Design Principles

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CS 121
“Ordering Chaos”
Design II
“Mike”
Michael A. Erlinger
Today:

intro.12.ppt
Design Principles…can we define them
Design
Practices
Principles
Patterns
How do we go about design and what do we produce?
What are the characteristics of good design?
What are good solutions to common design problems?
LAST TIME
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Practices: Forms of Models
Diagrams (UML)
Text (hyperlinked)
Prototypes
Mathematical models
Charts, graphs
LAST TIME
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Design
Practices
Principles
Patterns
How do we go about design and what do we produce?
What are the characteristics of good design?
What are good solutions to common design problems?
TODAY: Principles of design
Are there any?
Do they matter?
Can we evaluate them?
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Goals at the Highest Level
1. Make it easy to build
2. Make it easy to test
3. Make it easy to maintain
4. Make it easy to change
SIMPLE
INTUITIVE
FLEXIBLE
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Mountains and molehills
Design principles help manage
the
complexity that arises as project
size grows.
Software development in the:
Small vs Large
Problem is:
Small grows to Large without
a plan
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Design Principle: DRY
SIMPLE, INTUITIVE, FLEXIBLE
Don’t repeat yourself
data/code should occur once and only once
Examples: ??
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Design Principle:
INTUITIVE
Use real world objects
Domain
model
Abstract:
Game
–8–
Design
model
Real:
Game
console
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Design Principle: SRP
SIMPLE, INTUITIVE, FLEXIBLE
Single Responsibility Principle (SRP)
every class/object should have a single responsibility
Foundation of Software Development:
Functions with single purpose,
Objects, etc.
Several related principles
Encapsulation, Abstraction, etc.
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Design Principle: EV
related to SRP
Encapsulate Variation
every class should have only one reason to change
FLEXIBLE
Change should not cause a domino effect!
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EV example …
Purpose:
Convert images
Image
processor
bmp,
bmp,
What happens when
Input type changes?
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EV example …
Image
processor
Image Loader
bmp,
Sometime Later:
jpg, gif, …
– 12 –
bmp,
Sometime Later:
jpg, gif, …
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Design Principle: HCLC
related to SRP
High cohesion
Low coupling
– 13 –
A class is cohesive if its data and
methods are strongly connected
Classes have low coupling
if they are only loosely connected
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Cohesion: Examples
Functional cohesion (SRP):
Coincidental cohesion:
Logical cohesion:
?
Temporal/sequential cohesion:
Communicational:
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Cohesion: Examples
BEST
Functional cohesion (SRP): grouped because they
contribute to a single well-defined task
Coincidental cohesion: grouped together because
Logical cohesion: grouped because they fall into some
logical category, i.e. I/O
Temporal/sequential cohesion: grouped because they
are processed at the same time or in sequence; i.e.
error handling (create log, notifies user, etc.)
Communicational: grouped because they operate on
same data, e.g., operate on same record
WORST
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Coupling: Examples
Content coupling:
Common coupling:
Control coupling:
?
Data-structure coupling:
Message coupling:
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Coupling: Examples
Content coupling: a module or class relies on the WORST
implementation of another; i.e. accessing private
data
Common coupling: modules or classes share global
data
Control coupling: one module controls the logic of
another (e.g. passing a what-to-do flag)
Data-structure coupling: modules share composite
data structure
Message coupling: modules communicate through
interface
BEST
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Design principle
Law of Demeter
only talk to your friends
Principle of Least Knowledge
no no no: myGame->theBoard->cells[0][0].update()
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Design principle
The fundamental notion is that a given object should
assume as little as possible
about the structure or properties
of anything else (including its subcomponents).
Law of Demeter
only talk to your friends
Each unit should have only limited knowledge
about other units:
only units "closely" related to the current unit.
Each unit should only talk to its friends;
don't talk to strangers.
Only talk to your immediate friends.
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no no no: myGame->theBoard->cells[0][0].update()
Should not know details of theBoard
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Design Principle:
Open-Closed principle
classes should be open to extension but closed to modification
architecture of your game
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Design Principle:
Open-Closed principle
classes should be open to extension but closed to modification
idea was that once completed,
the implementation of a class could only be modified
to correct errors;
new or changed features
would require that a different class be created
architecture of your game
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Composition and Inheritance
shape
is a
has a
ball
sphere
shape
is a
sphere
is a
Design heuristic: Think like an object!
