Lesson 14 - Timberline Fire Protection District

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Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator — Lesson 14
Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator
Handbook, 2nd Edition
Chapter 14 — Water Shuttle Operations
Learning Objectives
1. Select facts about pumpers and water
tenders.
2. Distinguish between gravity and jetassisted dumps.
3. List disadvantages of jet-assisted dumps.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–1
Learning Objectives
4. List crucial decisions that must be made at
the beginning of a water shuttle operation.
5. Select facts about selecting dump and fill
site locations.
6. Answer questions about selecting the route
of travel.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–2
Learning Objectives
7. List safety issues to be considered when
selecting a particular route of travel.
8. Select facts about water shuttles in the
Incident Command System (ICS).
9. Answer questions about positioning the fill
site pumper.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–3
Learning Objectives
10. Select facts about a fill site layout.
11. List the methods for filling tenders on the
top of the apparatus.
12. Answer questions about operating and
shutting down the fill site.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–4
Learning Objectives
13. Operate at a fill site as part of a water
shuttle operation.
14. List the dump site operational methods.
15. Select facts about the dump site
operational methods.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–5
Learning Objectives
16. List the water tender discharge methods.
17. Answer questions about single and multiple
portable tank operations.
18. Select facts about shutting down the dump
site.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–6
Learning Objectives
19. Operate at a portable water tank dump site
as part of a water shuttle operation.
20. Establish, operate, and shut down a
multiple portable tank water shuttle dump
site.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–7
Learning Objectives
21. State the equations for determining travel
time, handling time, and tender flow rate.
22. Calculate tender flow rates.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–8
Pumpers
• Fill site pumpers
– Position at supply source and fill water tenders
– Have a minimum pump capacity of 1,000 gpm
(4 000 L/min) per NFPA® 1901
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–9
Pumpers
• Dump site pumpers
– Located at or near the fire scene and used
to draft water from portable water tanks
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–10
Pumpers
• Need to be equipped with hard intake hose
and strainers for drafting
• May be specifically designed by jurisdiction
– Light-duty trucks or trailers equipped with largevolume, auxiliary-powered, irrigation or trash
pumps that discharge through large diameter hose
– Capacities up to 1,600 gpm (6 400 L/min) at a
maximum of 80 psi (550 kPa)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–11
Water Tenders
• The backbone of any water shuttle operation
• Carry at least 1,000 gallons (4 000 L) of water
• Most carry from 1,500 to 3,000 gallons
(6 000 L to 12 000 L)
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–12
Water Tenders
• Those with water tanks with less than 2,500
gallons (10 000 L) and rapid unloading
capabilities are the most efficient for use in
water shuttle operations.
• Those with tanks exceeding 2,500 gallons
(10 000 L) are used as dump sites instead of
portable water tanks.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–13
Water Tenders
• Those used only for water shuttle operations
do not require a fire pump if they are
equipped with a suitable gravity dump
system.
• Some rural departments purchase vacuum
tankers because of efficiency. These self-fill at
a rate of up to 2,000 gpm (8 000 L/min) with
lift capability of up to 22 feet (6.7 m)
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–14
Water Tenders
• Some departments convert other types of
tank trucks, including petroleum tankers, milk
trucks, vacuum trucks, and surplus military
vehicles.
• Problems with these trucks:
– Chassis are not designed for weight of water
carried on them
– Tanks are inadequately baffled for fire service use
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–15
Water Tender Requirements
• Tank-to-pump line that is capable of supplying
the pump with 500 gpm (2 000 L/min) until at
least 80 percent of water is emptied
– Should be at least 2 inches (50 mm) in
diameter
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–16
Water Tender Requirements
• At least one external fill
connection that is plumbed
directly into the tank
– Allow tank to be filled at
a minimum rate of 1,000
gpm (4 000 L/min)
– Equipped with valve,
strainer, and 30º elbow;
valves 3 inches (77 mm)
or larger must be slowclosing
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–17
(Continued)
Water Tender Requirements
• At least one large tank
discharge that is capable
of emptying 90 percent of
the tank volume at an
average rate of 1,000 gpm
(4 000 L/min)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–18
Water Tender Filling and
Dumping Capabilities
• Those that use smaller diameter supply lines
for filling should have at least two external fill
connections piped directly to the tank.
