Population growth and paradoxes of diversity Ontario and the ROC

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Ontario, Migration and the
Paradoxes of Diversity
Jack Jedwab
Association for Canadian Studies
February 2013
Introduction
Ontario is often seen as the capital of Canadian multiculturalism with
one of the continent’s most multi-ethnic and multi-racial populations.
But how do Ontarians view questions around immigration, integration
and identity? To what degree are views around issues of immigration
and diversity amongst Ontarians shared by other Canadians? Is
Ontario a distinct society when it comes to relevant questions around
immigration and integration? The research below suggests a certain
paradox when it comes to views on immigration and integration.
Most important perhaps is the concern with the overall numbers of
immigrants despite the generally high degree of value attributed to
their contribution. Before proceeding to analyze the survey results
the next slide will present the evolution numbers of immigrants
(c.2002-2011) coming to Ontario and some of its larger cities. As well
changing demographic trends in Ontario on the basis of migration
are worth noting as economic concerns persist and population
growth stalls in the province.
Ontario July-Sept 2012 population increase
smallest for 3rd quarter since 1993
In the third quarter of 2012, Ontario (+0.3%) experienced a population
growth comparable to the national average. In October 1, 2012, Ontario’s
population was estimated at 13,546,100, an increase of 40,200 (+0.3%)
compared with July 1, 2012. It was the province’s smallest third-quarter
population increase since 1993. The slowdown in the province’s population
growth was mainly attributable to its losses in interprovincial migration (5,600). In the third quarter of 2012, Ontario lost almost 5,900 people in
migration exchanges with Alberta.
Alberta posted a population growth of 33,100 (+0.9%) in the third quarter
of 2012 to 3,906,800 as of October 1, 2012. Population increase had not
been this high for any quarter, with the exception of the third quarter
of 1980. This growth was mainly the result of net interprovincial migration
(+13,900), with net gain with Ontario (+5,900) and British Columbia
(+4,000).
Source Statistics Canada, Quarterly Demographic EstimatesJuly to September 2012,
(Released December 18, 2012)
Immigration tumbles in Ontario
As observed below in 2011 immigration to the province
of Ontario declined to 99 458 a near 20% decrease over
the previous year and a low for the 21st century. For the
third quarter of 2012 the trend continued with
immigration to Ontario at 86 385. Considering 4th quarter
growth averages 7500 per year (with a range of 5000 to
15 000 per year in Ontario) it is likely that the numbers
for 2012 will remain about the same as 2011. While the
number of permanent residents in Ontario declines
temporary entrants have gone up slightly rising to 67 405
in 2011 its highest for the 21st century and 10% higher
than in 2009
In 2011, Ontario overall immigration declined to lowest number thus far in the 21st
century. In our 5 cities
Ottawa total number of immigrants declined least between 2010 and 2011
Source: Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Urban
area
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Ottawa
7,156
5,960
6,366
6,377
6,279
5,798
6,286
6,297
7,172
6,411
Toronto
111,684
97,554
99,913
112,832
99,289
87,139
86,899
82,639
92,182
77,759
Hamilton 3,127
3,599
4,155
4,613
4,036
3,680
3,806
3,778
4,003
3,296
Kitchener 2,196
2,398
2,767
2,964
3,321
3,205
2,914
2,823
3,059
2,518
London
1,730
2,024
2,347
3,233
2,979
2,459
2,338
2,464
2,938
2,270
Ont
Prov
133,587 119,723 125,093 140,526 125,891 111,316 110,877 106,861 118,111 99,458
Methodology for Opinion Survey Results on
Immigration and Diversity
The National web-based survey was
conducted by the firm Leger Marketing
commissioned for the Association for
Canadian Studies with a sample of 2 200
Canadians was conducted during the
week of November 5th, 2012 and had a
probabilistic margin of error is 2.9 percent
19 times out of 20
Ontarians slightly above national average in percentage agreeing there are too
many immigrants in Canada But slightly above average in value ssigned to
diversity
% Agreement in brackets
percentage that disagree
Multiculturalism a source
of personal or collective
pride in Canada
Canada
68%
Maritimes
63%
QC
62%
ON
70%
MB/SK
62%
AB
68%
BC
68%
There are too many
immigrants in Canada
44% (48%)
26%
49%
46%
(49%)
43%
45%
43%
Immigrants should be
encouraged to give up
their customs and
traditions and become
more like the rest of the
population
People with different
ethnic and religious
backgrounds than the
majority make an
important contribution to
our society
Having many ethnic
groups weakens the
national culture
More than ever, in public, I
hear languages other than
English or French
47%(47%)
29%
61%
43%
(51%)
55%
48%
41%
67%
77%
54%
69%
68%
77%
67%
38%
25%
48%
37%
33%
41%
32%
82%
70%
77%
85%
82%
89%
85%
Ottawa residents most favorable to immigrants. Hamilton residents
most likely to agree that there are too many immigrants
There are too many
immigrants in Canada
Hamilton - Niagara
Peninsula
Strongly agree
23.7%
Somewhat
agree
28.0%
Total
Agree
Total
Disagree
51.7
SomeWhat
disagree
Strongly
disagree
I don't know
21.5%
20.4%
6.5%
41.9
Kitchener - Waterloo Barrie
14.9%
31.9%
46.8 47.8
25.5%
22.3%
6.2%
Greater London area
20.3%
21.7%
42.0 49.3
26.1%
23.2%
8.7%
Greater Ottawa area
19.5%
19.5%
39.0 55.3
28.5%
26.8%
5.7%
Greater Toronto area
13.8%
29.2%
43.0 52.9
23.7%
29.2%
4.0%
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