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DINING
I N T E R N A T I O N A L
DIN
DIN
Welcome to Fine Dining
- the place where the world
comes together in Sweden
Fine Dining
I N T E R N A T I O N A L
ine d
I N T
fine di n i n g
contents
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EDITORIALS
41
THE SIXTEEN SEASONS
”You have to be creative and learn when everything is
growing...”
NOTES 41
STOCKHOLM´S NEW SAUSAGE
FESTIVAL
SWEDENS WEST COAST, SOME SAY
THE BEST
Can be described as a mix of a Bistro and Market Hall
”I have wanted to get the Sausage out of the Closet and
into the Parlor for a long time.”
13
45 NOSH AND CHOW FROM
TO THE WOODS
THE
WORLD TO DOWNTOWN STOCKHOLM LET THE PARTY BEGIN.
”There you go, then we start with a lesson in Butchery...”
21 A SWEDISH CROWN JEWEL
49 AWARDS
How about the first 17 places in 18 participations in 2012.
27 A JAPANESE FLAGSHIP
”The best Japanese restaurant outside Japan”
Who are the ChAîne des Rôtisseurs
The Chaîne des Rôtisseurs is an international gastronomic society for both professionals and amateurs , with roots that
stretch back to the year 1248. The society is represented in about 70 countries and has more than 25000 members
worldwide. From its headquarters in Paris the organization is headed by President Yam Atallah In 1959 the Balliage de la
Suéde was founded by amongst others Tore Wretman. In Sweden there are 14 associations, so called Balliage (Bailliwicks)
which is individually responsible for its own program of activities. Coordination, administration and international contacts
are taken care by a national committee under the leadership of Bailli (Grand Bailiff ) Délègue. One of the society’s strong
points is the international membership which allows them to make use of the fantastic network and offers possibilities
to take part in any event at all, wherever and whenever over the whole world.
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fine di n i n g
EDITORIAL
Welcome To Fine Dining
It is perfectly acceptable to forward
Fine Dining to friends and acquaintances that are interested in
Fine Dining.
Let us know about interesting
events, meetings and so on at
[email protected]
We cannot take responsibility for
unsolicited material. Feel free to
quote us but always reveal your
sources.
Welcome to a New Year
with Fine Dining
T
he Easter tables are already cleared away and the beautiful
May is fast approaching. This year’s awards have been distributed, read more about those later in the magazine and the
annual White Guide´s winners have been crowned.
In this issue of Fine Dining, we´ll learn how to handle and cut game.
A bit about the West Coast - and the new Sausage Festival at the
Editor in Chief
Ove Canemyr
[email protected]
Fine Dining/Trendsetter Box 24013,
104 50 Stockholm
Editorial
Anne-Marie Canemyr,
Carl Wachtmeister
Catarina Offe
Chaîne des Rôtisseurs
Art Director
Sophie L Slettengren
[email protected]
English copy
Roger Brett
[email protected]
Nordic Museum. “Nosh and Chow” from all over the world to downtown Stockholm. So, let the party begin.
We´ll present and comment Fine Spirits of Sweden.
Right now we’re just waiting for the warmth of spring makes its entrance, for terraces and open air restaurants to get started in earnest,
and that the nation’s famous cherry trees in Kungsträdgården (The
Kings Garden. Stockholm´s center point) will burst into bloom for the
tourists, and of course to the greater joy of ourselves.
We wish you all a really lovely springtime
with lots of good food and drinks, Editors of
Fine Dining.
Would you like to be associated
in Fine Dining? Tell us about your
products or services.
Newly opened or new designs,
new foodstuffs and so on. Contact:
[email protected]
+46 70 794 09 87
Cover photo:
Anne-Marie Canemyr
Östermalms Saluhall, Stockholm
Ove canemyr
Editor-in-Chief
www.finedining.se
PS Let us know about friends and acquaintances who you think would like to
receive a copy of Fine Dining.
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NOTES
Gastro Thriller
Of course we´ve all heard of breathtaking novels, maybe we´ve even read
some of them. But a gastronomically
thrilling novel… I don´t think so!...Well
Now´s your chance. Torbjörn Lagmark
is one of our own talented chefs, and
is based in Helsingborg – He has put
together a fitting intrigue that begins
The One year old is beginning to grow!
1On May 1st Stafsäter Farm ice cream celebrates its first anniversary. To mark the
occasion they have invited in other local food producers and to create a food fair
of entirely locally produced foodstuff. The selection will be displayed in store at
the Stafsäter Farm, which is situated Linkoping , 150 clicks south of the capital
Stockholm. The following day, on May 2, they will also start with new retail outlet area inside the Linköping´s Market Hall.
For over a year the ice cream machines in the factory on the outskirts of Sturefors have been running “hot” so great is the demand for their ice cream.
Photos: HOI Publisher
- “We now supply several supermarkets in the area, in spite of the cold winter.
Our customers are our best advertising, says Maria Ekman, founder of Stafsäter
Farm ice cream.
-“During our first year we have been in contact with many other enthusiastic
food producers here in Östergötland, partly through the Agricultural Market.
Unfortunately there are not enough people who are aware of where they can
get hold of these wonderful products so close to home”, says Maria Ekman, the
founder.
Among those who you will find at market are Hydén strawberries and Asparagus
Country, from Skeda , Seltorps cheesecake from Sturefors, Ronaldo´s Sourdough
bakery as well as Blåklints organic products and other goods like sourdough
bread, eggs, organic flour, cheese and cheesecake, sausages, jams, and suchlike.
Everything will be for sale.
2nd The author, Torbjörn
Lagmark works as a cook and
operates successful restaurant,
The True food Studio, Wine &
Tapas bar in Helsingborg.
Photo: Anne-Marie Canemyr
in Mallorca, then their follows a wild
chase through Spain, France and Italy
ending up in the Austrian Alps. The
protagonist in the story is naturally a
chef called Hugo Larsson. The book is
our first Gastro thriller and an obvious
choice for those of us who love food,
wine and adventure. Normally it´s bad
manners to read at
the table, but in this
case…
Look out for it. ”The
hunt for the mysterious cup”.
The book come out
May 4th
Carl Wachtmeister
v is it u s at Fac e b ook
Fine Wines very own homepage
w w w. f in e wi n e. n u
Here you’ll find the last 4 editions of Fine Wine
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NOTES
Sweden Pantry
”There are too few innovative products in Sweden,” states Lars Schönemyr decided. Together with his wife Pia and their son Robert runs, he told Sweden Pantry,
with just such products. Previously existed, oil, mustard, vinegar, right now the
focus is on smoked. Pia pondered long on what could be used as fuel for smoking. Cheap would be, preferably free, available in quantities and give just the
just about enought smoky taste. So popped blueberry bushes up as the obvious
choice. And apple peel that was available through Brämhults juice. Said and
done. Now there is butter, mayonnaise, aioli, béarnaise, mustard and mustard in
the range, all with a dose smoked.
And as the entrepreneurs they are, they have presented the collection at KockVM,
Bocuse d’Or earlier this year. Sweden ’contestant Adam Dahlberg had a dollop of
smoled butter on his dish of turbot and lobster. There was no medal this year,
maybe he would have made a click to.
Just in time for the first apple blossoms bloom in Solliden Palace gardens get the
old coffee croft new life in the form of Sverige skafferiet´s concept store where
visitors can enjoy delicacies that affects all the senses, produced by methods
rooted in old Swedish cuisine.
Text och photo: Catarina Offe
Swedish Traditions
Jan-Öjvind Swahn
Published by Ordalaget
Here we have a Swedish food cookbook
available as an English translation. The
recipes are all very well, but the ingredients might be hard to find and the
utensil and methods so different that
the result might not always be what
we wanted to convey. One of our most
knowledgeable wise men, the Swedish
folklorist and Associate professor of
Ethnology at the University of Lund,
describes herein the origins of our
annual traditions and their meanings.
Some of them we share with the rest
of the world, but others are exclusively
genuine Swedish. Perhaps some of our
friends from overseas too would like to
embrace some of our traditions in the
same way that we bring home ideas
from our travels around the world. We
have read in our gastronomical calendar 2013 that a Vietnamese soup
was included in the King´s Christmas
celebrations. We read in Gastronomic
Calendar 2013th Not everyone needs
to taste the hated/loved surströmming
(fermented herring) in real time, it may
be enough just to read about it. A few
recipes for our most common Yule Table are included like mulled wine and
other with accessories that are fine examples of our Christmas tradition.
W o u l d Y o u l i k e t o h av e y o u r ow n i s s u e o f
F i n e D i n i n g i n yo u r e - m a i l - f r e e o f c h a rg e ?
Please give us an e-mail to [email protected]
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fine di n i n g
NOTES
Mathias Dahlgren has water on his mind
For the next 6 months the new theme will be
Water. Things that grow in it and things that grow
from it. Periodically Mathias and his cooks create a 5 special course menu as an alternative to
his ”The Natural Kitchen” which consists of with
eight dishes.
”All of us who work here like new challenges and
ideas approaches,” says Mathias. ”During the
time it takes to create a new theme we learn an
awful lot along the way,” he adds. At the present
time there´s been a lot of emphasis on seafood.
Even within a given central theme the menu is
varied depending upon the season. On the plant
front Mathias works in tandem with Rosendal´s
Garden featuring coastal plants this time. Photographer Magnus Skoglöf takes photos of water
related subjects that adorn walls of the dining
room and Mathias gives a part of the proceeds to
WWF ”Save the Baltic Sea”
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Magnus Skoglöf
The Oaxen Inn & Slipway opens in May
Photo Erik Olsson
The dining room will seat 32
guests and club room, which will
cater for smaller groups 14.
Their sister restaurant The Oaxen
Slipway is in same house has
room for more people and in the
summer you can sit out on quayside. The Slipway is a little simpler, if one can describe anything
that is a part of Oaxen in that
way. But according to Agneta they
will serve their interpretation of
bistro cuisine. It will be the perfect destination, easily accessible
by bicycle, and if you´re sitting
outside, you can even take the
dog. It´s well worth a try.
New glass for noble
beverages
Maria
Montazami
Sweden´s most popular Hollywood wife
has already designed
bags and dog collars.
Now she´s turned her
hand glass production at the Reymyre
Glassworks. There is a
certain restraint employed in the structure
of the glass that accompanies the noble
liquid content and they have Maria’s famous tassel” signature around the foot
of the glass. They feature beer or water
glasses, red and white wines, but headed
up of course by the Champagne glasses. Champagne is an enjoyable pastime,
which is highly appreciated by both Maria
and many others.
So Skål, says Maria.
6
Photo: aaron shintaku
Finally, in May, it’s time for famous Inn keeper couple Magnus Ek and Agneta
Green to open their new restaurant, Oaxen Krog & Slipway out on the waterfront in fashionable Djurgården, Stockholm. The Restaurants’ interior decor
is inspired by the marine engineering industry. This area used to be called
Beck Holm Bridge. ”We chose the new location with care. Here at Djurgården,
we can continue to develop our philosophy,” says Agneta. The New Oaxen
Inn will be reminiscent of its predecessor (the original Oaxen Inn, out in the
Stockholm archipelago). The meals are of the highest quality with great care
taken with nature’s own raw produce, found out in the countryside. Indeed
sustainable relationship between food and drink.
fine di n i n g
NOTES
Loka likes Old School
- with a taste of
chocolate milkshake,
strawberry and
lemon pie
”Loka likes” are back and this time turning the world of flavors upside down.
Loka mineral waters present new thirst
quenchers with tastes like chocolate
milkshake, strawberry and lemon pie.
It’s magically delicious - and totally
new on the Swedish market.
Viking on the march
Viking Line´s recently launched new flagship, the Viking Grace where stylish design and innovative concepts meets high quality service and consistent environmental consideration is something quite unique. The ship is the world’s first great
passenger ship to be powered by liquefied natural gas, and as such the most
environmentally friendly of its type. Amongst other things, the new hull design
reduces fuel consumption significantly.
The food concept caters for every taste. Everything from Fine Dining to Street
Food. The overall design is not in the least nautical. The aim has been to give
the illusion that you are on land. The staff carry the same top-quality as the ship
itself. As a testament to their efforts, VikingLine was awarded the Best Shipping
Company of the year. The motivation reads ”The launch of Viking Grace, the
world’s first natural gas-powered passenger ferry.
And to celebrate this, all the passengers are invited to enjoy a guest performance
in French gastronomy with such classical titillations as a glass of sparkling champagne and oysters as a pre-starter, followed by onion soup and snails, lemon
sole, duck, lovely pieces of tournedos and chateaubriand and finished off with
a tarte tatin.
Chef de Cuisine Philippe Clergue, who trained at the world famous Le Cordon
Bleu in Paris, was responsible for the excellent menu.
Text: Catarina Offe
Photo: VikingLine, Catarina Offe
With a bit of a nod to the Soda Fountains of the 50s Loka´s new flavors are
as ”old school” as jukeboxes and big
cars, but are still brand new. Water that
tastes like chocolate milkshake, strawberry and lemon pie - without sugar
or any other sweetening agents - have
never been available on the Swedish
market before.
- During the development of new ideas
we brainstormed about the typical flavors and aromas of the 1950´Initially
to get water to taste like a chocolate
milkshake seemed to be a crazy idea.
“Can you really do that?, Well, it turned
out that we could”, says Stefan Santos.
Marketing Director for Non Alcoholic.
In previous launches of Loka Likes,
there has been a strong preference
that the flavors should also be available in 150 cl PET bottle. So this year
- finally - Chocolate Shake and Strawberry Ice cream will be available in the
larger bottles
v is it u s at Fac e b ook
Fine Wines very own homepage
w w w. f in e wi n e. n u
Here you’ll find the last 4 editions of Fine Wine
7
fine di n i n g
Sweden´s West Coast, Some Say the Best
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Jimmy Millblad
18 years ago a cocky 21-year-old chef knocked on the door of the Swedish National Cooking team. The coach at
that time, who later became this cook´s mentor was at first a little hesitant. Would he fit into this extremely
,tight group based team. Everything they did was a joint effort; there was no room for independent and individual moves. Things like that could derail a whole team.
B
ut he made it, and joined the
team. Now Krister Dahl,
is a 4 time Food Olympics gold
medalist. Now it´s time for him
to close the door on something
he has actually spent half his life
doing, or to be more exact, his
entire adult life. Krister has put
in 10 years as a National Cooking, teammate and eight years
as the coach. Without any kind of
withdrawal symptoms Krister has
plunged himself into his next big
project at the Gothia Towers in his
own hometown Gothenburg.
As executive director, he is responsible for food and beverages
in all of hotel´s restaurants. Most
recently opened is the West Coast
down to the hotel lobby. Soon the
Gothia Towers Upper House to-