• If LDH is used, one fill connection to the tank
is adequate.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–19
Water Tender Filling and
Dumping Capabilities
• The direct tank fill inlet(s) may be designed so
that the tank is filled from bottom or top.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–20
Water Tender Filling and
Dumping Capabilities
• Although NFPA® only requires one large tank
discharge, or dump valve, be installed on a
water tender, it is highly recommended that
each tender be equipped with at least three.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–21
Gravity Dumps
• Rely on gravity to empty water from the tank
• Usually employ 8-inch (200 mm) or larger
round or square piping with a valve that
extends to the exterior of the apparatus
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–22
Gravity Dumps
• Have a valve that is
designed to be
opened manually or
remotely
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–23
Jet-Assisted Dumps
• Use of small diameter
in-line discharge
inserted into the piping
of the large tank
discharge, which
creates a venturi effect
that increases water
flow through the large
tank discharge
Courtesy: Rimrock Fire Dept. (AZ)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–24
Disadvantages of
Jet-Assisted Dumps
• Apparatus must be equipped with fire pump.
• The fire pump must be engaged before
dumping water from the tank.
• Water can still be discharged if the pump is
not operating, but at a considerably lower
rate.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–25
Disadvantages of
Jet-Assisted Dumps
• They increase cost of the apparatus.
• There is a danger of water being discharged
completely over the portable tank and hitting
anyone or anything on the other side.
• There is a danger of the pump and piping
freezing in cold temperatures.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–26
Beginning of the
Water Shuttle Operation
• The success or failure of a water shuttle
hinges on several decisions that must be
made at the beginning of the incident.
– Location of the dump site
– Location of the fill site
– Route of travel for the tenders between
dump and fill sites
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–27
Selecting the Dump Site Location
• Should be in close
proximity to the
incident scene
• May be advantageous
to locate at nearest
intersection in cases of
narrow lane, driveway,
or dead-end street
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–28
Selecting the Dump Site Location
• Large parking lots or other open areas very
near the scene make excellent dump sites.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–29
Selecting a Fill Site Location
• Should be selected by IC or water supply
group supervisor
• Should require a minimum of maneuvering of
backing of the water tenders
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–30
Selecting a Fill Site Location
• The best fill and
dump sites are
those in which the
water tenders drive
straight in, fill or
dump, then proceed
straight out
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–31
Selecting a Fill Site Location
• If some maneuvering is unavoidable,
remember that it is better to maneuver an
apparatus before the tank is filled.
• On large-scale operations, it may be
advantageous to use multiple fill and dump
sites.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–32
Selecting the Route of Travel
• The route of travel should reflect both safety
and operational efficiency considerations.
• A circular route is considered to be the
optimum arrangement.
– Full tankers leave the fill site following one
route; empty tenders leave the dump site
using a different route.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–33
Selecting the Route of Travel
• If possible, roadways should be closed to all
traffic other than emergency vehicles.
WARNING! At fill sites adjacent to roadways
that have not been closed to public traffic,
water tenders should be positioned off the
roadway when possible. When not possible,
traffic cones, signs, and/or other devices
should be set out to warn motorists to avoid
apparatus stopped there.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–34
Safety Issues When
Selecting a Route of Travel
• Narrow roads — Can cause tires to leave the
road surface and cause a rollover
• Long driveways — Require tight maneuvering
of apparatus
• Blind curves and intersections — Crossing
the centerline on blind curves risks entering
the path of other vehicles
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–35
Safety Issues When
Selecting a Route of Travel
• Winding roads — Require a lot of
concentration by driver/operators
• Steep grades — Slow the operation and
increase wear on the vehicle
• Inclement weather conditions — Avoid roads
that have not been cleared of ice, snow,
standing water, mud, or storm debris
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–36
Water Shuttles in the Incident
Command System (ICS)
• The IC may establish a water supply branch
or group that includes the water shuttle
operation.
• The supervisor of this group is known as the
Water Supply Group Supervisor; he or she
only communicates directly with command.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–37
Water Shuttles in the Incident
Command System (ICS)
• The supervisor should appoint individuals to
be in charge of the fill site and the dump site.
