Richfield Public Works Right to Know / Infectious Agents

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The
Globally Harmonized System
of Classification and Labeling
of Chemicals (GHS), Safety
Data Sheets, Labels, OSHA,
and You
Janet L. Keyes, CIH
11 April 2013
What’s GHS? Why?
Lots of chemicals out there
Lots of international trade
Can’t we just agree?
1992, Rio, UN Conference on Environment &
Development
2002: first version approved
2012: OSHA adopted
What GHS tries to do
Classify chemicals according to
hazard
Standardize the language, warnings
Make it easier for:
Suppliers/manufacturers
Users
And not conflict with transport
GHS in the US
OSHA: adopted
Revision to HazComm standard and
others
EPA: pondering
Pesticides
DOT: adopted in hazmat (49CFR) regs
CPSC: began considering
Federal Hazardous Substances Act
What does OSHA’s adoption of
GHS mean?
2013, December 1: Employees trained on
labels, SDS
2015, June 1: MSDSs replaced by SDSs
Your SDSs updated
2015, December 1: No old labels shipped
2016, June 1: in-house labels updated
Other standards change
All substance-specific hazards (e.g., lead),
Welding standard
Change warning sign language
Laboratory, PSM, Hazwoper
Flammable Liquids (use, spray, dip)
Change definitions
Combustibles (IIIB) goes away
What’s changed in HazComm?
• Classification of hazards
–
–
–
–
Based on specific criteria
Physical hazards – 16 classes
Health hazards – 10 classes
Environmental hazards – 2 classes
• Standardization of language
– For hazard statements and for
precautionary statements
Physical hazard classes
1 Explosives
2 Flammable Gases
3 Flammable Aerosols
4 Oxidizing Gases
5 Gases Under Pressure
6 Flammable Liquids
7 Flammable Solids
8 Self-Reactive
Substances
9 Pyrophoric Liquids
10 Pyrophoric solids
11 Self-Heating
Substances
12 Substances Which in
Contact with Water
Emit Flammable
Gases
13 Oxidizing Liquids
14 Oxidizing Solids
15 Organic Peroxides
16 Substances Corrosive
to Metal
Health hazard classes
1 Acute Toxicity
2 Skin Corrosion
3 Skin Irritation
4 Eye Effects
5 Sensitization
6 Germ Cell
Mutagenicity
7 Carcinogenicity
8 Reproductive
Toxicity
9 Target Organ
Systemic Toxicity:
Single Exposure &
Repeated
Exposure
10 Aspiration Toxicity
Environmental Hazard Classes
Not mandated by OSHA
Not yet required by EPA
Acute aquatic toxicity
Chronic aquatic toxicity
based on fish, crustaceans, algae
Hazardous to the ozone layer
Other Classes
Specific to OSHA
Not part of UN GHS
Simple asphyxiant
such as helium, nitrogen
Combustible dust
flour dust, grain dust
Pyrophoric gases
Washburn A Mill, 1878
Material
safety data
sheet:
Really old
version
Not that you can
read this small
type...
Material
Safety Data
Sheet
ANSI 16-part
Not that you can read
this small type...
Safety Data
Sheet: GHS
version
Safety Data Sheets will still have:
1.
2.
3.
4.
What is it, what’s in it – Section 1 & 3
What’s the hazard – Section 2
Emergency info – first aid, fire, spills
Safe use, handling and storage
–
Recommended PPE
5. How it behaves
6. Toxicology
7. Not mandatory: ecotoxicity, disposal,
transport, regulatory
Order will be consistent
1.
2.
3.
Identification
Hazard(s) identification
Composition/information
on ingredients
4. First-aid measures
5. Fire-fighting measures
6. Accidental release
measures
7. Handling and storage
8. Exposure
controls/personal
protection
9. Physical and chemical
properties
10. Stability and reactivity
11. Toxicological
information
optional
12. Ecological information
13. Disposal considerations
14. Transport information
and
15. Regulatory information.
required
16. Other information,
including date of
preparation or last
revision.
SDS Section 2 - acetone
Similar to label
Old labels
Labels are changing
1. Pictograms
2. Danger or Warning signal words
3. Hazard statement & Precautionary
statement
DOT placard can be used of pictograms on
original shipping container
Hazard Statement for a paint
thinner
Danger:
Highly flammable liquid and vapor.
May be fatal if swallowed and enters
airways.
Causes damage to liver or nervous system
through prolonged or repeated exposure
if inhaled.
Causes skin irritation and serious eye
irritation.
May cause drowsiness or dizziness.
Precautionary Statements for a Thinner (in part)
Prevention
Keep away from ignition sources such as heat/sparks/open flame
Ground/Bond container and receiving equipment.
Use only outdoors or in a well-ventilated area. Do not breathe
vapors or spray.
Wear protective gloves and eye/face protection as specified…
Response
In case of fire, use a fire extinguisher rated for Class B fires. Do not
use water.
IF IN EYES: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. If eye
irritation persists, get medical advice/attention. Wash hands
after handling
IF ON SKIN: Wash with plenty of soap and water. Take off
contaminated clothing and wash before reuse. If skin irritation
occurs, seek medical attention.
Storage
Store container tightly closed in cool, well ventilated place. Store
locked up.
Disposal
Dispose of contents in accordance with local, state, and federal
regulations.