ball
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Design Principle
Favor composition over inheritance
A
has a
A
B
inheritance
isa
composition
B
– 23 –
BLACK box reuse
WHITE box reuse
CS 121
Design principle
Favor composition over inheritance
A
has a
A
B
inheritance
isa
composition
Caveat: sometime inheritance is the right thing
(i.e. gives us polymorphism)
– 24 –
B
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Design Principle: LSP
Liskov substitution principle (LSP)
void doSomething(B myThingOfTypeB)
B
isa
void doSomething(C myThingOfTypeC)
this should work as well
C
not just any banana
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LSP violation
rectangle
class Rectangle
{
public:
void SetWidth(double w) {itsWidth=w;}
void SetHeight(double h) {itsHeight=w;}
double GetHeight() const {return itsHeight;}
double GetWidth() const {return itsWidth;}
private:
double itsWidth;
double itsHeight;
};
isa
square
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some time later …
CS 121
LSP violation
rectangle
class Rectangle
{
public:
void SetWidth(double w) {itsWidth=w;}
void SetHeight(double h) {itsHeight=h;}
double GetHeight() const {return itsHeight;}
double GetWidth() const {return itsWidth;}
private:
double itsWidth;
double itsHeight;
};
isa
square
– 27 –
PROBLEMS?
void Square::SetWidth(double w)
{
Rectangle::SetWidth(w);
Rectangle::SetHeight(w);
}
void Square::SetHeight(double h)
{
Rectangle::SetHeight(h);
Rectangle::SetWidth(h);
}
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LSP:
Assume a Square class that derives from a Rectangle class,
assuming getter and setter methods exist for both width and
height. The Square class always assumes that the width is
equal with the height. If a Square object is used in a context
where a Rectangle is expected, unexpected behavior may occur
because the dimensions of a Square cannot (or rather should
not) be modified independently.
This problem cannot be easily fixed: if we can modify the setter
methods in the Square class so that they preserve the Square
invariant (i.e., keep the dimensions equal), then these methods
will weaken (violate) the postconditions for the Rectangle
setters, which state that dimensions can be modified
independently.
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LSP violation
rectangle
class Rectangle
{
public:
void SetWidth(double w) {itsWidth=w;}
void SetHeight(double h) {itsHeight=w;}
double GetHeight() const {return itsHeight;}
double GetWidth() const {return itsWidth;}
private:
double itsWidth;
double itsHeight;
};
isa
square
A square is not a rectangle!!
Its external behavior is different
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Design Principle
INTUITIVE
SIMPLE
FLEXIBLE
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Summary
Don’t repeat yourself (D.R.Y)
Use real world objects
Single responsibility principle
Encapsulate variation
High cohesion/low coupling
Program to an interface, not an implementation
Law of Demeter (talk only to your friends)
Favor composition over inheritance
Open-closed principle
Liskov Substitution Principle
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Source: [Raymond, "Art of Unix Programming", Addison-Wesley, 2003]
Rule of Modularity: Write simple parts connected by clean interfaces
Rule of Clarity: Clarity is better than cleverness.
Rule of Composition: Design programs to be connected to other programs.
Rule of Separation: Separate policy from mechanism; separate interfaces from engines
Rule of Simplicity: Design for simplicity; add complexity only where you must
Rule of Parsimony: Write a big program only when it is clear by demonstration that nothing else
will do
Rule of Transparency: Design for visibility to make inspection and debugging easier
Rule of Robustness: Robustness is the child of transparency and simplicity
Rule of Representation: Fold knowledge into data so program logic can be stupid and robust
Rule of Least Surprise: In interface design, always do the least surprising thing
Rule of Silence: When a program has nothing surprising to say, it should say nothing
Rule of Repair: When you must fail, fail noisily and as soon as possible
Rule of Economy: Programmer time is expensive; conserve it in preference to machine time
Rule of Generation: Avoid hand-hacking; write programs to write programs when you can
Rule of Optimization: Prototype before polishing. Get it working before you optimize it
Rule of Diversity: Distrust all claims for “one true way”
Rule of Extensibility: Design for the future, because it will be here sooner than you think
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Agile Design Philosophies
•
Agile Designs are Emergent…
•
Unit tests form detailed design doc WHEN do test-driven development
(TDD)
•
Design models need to be just barely good enough
•
Multiple models used
•
Use each model in multiple ways
•
Designers should code
•
Prove it with code
•
Feedback is your friend (team and/or outsiders)
•
Iterate, iterate, iterate
•
Do design every day
•
Document complicated things
•
Do not over document…until the end
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Agile Design Philosophies…
•
Incorporate continuous User feedback
•
Understand your stakeholders…users, management, …
•
Design for the user experience
•
Make the app predictable
•
Bring objects to life through UI
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UNDER-PROMISE
and
OVER-DELIVER
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The End
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Trade offs
Class B
Class A
Class C
low cohesion
high coupling
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