• Jurisdictions with multiple radio frequencies
may find it helpful to switch the water shuttle
operation to a separate channel.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–38
Water Shuttles in the Incident
Command System (ICS)
• The supervisor should monitor water demand
at the dump site and anticipate problems.
• The IC should be in close contact with the
supervisor in case conditions demand a
significant change in water volume needed.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–39
Water Shuttles in the Incident
Command System (ICS)
• When a significant amount of water is
required for a large fire fighting operation, it
may be necessary to establish two or more
independent water shuttle operations.
• When two or more shuttles are required, the
IC may establish a water supply branch with
a Water Supply Branch Director in charge.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–40
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• Water supplies for a shuttle operation come
from either a fire hydrant or a static water
supply source.
• IFSTA recommends that a pumper be used
to fill tenders at all fill site operations,
regardless of whether a hydrant or static
source is used.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–41
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• A pumper connected to a hydrant can deliver
greater water volume per minute than a
hydrant alone.
• If a pumper is not available and water tenders
must refill from a hydrant, the first tender can
leave the necessary intake hose and fittings
for use by the next tender.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–42
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• Driver/Operators must determine best
position for drafting or hydrant connection
that allows maximum access for tenders to be
filled.
• When positioning at a hydrant, driver/
operators should connect a large diameter
intake hose between the large pump intake
and the steamer connection on the hydrant.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–43
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• If the hydrant is on a
particularly strong
main, smaller
diameter lines may be
connected between
2½-inch (65 mm)
hydrant outlet(s) and
auxiliary intake(s) on
the pump.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–44
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• When positioning at a draft, seek a spot that
requires a minimum amount of lift or hard
intake hose.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–45
Positioning the Fill Site Pumper
• If the static water supply source is
inaccessible, two or more high-volume
portable pumps may be used to relay water.
• A booster line or some other type of small
discharge line within view of the driver/
operator should be continuously flowed from
the fill site pumper to prevent loss of prime.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–46
Fill Site Layout
• Once fill site pumper has positioned at the
water supply source, lay out the remainder of
hose and appliances needed to operate.
• The most efficient hoses used are two 2½inch (65 mm) direct tank fill connections or
one LDH direct tank fill connection on the rear
of the vehicle.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–47
Fill Site Layout
• First determine where to position the water
tender when it arrives at the fill site. It should
be positioned to require a minimum of hose
from the fill site pumper.
• The ideal position allows the driver/operator
to enter and exit the site without the need to
turn around or back up.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–48
Fill Site Layout
• Once the exact fill site has been established,
a traffic cone or similar marker may be used
to denote the stopping point for the water
tender driver/operator. The water tender
should be pulled so that the driver’s side door
window is adjacent to the cone.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–49
Fill Site Layout
• If the tenders being filled have two 2½-inch
(65 mm) direct tank fill connections, two
hoselines should be laid to the approximate
location of the rear of the tender when it is
stopped for filling.
• If available, 3-inch (77 mm) hose should be
used as it allows for quicker filling of the tank.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–50
Fill Site Layout
• Each hoseline should have a gate valve
installed between the last section and next to
the last section of hose.
• These are used to open the lines once they
are connected to the tender for filling. If gate
valves are not available, use hose clamps.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–51
Fill Site Layout
• Many jurisdictions equip inlets on direct tank
fill connections with sexless couplings. These
speed connection of hose to the apparatus.
• If the apparatus is equipped with sexless
connections, it may be necessary to install
sexless adapters on the end of the hoses that
are used to fill the tenders.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–52
Fill Site Layout
• If tenders being filled have LDH direct tank fill
intakes, it is only necessary to lay one LDH
from the fill site pumper to the fill location.
• If a large in-line gate valve is not available for
the LDH, it may be possible to place an LDH
manifold between the last two sections of
hose to act as a gate valve.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–53
Fill Site Layout
• If no gate valve or manifold is available, it is
best to open and close LDH fill lines at the
pump panel of the fill site pumper.