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West Coast is located in the hotel lobby, accessible to all and
can be described as a mix of bistro and market hall.
gether with Nina Fors the newly
appointed hotel manager. Their
guests will be very worldly travelers with high demands, and
where a luxury fine dining restaurant is a must. ”Then the third
tower,” says Krister smooth
and does not sound the least bit
stressed. The experience of his
kocklandslagsår comes in handy. Team spirit, cooperation, do
their best, creativity and flexibility, together with the order and
structure are good examples of
what Krister has with his luggage. ”But there is a big difference
between competitive cooking and
the food that is cooked in restaurants,” he emphasizes. ”In a contest food is designed to demonstrate their professional skills. It’s
different techniques and cooking
methods to be presented right and
it should be structured in a certain
way. And when you work out the
competition, dishes can engage
in experimentation in a different
way than in a restaurant kitchen. ”
Now we hope for innovations on
the plate that comes from racing
the kitchen but still suited for us
ordinary restaurant guests.
West Coast is located in the hotel
lobby, accessible to all and can be
described as a mix of bistro and
market hall. Anyone can pop in,
solo travelers, groups large and
small, and last but not least, Göteborgers themselves started to find
there. On the extra comfortable
bar stools, a business traveler sit
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”West Coast is a declaration of love to the west coast, to Sweden
and our fantastic larder of ingredients.
down, talk with the staff at the bar
and feel relaxed. Thus have serving staff know the menu as well
as chefs and thus, the entire dining
experience alive for the guest. Stay
all night for a full dinner or have
a drink, some fried bacon rind
or a few oysters from Sweden’s
only oyster staircase before the
evening continues elsewhere. An
oyster staircase is a stair storage
just for oysters, equipped with
cooling and saltwater. Oyster is
on shelves and flooded regularly
with salt water through a special
treatment plant. So where else
should you eat oysters if not here?
And regardless of the length of the
visit should greet hushummern
Evert who was living a quiet life
in his private aquarium safe in the
knowledge that he is not just going to end up on someone’s plate.
It does, however, a whole bunch
of other fish and seafood caught
just a stones throw away. ”West
Coast is a declaration of love to
the west coast, to Sweden and our
fantastic larder of ingredients. We
select raw materials from some
of the region’s best producers,
for example we have seafood in
world-class here. On the West
Coast, we celebrate small suppliers who share our values and
stands for sustainability, environ-

