Virtue and Happiness in the Ancient Greek and Chinese Traditions

advertisement
1st INTERNATIONAL HELLENIC-CHINESE
CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
Raphael, “An Allegory” (1504)
Organizers:
 Laboratory of Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
 Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
 Qufu Normal University, China
15, 16 and 17 June 2014
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Conference Room KEDEA,
3rd Septemvriou str., Thessaloniki
Certificate of attendance
Information: http://www.philosophein.web.auth.gr/
1
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
All ethical and theological schools since antiquity have been concerned with
man and man’s happiness (eudaimonia) and well-being. In one way or another,
the ancient Greek and Chinese ethical systems attempt to save man from the
sufferings of our mundane existence and, quite often, of what awaits us in the
life to come. They try to show man the way to a kind of internal peace, ataraxia
and eudaimonia that grants us with immunity to errors, psychological
upheavals, moral lapses and the misfortunes of worldly life. Not only this. What
the ethical schools of antiquity, whether of a Chinese or a Hellenic origin,
emphasize is that eudaimonia is not a goal achievable by any human being. Man
can only eventually become eudaimon (εὐδαίμων), if he consciously tries to
control all aspects of human nature and becomes wise, according to certain
schools, a god according to others, or in unity with Tao according to Taoism.
Man’s conquest of his weaknesses is a rather complicated issue with which each
school deals differently. Some of these schools view human life as a kind of a
continuous struggle between our human, weak and vulnerable aspect and our
godly aspect at the end of which virtue and wisdom prevail. Some others regard
that this struggle, even though it is conducted in the context of our worldly life,
continues in infinite time, under the assumption of the immortal soul and the
existence of a supreme being such as God. Nevertheless, no matter how we
conceive the accomplishment of eudaimonia, the truth is that it is a long and
difficult journey which requires conscious internal lifelong efforts, the
contribution of external circumstances and, in certain cases, the existence of an
omnipotent God, or at least the assumption of his existence.
The Conference will address all such and other similar issues. Both historical and
analytical (or systematic) approaches will be adopted. The main aim and
concern of the Conference is to bring forward the points of contact between the
ancient Greek and the Chinese approaches to virtue and eudaimonia. As a
consequence, particular emphasis will be given to all approaches that embark
on a fruitful comparison of the two philosophical traditions.
Conference languages: Greek, Chinese, English.
2
Academic Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Laboratory of
Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal Philosophein.
Politika Anthropologika, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Kleitos Ioannides, President of the Cypriot Society of Philosophy, Researcher
Joannis Markopoulos, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Theodosios Pelegrinis, Professor of Philosophy, Rector, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Robin Wang, Director of Asian and Pacific Studies, Professor of Philosophy,
Loyola Marymount University
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Peking University.
Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Vassiliki Karavakou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Macedonia
Panagiotes Pantazakos, Associate Professor of Philosophy, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Organizing Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis: [email protected]
Eleni Kalokairinou: [email protected]
Robin Wang: [email protected] , [email protected]
Elena Avramidou: [email protected] , [email protected]
Pelagia Karpathiotaki: [email protected] , [email protected]
For further information on academic issues:
(a) Please get in touch with Professors Robin Wang and Elena Avramidou, if you
are interested to submit a title and an abstract for a paper on Chinese
Philosophy (and/or in Chinese/English language).
(b) Please get in touch with Professors Socrates Delivoyatzis and Eleni
Kalokairinou, if you wish to submit a title and an abstract on Ancient Greek
Philosophy (and/or in Greek/English language).
For travel information:
For information about obtaining visas, please get in touch with Professor Elena
Avramidou and Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki.
3
(a) Please get in touch with Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki, if you are coming from
China.
(b) If you are coming from Europe or USA, you are strongly advised to make
your own reservations.