Pictograms
Meant to quickly convey hazard
Always:
Diamond
black & white, red border
Similar to DOT placards
Nine types
Know what they
mean? You probably
do
This symbol is used for:
1. Flammables
2. Gases under
pressure
3. Things that can
hit you
4. Paddles
Which products would get this
symbol?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Muriatic acid
Oxygen
LP gas
Isopropyl alcohol
Only application: gases under pressure
Gases under pressure symbol
includes:
Compressed gases
≥29 psi
Liquefied gas
Refrigerated
liquefied gas
Dissolved gas
(acetylene)
This symbol is used for:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Fireplaces
Oxidizers
Flammables
Things that you
can smoke
Which products would get this
symbol?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Acetone
Isopropyl alcohol
Latex paints
Battery acid
Flame symbol is for:
Flammable liquids
Flammable aerosols, too
Flammable gases
Flammable solids
Pyrophorics
Self-heating
Self-reactive
Emit flammable gas
Organic peroxides
Fire Hazard Examples
Flammable solids: aluminum powder,
magnesium ribbons
Pyrophorics: organometallics, silane
Self-heating: linseed oil rags
Flammable gases: acetylene, hydrogen
Self-reactive: acetylene, azides
Emit flammable gas: lithium, calcium
carbide
Organic peroxides: MEK peroxide
Flammable Liquids are divided
into categories
Category 1 = higher hazard
Category Flash point
Boiling point
1
2
<23ºC (73 ºF)
<35ºC(95 ºF)
<23ºC (73 ºF)
>35ºC (95 ºF)
3
Between 23ºC & 60ºC
(73 - 140 ºF)
Between 60ºC & 93ºC
(140 - 200 ºF)
4
This symbol means the chemical:
Oxidizer
1. Is surprised
2. Is highly reactive
3. Will contribute
oxygen and
promote fires
4. Is highly
flammable
?
Which products would get this
symbol?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Nitric acid
Silica
LP gas
Oxygen
Only application: oxidizers
This symbol means the chemical:
1. Can explode
2. Decomposes
3. Will blow up
easily
4. Catches fire easily
?
Which would get this symbol?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Ammunition
Aerosol cans
Fireworks
Acids
Oxygen
Exploding Bomb symbol is for
Explosives
Self-reactives
Organic peroxides
Unstable – by themselves,
cause violent chemical
reaction
?
This symbol means
1. The fishing’s bad
2. The chemical is an
environmental
pollutant
3. Trees kill fish
4. You’re a bad
fisherman
This symbol means the chemical:
1. Will cause burns or
strong irritation
2. Will damage pirates
who drink it
3. Is acutely toxic
4. Will try to take over
the world
Skull and Crossbones criteria are
different than for consumer
products
For chemicals that
can kill at pretty low
doses
Won’t apply to many
chemicals in
commercial use
Acutely Toxic is divided into
categories
Category 1 = higher hazard
Category Amount to kill 50% of
test animals (LD50)
Example
1
2
3
5 mg/kg
Cyanide, nicotine
50 mg/kg
Hydrogen sulfide
300 mg/kg
Carbon monoxide
4
5
2000 mg/kg
2,4-D
5000 mg/kg
Sulfuric acid
?
This symbol means the chemical:
1. Can cause acute
toxicity
2. Dissolves metals
3. Has a pH of 7 or
more
4. Causes skin burns or
severe eye irritation
?
Which products would get this
symbol?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Battery acid
Isopropyl alcohol
Nitric acid
Carbon monoxide
Amorphous silica
Corrosion symbol is for:
Skin corrosion/burns
Severe (permanent)
eye damage
Corrosive to metals
pH ≤2, ≥11.5
Not as corrosiveļƒØ irritant
?
This symbol means the chemical
can:
1. Makes your chest
explode
2. Cause long term
health harm
3. Cause cancers
4. Cause allergic lung
reactions (asthma)
more than one correct answer
?
This symbol means the chemical
is:
1. An alien that sucks
out your lifeblood
2. A skin penetrant
3. A specific target
organ toxicant
4. Blow up in your
face
The exploding torso is used for:
Respiratory sensitizers
Mutagens
Carcinogens
Reproductive toxicants
Specific target organ
toxicity (single or
repeated exposure)
Aspiration hazard
Serious health hazards, short of death
?
This symbol means the
chemical:
1. Could cause
irritation or allergic
skin reactions
2. Can burn intensely
3. Can cause asthma
4. Should be listened
to
?
This symbol means the chemical
could:
1. Make you a more
sensitive, caring
person
2. Rapidly decompose
3. Give you pimples
4. Make you dizzy and
lightheaded
Exclamation point symbol will
be for:
Health hazards, but
not that severe
irritant to eye, skin,
breathing
skin sensitizers
narcotic effects
And hazard to ozone
layer
How to tell how nasty something is
Signal word present?
Danger > Warning > None
Pictogram present?
>
Hazard statement
Extremely > highly
Fatal > toxic > harmful
> none
Hazard Categories
1
3
0
How do these fit in?
Not required
If you use in-house, train
Watch for conflict with GHS
(e.g., flammability)
Potential confusion:
1=bad (GHS); not bad (these)
2
3
Your Next Steps
1. Learn the pictograms
2. Train your workers
–
Emphasize labels
3. Start updating data sheets
4. Take a look at in-house labeling
Questions?
Resources:
OSHA quick cards on SDS, labels,
pictograms
http://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghsquickca
rds.html
Me: Jkeyes@chess-safety.com
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