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But the West Coast is not just seafood. Outside the city limits there
are pigs, lambs and cattle are the meat of the highest quality.
mental awareness and conscious
choice, ”says Krister.
But the West Coast is not just
seafood. Outside the city limits
there are pigs, lambs and cattle
are the meat of the highest quality.
Oxkind as porterkokas and longcooked pork side watering in the
mouth. Krister and chef Fredrik
Andersson has decided, this only
served Swedish meat and thus is
the first West Coast restaurant that
bears the label Swedish Meat. Cooperation between is a pilot and
will serve as a model for other
restaurants that also want to use
the label Swedish meat in their
menus.
After the Food Olympics in October last year Krister searched
beyond the job a completely personalized new challenge, so now
he trains MMA and conditioning
several days a week. But it will
probably be a long time before
Krister has time to spend full days
on the golf course.
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fine di n i n g
God news for Connoisseurs!
This spring you have the possibility to buy rare bottles
at Systembolagets online auctions in collaboration with
Stockholms Auktionsverk at www.stadsauktion.se.
.
11-13 of March starting at 1 pm
15-17 of April starting at 1 pm
13-15 of May starting at 1 pm
10-12 of June starting at 1 pm
FineWine_180x240_Fogra39_300.indd 1
2013-02-26 08:17
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To The Woods
Text: Rebecca Wahren Dalén Photo; Carl Wachtmeister
A hung, flayed red deer calf hangs inside the restaurant. There is not a cute welcome, rather more an exciting one.
An offense to the eye which otherwise registers the fire, burning cozily in the fireplace.
“There you go, then we
start with a lesson in
butchery, says Chef
Claus Jarding
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O
n the tables are beautiful
hand-forged wrought iron
candlesticks with lighted candles.
It wasn´t for the animal´s carcass,
the comfort factor would be high.
“There you go, then we start with
a lesson in butchery, says Chef
Claus Jarding, who is known as
Classe by the staff.
In other words a 30 kg Buck, is
hanging right in front of us. There
is a difference in the gender. The
females are called does and the
collective name for this species is
Red deer. Classe begins his butchering exhibition at breakneck
speed. It looks incredibly simple.
By now you’re probably wondering where we are. What are we
doing here? Well geographically
we´re literally in the middle of
nowhere. Namely the old Virå
Millworks on Lake Stavsjö. The
- Hang the meat with its fur, and never skin the animal meat in
freezing temperatures. When the animal is skinned and dismembered,
let the meat rest for a few more days. This will give it that extra
premium quality.