Proposed hotels for downtown Thessaloniki (close to the Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki):
Electra Hotel: 9, Aristotelous square www.electrahotels.gr
Daios Luxuxry Living: 59 Nikis Avenue www.daioshotels.com
Egnatia Palace: 61 Egnatia Av. www.booking.com/Egnatia-palace
City Hotel: 11 Komninon str.
www.cityhotel.gr
Zaliki Boutique Hotel: 6, Gr. Zaliki str. www.zaliki-hotel-thessaloniki.h-rez.com/
ABC Hotel: 41 Angelaki str.
www.hotelabc.gr
Le Palace Art Hotel: 12 Tsimiski str. http://lepalace.gr/en/
El Greco Hotel: 23 Egnatias Avenue www.hotelelgreco.gr
Amalia Hotel: 33 Ermou str.
www.amalia-hotel.directrooms.com/
Additional information will be available later on in regard to transportation
available from SKG Makedonia Airport of Thessaloniki (Greece) to the centre of
the city and also from your hotels to the venue.
4
1st INTERNATIONAL HELLENIC-CHINESE
CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
G.A. Spangerberg, Schule des Aristoteles (1888)
Organizers:
 Laboratory of Philosophical Research on the Imaginary,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
 Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
 Qufu Normal University, China
15, 16 and 17 June 2014
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Conference Room KEDEA,
3rd Septemvriou str., Thessaloniki
Certificate of attendance
Information: http://www.philosophein.web.auth.gr/
5
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
All ethical and theological schools since antiquity have been concerned with
man and man’s happiness (eudaimonia) and well-being. In one way or another,
the ancient Greek and Chinese ethical systems attempt to save man from the
sufferings of our mundane existence and, quite often, of what awaits us in the
life to come. They try to show man the way to a kind of internal peace, ataraxia
and eudaimonia that grants us with immunity to errors, psychological
upheavals, moral lapses and the misfortunes of worldly life. Not only this. What
the ethical schools of antiquity, whether of a Chinese or a Hellenic origin,
emphasize is that eudaimonia is not a goal achievable by any human being. Man
can only eventually become eudaimon (εὐδαίμων), if he consciously tries to
control all aspects of human nature and becomes wise, according to certain
schools, a god according to others, or in unity with Tao according to Taoism.
Man’s conquest of his weaknesses is a rather complicated issue with which each
school deals differently. Some of these schools view human life as a kind of a
continuous struggle between our human, weak and vulnerable aspect and our
godly aspect at the end of which virtue and wisdom prevail. Some others regard
that this struggle, even though it is conducted in the context of our worldly life,
continues in infinite time, under the assumption of the immortal soul and the
existence of a supreme being such as God. Nevertheless, no matter how we
conceive the accomplishment of eudaimonia, the truth is that it is a long and
difficult journey which requires conscious internal lifelong efforts, the
contribution of external circumstances and, in certain cases, the existence of an
omnipotent God, or at least the assumption of his existence.
The Conference will address all such and other similar issues. Both historical and
analytical (or systematic) approaches will be adopted. The main aim and
concern of the Conference is to bring forward the points of contact between the
ancient Greek and the Chinese approaches to virtue and eudaimonia. As a
consequence, particular emphasis will be given to all approaches that embark
on a fruitful comparison of the two philosophical traditions.
Conference languages: Greek, Chinese, English.
6
Academic Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Laboratory of
Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal Philosophein.
Politika Anthropologika, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Kleitos Ioannides, President of the Cypriot Society of Philosophy, Researcher
Joannis Markopoulos, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Theodosios Pelegrinis, Professor of Philosophy, Rector, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Robin Wang, Director of Asian and Pacific Studies, Professor of Philosophy,
Loyola Marymount University
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Peking University.
Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Vassiliki Karavakou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Macedonia
Panagiotes Pantazakos, Associate Professor of Philosophy, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Organizing Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis: [email protected]
Eleni Kalokairinou: [email protected]
Robin Wang: [email protected] , [email protected]
Elena Avramidou: [email protected] , [email protected]
Pelagia Karpathiotaki: [email protected] , [email protected]
For further information on academic issues:
(a) Please get in touch with Professors Robin Wang and Elena Avramidou, if you
are interested to submit a title and an abstract for a paper on Chinese
Philosophy (and/or in Chinese/English language).
(b) Please get in touch with Professors Socrates Delivoyatzis and Eleni
Kalokairinou, if you wish to submit a title and an abstract on Ancient Greek
Philosophy (and/or in Greek/English language).
For travel information:
For information about obtaining visas, please get in touch with Professor Elena
Avramidou and Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki.
7
(a) Please get in touch with Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki, if you are coming from
China.
(b) If you are coming from Europe or USA, you are strongly advised to make
your own reservations.
