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Community Perspective on
Electrification
By
Tlaleng Moabi
Energy Indaba
15 March 2012
Presentation Outline
• WOESA Background & Objectives
• Women Involvement in Electrification Projects
• Community Perspective
• Prior to implementation
• During Implementation
• Post Implementation
WOESA Origins

WOESA was established in 2002 with support from the
then DME and the Minister of Minerals and Energy

WOESA was created as a Section 21 company with
membership of about 300 WOMEN companies

WOESA Profile
 >300 Member Companies represented in all
9 provinces, include corporate members
 Companies range from small rural
establishments to medium operations
WOMEN INVOLVEMENT

Unfortunately, most of our constituency is
companies with interest in the sector but have no
technical skills
 However, we have women that are involved in
engineering, project management and
construction in the Energy sector
 Drive towards development of women in
technical fields in the oil and energy
sectors, e.g. professional women in the
Energy Sector
ELECTRIFICATION
PROGRAMME
COMMUNITIES
PERSPECTIVE
IMPACT OF
ELECTRIFICATION

Improved access to essential services such
as healthcare, education and clean water
 Better quality of life
 Job Creation
 Reduction of greenhouse effect
INITIATION STAGE

>30 years without electricity, the gratitude
when one first makes contact is humbling.

Eager to assist the Contractors in terms of:
– Site establishment
– Safe guarding of material and the electricity
network during the construction phase.
INITIATION STAGE

Initially, communities are willing to
accommodate structures (strut poles and stay
wires) in their yards, where there is open
space
 A lot of “houses” spring up on empty stands
upon the announcement of the electrification
project
– Do not want to be left without electricity when
the project is complete.
– Perception that it will take another 20 years
before they can get connected.
CONSTRUCTION STAGE

Although skill transfer programmes are initiated, but due to
short duration of contracts, no long-term comprehensive
plan (N3 to Electrician level) can be achieved.

In some cases, potential candidates are recruited and offered
job opportunities by contractors.

Due to lack of technical skills, mostly the EPWP work that
most communities can offer works like trenching and laying
cables.
POST-CONSTRUCTION

During audits, we have found:
– Loosened stays and/or moved strut poles, as
residents or new owners extend their activities on
their yards, resulting in the network looking saggy
with low lying conductors.
– Some communities, particularly rural, continue to
use open fires/ firewood to cook and waterheating, use electricity is only for lights, radio,
TV’s and fridges - thus their consumption is
generally low.
POST-CONSTRUCTION

In terms of the impact the electricity has had on
communities lives, majority are still grateful
Benefits include:
– Children being able to study at night without the fear
of burning down the house.
– Improved quality of life
– Healthcare facilities and schools (clinics) operate
better
POST-CONSTRUCTION
Concerns include
– Availability of vending machines in the villages
– thus it costs to purchase their electricity
– “Availability” of supply/ Network Strength
during adverse weather conditions
– Generally, there are low instances of electricity
theft in rural areas.
CONCLUSION
As we prepare for Phase 2 of the Programme:

Review how effectively implement skill development in the
rural communities

Support and/or develop women companies to get involved in
the hardcore energy sector (manufacturing and services) –
through EDI programmes

Look at Hybrid solutions, e.g. Electrification together with
Solar Geyser programme

Don’t underestimate the need to educate and train people on
energy efficiency
Contact details
Office:
15 Gold Reef Road
Ormonde
Telephone:
011 835 1880
Email:
[email protected] or
[email protected]
Website:
www.woesa.com
Contact:
Tlaleng Moabi, Energy Advisor
Thank You
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