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fine di n i n g
Consumers are particular about origins today, that´s why the cooks
are very careful about the history of the meat and that it has been
treated correctly, to ensure the best texture and also the ethical
aspects of the hunt itself.
old Millworks, which is a conceptual experience is owned by the
Åfors Family and is situated deep
in the forest of Södermanland.
We are gourmet tourists. We like
finesse and we like to test out of
the ordinary dining experiences.
Which of course is why we are
here?
“Listen up everyone, the meat lesson continues” says a laughing
Classe, which makes us pay attention.
“- Hang the meat with its fur, and
never skin the animal meat in
freezing temperatures. When the
animal is skinned and dismembered, let the meat rest for a few
more days. This will give it that
extra premium quality. When an
animal is shot, it is important that
it isn´t cooled down too quickly,
otherwise the meat can get what is
called “cold contractions” Which
means that when it ends up on
a plate it will be very tough. On
the first day, the carcass´s temperature must not drop below plus
10 degrees centigrade. Which
means that the animals should
not be hung outdoors in freezing
weather? That´s why they keep
the pelt for the first day at Virå,

15
fine di n i n g
because it results in more tender
meat.
- We get orders from restaurants
and chefs who want to have game.
Consumers are particular about
origins today, that´s why the
cooks are very careful about the
history of the meat and that it has
been treated correctly, to ensure
the best texture and also the ethical aspects of the hunt itself.
Many chefs talk about utilizing
the whole animal. Virå takes it a
step further.
- “The Chef´s biggest challenge is
to find less common cuts of meat
and makes something good out of
it. In this way it is possible to eat
the whole animal.”
In front of us, are all the different
joints? Now we will be divided
into teams, to cook the venison
dishes for this evening.
“Do customers find their way here
alright?” I asked little thoughtfully.
- “Yes, of course, Pär Moberg the
famous actor and television chef
was sitting here the other day,”
says Classe gesturing to a specific
table.
- We like to see cooks who want to
learn more about wild game.
- “The Chef´s biggest challenge is to find less common cuts of meat
and makes something good out of it. In this way it is possible to eat
the whole animal.”

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fine di n i n g
A composition of taste and raw
produce.
A celebratory feast at the Virå old
Millworks.
Together we cook the first dishes,
and talk about the food´s composition and how to get the best mix
of flavors onto the plate. It is an
art in itself, balancing contrasting
textures and colors to give the
correct and exciting image.
Food texture and structure are
equally important. The eye wants
to see something soft, round,
square, jagged, straight, oval,
crunchy, fluffy, bubbly, hard,
things that can lift food to a new
dimension.
We keep track of the composition
of flavors in the dishes. There has
to be saltiness, acidity, sweetness,
and a little bitterness in the dish
law if it is to deliver a taste experience.
We ask Classe to explain the taste
of Venison to us.
It is an art in itself, balancing
contrasting textures and colors to
give the correct and exciting image.
“Deer are not as raw boned as the
Elk. Deer have more fatty tissue
in the meat, which gives more
flavor and tenderness to the flesh.
It´s also important that the deer
get supplementary nourishment
from fodder tables which are deployed during the periods when
the deer have difficulty in finding
food through the snow-cover. To-

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One of Sweden’s finest flocks of Red Deer, expert game cook s,
an indoor shooting range and the beautiful grounds of Virå old
Millworks lands, making it all worthwhile visit.
night all of the dishes were very
enjoyable. Every venison based
flavor was finely honed; the arrangements were beautiful, presented with balance and harmony.
Below I have selected some of the
best of the best and let the menu
speak for itself.
wonderful pats of butter and mustard sauce, topped off with watercress. A skillful blend of taste and
texture, beautifully presented on
genuine green marble from Kolmården.
The Best Dishes
After the meal, two 4WD terrain
vehicles, equipped with strong
searchlights stood waiting to take
for us for a ride in the forest. The
trip took us through narrow winding forest tracks, all covered in
snow. We sat in the back and had
great views of the wintry night.
Thanks to the powerful lights we
caught glimpses of the curious
deer through the trees.
Red deer starter, with its core of
diced, raw, dark and venison,
adorned with grated horseradish,
sour pickled berries, with two
Rounding Off the Evening.
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fine di n i n g
The Menu
Appetizer
Roast Venison liver on a thin
slice of sourdough bread with
walnuts and tangy Alice apple
chutney.
Starter:
Venison sweetmeats, Deep
fried deer heart, breaded with
panko meal.
Ravioli filled with venison
shanks and with served with
veal broth with parsley butter
and a dash of canola rapeseed oil.
Melon with Sorbet of apple
Main course:
Crown Veal shank with dill
sauce and Gotland Carrots
Dessert:
Energy Bars balls made from
porridge of oats
The final destination for the
evening’s festivities was the old
Mill Lake with its cabins and
sauna. The fireplace in the lounge
living flickered and crackled cozily, while we continued our lovely
conversations in the company of
one of the best features of the evening namely a Martell Cordon
Bleu Cognac.
A Summary of the experience
One of Sweden’s finest flocks
of Red Deer, expert game cook
s, an indoor shooting range and
the beautiful grounds of Virå old
Millworks lands, making it all
worthwhile visit.
Besides the beautiful presentation, you are treated to stunningly,
innovative food, containing a high
degree of environmental awareness, which will increase your
knowledge on eating wild game.
There is a marked trend amongst
cooks and people interested in
food to return to the roots of meat
consumption. In general people
want to know what they are eating, they want to turn back the
clock historically and get away
from synthetic additives and edible supplements. Our minds are
open to game and old raw produce
techniques. For me, a visit to the
Virå old Millworks is not only a
culinary highlight but an interlude
with several experiences. Whatever category you fall into, either
as a Chef of an enthusiastic Foodie, you will love Virå Mill.
19
Cheese platter:
3 cheeses with fresh bread
Sörmlands blue cheese
Linné Cheese
Drogbäcks Cheese from the
lakeside town of Hjo
fine di n i n g
A major UK PLC Professional Services Company with 40,000 people worldwide is looking for a
Reward Consultant at one of their offices. The role is dynamic, fast paced and challenging and we
are looking for professionals who have the skills to drive transition and change and bring
business standards up to World Class level.
Reward Consultants
Being part of the Reward Team reporting to the Head of Reward, you will be responsible for the
contribution towards the design of strategic reward programmes and their deployment and responsible for the development and management of the Reward agenda. Your responsibilities will
involve:
• Supporting the transformation of reward function from transactional to providing a strategic
partnership to the business by:
- identifying and developing Reward activity transfer plans
- driving the implementation of such plans through to measurable success
- designing and delivering Reward tools to the Country & Group Service line to support
Business Leaders and their teams to understand and manage Reward activities within
their teams
- continuing to identify and deliver solutions to support the growth/development of
the company
• Deploying reward solutions (compensation, benefits and recognition) that support business
strategy in geographies/service lines
• Independently driving and completing projects with little or no oversight
• Working with the Head of Compensation & Benefits in the development/delivery of specific
group reward programmes
• Ensuring that Total Reward programmes are fit for purpose – best practice, market competitive,
cost neutral, tax/social security compliant
As a person you will be committed and innovative with strong influencing and communication
skills and you are a strong team player.
Background / Experience
Graduate level or equivalent with 5-8 years specific Total Reward experience of which at 3 should be
internationally in a matrix environment. In particular you will need to have significant expertise in compensation (including cash and share based incentives), benefits (including retirement benefits) and recognition. You will need to be an experienced project leader with significant experience of managing
and deploying global Total Reward projects. In addition, experience in working with remote/virtual
teams is required. It is essential that you have experience of working across international boundaries
and a strong history of quickly building key relationships and gaining credibility within the business.
[email protected]
20
FI
R
IT
IT
FI
R
OF SWEDEN
OF SWEDEN
fine di n i n g
FINE SPIRIT
OF SWEDEN
FINE SPIRIT
OF SWEDEN
A Swedish crown jewel
The Swedish flag waves in the wind as we drive up the gravel path to Ellinge Castle the Stronghold of Purity
Vodka deep in the heart of southernmost Sweden known as Skåne (Scania). Purity has been one of the most acclaimed vodka brands that the world has ever seen.
O
r how about the first 17 places in 18 participations in
international Spirits competitions
in 2012. Moreover, Purity Vodka
was appointed Vodka-of-the-Year
for two years in a row. A feat no
other brand has ever achieved before.
But were getting a bit ahead of
ourselves let’s take it from the beginning.
Fine Dining meets up with Thomas Kuuttanen, Master Blender
of Purity Vodka. We ask him to
tell us a little about the road to
success.
”- If I start from scratch, Sweden
has a long and proud history of
vodka. The oldest documentation
we have is from Lund in 1349.
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21
fine di n i n g
That´s a long tradition. But why did
you choose to produce new vodka?
”- I wanted to recreate vodka´s
former qualities. Modern vodka is
not bad, it’s just boring. It is distilled in industrial plants like oil
refineries, creating a neutral alcohol, into a strong and fiery spirit.
Before the Industrial Revolution,
vodka tasted completely different.
The traditional, artisan distillation
in copper stills created spirits with
flavor, aroma and complexity.
But if you make vodka that everyone likes, isn´t that better?
”- If you try to create a vodka that
everyone enjoys, then nobody
will love it. This is precisely one
of the problems in the vodka industry. They produce what they
think the masses want, rather than
what they believe themselves.
”- If I start from scratch, Sweden has a
long and proud history of vodka. The
oldest documentation we have is from
Lund in 1349.
22