CAUTION! Using hose clamps on LDH can
be unsafe. Flow through LDH should only be
controlled at the pumper or with valved
appliances.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–54
Fill Site Layout
• If some of the water tenders to be filled have
2½-inch (65 mm) intakes and others have
LDH intakes, it will be necessary to use
adapters to make the connections. However,
it may be faster and more efficient to lay out
hoses of the appropriate sizes to allow
connecting to either type of intake.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–55
Methods for Filling Tenders
on the Top of the Apparatus
• Fixed or portable overhead pipes at the static
water source
• Permanent or portable manifolds
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–56
Fixed or Portable Overhead
Pipes at the Static Water Source
• These devices are operated by placing one
end of the fill pipe in a static source.
• A pumper discharges water through a small
diameter hose line into an in-line water
siphon that is inside the fill pipe, creating an
adequate flow rate through the fill pipe.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–57
Fixed or Portable Overhead
Pipes at the Static Water Source
• In-line water siphons should be pumped at
150 psi (1 050 kPa) and provide 700 to 800
gpm (2 8000 L/min to 3 200 L/min) through 4inch (100 mm) pipe.
• These devices are only used when the
tenders have no other way of being filled than
through the top opening.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–58
Permanent or Portable Manifolds
• Located adjacent to a water source and fed
by the fill site pumper
• The fill site pumper connects between the
water supply and the fill pipe to provide
overhead water when a tender is positioned
beneath the fill opening.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–59
Permanent or Portable Manifolds
• If the water supply source is reliable, high fill
rates may be accomplished.
• The downside is that it may take jockeying
(and loss of time) to get the tank opening
positioned directly beneath the fill spout.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–60
Permanent or Portable Manifolds
Note: Filling a tanker through the top with a
portable fill device, or an open hose butt, is
not recommended due to reaction of the
hoseline. Firefighter safety is a primary
concern; firefighters can be thrown off or slip
from a tanker during top filling by this method.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–61
Operating the Fill Site
• It is recommended that the fill site pumper
remain in gear with the tender fill lines
charged at all times.
• A booster line or other waste line can be
continuously flowed to prevent loss of prime
or pump overheating.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–62
Operating the Fill Site
• Make and break personnel — Make the fill
connection when the tender arrives and
disconnect the hose(s) when the tank is full;
these personnel remain with these lines until
other firefighters replace them.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–63
Operating the Fill Site
• When reaching the fill site, driver/operators
should cautiously pull into the filling position
until the driver’s door is parallel to the stop
marker.
• When the apparatus has come to a complete
stop, the make and break personnel connect
the fill hose(s) to the direct tank fill intake(s).
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–64
Operating the Fill Site
• Once the hose is connected, the intake
valve(s) may be opened.
• At this point, the make and break personnel
return to the gate valve(s) or manifold on the
fill hose(s) and slowly open the valve(s) to
start water flowing.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–65
Operating the Fill Site
• While filling is taking place, the tender
driver/operator should remain in the cab of
the apparatus.
• Any tenders that arrive in the area of the fill
site while one tender is being filled should
stage a safe distance back, and maintain an
orderly line.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–66
Operating the Fill Site
• If the fill site has sufficient room, a second set
of fill lines may be laid from the pumper for a
second tender.
• While one tender is being filled, the second
may be pulled into position and connected to
fill lines.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–67
Operating the Fill Site
• When the first tender is full and lines are shut
down, lines to the second tender may be
opened to begin filling.
• Note: Unless the fill site pumper is connected
to a high flow hydrant, it is generally not
recommended that both tenders be filled at
the same time.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–68
Operating the Fill Site
• Once the water tank is completely full, the
make and break personnel should first slowly
close the valve(s) on the gate valve or
manifold.
• They should then proceed to the connection
at the direct tank fill inlet, close the tank fill
valve, and operate the bleeder valve to
relieve the pressure on the line(s).
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–69
Operating the Fill Site
• Once the pressure has been relieved, the
hoses should be disconnected and pulled off
to the side of the fill site.
• The driver/operator should then be signaled
to proceed back to the dump site.
• The next tender may then proceed to the fill
site, and the process is repeated.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–70
(Continued)
Operating the Fill Site
• The make and break personnel or fill site
officer should monitor the ground conditions
around the fill site as operations proceed.
