles?
EVALUATION RUBRIC
Lists performance-based criteria for grading.
Rubric for Activity #1:
Diary/Journal Entries
CATEGORY
Creativity
4
The entries
contain many
creative details
and/or descriptions
that contribute to
the piece. The
author has really
used his/her
imagination.
3
The entries
contain a few
creative details
and/or descriptions
that contribute to
the piece. The
author has used
his/her
imagination.
Accuracy of
Facts
All facts presented
in the entries are
accurate.
Almost all facts
presented in the
entries are
accurate.
Requirements
All of the written
requirements (# of
entries, format,
etc.) were met.
Almost all (about
90%) the written
requirements were
met.
Spelling and
Punctuation
There are no
spelling or
punctuation errors
in the final draft.
The setting and
names that the
author used are
spelled
consistently
throughout.
The final draft of
the entries is
readable, clean,
neat and
attractive. It is free
of erasures and
crossed-out words.
It looks like the
author took great
pride in it.
There is one
spelling or
punctuation error
in the final draft.
Neatness
The final draft of
the entries is
readable, neat and
attractive. It may
have one or two
erasures, but they
are not distracting.
It looks like the
author took some
pride in it.
2
The entries
contain a few
creative details
and/or
descriptions, but
they distract from
the story. The
author has tried to
use his/her
imagination.
Most facts
presented in the
entries are
accurate (at least
70%).
Most (about 75%)
of the written
requirements were
met, but several
were not.
There are 2-3
spelling and
punctuation errors
in the final draft.
1
There is little
evidence of
creativity in the
entries. The author
does not seem to
have used much
imagination.
The final draft of
the entries is
readable and
some of the pages
are attractive. It
looks like parts of
it might have been
done in a hurry.
The final draft is
not neat or
attractive. It looks
like the student
just wanted to get
it done and didn't
care what it looked
like.
There are several
factual errors in
the entries.
Many
requirements were
not met.
The final draft has
more than 3
spelling and
punctuation errors.
Disney
Rubric for Activity #2:
Research Report: C.S. Lewis Biography
CATEGORY
4
Organization
Information is very
organized with
well-constructed
paragraphs and
subheadings
Information clearly
relates to the main
topic. It includes
several supporting
details and/or
examples
Successfully uses
suggested Internet
links to find
information and
navigates within
these sites easily
without assistance
Information is
organized with
well-constructed
paragraphs
Information is
organized, but
paragraphs are not
well-constructed
The information
appears to be
disorganized
Information clearly
relates to the main
topic. It provides 12 supporting
details and/or
examples
Usually able to use
suggested Internet
links to find
information and
navigates within
these sites easily
without assistance
Information clearly
relates to the main
topic. No details
and/or examples
are given
Information has
little or nothing to
do with the main
topic
Needs assistance
or supervision to
use suggested
Internet links
and/or to navigate
within these sites
Sources
All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented in the
desired format
Mechanics
No grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors
All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented, but a
few are not in the
desired format
Almost no
grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors
Occasionally able
to use suggested
Internet links to
find information
and navigates
within these sites
easily without
assistance
All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented, but
many are not in
the desired format
A few
grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors.
Quality of
Information
Internet Use
3
2
1
Some sources are
not accurately
documented
Many grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation errors
CONCLUSION
Brings closure to the Web Quest by providing questions for reflection on what was learned, and/or
providing additional web links for further study and research.
Movie City News, 2005
You have made your way back to the current year, and you have returned safely. Did you take notes
while you were there? Did you see anything interesting?
What would your life have been like in London during World War II? Do you think that an author’s life
influences his/her works?
Your journey does not have to end just yet.
Click on this link to play a game: Narnia Game - Prince Caspian or Narnia Games
Click here to: Talking with Mr. Tumnus
Click this link for WWII Interactive Games (then click on games)
TEACHER INTRODUCTION
This Web Quest was created to allow students to engage in the novel The Lion, the Witch, and the
Wardrobe from both a historical and a literary approach. The Web Quest will supplement the class
lessons and activities that are based on the sections of the novel.
Students navigate the Internet, read critically and synthesize information, write a biography, and create a
diary/journal utilizing both a historical and literal approach. The Web Quest provides supplemental
lessons for The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe to enhance the students’ development.
STANDARDS
Standards for New Jersey:
21st Century Skills
In grades 5-8, students expand their capacity to use operations and applications, apply information-literacy skills,
and select the appropriate tools and resources to accomplish a variety of tasks, as they develop digital citizenship. As
students participate in online learning communities, collaborating in the design of products that address local and
global issues across the curriculum, they build understanding of the perspectives of learners from other countries.
Students at this level can apply the design process in the development of products; understand impact constraints,
trade-offs, and resource selection; and solve a design challenge and/or build a prototype using the design process.
Students can explain why human-designed systems, products, and environments need to be monitored, maintained,
and improved, and they recognize the interdependence of subsystems as parts of a system.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular
details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3 Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well
as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall
structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.6 Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.7 Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to
or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when
reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9 Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems;
historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details;
provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall
structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed
in the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.7 Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1a Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1b Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and
demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and
reasons.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1d Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2a Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as
definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g.,
charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2b Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2c Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the
topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2e Establish and maintain a formal style.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3a Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator
and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3c Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal
shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3d Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to
convey experiences and events.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3e Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in
standards 1–3 above.)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to
interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of
three pages in a single sitting.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and
refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the
credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and
providing basic bibliographic information for sources.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and
audiences.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.1e Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others' writing and
speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.2a Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical
elements.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.2b Spell correctly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.3a Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.*
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.3b Maintain consistency in style and tone.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.4c Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and
digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
LEARNERS
The intended learners of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Web Quest are grade 6 English
Language Arts students.
TEACHER RESOURCES
* The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis (one copy per student)
* Computers with Internet access
* State of New Jersey Department of Education website for Standards
TEACHER PROCESS
Students should have individual access to computers with Internet access. If this is not feasible, students
may work in groups and collaborate to gather information. Teachers may wish to assign the Web Quest
in pairs or groups for ELL learners or for differentiated instruction.
CREDITS
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis
Thank you to all those who provided resources or help.
Thank you to all of the creators of the websites depicting World War II, The Lion, the Witch, and the
Wardrobe, and/or C.S. Lewis.
Thank you to the technology department who helped the students to review the basic functions necessary
to complete their assignments.
Images are from wikepedia.com, Disney.com, cslewis.com, and moviecitynews.com.
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