fine di n i n g
It’s like when wine producers
claim that their wine is suitable
for fish, poultry, beef, pork, venison, pasta and salads. Instinctively
we know that it is not absolutely
perfect for anything. You have to
know what you are and are honest
with yourself. Purity Vodka is not
perfect for all drinks. If you like
to mix vodka with sweet liqueur
and Red Bull, then there are other
brands that are both cheaper and
better. If you would rather drink
vodka clean, on-the-rocks, like a
vodka martini or another elegant
cocktail then Purity Vodka is hard
to beat.
It seems that you have succeeded
when you look at Drinks International Vodka charts.
CHARACTER
Purity Vodka
Kauffmann
Ultimat
XO Jean Marc
Oval
Cîroc
Stoli Elit
U’Luvka
Akademicka
Karlsson’s Gold
Ketel One
Level
42 Below
Belvedere
Rain
Tito
Stolichnaya Gold
Hangar One
Grey Goose
Cavalli
Skyy 90
Snow Queen
Exquisite
Frïs
Bong
Pearl
Wyborowa Stolichnaya Smirnoff Black
Akvinta
Cape North Absolut 100 Russian Standard Imperia
Vikingfjord
LIGHT
DQ

Reyka
Chopin
Square One
Sobieski
FULL BODIED
Orzel
Three Olives
Finlandia
Absolut
Purus
Vox
360 Vodka
Svedka
Of all the reviews from the various
media about Purity Vodka, which
are you most pleased with?
Koskenkorva
Smirnoff Red
Skyy
Polar Ice
Bols Vodka
”- The Crown Jewel of Vodka”
That review is good because
we had the ambition to redefine
Eristoff
Danzka
Dworek
NEUTRAL
My goal is to maintain the qualities you would expect from modern
quality vodka, while at the same time adding character, complexity
and richness
23
fine di n i n g
vodka. My goal is to maintain the
qualities you would expect from
modern quality vodka, while at
the same time adding character,
complexity and richness.
In short how is it produced?
Usually Vodka is a drink that´s
quick and inexpensive to produce.
We do it the other way round; our
production is slow and costly.
Instead of working with enzyme
added grain, we produce a mash
of organic, malted barley and
winter wheat. Distillation takes
place in our own stills made from
copper and gold. It is split into 34
stages, where each stage gently
cleanses liquor without removing
more flavors than is necessary.
After the slow distillation, we cut
out ninety percent of alcohol and
retain the pure heart as the base
of Purity Vodka. Out of 600 liters
only 60 liters of spirits are considered good enough. The distillate
that is 96% vol. The taste is so
clean that it needs to be filtered.

24
fine di n i n g
We seek solutions where we can
retain flavors instead of eliminating them.
The tasty spirit is then gently reduced with organic, colloidal
distilled wheat spirit and a blend
of natural water from a protected
water source of de-ionized water
before it is bottled in the characteristic bottle.
We knew from the beginning that
it would take time and money but
if you want to create a unique
quality product, we are much too
small and passionate about what
we do to just rely on marketing
gimmicks.
”The Swedish crown jewel” has
just begun its global journey.
Despite the limited production,
Purity Vodka is already available
in 26 countries, predominantly in
famous Restaurants and prestigious
bars.
”The Swedish crown jewel” has
just begun its global journey
Anyone who wants to know more
about Purity Vodka can go into
www.purityvodka.com
25
fine di n i n g
”bästa
mousserande
vin 2012”
FYND!
”matigt bubbel
med intensiv
koncentration”
köp!
en
finns äv ka
s
a
l
f
på halv
65:-
”mest
champagnelika
mousserande
vinerna och
avsevärt
bättre”
”fyndpris för
så mycket
kvalitet”
RöttoRps bästa
mousseRande vineR
Pongrácz Brut
12%VoL, Art.nr 7628
750ML 109Kr / 375ML 65Kr
www.janake.se
Alkohol i samband med
arbete ökar risken för olyckor.
26
fine di n i n g
A Japanese flagship
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Britt Edlund
On the outskirts of Östersund you´ll find the unique restaurant called the Take Mikado. In restrained almost
ascetic surroundings the restaurant was built in 2008. But the story of the Mikado began long before that.

