Independent and Supplementary Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives

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School of Health and Social Care
Independent and Supplementary Prescribing for
Nurses and Midwives
PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION/ UNIT
DIRECTORY
Document date: May 2010
© 2010 Bournemouth University
Document date: May 2010
Circulation: General
Bournemouth University undertakes to encourage the recognition, protection and exploitation
of intellectual property rights generated by participants in this programme, to the benefit, as
appropriate, of students, staff, industrial/other third parties/partners and the university.
School of Health and Social Care
Bournemouth University
Poole
Dorset
BH12 5BB
CONTENTS
BASIC PROGRAMME DATA .................................................................................... 2
AIMS OF THE DOCUMENT ...................................................................................... 3
ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL CONTEXTS ...................................................... 3
AIM OF THE PROGRAMME ..................................................................................... 3
INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES ....................................................................... 4
LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES AND METHODS .................................. 4
ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES AND METHODS ....................................................... 5
WORK-BASED LEARNING (WBL) / PLACEMENTS ELEMENTS ............................. 6
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE ................................................................................... 6
ADMISSION REGULATIONS .................................................................................... 7
ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS ............................................................................... 8
PROGRAMME PROFILE .......................................................................................... 9
UNIT SPECIFICATION ........................................................................................... 10
APPENDIX: NMC PRESCRIBING COMPETENCIES ............................................. 17
1
BASIC PROGRAMME DATA
Originating institution(s)
Bournemouth University
Award(s) and programme title(s)
Independent and Supplementary
Prescribing
Meets the Nursing and Midwifery
Council Standards of proficiency for
Nurse and Midwife Prescribers
Nursing and Midwifery Council validate
the programme
External Reference Points
Professional Body Links
Place of Delivery
Mode of Delivery
Bournemouth University and University
College Yeovil
Part time
Credit structure
40 level H credits
(ECTS (European Credit Transfer
Scheme) equivalent credit values
shown in brackets)
20 ECTS credits
Duration of programme
Minimum 6 months
Maximum 12 months
Date of original approval
Date of first intake
September 2003 (reviewed September
2004 and 2007)
September 2010
Initial target intake
25 x 4 intakes per year
Placements
Within employment
Version number of this document: 4
This Programme Specification was approved in May 2010 following revalidation by
Academic Standards Committee. It takes effect from September 2010 and applies to
all new enrolments.
2
AIMS OF THE DOCUMENT
The aims of this document are to:

Define the structure of the Independent and Supplementary Prescribing
programme
Identify programme learning outcomes
Articulate the regulations governing this programme


ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL CONTEXTS
The Independent and Supplementary Prescribing programme consists of a single 40credit unit. It has been developed within the Nursing and Midwifery Council
Standards of Proficiency for Nurse and Midwife Prescribers 2006. The focus of the
unit is on developing knowledge and skills in prescribing
This programme consists of a single 40 credit unit. The intended learning outcomes
are set out later in this document.
The Programme is distinctive because:

It has been developed in close collaboration with the Department of Health
and has been designed to meet the needs of the workforce.

It meets the requirements set by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

The programme places work based learning at its core to ensure the
provision of time efficient, relevant education for busy professionals.