Proposed hotels for downtown Thessaloniki (close to the Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki):
Electra Hotel: 9, Aristotelous square www.electrahotels.gr
Daios Luxuxry Living: 59 Nikis Avenue www.daioshotels.com
Egnatia Palace: 61 Egnatia Av. www.booking.com/Egnatia-palace
City Hotel: 11 Komninon str.
www.cityhotel.gr
Zaliki Boutique Hotel: 6, Gr. Zaliki str. www.zaliki-hotel-thessaloniki.h-rez.com/
ABC Hotel: 41 Angelaki str.
www.hotelabc.gr
Le Palace Art Hotel: 12 Tsimiski str. http://lepalace.gr/en/
El Greco Hotel: 23 Egnatias Avenue www.hotelelgreco.gr
Amalia Hotel: 33 Ermou str.
www.amalia-hotel.directrooms.com/
Additional information will be available later on in regard to transportation
available from SKG Makedonia Airport of Thessaloniki (Greece) to the centre of
the city and also from your hotels to the venue.
8
1st INTERNATIONAL HELLENIC-CHINESE
CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
G.A. Spangerberg, Schule des Aristoteles (1888)
Organizers:
 Laboratory of Philosophical Research on the Imaginary,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
 Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
 Qufu Normal University, China
15, 16 and 17 June 2014
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Conference Room KEDEA,
3rd Septemvriou str., Thessaloniki
Certificate of attendance
Information: http://www.philosophein.web.auth.gr/
9
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
All ethical and theological schools since antiquity have been concerned with
man and man’s happiness (eudaimonia) and well-being. In one way or another,
the ancient Greek and Chinese ethical systems attempt to save man from the
sufferings of our mundane existence and, quite often, of what awaits us in the
life to come. They try to show man the way to a kind of internal peace, ataraxia
and eudaimonia that grants us with immunity to errors, psychological
upheavals, moral lapses and the misfortunes of worldly life. Not only this. What
the ethical schools of antiquity, whether of a Chinese or a Hellenic origin,
emphasize is that eudaimonia is not a goal achievable by any human being. Man
can only eventually become eudaimon (εὐδαίμων), if he consciously tries to
control all aspects of human nature and becomes wise, according to certain
schools, a god according to others, or in unity with Tao according to Taoism.
Man’s conquest of his weaknesses is a rather complicated issue with which each
school deals differently. Some of these schools view human life as a kind of a
continuous struggle between our human, weak and vulnerable aspect and our
godly aspect at the end of which virtue and wisdom prevail. Some others regard
that this struggle, even though it is conducted in the context of our worldly life,
continues in infinite time, under the assumption of the immortal soul and the
existence of a supreme being such as God. Nevertheless, no matter how we
conceive the accomplishment of eudaimonia, the truth is that it is a long and
difficult journey which requires conscious internal lifelong efforts, the
contribution of external circumstances and, in certain cases, the existence of an
omnipotent God, or at least the assumption of his existence.
The Conference will address all such and other similar issues. Both historical and
analytical (or systematic) approaches will be adopted. The main aim and
concern of the Conference is to bring forward the points of contact between the
ancient Greek and the Chinese approaches to virtue and eudaimonia. As a
consequence, particular emphasis will be given to all approaches that embark
on a fruitful comparison of the two philosophical traditions.
Conference languages: Greek, Chinese, English.
10
Academic Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Laboratory of
Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal Philosophein.
Politika Anthropologika, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Kleitos Ioannides, President of the Cypriot Society of Philosophy, Researcher
Joannis Markopoulos, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Theodosios Pelegrinis, Professor of Philosophy, Rector, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Robin Wang, Director of Asian and Pacific Studies, Professor of Philosophy,
Loyola Marymount University
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Peking University.
Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Vassiliki Karavakou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Macedonia
Panagiotes Pantazakos, Associate Professor of Philosophy, National and
Kapodistrian University of Athens
Organizing Committee:
Socratis Delivoyatzis: [email protected]
Eleni Kalokairinou: [email protected]
Robin Wang: [email protected] , [email protected]
Elena Avramidou: [email protected] , [email protected]
Pelagia Karpathiotaki: [email protected] , [email protected]
For further information on academic issues:
(a) Please get in touch with Professors Robin Wang and Elena Avramidou, if you
are interested to submit a title and an abstract for a paper on Chinese
Philosophy (and/or in Chinese/English language).