27
fine di n i n g
In the tiny village of Brunflo on the outskirts of Östersund they
converted the disused Co-op store into to ”The best Japanese
restaurant outside of Japan!”
J
apanese chef Tsukasa Takeuchi, known as called Tim, came
to Sweden on his grand tour trip
of Europe. Like so many before
him, he met a Swedish lady. With
the inheritance of his parent’s
restaurant in Japan, the dream of
a Japanese restaurant in Sweden
eventually turned into a reality.
In the tiny village of Brunflo on
the outskirts of Östersund they
converted the disused Co-op store
into to ”The best Japanese restaurant outside of Japan!” As it was
continually mentioned called in
reviews. For twenty years Tim
was in the kitchen. Since 1994,
together with his partner whose
name is Britt they ran the restaurant to the fatal end. The exterior
façade was pretty awful Britt admits, but inside the restaurant was
crowded and cozy, the guests had
to squeeze themselves in with
hundreds of Japanese dolls and
antiques. It was a living museum.
Guests flocked there from far and
wide. There were few places and
long waits for a table. All of this
meant that there was a strong attraction for gourmets who want to
experience the unique and exclusive atmosphere. One cold night
in March 2007, the unimaginable
happened, the Restaurant Mikado burned down to the ground
and took all the dolls along with
it. Seeing a lifetime achievement
being devoured by the hungry flames is a shock hard to describe,

28
fine di n i n g
and Tim and his wife ended up
living in a vacuum for several
months. But the longing to resume his profession eventually took
the upper hand and the couple began to think about starting all over
again.
The offer of an old military building in Östersund settled it. Tim’s
original sketch became the building that today’s houses the new
Take Mikado . Guests are offered
the same menu and the same kind
of cooking that they previously
made pilgrimages to Brunflo for.
There are several Japanese restaurants in Sweden but not quite
that many that only offer Japanese
food and none of them are even
close to Tim’s very special artistic
talent.
the guests can testify that Tim is totally
the Japanese chef geek with an extreme skill
which is reflected in both appearance and
taste of the food.
All the food is based entirely on
Japanese cooking. But the meat is
completely Swedish. The indispensable entrecote is from Småland, salmon is from Norway. The
closer the produce is the fresher it
is. However some typical ingredients, come from far away, this is
all about quality Tim insists that
the best Japanese rice comes from
California and the best tuna fish
from South Korea. Tim spends
most of his time in the kitchen so
he doesn´t see a lot of guests, but
they are well taken care of Britt
and her staff. Tim´s knife techni-

29
fine di n i n g
ques take many years to master
so finding the right understudy
for him is not easy to find. “Tim
thinks that he can do everything
himself,” Britt whispers and the
guests can testify that Tim is totally the Japanese chef geek with
an extreme skill which is reflected in both appearance and taste
of the food.. Mikado’s flagship
is a dish in the form of a boat, a
wooden hull filled with Japanese
morsels on a bed of ice and a perfectly cut network of radishes as
the sails. All dishes are amazingly
30
beautiful and presented with a
small lecture and more often than
not with Tim’s own signature.
The visual experience along with
the exquisite taste makes the most
seasoned gourmet impressed. The
road to Japan is long, the road
to Take Mikado is slightly shorter and well worth the journey.
The menu includes an impressive number of dishes, entrees,
soups, sashami and tempura, roast
and stews that the guests prepare
themselves at the table and also
a number of well composed dinner suggestions. It requires a little
planning, so ordering is done at
least three days in advance, and
only then Tim knows how many
people he will have when he makes their raw produce purchases,
this is how a perfectionist works.
fine di n i n g
Lär dig konsten att
rymma en dag.
Vad gör du på söndag? Ta med dig någon
du gillar och parkera vardagen på land. I
lyxhytten på Viking Cinderella väntar en
fluffig badrock och ett par mjuka tofflor på
att få rå om dig. Ni börjar med en lyxig
spabehandling à la Kerstin Florian,
fortsätter med en shopping-sväng bland
märkesmode och taxfreefynd eller glider
ner till baren och välkomstdrinken. När
magen kurrar är det dags att samlas runt
skaldjursplatån och sen väntar Östersjöns
hetaste dansgolv.
The Cinderella Spa Escape!
Nyhet! Prisexempel 1795:-/person
Kryssa Stockholm–Mariehamn, med del i lyxhytt, entréavgift och 50-minutersbehandling i
Cinderella Spa, trerättersmiddag alt. skaldjursplatå och champagnefrukost.
Gäller söndagsavgångar t o m 16/6 2013.
31
fine di n i n g
The sixteen seasons
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Lux Stockholm, Catarina Offe
Restaurant Lux Stockholm is celebrating its 10th anniversary, during this time it has been awarded a Michelin
star several times. It is perhaps even more relevant nowadays because Lux´s proprietor Henrik Norstrom has
discovered the Sixteen Seasons.
E
ver since its inception,
Henrik´s ambition has been to
purchase small quantities of produce from the right areas. Things
like reindeer meat from the north
and shellfish from the west coast,
but most of all he likes to shop
with suppliers near to home, the
Mälardalen (that covers the 3rd
largest lake in Sweden) Over the
years he built up trusted relation-
32
ships with them. ”It takes time,”
says Henry, but once a good working cooperation is established, it
is worth its weight in gold.
When the regular routine work
up and running, Henry to delve
deeper into the raw produce and
its optimum quality. ”If you only
follow our four seasons, then you

fine di n i n g
”You have to be creative and learn when
everything is growing,” says Henry
risk missing certain ingredients
that have a shorter season, and
when they are when they are at
their very best,” Henrik says.
So in the end, together with his
suppliers he discovered nothing
less than sixteen seasons. When
rhubarb tastes best, not in the
spring and not in May, but rather
the exact moment when it´s at its
peak, the same times as lilies of
the valley beats come into bloom.
What come comes concurrently
with the swallows? ”You have to
be creative and learn when everything is growing,” says Henry,
because that is something that
only Mother Nature knows. “Now
I have a long list, at least in my
head, when everything is at its
best; red roe, for a few weeks in
September-October, just about the
time that plums are just about to
fall off the branches. Henry continues to explain about raspber-

