SMART Grid Integration Through Advance Analytic

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SMART Grid
Integration Through
Advance Analytic
Solutions
Conference on Transmission Distribution &
Metering India (Enabling Smart Grid Smart
Metering) – New Delhi
10-11 November 2010
Arindam Ghosh
Smart Grid Vision
To digitize a largely passive network into a two-way,
interactive information highway to support metering and grid
monitoring and control, from demand management to “selfhealing” circuits.
– Grid intelligence (collecting and analyzing data about grid
activities and behaviors) and the ability to act in real-time
are the defining capabilities.
– Smart Grid involves a large-scale investment in T&D
infrastructure aimed at enabling, and improving, advanced
metering, demand response, asset management, and
system reliability.
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Source: EEI
Uncertainties and obstacles
•
Little consensus on definition or direction
•
Lack of standards
•
Uncertain performance expectations,
benefits, and costs
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
•
Limited investment capacity
•
Uncertain regulatory treatment
Smart Grid Future Technology - the Driving Force
Characteristics of SMART GRID
Drivers of SMART GRID
Demand
• Rapid Growth in Overall
Electricity Demand
• Growing awareness for
Reliable and Quality
Electricity supply
Technology
• Network Operations
Optimization
• Dispersed Generation and
Grid coordination
• Renewable energy
Integration
Regulatory
• Increasing competition within
Industry due to deregulation
and restructuring
• Pressure on DISCOMS to
increase energy efficiency and
be self sufficient
Internal
• Theft and Fraud Detection
• Demand Management and
Volatility adjustment
• Meter based Billing rather than
estimated billing
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Smart Grid Represents a Major Enterprise Transformation
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
The Impact Is Broad and Pervasive
Smart Grid Business
Changes
Major Processes
Impacted
Benefit Categories
• Meter reading expense
Leveraging opportunities
to gain operational efficiency
• Asset management
• Meter to cash
• Field service and maintenance
• Preventable field labor accidents
• Back-office operating cost
• Revenue growth
• Field customer service costs
• Non-collectible expense
Leveraging opportunities
to gain operational efficiency
• Customer service
• Customer response
Enabling new capabilities for
advanced power management
• Network operations
• Generation capacity and planning
• Energy scheduling and dispatch
• Customer service field labor
• Service order response time
• Forecast accuracy
• Net billing
• Line loss revenue
• Fuel cost avoidance
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
A Broader Approach Recognizes the Role and Importance of Data
as a Transformation Driver
Technology
• Interoperability
• Systems integration Process
• Architecture
• There is tremendous value potential in
identifying ways in which data can
transform the business.
Organization
• Workforce rationalization
• Skill development
• Resource progression
• Data can be the source of new value as
well as being the “multiplier effect” to
leverage additional value from existing
Process
• Re-engineering
• Process optimization
• Quality and productivity
investments.
• Decision support
Data
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
• Optimized operation
• Automation
Data Becomes a Key to Driving Value
Optimizing the benefits of Smart Grid requires a data-driven transformation in addition to technology and process
New and Additional Data
• Interval consumption
• Interval demand
• Meter status/error reporting
• Event completion notification
• Condition alert (i.e. tampering)
• Grid node status
• Distributed generation data
• Feeder status/monitoring data
• Power quality incidents
• T&D line loss
• Grid voltage stability
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Meter Data Management Managing a Complex Environment
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Meter Data Management (MDM)
– Why it is critical for Smart Grid
•
New meter technologies capture significantly more data. Utilities need a central
repository for this data.
•
MDM is the foundation on which many AMI and Smart Grid programs will be built,
both as a technical prerequisite and as a foundation for improved business value.
•
While meter data was once viewed as simply an input to the billing process, its
strategic business value has grown considerably.
•
It provides the data required for regulatory reporting compliance as well as key
business metrics.
•
MDM is a central component to enabling and managing security and information
protection
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Some key data management considerations
• Data Volume & Management
• Data Collection & Collation
• Legal Consultation and Privacy Concerns
• Incident and Breach Management Planning
• Leverage Data Audits and Reviews
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
The Architecture of Smart Grid Creates a Paradigm Shift in the
Role of Data
At Present
Future
Bidirectional, real-time
communications
Time sensitivity in
milliseconds
Consolidated & Integrated
Applications
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
How to Extract Value from Data
Example – Distribution Management
Network Operation and
Maintenance
Schedule and Dispatch
Energy Management
Network Planning
Grid operations have historically been limited by unidirectional communication devices and a high degree of
manual involvement. Outage management is typically a reactive process based on trouble calls. A “Smart”
grid with numerous data collection and control points will provide the data to enable advanced distribution
and power management capabilities.
