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Walla Walla Community College at C R C C
English 102 Spring 2 0 1 1
Proposed Schedule of Activities*
Due
Date
Monday March
28
Wednesday
March 30
Monday
April 4
Wed. April 6
Monday
April 11
Wednesday
April 13
Monday
April 18
Wednesday
April 20
Monday
April 25
Wednesday
April 27
Monday
May 2
Wednesday
May 4
Monday
May 9
Wednesday
May 11
Monday
May 16
Wednesday
May 18
Activity
Author(s)
Readings are due the day they are listed
See reference
Irwin Shaw
Aristotle
Essay
Diane Hacker
Robert Frost
Class Introductions / Explanation of Grading (and other Rules)
Review of Fallacies. “The Girls in Their Summer Dresses”
Discussion on: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.
In-class 5-Paragraph Essay on “Who has the better claim?”
Rules for Writers: “Writing about texts”
“Design”: Start Annotation/Paraphrase /Analysis exercise
In-Class review of 5-Paragraph essay
Rules for Writers
In-class presentation/discussion of outline on “Design”
Work on “Design”Analysis / Read Levitt and Dubner (see below)
Rules for Writers: “Evaluating arguments”
Class discussion on outline of Critique on Freakonomics/Chapter 2 of
Freaknomics / Essay on Frost’s “Design” is due
Due: In-class student presentation of Freakonomics critique outline
Work on your summary of the Freakonomic’s chapter
Have first draft of Freakonomics critique ready for peer editing
Questions and Answers session
Final draft of critique essay is due (outline, summary, draft, final)
Start reading Hamlet (in Green Text)
In-class review of Freakonomics critique
Outline
Diane Hacker
Diane Hacker
Levitt and Dubner
Essay
Outline
Essay Draft
Essay
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Essay Draft
William Shakespeare
Essay / Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
Monday
May 23
Jonathan Swift
Wednesday
May 25
Monday
May 30
Jonathan Swift
Final Draft
Jonathan Swift
Essay
End of Quarter
3 Handouts
Handout
345-357
Handout
357-371
Handout
371-380
49-78 & 476-528
Fallacy Quiz
Handout
49-78
49-78
1367-1478
1367-1478
1367-1478
Handout
1367-1478
1367-1478
“To be or not to be” Paraphrase
First draft on “To be or not to be” Analysis/Evaluation essay
Peer-editing
Final Draft on “To be or not to be” is due
Start reading “A Modest Proposal”
“A Modest Proposal” Annotation/Summary due
Handout / 1414
In-class presentation of your outline of Write your own “Modest
Proposal” Analysis / Critique/ Evaluation
In-class peer-editing. First draft of your own “Modest Proposal” is
due (Print Drafts for Everyone)
In-class peer-editing. First draft of your own “Modest Proposal” is
due (Print Drafts for Everyone)
FIN A L E S S A Y DU E T O D A Y
“Write your”
Handout
Las t D a y of C l as s
Wednesday
June 1
Monday
May 6
In-class discussion on Hamlet
Character analysis
In-class discussion on Hamlet
Rhetorical devices / Problems with credibility of plot
“To be or not to be” Annotation / Summary
Pages
NO CLASS TODAY
*The instructor reserves the right to make changes to the above schedule without prior notice.
1367-1478
Handout
Handout
Handout
Essay
Handout
Essay
Welcome, English 102 Student:
The first thing you need to know is that this is a 5-credit class and that you are expected to study an additional 2 to 3 hours for
each hour you spend in class, which means that you will need 10 or more hours minimum outside of class to read and work on
your assignments. If this is too much, take the class later when you can put in the time and effort necessary to learn all that this
class intends to teach. If you choose to stay enrolled, then know that by doing so you enter into an agreement to become a
willing participant and observer of all class requirements and rules. Know then that lecture time is not the time for interrupting
the instructor or others students, but rather a time for listening, asking questions, and being respectful of others doing the same.
What are you supposed to learn and be able to do in and after English 102? For one, you need to go beyond what you learned
and did in English 101, which was an introduction to formal writing, the essay, and a very modest introduction to research, for
which you needed to create your own MLA text, wrought with your own arguments and supported by the outside sources. In
English 102 you will be asked to do the same, but in addition you will be expected to identify and avoid fallacious arguments,
expand your idea of what a text is, how it works, and the various ways in which arguments can be woven into any text.
English 102, for example, will ask that you to regard multiple forms of art, not just essays, as texts with their own unique forms of
arguments. A song, a painting, a play, a poem, a film, even a textile or a performance, etc., can be analyzed as a text and
therefore as an argument or exposition of ideas that reveals something about the work in question, the reader or spectator, and
the history, society, or collective in which the phenomenon takes place.
In English 102 you will be expected to build on your critical thinking ability by becoming more adept at understanding the
relationship between the arguments and fallacies and what you infer were the intentions of the author or authors. Not only must
you employ sound reasoning and logic in your own work, — from the sentence level to that of an entire essay — but you must
also be able to identify the rhetorical tools employed in arguments comprised in the texts of others. Writing, though considered
mostly an art, must be evaluated along with all forms of text, with the same keen spirit and desire for exactitude as any science,
— even it is only its jouissance or subjective sense of pleasure being weighed. From art to advertisement, from civically-minded
essays to political ads and election campaigns, arguments abound in a variety of forms. The goal, therefore, is that every English
102 student will be able to not only understand that which is implied and expected to be inferred and by whom, but also be able
to evaluate, weigh, and analyze in written form using reason and logic.
In English 102, you will examine critically (and all that it involves) a variety of texts and do the following:




Annotate, paraphrase, summarize, and outline what is of importance in a text
Analyze/Evaluate a variety of texts
Construct your own arguments (in a credible, persuasive way using facts, statistics, and expert opinions)
Put your original ideas forth in written form according to formal writing rules and formats (MLA and APA)
As for the grading scale, given that the skill level of each student can vary drastically from that of the next, all students must read
and re-read, write, and re-write all assignments several times in order to reach the class goals:
All annotations, summaries, paraphrases, quizzes, presentations, etc. (portfolio) will account for 50 points.
First in-class, 5-paragraph opinion essay (in MLA format) will account for 50 points.
In-class participation, including peer-editing, will account for 100 points.
Analysis essay on Robert Frost’s “Design” (MLA) will account for 100 points.
The Chapter 2 of Freakonomics (in APA format) will account for 200 points.
The essay on Shakespeare’s Hamlet /“To be or not to be” analysis essay will account for 200 points.
The final essay on Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” (MLA) will account for 300 points.
The total is 1,000 points. There will be no late assignments, no extra-credit, and no excuses beyond medical or other facilitymandated call-outs. As for behavior, act in a manner that is conducive to learning. Work hard and have an edifying experience.
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