(b) Please get in touch with Professors Socrates Delivoyatzis and Eleni
Kalokairinou, if you wish to submit a title and an abstract on Ancient Greek
Philosophy (and/or in Greek/English language).
For travel information:
For information about obtaining visas, please get in touch with Professor Elena
Avramidou and Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki.
11
(a) Please get in touch with Ms. Pelagia Karpathiotaki, if you are coming from
China.
(b) If you are coming from Europe or USA, you are strongly advised to make
your own reservations.
Proposed hotels for downtown Thessaloniki (close to the Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki):
Electra Hotel: 9, Aristotelous square www.electrahotels.gr
Daios Luxuxry Living: 59 Nikis Avenue www.daioshotels.com
Egnatia Palace: 61 Egnatia Av. www.booking.com/Egnatia-palace
City Hotel: 11 Komninon str.
www.cityhotel.gr
Zaliki Boutique Hotel: 6, Gr. Zaliki str. www.zaliki-hotel-thessaloniki.h-rez.com/
ABC Hotel: 41 Angelaki str.
www.hotelabc.gr
Le Palace Art Hotel: 12 Tsimiski str. http://lepalace.gr/en/
El Greco Hotel: 23 Egnatias Avenue www.hotelelgreco.gr
Amalia Hotel: 33 Ermou str.
www.amalia-hotel.directrooms.com/
Additional information will be available later on in regard to transportation
available from SKG Makedonia Airport of Thessaloniki (Greece) to the centre of
the city and also from your hotels to the venue.
12
1st INTERNATIONAL HELLENIC-CHINESE
CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
Organizers:
 Laboratory of Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
 Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
 Qufu Normal University, China
15, 16 and 17 June 2014
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Conference Room KEDEA,
3rd Septemvriou str., Thessaloniki
Certificate of attendance
Information: http://www.philosophein.web.auth.gr/
13
Virtue and Happiness
In the East and the West
All ethical and theological schools since antiquity have been concerned with
man and man’s happiness (eudaimonia) and well-being. In one way or another,
the ancient Greek and Chinese ethical systems attempt to save man from the
sufferings of our mundane existence and, quite often, of what awaits us in the
life to come. They try to show man the way to a kind of internal peace, ataraxia
and eudaimonia that grants us with immunity to errors, psychological
upheavals, moral lapses and the misfortunes of worldly life. Not only this. What
the ethical schools of antiquity, whether of a Chinese or a Hellenic origin,
emphasize is that eudaimonia is not a goal achievable by any human being. Man
can only eventually become eudaimon (εὐδαίμων), if he consciously tries to
control all aspects of human nature and becomes wise, according to certain
schools, a god according to others, or in unity with Tao according to Taoism.
Man’s conquest of his weaknesses is a rather complicated issue with which each
school deals differently. Some of these schools view human life as a kind of a
continuous struggle between our human, weak and vulnerable aspect and our
godly aspect at the end of which virtue and wisdom prevail. Some others regard
that this struggle, even though it is conducted in the context of our worldly life,
continues in infinite time, under the assumption of the immortal soul and the
existence of a supreme being such as God. Nevertheless, no matter how we
conceive the accomplishment of eudaimonia, the truth is that it is a long and
difficult journey which requires conscious internal lifelong efforts, the
contribution of external circumstances and, in certain cases, the existence of an
omnipotent God, or at least the assumption of his existence.
The Conference will address all such and other similar issues. Both historical and
analytical (or systematic) approaches will be adopted. The main aim and
concern of the Conference is to bring forward the points of contact between the
ancient Greek and the Chinese approaches to virtue and eudaimonia. As a
consequence, particular emphasis will be given to all approaches that embark
on a fruitful comparison of the two philosophical traditions.