1. Identify
Available Data
• Condition-based monitoring
• Feeder segmentation
• Distributed generation
• Plug-in electric vehicle (PHEV)
• Demand-side demand response
• Home area network
• Grid voltage
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
2. Assess
Potential Value
• Enable “self-healing” and increase distribution
management automation
• Grid can proactively identify potential failure points
and react to prevent outage
• Reduce outage rate of occurrence and impact
• Make outage management more proactive vs.
reactive
• Increase grid management
“intelligence”
3. Develop the
Transformation
• Automate sensors and control nodes to react to specific
events
• Program outage alarms and notifications to automatically
initiate repair crew work orders and customer communication
• Establish a distribution management system to operate grid
• Assess potential redundancies with other systems (i.e. Outage
Management System (OMS)
Data Analytics - Life Cycle for a Power Distribution Utility
Data Point
Optimization
•
Demand Analysis
•
Market Insights
•
Dashboards
Business
Drivers to
Achieve
MDMS
•
Customer Data
Analytics
•
Load Data Analytics
•
Billing Data Analytics
•
Vendor Data
Management
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
•
Grid Optimization
•
Demand
Management
Revenue Protection
•
Outage
Management
Business
Benefits
after MDMS
MDMS
•
Abnormal
consumption report
•
Areas of High Loss
Report
•
Consumption
trends Report
MIS and Reporting
Key Concentration Areas
•
Roadmap after MDMS
Metered Data Management System
Intelligent Solutions
Business Analytics
Roadmap to MDMS
Advantages of Advance Analytics
“Customer Information
and Energy Use”
• Automation / effort reduction
• Restoration improvements
• Revenue protection
• Some demand reduction
“Grid Optimization “
• Asset life optimization
• System operational efficiency
• Improved reliability
• Predictive maintenance
Beyond the
Meter
“Strategic Consumer
Integration and
Empowerment”
• Consumer engagement
• Energy efficiency
• Incremental revenue
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Focus:
Change:
•
•
•
•
Infrastructure and meter install
Customer interaction
Usage and outage analytics
Meter to cash process
connectivity
• Governance
Focus:
Change:
• Network and asset management
• Advanced workflow
• Real-time data management and
analytics
• Operating model integration
Focus:
Change:
• Enhanced Business model
• Customer strategy and
behaviors
• Third party relationships
• Innovation and collaboration at
speed
14
Analytics Solution - Illustrative
Grid Optimization
Revenue
Protection
Customer Information and Energy Use
+
Active Load
Control
Performance
Outage
Management
Strategic Consumer Integration
and Empowerment
Sub-Metering
 Abnormal consumption report
 Demand Optimization
 Price & Load Modeling
 Load Forecasting
 Load Profile
Solutions
_
 Market profile
 Customer profile
 Peak clipping
 Load shifting
 Scheduling & Settlement
 Tariff profiling
 Theft Detection
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
 Integrated Voltage /VAR Control
 Usage Analysis
 Distribution Planning & Analysis
 Areas of High Loss Report
 Consumption trends Report
Real time
Decision
Making
Risk Analytics Solution - Illustrative
+
Rate Analysis &
Load Factor
Analysis
Usage and
Scenario Analysis
Energy
Performance
Accounting
Transformer &
cable load and
equipment load
analysis
Alarm and
Notifications
 Energy Balance
Report
 Transformer & cable
load and equipment load
analysis
Solutions
_
 Last-Gasp, PowerUp Messages,
 Carbon footprint
Analysis
 Peak and Valley
Analysis
 Demand violations
 Abnormal power
factors
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
 Advanced switching
Modeling
 Applications Utility
Modeling
 Flexible Load building
Modeling
 Reliability area
footprint modeling
 Demand supply /
demand response
Modeling
 Energy mix Analysis
 Forecasting & Energy
Procurement
 Baselines and Outlier Analysis
 Identifying tampered meters
or zero readings
 Customers who are billed but
never pay
 Customers billed on average
or minimum
 Customers with same name
and address
 Same customer number with
different names and addresses
 Customers with no name and
address
MIS and Reporting Solution - Illustrative
Continuous Monitoring and Vigilance Dashboard
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated
with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
•
Near real time energy accounting
•
Data Reconciliation Monitoring
•
Area / Office wise monitoring
•
Watching High Value Customers for fraud
Thank You
Presentation by Arindam Ghosh
Associate Director – Advisory
KPMG
DLF Corporate Park
DLF City, Phase III
Gurgaon 122002, India
Mobile: +91 9650666868
Email: arindamghosh@kpmg.com
© 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG
network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International
Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
The KPMG name, logo and "cutting through complexity" are registered
trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International Cooperative ("KPMG
International").
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