– During freezing conditions, ice may begin to form
due to water spilled in the area.
– If the road is not paved, it may begin to become
soft.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–71
Shutting Down the Fill Site
• Once the decision has been made that the
water shuttle operation is no longer
necessary, the fill site should remain in
operation until all tenders participating in the
shuttle have been refilled.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–72
Shutting Down the Fill Site
• Most jurisdictions prefer to fill their tenders
before they begin their return to quarters to
ensure that they have adequate water to
handle any incident they may encounter on
their return. This also ensures that they are
available to immediately respond to another
call if needed.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–73
Shutting Down the Fill Site
• It is recommended that the apparatus housed
farthest from the scene be released first.
• Once all the water tenders have been refilled,
the fill site pumper and equipment may be
shut down and prepared to return to service.
• If the water supply source was a static
source, all pumps and equipment should be
flushed to clear stones or debris.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–74
Dump Site Operational Methods
• Direct pumping operations
• Nurse tender operation
• Portable water tank operations
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–75
Direct Pumping Operations
• Occur when a water tender pumps the water
from its tank directly into the pump intake of
the attack pumper
• Are typically set up by having the attack
pumper lay out the supply line, equipped with
a clappered or gated siamese, to a location
that is easily accessible to the tenders
approaching the scene
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–76
Direct Pumping Operations
• When the first water tender arrives at the
dump site, the supply hose is connected to a
discharge on the fire pump on the water
tender.
• The contents of the tender’s water tank are
then pumped to the attack pumper.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–77
Direct Pumping Operations
• While the first tender is supplying water to the
attack pumper, a second water tender
connects to the other inlet of the siamese and
charges that line at the pressure slightly lower
than that being pumped by the first tender.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–78
Direct Pumping Operations
• When the first tender’s tank is empty, their
supply line is shut down.
• Because the second tender’s supply line is
already connected and charged, there is no
interruption of the water supply to the attack
pumper.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–79
Direct Pumping Operations
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–80
Nurse Tender Operations
• Generally involves a very large water tender
that is positioned immediately adjacent to the
attack pumper and fulfills the same function
as a portable tank.
• The attack pumper is either supplied by a
discharge line from the pump of the nurse
tender or drafts directly from the tank of the
nurse tender.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–81
Nurse Tender Operations
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–82
Advantages of Nurse
Tender Operations
• In many cases the nurse tender is so large
that the fire is controlled before there is a
need to refill its tank.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–83
Disadvantages of
Nurse Tender Operations
• All shutter tenders are required to have a
sizable fire pump to pump their loads into the
nurse tender.
• Even with a sizable pump, the dumping time
for each tender is significantly longer than if
they were able to discharge through their
large diameter direct tank discharge valve.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–84
Portable Water Tank Operations
• Use one or more portable water tanks as the
dump site water supply source.
• One or more of these tanks is positioned in a
strategic location near the fire scene.
• Once the tank is positioned, the dump site
pumper deploys a hard intake hose with a
low-level strainer into one of the tanks and
prepares to draft water from the tank.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–85
Portable Water Tank Operations
• When the first tender arrives on the scene, it
discharges its water into the portable tank.
• The dump site pumper may then begin
drafting from the tank and supplying water to
the attack pumper.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–86
Advantages of Portable
Water Tank Operations
• Do not require the water tenders to be
equipped with a fire pump as long as they
have an adequate-sized direct-tank discharge
valve and adequate venting
• May be the easiest of the three methods to
ensure a constant supply of water to the
attack pumper
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–87
Disadvantage of Portable
Water Tank Operations
• If a multiple tank operation is to be employed,
a substantial amount of working space is
required for the dump site
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–88
Water Tender Discharge Methods
• Using a pump on the tender
• Using a dump valve
• Pumping and dumping simultaneously
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–89
Single Portable Tank Operations
• The simplest form of a dump site operation is
one in which a single portable water tank is
used.
• In this case, the tenders dump their water
directly into the tank from which the dump site
pumper is drafting.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–90
Single Portable Tank Operations
• This method works on fires that require
relatively low overall flow rates (less than 300
gpm [1 200 L/min]).