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fine di n i n g
”If you only follow our four seasons, then you risk missingcertain
ingredients that have a shorter season, and when they are when
they are at their very best,” Henrik says.
ries and asparagus, but also about
fish and the lambs. That´s when
his suppliers call and say come
and collect the produce now and
raw material end up directly into
the menu for the day. The menus
are usually composed of five starters, three main courses and two
desserts which are changed out 16
times a year. “Which flavors can´t
you discover here?”
leaves, they should be picked
when they are a few inches long.
Then there´s the elderberries. The
blooms are used as fresh spice,
and berries are conserved. And
the red currants, not known to be
amongst the most delicate of soft
fruits. Either they are picked unripe or left to hang until the leaves
fall off... then they are good and
sweet and full of flavor.
Henry continues: And then there
are plants with multiple seasons,
spring, for example, which offers both flowers and berries and
wild garlic with their lily-like
The plums grow profusely in a
neighbor’s garden and fell to the
ground was often to no avail, just
like the apples and pears. Nowadays, thanks to Henry’s care and
attention they offer baskets full of
joy.
34
fine di n i n g
When I wonder what time of
year that is most difficult or perhaps most boring, answer comes
at lightning speed, Now!, Which
at the time of writing is March.
March when winter still a stranglehold on the countryside. ”I call
it the “Bulb season” Henry sighs.
All stored root vegetables are running out. All of the greenery is
still covered by ice. ”But soon,”
he says wistfully. ”Just think when
we´ll be able to can sprinkle little
young leaves of the dishes!” Henry picks sorrel and nettles, violets,
Ground elder that grow in profusion, garlic-mustard, best known
as a troublesome weed. Onion
stack is a weed for the connoisseur, but accessible to all. It grows
in almost every residential garden
and has a mild taste of onion and
garlic. The horseshoe-shaped leaves closest to the ground have a
stronger taste of garlic while the
leaves that grow further up on the
trunk are milder. All the leaves
are good to eat and are best suited in cold salads or sauces when
the volatile flavor dissipates when
heated. But they can be added to a
sauce or soup at the last minute or
butter fried to crunchy sprinkles.
So onion stacks will probably be
spring melody along with the nettles. Here is one last tip from with
one last tip from Henrik. ”When
you picked nettles, you can go
back to the same place in two to
three weeks, and then there will
be new leaves. What you don´t
find you can eat at your leisure at
restaurant Lux.”
35
fine di n i n g
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Matilda – A pure family history
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Matildas
Frida, her husband and her mother and father all work at Restaurant Matilda, in the county of Gästrikland . The
distribution of work is clearly defined and runs smoothly. Johan who has experience from working in Stockholm pubs stands at the stove alongside Frida, while mother Maria takes care of the marketing and advertising.
Father Lars Göran handles the financial side of things.
L
ars Göran is also the sommelier and often doubles
willingly as a waiter. In all the reviews, including the White Guide,
you´ll see the word “tasty” repeated over and over again ”We’re
just a nice neighborhood restaurant, cooking good food with a
kind of concept to it,” says Johan
modestly. ”The presentation is
supposed to be neat and pleasant,
but not “fussy,” he adds. In addition to this they are all interested
in interior design. The surroundings are markedly Scandinavian;
the chairs are from Arne Jacobsen
and Herr Wagner and the unique
pottery collection, from a friend
and artist.
Different crockery sets the scene
for the restaurant’s best dishes, as
well as handmade wooden boxes
both ancient and modern and just
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fine di n i n g
Vegetables and root
vegetables are of
course a chapter on
their own. For the
most part they come
from the family’s
very own kitchen
garden in nearby
Ockelbo and run by
Lars Krantz their
devoted gardener.
about anything else that catches
falls restaurateurs eye and their
guest´s s taste.
There is no doubt whatsoever that
the food is the center piece of everything. Fishy foodies can enjoy
scallops collected by a scuba diver
or a box of crispy deep fried fish,
or buttered cod. For meat lovers,
roast pork from a local farm, and
for anyone who has not yet had
the opportunity to enjoy it, then
real homemade black pudding is
a chance here, that shouldn´t be
missed. For dessert there might be
dessert shelled cherries with goat
milk ice cream, soft spiced cake
and burnt white chocolate. Can
anything sound tastier?
Vegetables and root vegetables are
of course a chapter on their own.
For the most part they come from
the family’s very own kitchen garden in nearby Ockelbo and run by
Lars Krantz their devoted gardener. ”We decided that we wanted
to grow our own produce,” says
Johan. And that covers pretty
much everything - except for tomatoes, beetroot, flowers, and
nettles. They usually last us until
enough until late winter.”
38

fine di n i n g
Meat and fish come from
the market hall and are
eco-certified. ”I have
complete confidence in them
Meat and fish come from the
market hall and are eco-certified.
”I have complete confidence in
them,” declares Johan. Lars Göran
tends to the wine list and works
closely with the local wine merchant. He has a special fondness
for the old world and “lays down”
the occasional rarity. ”With our
good storage capabilities it´s all
possible,” Johan explains.
The people of Gävle have been
good at eating out. There are many
good local restaurants, not just
only pizzerias like in many other
towns. Johan is pleased with his
stream of visitors at the weekend
he needed all of his 57 places and
recently he hired a new sous chef.
However, catering on the other
hand is no big thing for Matilda´s.
”Our mission is to be in place and
serve kitchen food,” says John.
39
”But we can take on any assignment if it seems like fun. But then
we like to take care of the whole
thing from preparing the food to
serving to the guests. We don´t
like leaving anything to chance.”
Frida and Johan re-charge their
batteries on food trips to Spain and France of course. America is
a big favorite as well. ”There’s an
exciting diversity over there and
they have everything,” says Johan. Johan also has good contacts
with the restaurants in Stockholm
and chef buddies with their families and friends come to visit often.
Just looking at their menu, these
visits will become more often.
fine di n i n g
40
fine di n i n g
I´ve Got You under My Skin
Stockholm´s New Sausage Festival
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Sören Lundström, Catarina Offe
On a weekend in February at the Nordic Museum, a new food festival saw the light of day. Just like the wildly popular chocolate festival the queues started forming out towards the fashionable Djurgården area of
Stockholm. So now the residents of the capital and visitors have two new annual highlights.

41
fine di n i n g
”I have wanted to get the sausage out
of the closet and into the parlor for
quite a long time.”
I
nside the museum the program
was interspersed with different
events, competitions and music
and rows and rows of sausage makers.
Big and little, thick and thin, often
well spiced - lamb, beef and pork.
Bullen´s classic hot dogs were allowed a stand as a nostalgic representative of times gone by, when
hotdogs were just about the only
fast food that was available.
Skansen Gubbhyllan tempted with
some good accessories as well as
the Sausage Course ”D.I.Y” and
different varieties of mustard and
buns made on sour dough. It was
quite a mixed crowd and remarkably there were many men who
tasted the wares.
Per Karlsson is meat farmer from
Halland, who got tired of being
poorly paid for his meat and started making pork sausages instead.
He used all parts of the animal;
pork loin and the ham and tenderloin. Then in September Boarps
Farm started selling his Butcher
Sausages, which were tremendous success from the start. The
contents of the sausages are somewhat unusual:
”They contain 82 percent meat,
of which 100 percent is hand cut
Swedish pork. Everything in the
Butcher sausages (with the exception of spices) is manufactured
in Sweden by Swedish workers.
Which means social security contributions, sickness benefits, pension and income tax. The bottom
line is Jobs in Sweden create prosperity in Sweden. ”
The Butcher’s sausage is available as the Original fillet sausage;
tenderloin Herb sausage and
Rough fillet sausage soon will
also be cocktail sausages and beer
sausages.