It aims to further develop professional critical reflective practice to provide a
sound preparation for non medical prescribing practice.
There are currently no QAA subject benchmarks statements for prescribing
AIM OF THE PROGRAMME
To prepare nurses and midwives to prescribe safely, appropriately and cost
effectively as an independent/supplementary prescriber. In doing so students will be
required to evaluate the evidence underpinning the practice of nurse prescribing,
critically reflect upon their level of competency in respect of nurse prescribing and
develop an individual programme of learning in practice.
3
INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Having completed this programme, the student is expected to demonstrate the ability
to:
1. assess and consult with patients/clients, clients, parents and carers;
2. undertake a thorough history, including medication history and current
medication (including over the counter, alternative and complementary health
therapies)to inform diagnosis;
3. understand and apply the relevant legislation to the practice of nurse/midwife
prescribing, including the prescribing of unlicensed medication and
prescribing ‘off label’;
4. critically appraise sources of information/advice and decision making
frameworks in prescribing practice;
5. critically debate the influences that effect prescribing practice and
demonstrate understanding by managing prescribing practice in an ethical
way;
6. understand and apply knowledge of drug actions in prescribing practice;
7. demonstrate an understanding of the roles and relationships of others
involved in prescribing, supplying and administering medicines;
8. prescribe safely, appropriately and cost effectively;
9. practise within a framework of professional accountability and responsibility;
10. develop clinical management plans within legislative framework;
11. demonstrate the recognition of the unique implications and developmental
context of the anatomical and physiological differences between neonates,
children and young people
12. developed numeracy skills appropriate to be able to prescribe safely in own
area of practice.
The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) have stipulated these outcomes
LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES AND METHODS
Learning & Teaching Methods (Taught Programme)
The taught indicative content will normally be delivered over 26 days in the University
plus 12 days of supervised clinical practice. Attendance for the taught days is
mandatory. Learning and teaching will take place in both the classroom and in
practice. Lectures of factual material will be followed by question and answer
sessions including group discussion and analysis of case examples. The programme
is supported by materials available on the University’s virtual learning environment
myBU
Teaching and Learning Methods (Blended Programme)
The blended programme will normally consist of 8 taught days and the equivalent of
10 days open learning utilising web based and electronic open learning material. The
taught days will focus on key lectures and discussion and feedback from open
learning activity. Attendance at the taught days is mandatory. Each student is
provided with a CD Rom which includes open learning of the professional practice of
4
prescribing, links to materials provided by the national Prescribing Centre and
revision activities on path physiology. Students also have access to all of the
programme material via myBU.
All students will have a personal tutor from the University and the support of a
designated medical practitioner as a supervisor in practice. Supervisor workshops
are planned to appraise medical supervisors of the learning outcomes expected from
the programme and their responsibilities. Students and their supervisors will be
provided with information on when their personal tutor is available to be contacted
either by telephone or email.
ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES AND METHODS
Assessment
Total assessment workload will not exceed the equivalent of 10,000 words
The learning outcomes of the programme will be assessed as follows:
1. A portfolio that demonstrates application of theory to practice, and provides
rationale for prescribing decisions and reflective practice. It will also
include evidence of numeracy skills, writing prescriptions and a range of
scenarios. Linked to learning outcomes 1-12.
2.
An Objective Structured Clinical Examination which takes place in a
setting relevant to the students’ area/field of practice or a video
consultation in a live practice setting. Linked to learning outcomes 1,2 and
8.
3. Satisfactory completion of the period of practice experience and the sign
off by the designated medical practitioner and the employer that the
student is competent to prescribe medicines in their area of practice.
Linked to learning outcomes 1-11.
4. A written examination consisting of 20 short answer/ multi-choice
questions. The examination tests pharmacological knowledge and its
application to practice. Linked to learning outcomes 6,7 and 8.
5. A numerical assessment within the context of prescribing practice. Linked
to learning outcome 11.
5
WORK-BASED LEARNING (WBL) / PLACEMENTS ELEMENTS
Students will be employed as a nurse or midwife whilst undertaking this Unit. They
will be required to use practice based material to support learning and assessment
Although students will remain in their place of employment throughout the
programme they will have the equivalent of 12 days of practice supervised by a
medical practitioner. The Department of Health has specified that medical
supervisors must be a registered medical practitioner who:
(i) has normally had at least 3 years recent clinical experience for a group of
patients/clients in the relevant field of practice;
(ii) is within a GP practice and is either vocationally trained or is in possession of
a certificate of equivalent experience from the Joint Committee for Post-graduate
Training in General Practice Certificate (JCPTGP);
or
is a specialist registrar, clinical assistant or a consultant within a NHS Trust or
other NHS employer;
(iii) has the support of the employing organisation or GP practice to act as the
designated medical practitioner who will provide supervision, support and
opportunities to develop competence in prescribing practice.
(iv) has some experience or training in teaching and \ or supervising in practice.
Designated medical supervisors are expected to have the skills and knowledge to
assess the expected competencies; however it is acknowledged that some DMPs
may not be experienced in prescribing for children and therefore some students
may require a second medical supervisor to assess this competency.
All designated medical supervisors are invited to a briefing session and are
provided with a handbook; in addition they are given the contact details of the
teaching team which they are actively encouraged to utilise if they encounter any
difficulties with their role.
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
PROGRAMME DIAGRAM
Independent and Supplementary Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives
Level H
Exit qualification:
40 Level H credits for:
Independent and Supplementary
prescribing
Core Units (Compulsory)
Independent and
Supplementary
prescribing for Nurses
and Midwives (40 Level
H Credits)
Outcomes developed and
assessed:
Knowledge as indicated by
programme title & skills.
6
ADMISSION REGULATIONS
The regulations for this programme are the University’s Standard Undergraduate
Admission Regulations’. The University Standard Admission Regulations are
available on the portal at http://portal.bournemouth.ac.uk/Documents/.
In addition, students will need to meet the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s criteria for
eligibility to undertake a nurse independent/supplementary prescribing programme.
The criteria are that the student:

Must be a registered nurse, midwife and/or specialist community public health
nurse.

