History_of_ACF_Powerpoint

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The History of the
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The Army Cadet Force
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Not part of the Army
The Army’s sponsored Youth Organisation
Open to ALL Boys & Girls
Cadets can join now in the year they are 12yrs
to 18yrs 9 months
• And leave when they like
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When did it all start?
• Can trace its existence back to 1859
• French threatened to invade Britain
• Army heavily involved in India trying to
quell the Indian Mutiny
• Few regular units in UK
• Volunteer companies from at least 8
schools,
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When did it all start?
• Senior boys and masters
• Some companies started their own cadet
companies
• From younger boys
• The invasion never came
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Social Workers
• Seen benefit of Cadet Companies for
young boys
• Conditions at home were very bad
• A dirty environment
• Children getting caught up in crime
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Miss Octavia Hill
• Pioneer Social Worker
• Worked hard for the
National Trust
• Not a military person
• She formed the first Cadet
Company
• East End of London
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Miss Octavia Hill’s Aim
To introduce boys from
the slums to:
• Important Character
Training
• Teamwork
• Cleanliness
• Self reliance
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Miss Octavia Hill
• Today’s ACF stems from
Miss Hills idea
• Our Aims are still the
same
• To Inspire
• To Achieve
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First World War
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Big expansion in Cadet Forces
War Office (now MOD) took control
All administration and finances
1923 handed back control to TA
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1930
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Government ceased to recognise “Cadet Force”
Withdrew all financial support
Everything had to be provided privately
Cadet Forces had to raise their own funds
Wearing of Regimental badges and buttons
forbidden
• Units had to become self sufficient
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Second World War
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Big expansion of Cadet Force
1942 War Office took over control
Named “Army Cadet Force”
Supplied accommodation, equipment, uniforms
Cadets joined Armed Forces at age of 18yrs
With a good knowledge of military
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1945
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Army Cadet Force Association (ACFA)
Report direct to Ministry Of Defence
ACFA still effective today
Report on all cadet matters
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1959
• Army Cadet Force get official reconciliation
• Appointment of “Cadet Training Centre at
Frimley Park, nr. Aldershot, Hants
• Centre for training of Adult Instructors
• Use of ACF & CCF
• Leadership Courses for Senior Cadets
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1960
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Centenary Year of ACF
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh
Colonel in Chief, Army Cadet Force
Presents ACF Banner at Tower of London
Banner now housed at CTC Frimley Park
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Weapons and Equipment
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Females joined the ACF
1980’s Received new Rifle
Version of Army’s SA 80 5.56mm
Single shot Cadet General Purpose Rifle
Known as “LA98A1 Cadet GP Rifle”
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Weapons and Equipment
• Army Proficiency Certificate replaced “Part 1
& Part 2 Certificates”
• Changes made to suit Modern Day Army and
civilian life
• 1999 saw us get new 90 Pattern Webbing
• Uniforms and equipment are modern
• Combat 95 clothing issued to cadets
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Weapons and Equipment
• With socks and tee shirts
• New weapon “Self Loading Rifle” based on
British Army SA80 A2
• BFA can be fitted (with blank magazine)
• New assault vest issued for cadets
• Cadet Gortex Jackets issued for cadets
• New MTP Clothing will be issued to ACF shortly
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Army Cadet Force
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We are a modern Youth Organisation
With many options for all cadets
Qualifications (BTEC/NVQ)
Changes in the Syllabus
Up to date Manuals for The Cadet Forces
Westminster record data base for cadet units
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Army Cadet Force
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40,000 cadet in the UK
1,700 Platoons/Troops
Better Detachment accommodation
Better trained adult staff
Cadets better trained and having fun
We need 30 cadets in each detachment
Supporting our cadets with
“Action – Fun – Adventure”
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The ACF in Northern Ireland
• Cadet Battalions thrived through
the troubles
• Some detachments closed due to
trouble in that area
• Most remained strong due to the
determination of the Officers
and Adult Instructors who over
came many challenges
st
Come
on the MicksBn Royal Irish Rangers 1980
1
(Cadet)
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The ACF in Northern Ireland
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Consists of 2 Battalions
1st (Northern Ireland) Battalion ACF
2nd (Northern Ireland) Battalion ACF
ACF NI restructured in 1992
Antrim & Belfast Bn and 1st (Cadet) Bn Royal Irish
Rangers
• Became 1st (NI) Bn ACF
• 4 Companies A-B-C-D
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The ACF in Northern Ireland
• 1st Bn covers an area from:
North Belfast, Co. Antrim, Co. Londonderry,
City of Londonderry. Co. Tyrone and Co.
Fermanagh
• Headquarters of ACF NI is in Carryduff Belfast
• Administered by Reserve Forces and Cadets
Association (Northern Ireland) RFCA (NI) ACF
Sub Committee within RFCA
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The ACF in Northern Ireland
• RFCA employ all civilian staff within the ACF
e.g. CEO, CQM, CAA’s & Clerks
• New Cadet Training Centre at Magilligan Camp
opened September 2007 (Cost £4.8m)
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2nd (Northern Ireland) Bn ACF
• Headquarters Carryduff with a CEO
• Restructured in 1992
• Made up from Old ACF Bn’s of Antrim &
Belfast Bn and Armagh & Down Bn
• Bn Covers: Greater Belfast, Co Down, Co
Armagh
• Training Centre at Ballykinler opened May 2000
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The End
The End
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