14
PROGRAM
Sunday, 15 June 2014
11.00 – 11.30 Registration
11.30 – 12.00 Welcoming Addresses
Ioannis Mylopoulos, Professor at the School of Civil Engineering, Faculty of
Engineering, Rector of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Theodosios Pelegrinis, Professor of Philosophy, School of Philosophy, Rector of
the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, School of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Director of the Laboratory of Philosophical Research on
the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
Chen Guu-Ying, Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Center of Taoism Studies,
Department of Philosophy, Peking University
Host: Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, School of Philosophy,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Inaugural Session
Chair:
12.00 -12.45
12.45 – 13.30
Vassiliki Karavakou, Associate Professor of Philosophy,
University of Macedonia,
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Peking
University
Epimeleia Eautou and an Aesthetics of Existence
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Director of the Laboratory of
Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal
Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
Confucian Role Ethics: Landscape and Traveling on the Road
to Human Flourishing
Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy, University of
Hawaii
15
1st Session: The Origins of Virtue and Eudaimonia I
Chair:
Theopi Parissaki, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Robin Wang, Professor of Philosophy, Director of Asian and
Pacific Studies, Loyola Marymount University
16.00 - 16.20
Ren” and Happiness in Confucianism
By Fu Yongju, Professor of Philosophy, President of Qufu
Normal University
Read by Li Zhaoxiang, Professor of Philosophy, Qufu Normal
University
16.20 - 16.40
Philosophy and Poetry on Excellency
Theodosios Pelegrinis, Professor of Philosophy, Rector of
the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
16.40 – 17.00
The Socratic and the Stoic Logos as virtue and Eudaimonia
Kleitos Ioannides, President of the Cypriot Philosophical
Society
17.00 – 17.20
The Possible Choices of Chinese Virtue Life
Li Dahua, Professor of Philosophy, Shenzhen University
17.20 – 17.40
Epictetus’ Philosophical Experience
Ioannis Christodoulou, Lecturer of Philosophy, University of
Cyprus
17.40 – 18.00
Discussion - End of Session
18.00 - 18.20
Coffee Break
2nd Session: The Origins of Virtue and Eudaimonia II
Chair:
Alexandra Deligiorgi, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Li Dahua, Professor of Philosophy, Shenzhen University
18.20 – 18.40
The Early Chinese Concept of De
Li Rui, Professor of Philosophy, Beijing Normal University
Residing in De: Contentment in the Liezi
Jeffrey Dippmann, Professor of Philosophy, Central
Washington University
18.40 – 19.00
16
19.00 – 19.20
19.20 – 19.40
19.40 – 20.00
20.00 - 20.20
20.20 – 20.40
The Function of “De” in the Ontology of Lao Zi and
Extended Study on the Idea of Happiness
Cao Feng, Professor of Philosophy, Tsinghua University
The Universality of Epicurean Bliss
Chrysanthi Kechrologou, Ph.D., Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Dong Zhongshu’s Thought of Rule by Virtue
Li Zonggui, Professor of Philosophy, Sun Yat-sen University
Zeno of Citium and Zhuangzi on Virtue and Eudaimonia
Panos Eliopoulos, Ph.D., National and Kapodistrian
University of Athens
Discussion – End of Session
Monday, 16th June 2014
3rd Session: Virtue and Happiness in the Ancient Greek and
Chinese Traditions:
Comparative Approaches I
Chair:
9.30 – 9.50
Kleitos Ioannides, President of the Cypriot Philosophical
Society
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor, Peking University
Considerations of Virtue and Eudaimonia in the World
Religions compared to the Philosophy of Zeno of Citium:
Τὸ κατὰ φύσιν ζῆν ταὐτό τοῦ κατ' ἀρετὴν ζῆν
Areti Demosthenous, Director of the Institute of Historical
Research for Peace
9.50 - 10.10
The Trigger between Benevolence and Wisdom, the Key of
Ever Changing - Thesis in Zhu Tzi about Benevolence and
Wisdom
Wu Qihao (NG Kai Chiu), Associate Professor, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong
10.10 – 10.30
Confucius’ Ren and Plato’s Good
Elena Avramidou, Associate Professor, Peking University
10.30 – 10.50