Must have at least three years’ post registration experience and be deemed
competent by the employer to undertake the programme. One of these three
years, the year immediately preceding application to the programme, must
have been in the clinical field in which you intend to prescribe.

The student must provide written confirmation from their employer of their
support for this programme.

Must have a designated medical practitioner who meets the eligibility criteria
for medical supervision of nurse prescribers who has agreed to provide the
required form of supervised practice.

Where the student has/is not undertaking a programme to prepare them in
diagnosis and physical assessment the employer is responsible for confirming
that the applicant has been assessed as competent to take a history,
undertake a clinical assessment and diagnose within their field of practice.
This would normally be a statement from the supporting manager specifying
that the student has appropriate assessment and diagnostic skills in their area
of practice.

The supporting employer has systems in place for monitoring and auditing
prescribing practice, for example a clinical governance framework.

Prior to attending the programme students must have undergone an
enhanced CRB check and their CRB must be available on the first day of the
programme
Students employed in the independent sector will normally be interviewed to ensure
they meet the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s criteria for eligibility to undertake the
programme. In particular the ability of their employer to provide a system for
supporting, monitoring and auditing prescribing practice, for example a clinical
7
governance framework and all staff having access to appropriate clinical supervision.
The employer would be required to declare their support for the students and that the
student would be enabled to attend all the taught and clinical days and be given
adequate time to study. Independent sector employed applicants would also need to
verify they have the support of a designated medical practitioner who meets the
criteria laid down by the Department of Health.
ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS
The regulations for this programme conform to the requirements of the Nursing and
Midwifery Council, and are the Standard Undergraduate Assessment Regulations
with the following approved exceptions
Period of Registration
The maximum period of registration a student may take to complete the programme,
from the first registration, is normally 1 year
Pass Mark
The pass mark for the short answer examination will be 80%. The pass mark for the
numeracy test will be 100%. The pass mark for the portfolio will be 40%. The record
of supervised practice and the OSCE are assessed on a pass/fail basis.
Compensation
Compensation does not apply
Awards
The only award available is the award of credit
If a student in any element of assessment fails to answer correctly any question that
may result in direct harm to a patient/client or within written submissions within the
portfolio recommends treatment which may result in direct harm to a patient/client,
the student will fail that element of the programme. If this occurs where a student is
being reassessed, the student will be required to re-register and to re-attend the
programme.
The University Standard Assessment Regulations are available on the portal at
http://portal.bournemouth.ac.uk/Documents/.
8
PROGRAMME PROFILE
Originating
Institution(s):
Bournemouth
University
School:
HSC
Partner institution:
Place(s) of
Delivery:
Bournemouth
University
Programme HESA
JACS code:
Framework Title N/A
Programme Award and Title.
Independent and Supplementary
Prescribing for Nurses and
Midwives
Mode(s) of study Part time
Expected Length of study 6
months:
BU Credit Structure 40 H
credits
ECTS 20 credits
Cost Centre
Assessment Regs
SR with approved amendments
Unit identification
Unit
version
no.
Unit name
HESA
JACS
Subject
Code
Independent and Supplementary Prescribing for
Nurses and Midwives
Effective from
September 2010.
CC 1
05
%
HESA
JACS
Subject
Code
CC %
2
100%
Contact in School [email protected]
Core
Core
Date approved
May 2010
Name of Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body Nursing and Midwifery Council
9
Prog
year
Placement
in workplace
No of credits
40
Le
vel
H
Assessment
Element Weightings
Exam Practice OSCE CW1 Numeracy
1
40%
P/F
P/F 40% 20%
Unit Specification
Version
number
4
Unit title
Independent and Supplementary Prescribing for Nurses and
Midwives
Level
H
Credit value
40
Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites
There are no pre or co requisites
Aims
To prepare nurses, midwives and specialist community public health nurses to prescribe
safely, appropriately and cost effectively from either the community practitioner formulary for
nurse prescribers or as an independent/supplementary prescriber. In doing so students will
be required to evaluate the evidence underpinning the practice of nurse prescribing, critically
reflect upon their level of competency in respect of nurse prescribing and develop an
individual programme of learning in practice.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Having completed this unit, the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to:
1. assess and consult with patients/clients, clients, parents and carers;
2. undertake a thorough history, including medication history and current medication
(including over the counter, alternative and complementary health therapies)to inform
diagnosis;
3. understand and apply the relevant legislation to the practice of nurse/midwife
prescribing, including the prescribing of unlicensed medication and prescribing ‘off
label’;
4. critically appraise sources of information/advice and decision making frameworks in
prescribing practice;
5. critically debate the influences that effect prescribing practice and demonstrate
understanding by managing prescribing practice in an ethical way;
