Problem-Based Learning - chemistrycameron

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Problem-Based Learning
in stoichiometry
GPS Addressed
0 SC2 Students will relate how the Law of
Conservation of Matter is used to determine
chemical composition in compounds and chemical
reactions.
0 c. Apply concepts of the mole and Avogadro’s number to
conceptualize and calculate
0 Empirical/molecular formulas,
0 Mass, moles and molecules relationships,
0 Molar volumes of gases.
Classroom Structure
0 This PBL can be utilized in an on level chemistry class
as well as an honors/gifted setting.
0 PRHS is on a 90 minute block (4 blocks daily) in which
we see our students everyday.
Rocket Launching into a PBL
0 Prior to this activity, the students are involved in an
investigational activity which allows them to
hypothesize about the appropriate ratio needed to
create rocket fuel using zinc and sulfur.
0 This project piggy backs off of that demonstration
providing real world application to a very complex
concept.
0 http://www.periodicvideos.com/videos/mv_zinc_and_sulfu
r.htm
Partners create a team name
Each
student
gets a
time
card
Day 1 - Molar mass
Day 1 of your new job as the quality assurance inspector at the Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket
Shop will require that you learn how much every part weighs. And by taking the weight of each
of these parts, you can determine how much each of the 7 rockets that we make weighs. At the
Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket Shop we measure weight in RPU – Rocket Part Units.
Day 1 - Molar mass
Determining the Weight of Rockets
Part Weights: The following table is a list of all of the parts used at the rocket shop with their
respective weight.
Part Name
Hex Nut
Small Rocket Body
Large Rocket Body
Wing
Engine
Cylinder
Abbreviation Weight of One
HN
2 RPU
SRB
115 RPU
LRB
243 RPU
W
119 RPU
E
58 RPU
C
76 RPU
Rocket Components: The following is a list of all of the rockets produced at the rocket shop.
For each rocket, the table shows what components make up that rocket.
Rocket
Cameron 100
Eales 200
Wahl 300
Kumar 400
Placek 500
Matthews 1000
Lion 2000
HN
1
2
5
12
33
34
45
Number of Each Part
SRB LRB W
E
1
2
1
2
4
2
1
3
3
2
4
4
1
1
4
4
1
2
5
5
2
2
7
6
C
1
2
3
3
4
6
8
Day 1 - Molar mass
Calculation of the weight of a single rocket:
Sample Calculation: What is the weight of the Cameron 100 rocket?
Rocket
Cameron 100
Part
Hex Nut (HN)
SRB (Small rocket body)
LRB (Large rocket body)
W (Wing)
E (Engine)
C (Cylinder)
HN
1
Number
1
1
0
2
1
1
SRB
1
LRB
W
2
Weight
2 RPU
115 RPU
243 RPU
119 RPU
58 RPU
76 RPU
TOTAL WEIGHT =
E
1
C
1
Total
2 RPU
115 RPU
0 RPU
238 RPU
58 RPU
76 RPU
489 RPU
Day 2 – Percent Composition
Day 2 of your new job as the quality assurance inspector at the Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket
Shop will require that you learn what we call the percent composition for each of the rockets that
we make. The percent composition is the percent by weight of each part in the rocket. The best
way to understand this is to look at two examples.
Day 2 – Percent Composition
Calculation of Percent Composition
Steps to Finding Percent Composition
1. Find the weight of the rocket
2. Find the weight of each part
3. Divide the weight of the part by the weight of the rocket
4. Multiply the answer by 100
5. Repeat steps 2-4 for all parts
Sample Calculation: What is the percent composition of the Cameron 100 rocket?