The Dialectical Relation of Virtue, Happiness and Political
Status: a Comparison between Confucius and Plato
Ai Chenyi, Ph.D. Candidate, Peking University
17
10.50 – 11.10
11.10 – 11.30
Chair:
Discussion – End of Session
Coffee break
4th Session: Virtue and Happiness in the Ancient Greek and
Chinese Traditions:
Comparative Approaches II
Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy, University of Hawaii
Areti Demosthenous, Director of the Institute of Historical
Research for Peace
11.30 – 11.50
11.50 – 12.10
12.10 – 12.30
12.30 – 12.50
12.50 – 13.10
A Study of Filial Piety in Ancient Judaism and Confucianism
Fu Youde, Professor, Director of the Center for Judaic and
Inter-religious Studies, Shandong University, Vice-president of
China Society of Religion
Knowledge in the Quest for Virtue in the Confucian and
PlatonicTtraditions
Lambros Papayiannis, Ph.D., Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki
Qiong Da Yi Shi, Circumstances of the Confucians’ View of
Virtue and Happiness, Self-sufficiency of Virtue
Wang Zhongjiang, Professor of Philosophy, Peking University
Confucian Ethics is not Virtue Ethics
Paul D’ Ambrosio, Postdoctoral Fellow, East China
Normal University
Discussion – End of Session
5th Session: Virtue and Happiness in the Ancient Greek and
Chinese Traditions:
Comparative Approaches III
Chair:
Robin Wang, Professor of Philosophy, Loyola Marymount
University
Joannis Markopoulos, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki
16.00 – 16.20
Virtue and the Way to Happiness in Aristotle and Confucius
18
16.20 – 16.40
16.40 – 17.00
17.00 – 17.20
17.20 – 17.40
17.40 – 18.00
Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki
Zhuangzi and David Hume: Becoming the Authentic Self
Carl Clinton, Graduate Student, Loyola Marymount University
Ren and Reason
Vassiliki Karavakou, Associate Professor of Philosophy,
University of Macedonia
Confucius’ Views on Unity of Virtue and Happiness
Zeng Chunlian, Associate Professor, Sun Yat-sen University
Discussion – End of Session
Coffee Break
6th Session: Virtue and Happiness in the Ancient Greek and
Chinese Traditions:
Comparative Approaches IV
Chair:
18.00 – 18.20
18.20 – 18.40
18.40 – 19.00
19.00 – 19.20
19.20 - 19.40
19.40 – 20.00
Fu Youde, Professor, Director of the Center for Judaic and
Inter-religious Studies, Shandong University, Vice-president of
China Society of Religion
Ioannis Christodoulou, Lecturer of Philosophy, University of
Cyprus
De and Arete (Virtue): an Example of Cross-cultural
Comparison Study about Human Nature and Ethics
(Chinese)
Zheng Kai, Professor of Philosophy, Peking University
Self-deception, Sincerity and Zhu Xi’s Last Word
Zheng Zemian, Professor of Philosophy, Wuhan University,
Freie Universität Berlin (Germany)
Wives or Immortals: A Comparison of Virtuous Models
in Confucianism and Daoism
Sharon Small, Ph.D. Candidate, Peking University
The Idea and Praxis of the Cluster of Virtue and Eudaimonia
Alexandros Kaidoglou, Journalist, Columnist
Dewey’s Happiness as a Means of Moral Development
Ermolaos Psarianos, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Macedonia
Discussion - End of Session
19
Tuesday, 17 June 2014
th
7 Session: Eastern and Western Modern Approaches
Chair:
10.30 - 10.50
10.50 - 11.10
11.10 - 11.30
11.30 - 11.50
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Director of the Laboratory of
Philosophical Research on the Imaginary, Editor of the Journal
Philosophein. Politika Anthropologika
Eleni Kalokairinou, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki
Virtue and Happiness: From Ancient Greek Thought to
Post-modernism
Joannis
Markopoulos, Professor
of
Philosophy,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Happiness or Pleasure?
Yannis Mitrou, Psychoanalyst, Stage Director
Confucius’ “Ideal Personality” and Its Contemporary Value
Cheng Jichum, Professor of Philosophy, Qufu Normal
University
Rationality and Embodied Virtue (De): Early Daoist Texts on
Three Pillars of Human Life
Robin Wang, Professor of Philosophy, Loyola Marymount
University
11.50 - 11.10
Discussion – End of Session
11.10 - 13.00
Conclusions
Socratis Delivoyatzis, Elena Avramidou,
Eleni Kalokairinou, Robin Wang
End of Conference
20
Download
Related flashcards

Roman goddesses

26 cards

Christian mythology

16 cards

Creation myths

21 cards

Roman mythology

49 cards

Create Flashcards