6. understand and apply knowledge of drug actions in prescribing practice;
7. demonstrate an understanding of the roles and relationships of others involved in
prescribing, supplying and administering medicines;
8. prescribe safely, appropriately and cost effectively;
9. practise within a framework of professional accountability and responsibility;
10. develop clinical management plans within legislative framework;
10
11. demonstrate the recognition of the unique implications and developmental context of
the anatomical and physiological differences between neonates, children and young
people
12. developed numeracy skills appropriate to be able to prescribe safely in own area of
practice.
The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) have stipulated these outcomes
Competencies for Prescribing
The NMC competencies for prescribing are laid out in the appendix.
Relationship between course outcomes and Prescribing Competencies
The learning outcomes of the programme relate to the prescribing competencies as follows:
Learning outcome 1 – Practice
Learning outcome 2 – Practice
Learning outcome 3 – Principles
Learning outcome 4 – Principles
Learning outcome 5 – Practice
Learning outcome 6 – Responsibility
Learning outcome 7 – Subsumes all the competencies
Learning outcome 8 – Principles and practice
Learning outcome 9 – Principles and Practice
Learning outcome 10 – Principles and Practice
Learning Outcome 11 – principles and practice
Learning outcome 12 – Subsumes all the competencies.
Learning & Teaching Methods (Taught Programme)
The taught indicative content will normally be delivered over 26 days in the University plus
12 days of supervised clinical practice. Attendance for the taught days is mandatory.
Learning and teaching will take place in both the classroom and in practice. Lectures of
factual material will be followed by question and answer sessions including group discussion
and analysis of case examples.
Teaching and Learning Methods (Blended Programme)
The blended programme will normally consist of 8 taught days and the equivalent of 10 days
open learning utilising web based, electronic and printed open learning nurse prescribing
programme material. The taught days will focus on key lectures and discussion and
feedback from open learning activity. Attendance at the taught days is mandatory.
All students will have a personal tutor from the University and the support of a designated
medical practitioner as a supervisor in practice. Supervisor workshops are planned to
appraise medical supervisors of the learning outcomes expected from the programme and
their responsibilities. Students and their supervisors will be provided with information on
when their personal tutor is available to be contacted either by telephone or email.
11
Assessment
Total assessment workload will not exceed the equivalent of 10,000 words
The learning outcomes of the programme will be assessed as follows:
1. A portfolio that demonstrates application of theory to practice, and provides
rationale for prescribing decisions and reflective practice. It will also include
evidence of numeracy skills, writing prescriptions and a range of scenarios.
Linked to learning outcomes 1-12.The pass mark for the portfolio is 40%.
2. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination which takes place in a setting
relevant to the students’ area/field of practice or a video consultation in a live
practice setting. Linked to learning outcomes 1,2 and 8. This is assessed on a
pass/fail basis.
3. Satisfactory completion of the period of practice experience and the sign off
by the designated medical practitioner and the employer that the student is
competent to prescribe medicines in their area of practice. Linked to learning
outcomes 1-11. This is recorded in the practice profile and is assessed on a
pass/fail basis.
4. A written examination consisting of 20 short answer/ multi-choice questions.
The examination tests pharmacological knowledge and its application to
practice. Linked to learning outcomes 6,7 and 8.The pass mark for the
examination is 80%.
5. A numerical assessment within the context of prescribing practice. Linked to
learning outcome 12. The pass mark for the numeracy assessment is
100%.and is recorded as a pass/fail.
Indicative content
Consultation, decision-making and therapy, including referral
 models of consultation
 accurate assessment( across the age ranges) history taking, communication and
consultation with patients/clients and their parents/carers
 concepts of working diagnosis or best formulation
 development of a management plan and/or clinical management plan
 confirmation of diagnosis/differential diagnosis - further examination, investigation,
referral for diagnosis
 prescribe, not to prescribe, non-drug treatment or referral for treatment
 prescribing ‘off label’ and unlicensed medication
 numeracy and drug calculations
 stopping medication prescribed by others
 medicines review.
12
Influences on, and psychology of, prescribing
• patient/client demand, and preference vs patient/client need – knowing when to say ‘no’
• external influences, e.g. companies or colleagues
• patient/client partnership in medicine-taking, including awareness of cultural and ethnic
needs
• concordance as opposed to compliance
• achieving shared understanding and negotiating a plan of action
Prescribing in a team context
• rationale, adherence to, and deviation from national and local guidelines, local formularies,
protocols, policies, decision support systems and formulae
• understanding the role and functions of other team members
• documentation, with particular reference to communication between team members,
including electronic prescribing
• auditing, monitoring and evaluating prescribing practice
• interface between multiple prescribers and management of potential conflict
• budgets and cost effectiveness
• dispensing practice issues
Clinical pharmacology, including the effects of co-morbidity
