Chemistry: Matter and Change

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Section 15.2 Heat
• Describe how a
calorimeter is used to
measure energy that is
absorbed or released.
• Explain the meaning of
enthalpy and enthalpy
change in chemical
reactions and processes.
Calorimetry
• A calorimeter is an insulated device used
for measuring the amount of heat absorbed
or released in a chemical reaction or
physical process.
• How dose it work?
• 1- A sample(food for example) is positioned in
a steel inner chamber called the bomb, which
is filled with oxygen at high pressure.
• 2- Surrounding the bomb is a measured mass
of water stirred by a low-friction stirrer to
ensure uniform temperature.
• 3- The reaction is initiated by a spark, and the
temperature is recorded until it reaches its
maximum.
• You have to know that:
• A known mass of water is placed in an
insulated chamber to absorb the energy
released from the reacting system or to
provide the energy absorbed by the
system.
• Combustion reactions carried out in
calorimeters
• Determining specific heat: Using foam-cup
calorimeter which are open to the atmosphere,
so reactions carried out in them occur at
constant pressure.
Q:Suppose you put 125 g of water into a foamcup calorimeter and find that its initial
temperature is 25.60°C.Then you heat a 50.0g
sample of the unknown metal to 115.0°C and
put the metal sample into the water
• Heat flows from the hot metal to the cooler
water, and the temperature of the water rises.
The flow of heat stops only when the
temperature of the metal and the water are
equal.( specific heat of water=4.184j/(g.C), T final for water = 29.3C, T final for metal=29.3C)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Equation for Calculating Heat:
q = c × m × ∆T
q = the heat absorbed or released
C= specific heat
M= mass
∆T= is the change in temperature in °C, or Tfinal -Tinitial.
• q water = 4.184 × 125 × (29.30°C 25.60°C)
• q water = 4.184 × 125 × 3.70°C
• q water = 1940 J
• The heat gained by the water, 1940 J,
equals the heat lost by the metal,
• q metal = q water
• q metal = −1940 J
• c metal × m × ∆T = −1940 J
• c metal = -1940 J
m × ∆T
• c metal = -1940 J
(50.0 g)(-85.7°C)
= 0.453 J/(g·°C)
Chemical Energy and the Universe
• Thermochemistry is the study of heat
changes that accompany chemical
reactions and phase changes.
• The system is the specific part of the
universe that contains the reaction or process
you wish to study.
Chemical Energy and the Universe (cont.)
• The surroundings are everything else
other than the system in the universe.
• The universe is defined as the system plus
the surroundings.
Chemical Energy and the Universe (cont.)
• Chemists are interested in changes in
energy during reactions.
• Enthalpy is the heat content of a system at constant
pressure.
• The enthalpy change for a reaction is the
enthalpy of the products minus the enthalpy of
the reactants.
• Enthalpy (heat) of reaction is the change in
enthalpy during a reaction symbolized as ΔHrxn.
ΔHrxn = Hfinal – Hinitial
ΔHrxn = Hproducts – Hreactants
Chemical Energy and the Universe (cont.)
• Enthalpy changes for exothermic reactions
are always negative.
• Enthalpy changes for endothermic reactions
are always positive.
Chemical Energy and the Universe (cont.)
Chemical Energy and the Universe (cont.)
• Q1:Describe how you would calculate the
amount of heat absorbed or released by a
substance when its temperature changes?
• The heat absorbed or released equals the
specific heat of the substance times its
mass times its change in temperature
• Q2 Explain why ∆H for an exothermic
reaction always has a negative value?
• ∆ H rxn = H products - H reactants
and H products < H reactants .
• Q3 Explain why a measured volume of
water is an essential part of a calorimeter?
• You need the mass of the water in order to
calculate the heat absorbed or released
• (q = cm∆T).
Q4 Explain why you need to know the
specific heat of a substance in order to
calculate how much heat is gained or lost
by the substance as a result of a
temperature change?
The specific heat of a substance tells you
the number of joules that are lost or
gained for every degree change in
temperature and for every gram of the
substance.
• Q5 Describe what the system means in
thermodynamics, and explain how the system
is related to the surroundings and the
universe.
• The system contains the process being
studied. The surroundings are every- thing
except the system, and the universe is the
system and its surroundings.
In thermochemistry, the specific part
of the universe you are studying is
called ____.
A. system
B. area
C. enthalpy
D. surroundings
A.
B.
C.
D.
A
B
C
D
What is the heat content of a system at
constant pressure called?
A. heat of reaction
B. heat of the system
C. enthalpy
D. entropy
A.
B.
C.
D.
A
B
C
D
What is the universe when using a bombcalorimeter to measure heat absorbed by
a substance in a process?
A. the substance in the calorimeter
B. the calorimeter itself
C. the water in the calorimeter
D. the calorimeter and all
its contents
A.
B.
C.
D.
A
B
C
D
In which example is the ΔH° positive?
A. an ice cube melting
B. condensation forming on
cold glass of water
C. molten lava cooling to
form solid rock
D. water vapor changing
directly into frost on windows
A.
B.
C.
D.
A
B
C
D
The specific heat of ethanol is 2.4 J/g ● C.
How many degrees Celsius can a 50.0g
sample be raised with 2400 J of energy?
A. 10°
B. 20°
C. 30°
D. 40°
A.
B.
C.
D.
A
B
C
D
End of sec 15.2
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