• The portable tank and the dump site pumper
must be positioned so that easy in-and-out
access is allowed for the water tenders that
are dumping into the tank.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–91
Single Portable Tank Operations
• Several types of portable water tanks may be
used.
– Folding type
– Type with several sections that must be
assembled at the scene
– Self-supporting or frameless portable tank
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–92
Single Portable Tank Operations
• Regardless of type, it is recommended that
the portable water tank be set up on a level
surface and have a capacity that is at least
500 gallons (2 000 L) larger than the capacity
of the water tank on the apparatus carrying it.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–93
Single Portable Tank Operations
• The dump site pumper should have a lowlevel strainer attached to the hard intake hose
allowing continuous drafting ability down to
the point where only about 2 inches (50 mm)
of water is left in the tank.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–94
Single Portable Tank Operations
• Once the portable tank has been set up, the
first tender may dump water into the tank.
• Once the first tender has emptied its tank into
the portable tank, it should immediately
proceed toward the fill site to reload.
• If there is space in the portable tank, the next
tender should be positioned and its water
dumped into the portable tank until it is filled.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–95
Multiple Portable Tank Operations
• Incidents that require flow rates in excess of
300 gpm (1 200 L/min) are best served by
this type of operation.
• The number of portable tanks used at a dump
site is limited only by the number of tanks and
amount of water transfer equipment available
at the scene.
• Most multiple portable tank operations range
from two to five portable tanks.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–96
Multiple Portable Tank Operations
• When multiple portable tanks are used, each
of the tanks is positioned so that water may
be transferred from one tank to the next.
• The ultimate destination of the water in all the
tanks is to be routed into the last tank, from
which the dump site pumper is drafting water
that is being supplied to the attack pumper.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–97
Multiple Portable Tank Operations
• Methods
– Connect two
tanks by their
drain openings
– Use jet siphons
to move water
from one tank to
another
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–98
Multiple Portable Tank Operations
• The dump site officer should monitor the
ground conditions around the dump site as
operations proceed.
• If all the portable tanks become empty at
some point during the operation, the dump
site pumper may continue to support
fireground operations using water in its
onboard water tank.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–99
Multiple Portable Tank Operations
• At this time, firefighters in hazardous
positions should be withdrawn as loss of
water to attack lines may be imminent. Once
the portable tanks are refilled, normal
operations may resume.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–100
Shutting Down the Dump Site
• Before shutting down a dump site operation,
it is generally a good idea to make sure that
the attack apparatus and dump site pumper
have topped off their onboard water tanks.
• Once the tanks are full, all drafting and water
transfer equipment can be disassembled,
cleaned, and stowed.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–101
Shutting Down the Dump Site
• Any tenders that were staged in preparation
for dumping may be returned to service or
used in any other manner the IC deems
appropriate.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–102
Calculating Travel Time
• Customary
0.65 + (1.7)(Distance in miles)
• Metric
0.65 + (1.06)(Distance in km)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–103
Calculating Handling Time
Fill site time + dump site time
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–104
Calculating Tender Flow Rate
Water tank size (gal or L) – 10%
Travel time + handling time
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–105
Summary
• Water shuttle operations are needed when
the distance from a fire to the nearest water
source makes relay pumping impractical.
• Unless vacuum tenders are being used,
these operations usually involve a pumper
stationed at the water source to refill water
tenders that shuttle water to another pumper
at the fire scene.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–106
Summary
• In jurisdictions that do not have a pressurized
water supply in all areas of the district,
driver/operators must be trained on water
shuttle techniques and be capable of
performing any part of the operation to which
they may be assigned.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–107
Discussion Questions
1. Name the two types of pumpers.
2. What are some disadvantages of jetassisted dumps?
3. What are the crucial decisions that must be
made at the beginning of a water shuttle
operation?
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–108
Discussion Questions
4. Name some safety issues to be considered
when selecting a particular route of travel.
5. What are the methods for filling tenders on
the top of the apparatus?
6. Name the dump site operational methods.
(Continued)
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–109
Discussion Questions
7. Name the water tender discharge methods.
8. What are the three types of portable water
tanks?
9. State the equations for determining travel
time, handling time, and tender flow rate.
Pumping Apparatus
Driver/Operator
14–110
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