• pharmacology, including pharmaco-dynamics, pharmaco-kinetics, pharmaco-therapeutics
• anatomy and physiology as applied to prescribing practice and community practitioner
formulary
• basic principles of drugs to be prescribed, e.g. absorption, distribution, metabolism and
excretion, including adverse drug reactions (ADR)
• interactions and reactions
• patient/client compliance, concordance and drug response
• impact of physiological state on drug responses and safety, for example, in elderly people,
neonates, children and young people, pregnant or breast feeding women
• pharmaco-therapeutics related to controlled drugs.
13
Evidence-based practice and clinical governance in relation to nurse prescribing
• rationale, adherence to and deviation from national and local guidelines, protocols, policies,
decision support systems and formulae
• continuing professional development - role of self and role of the organisation
• management of change
• risk assessment and management, including safe storage, handling and disposal
• clinical supervision
• reflective practice/peer review
• critical appraisal skills
• auditing practice and scrutinising data, systems monitoring
• identify and report adverse drug reactions and near misses
• prescribing controlled drugs
• prescribing and administering
• prescribing and dispensing.
Legal, policy and ethical aspects
• sound understanding of legislation that impacts on prescribing practice
• legal basis for practice, liability and indemnity
• legal implications of advice to self-medicate including the use of alternative therapies,
complementary therapy and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines
• safe-keeping of prescription pads, action if lost, writing prescriptions and record keeping
• awareness and reporting of fraud (recommendations from the Shipman Inquiry, Fourth
Report)
• drug licensing
• Yellow Card reporting to the Committee of Safety on Medicines (CSM) and reporting
patient/client safety incidents to the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA)
• prescribing in the policy context
• manufacturer’s guidance relating to literature, licensing and off-label
• ethical basis of intervention
• informed consent, with particular reference to client groups in learning disability, mental
health, children, critically ill people and emergency situations
• legal implications and their application to supplementary prescribing.
14
Professional accountability and responsibility
• The NMC code of professional conduct; standards for conduct, performance and ethics
• NMC Standards for prescribing practice
• Ethical recommendations from the Shipman Inquiry, Fourth Report
• accountability and responsibility for assessment, diagnosis and prescribing
• maintaining professional knowledge and competence in relation to prescribing
• accountability and responsibility to the employer
• Prescribing in the public health context
• duty to patient/clients and society
• policies regarding the use of antibiotics and vaccines
• inappropriate use of medication, including misuse, under-use and over-use
• inappropriate prescribing, including over-prescribing and under-prescribing
• access to health care provisions and medicines
• prescribing in its broadest sense, e.g. exercise.
Indicative Key Learning Resources
Books
THE BRITISH NATIONAL FORMULARY (B.N.F.)
Courtney, M. & Griffiths,M., 2004. Independent and supplementary prescribing; Essential
guide. London: Greenwich Medical Media.
Crouch,S & Chaplelhow C. 2008 Medicines Management a nursing perspective. Harlow.
Pearson Education
Department of Health, 1999. Review of prescribing, supply and administration of medicines:
final report. Crown I. London. HMSO.
Department of Health, 2005. Supplementary
prescribing by Nurses,
Pharmacists,
chiropodists/Podiatrists, Physiotherapists and radiographers within the NHS in England: A
Guide for Implementation. London: DOH.
Dimond, B., 2005 Legal aspects of nursing. 4th ed. London: Prentice Hall.
Huether, S. E. & McCance, K. L., 1996. Understanding pathophysiology. St Louis: Mosby.
McGavock, H., 2003. How drugs work. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press.
McGavock,H.2009. Pitfalls in prescribing and how to avoid them. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press
Neal,J., 2002. Medical Pharmacology at a Glance. 4th ed. Oxford: Blackwell Science.
15
Shulman,R;Montgomery,H;Ng,J;Keady,S eds 2007 Surviving Prescribing: A practical guide.London.
Remedica
Trounce, J., 2000. Clinical pharmacology for nurses. 16th ed. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.
Web-based sources
www.npc.co.uk
National Prescribing Centre web site, provides a range of information to support non medical
prescribers, including a competency framework and access to Merck updates, patient group
directions
www.dh.gov.uk
The Department of Health website provides information on non medical prescribing
www.mhra.gov.uk
The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency website contains information
about the legal framework governing prescribing, supply and administration of medicines
www.nmc-uk.org
The Nursing and Midwifery Council website, publications on standards of professional
practice etc
www.nelh.org
National Electronic Library for Health, latest information on medicines and clinical conditions,
as well as useful resource on complementary therapies
www.the-shipman-inquiry.org.uk
Information on the recommendations from the Shipman Inquiry
www.nelm.nhs.uk
National electronic library for medicines – good links to research, NICE guidance, and latest
news page
www.druginfozone.nhs.uk
Information on medicines, licensed usage, possible interactions
www.emc.medicines.org.uk
approved information sheets (including details of product licenses) for UK prescription
medicines
16
Appendix: NMC Prescribing Competencies
The principal areas, knowledge and competencies required to underpin the
practice of prescribing:
Principal Knowledge
areas
Principles