Part
Hex Nut (HN)
Number
1
SRB
(Small rocket body)
LRB
(Large rocket body)
W (Wing)
1
E (Engine)
C (Cylinder)
Weight
2 RPU
115 RPU
Total
2 RPU
Calculation
2
115 RPU
489
115
0
243 RPU
0 RPU
489
0
2
119 RPU
238 RPU
489
238
1
58 RPU
58 RPU
489
58
76 RPU
489
76
1
76 RPU
 100
 100
 100
 100
 100
 100
Percent
0.41%
23.5%
0%
48.7%
11.9%
15.5%
489
TOTAL =
489 RPU
100.01%
Day 3 – Empirical and
Molecular Formula
On day 3 as the quality assurance inspector at the Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket Shop there has
been a crime committed. An unhappy employee has damaged some of the equipment at the shop
by pouring a sugary soda drink all over the assembly line equipment. The suspect has been
narrowed down to six employees. Each of the employees drinks a different kind of soda. Each
soda contains a different type of sugar in it. All of the sugars in the sodas have carbon, hydrogen
and oxygen in their molecular formulas, but all in different amounts. Your job is to analyze each
of the six known soda sugars and compare them to the unknown sample taken at the crime scene.
Day 3 – Empirical and
Molecular Formula
Procedures:
1. For each of the 5 sugar samples, perform the
following steps:
a. Mass each of the three elements and record
in data table.
b. Showing all work, perform calculations to
determine empirical formula.
c. Showing all work, perform calculations to
determine molecular formula.
2. For the unknown, perform the following steps:
a. Mass each of the three elements and record
in data table.
b. Showing all work, perform calculations to
determine empirical formula.
c. Determine if the unknown matches any of
the known sugar samples.
Day 3 – Empirical and
Molecular Formula
YOUR TURN!
Mass of Element
Carbon
Sugar 1
Sugar 2
Sugar 3
Sugar 4
Sugar 5
Unknown
Hydrogen
Calculated Formula
Oxygen
Empirical
Molecular
Day 4 – Report
The Strange Case of Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket Shop Vandalism:
Case # 1023
You and Your PRCSI team are called to the scene of a recent vandalism at the
Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket Shop. The equipment shows signs of human
interference. The one unknown compound found at the scene is C6H15O6. The
suspects were found in and around the crime scene and must be identified by
the substances found in their belongings or in their persons. Interviews are
not available so it is up to you to identify the suspects based on this evidence
and the employee database (Sugary drink lab). You must submit your report to
your executive director explaining how each suspect was identified. Include a
data table showing the suspects, their names, and the formulas and names of
the compounds used identify them. As always, the director will want to see all
of your work. Based on this data, it is up to you to determine which suspect is
responsible for the vandalism and explain their motive.
Day 4 – Report
Suspect with sugar #
1
2
3
4
5
6
Analysis of compound
Na=27.38 H=1.19 C=14.29 O=57.14
C= 44.44 H=6.17 O=49.38
C=40.00 H=6.67 O=53.33
Molecular Mass= 180g/mol
Ca= 40.00 C= 12.00 O=48.00
C=57.14 H=6.16 N=9.52 O=27.18
C=63.56 H=6.00 N=9.27 O=21.17
The following is a list of the possible compounds:
Aspartame
C14H18N2O5
artificial sweetener
Flour
C6H10O5
used in baking cakes
Acetaminophen
C8H9NO2
pain killer
Glucose
C6H12O6
ingredient in chocolate
Baking Soda
NaHCO3
used in making breads
Calcium Carbonate CaCO3
used in antacids
Day 4 – Report
Here is the suspect list:
Christine Chemrules- chemist addicted to sugar-free drinks
Sarah Sugar- manager that eats chocolate for breakfast, lunch, and dinner
Kasey Kumar- Astronaut and internationally recognized baker
Cameron Cakes- Chef who is famous for his designer cupcakes
Mechanic Matthews- world renowned mechanic with a shoulder injury
K Tashlein- builder of schools (a very stressful job)
Day 4 – Report
The Strange Case of Mendeleev Mechanics Rocket Shop Vandalism:
Case # 1023 Report
Once all investigative work is finished, you will need to complete a report to
be submitted to the courts. The report needs to include the following:
An overview of the process in which you identified all of the victims. (How
you determined the substances using empirical formula)
Identification of the passenger responsible for the crash. (This is where you
make up a motive supported by your evidence)
A picture that will help explain the story.
This report should contain at least two paragraphs as well as a colorful
picture representing the story. All of this needs to be presented neatly on one
or two sheets of paper.
Your report must be submitted by ____________________or the suspect goes free!
PowerPoint Presentation
www.chemistrycameron.wikispaces.com
Session Evaluation: Friday
http://tinyurl.com/GSTA27
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