Legislation that
underpins prescribing
Team working principles
and practice
Philosophy and
psychology of prescribing
Competency







Practice




Up to date clinical and
pharmaceutical
knowledge
Principles of drug
dosage, side effects,
reactions and
interactions
Communication, consent
and concordance
Relationship of public
health requirements to
prescribing










Accountab 
ility




The Code of professional
conduct.
The lines of
accountability at all levels
for prescribing
Drug abuse and the
potential for misuse
Requirements of record
keeping
Lines of communication







Responsib 
Leadership skills

17
Works within the legislative framework relevant to the
area of practice and locality
Understands the principles behind supplementary
prescribing and how they are applied to practice
Able to use the adverse reaction reporting mechanisms
Awareness of the impact of prescribing in the wider
delivery of care.
Able to work and communicate as part of a
multidisciplinary prescribing workforce
Reviews diagnosis and generates treatment options
within the clinical treatment management plan
Understand the complexity of the external demands and
influences on prescribing
Makes an accurate assessment and diagnosis and
generates treatment options
Relevant to own area of expertise
Able to prescribe safely, appropriately and cost
effectively
Understands how medicines are licensed, monitored
Able to work with patients and clients as partners in
treatment
Proactively develops dynamic clinical management
plans
Able to assess when to prescribe or make appropriate
referral
Able to refer back to a medical practitioner when
appropriate.
Aware of policies that have an impact on public health
and influence prescribing practice
Able to articulate the boundaries of prescribing practice
in relation to the duty of care to patients and society
Able to apply the principles of accountability to
prescribing practice
Able to account for the cost and effects of prescribing
practice
Regularly reviews evidence behind therapeutic
strategies
Able to assess risk to the public of inappropriate use of
prescribed substances
Understand where and how to access and use patient /
client records
Able to write and maintain coherent records of
prescribing practice
Able to communicate effectively with patients, clients
and professional colleagues
Able to advise and guide peers in the practice of
ility




Roles of other
prescribers
Relationship of
prescribers to
pharmacists
Clinical governance
requirements in
prescribing practice
Audit trails to inform
prescribing practice




18
prescribing
Able to articulate and understand the roles of other key
stakeholders in prescribing practice
Understand the requirements of pharmacists in the
prescribing and supply process
Link prescribing practice with evidence base, employer
requirements and local formularies
Demonstrate ability to audit practice, undertake
reflective practice and identify continuing professional
development needs
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