42
fine di n i n g
Bridget Starck of StenÅkra Meats
& Deli, became the Sausage Profile of the year and Johansson signing himself Stig-Rune won the
award for best sausage limerick
The force behind this great event
are enthusiasts from the Sausage
Academy which who up to now
has had a modest existence. But
now with Christian Möller as
chairman and a host of dedicated
members Christian say ”I have
wanted to get the sausage out of
the closet and into the parlor for
quite a long time.” When the Coop did a customer survey it was
the “Falu Korv (Savaloy) that
was the leading sausage for 25
years, but in interviews, it emerged that no one was eating it. One
can only wonder where it went to,
if not in the consumer’s stomachs.
The truth is that the Swedish savaloy sausage was not good enough.
Star chef Roland Persson counters that he always had homemade lamb sausage on the menu
at the Grand´s French during the
time that it existed. ”It was the
legendary Chef Örjan Klein, who
taught me to make sausage,” says
Roland. ”Grand´s lamb sausages
were frightfully expensive but we
had regulars who came just for
the sake of the sausages,” he adds.
And the rest of us are just waiting
for the next Sausage Festival to
come to town.
Academy of Beautiful Sausages is an association whose sole aim is
raising the reputation of sausage and its supply throughout the
community.
43
fine di n i n g
The Chaîne des Rôtisseurs is an international gastronomic society for both professionals
and amateurs , with roots that stretch back to the year 1248. The society is represented in
about 70 countries and has more than 25000 members worldwide. From its headquarters
in Paris the organization is headed by President Yam Atallah In 1959 the Balliage de la
Suéde was founded by amongst others Tore Wretman. In Sweden there are 14 associations, so called Balliage (Bailliwicks) which is individually responsible for its own program
of activities. Coordination, administration and international contacts are taken care by
a national committee under the leadership of Bailli (Grand Bailiff ) Délègue. One of the
society’s strong points is the international membership which allows them to make use
of the fantastic network and offers possibilities to take part in any event at all, wherever
and whenever over the whole world.
44
fine di n i n g
Nosh and Chow from the world
to Downtown Stockholm.
– Let the party begin
Text: Catarina Offe photo: Catarina Offe, Wolfgang Kleinschmidt
In a house dating from 1895,
right next to Stureplan,
Stockholm’s largest amusement
center. This is Bern´s continental contribution to the inner
city’s nightlife. Spread over 4
floors, guests can enjoy food
and drink in several bars,
restaurants as well as outdoor
dining.
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45
fine di n i n g
The house has been completely
renovated. At the present time,
the restaurant Nosh and Chow,
three bars and a courtyard are
ready for business.
T
he house has been completely renovated. At the present time, the restaurant Nosh and
Chow, three bars and a courtyard
are ready for business. Eventually
it will also house a fine dining
restaurant and a number of Town
house style suites and breakfast will be served. No effort has
been spared and the interior décor is spectacular to say the least.
Thanks to Interior designer Lázaro Rosa-Viola from Barcelona,
there are many surprises. More
rather than less is more is a fitting
expression and don´t forget all to
visit the toilet in the basement.
In a maze of mirrors, hopefully
find the right washbasin, and afterward dry your hands in an old
trough previously used watering
horses. And while you’re at it,
can check out the evening’s DJ,
who´s on the same floor. Lázaro
has lugged stuff here from far and
wide, everything ranging from
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46
fine di n i n g
street finds, to auction items and
or freshly constructed in his own
studio. It supposed to look like a
home, I grant you a highly cosmopolitan one at that, with a mixture
of stuff from all over the world.
A lot of energy has been devoted
to the lighting plan, which is different in every room. You should
come here often, it takes several
nights to see and experience everything in all the rooms.
The food contains flavors from selected
parts of the world. Tasty specialties from
Morocco, Mexico, Malaysia and surprisingly
enough.
47
In bars you´ll be Cosmopolitan
cocktails, classics, with a twist,
sours, or select one of the house´s
20 varieties of champagne.
There´s the even the non-alcoholic beverages are beyond expectation. Without alcohol is beyond
the expected range. If you´re not
particularly hungry, there are
snacks available in the bars.
The food contains flavors from
selected parts of the world. Tasty
specialties from Morocco, Mexico, Malaysia and surprisingly
enough. Karelia, all prepared with
Swedish ingredients. Every re-
fine di n i n g
The driving force behind the food concept is Bern’s cellar master
Johan Lindqvist and Nosh and Chow chef Anders Atte. They both have
their own personal favorites from special areas in the world.
gion has its own full menu. The
driving force behind the food concept is Bern’s cellar master Johan
Lindqvist and Nosh and Chow
chef Anders Atte. They both have
their own personal favorites from
special areas in the world. The
menus will be replaced several times a year. In the beginning I had
48
trouble remembering the name. I
used to call it Bern´s Little Sister.
Now I know better.
Let the Party Begin.
fine di n i n g
 Awards
The first quarter of every year is set aside the to honor all the deserving profiles, who
each in his or her own way have contributed to the top gastronomy of Culinary Sweden
Photo: Catarina Offe
The Gastronomic Academy awards
The academy’s gold medal went to Daniel Berlin of Daniel Berlin Basket in Tranås/
Skåne (Southern Sweden) for extraordinary contribution to Swedish cuisine. The
Silver medal went to Richard Tellström, lecturer at Grythytte Academy (Sweden´s
Gastronomical University)
Ulla Karlström, editorial director of All about Food, received the Gold Pen, while the
Hiram Prize went to food writer Margaret Richert. Diplomas were awarded to Michal
Jidenholm, Ugglarps Grönt, for cultivating Sweden’s most species-rich vegetables,
Ewa Vikingson, Kullinge Kalvdans, Pauline and Per Vidlund, Ängsö Fish and Tor Nyberg and Inger Bjugård, Väversunda Bärödling for the loving cultivation of rhubarb.
Chef of the Year
On his birthday on February 8th this year, he actually took home the title of Chef
of the Year in 2013 at the finals at the Stockholm Waterfront. Daniel is 38 years old
and this is the 3rd time he has made the Chef of the Year finals. The jury consisted
of H.RH Prince Carl Philip who sat in both of the two juries and awarded the medals together with Hannah Halpern, CEO of Chef of the Year.
Young Chef of the Year 2013
On the 25th February Jimmi Eriksson from Pontus´s was announced Young Chef of the Year
2013 at a ceremony at Stockholm’s Hotel and Restaurant School. Together with 5 other
finalists he cooked a three-course meal from a secret basket of produce, which contained
amongst other things a whole goose and a whole chicken as compulsory ingredients. The
competition is open to chefs under 27 years working in restaurants affiliated to the connected to the Chaîne des Rôtisseurs. The winner then goes on to the world finals in Istanbul to
be held on 6th September. Jimmi´s fellow competitors will be 20 young Chefs from all over
the world. . Michael Andersson from Lux (Stockholm) took the 2nd place and in third place
Cecilia Kvist from Operakällaren in Stockholm
Photo: Ewa Säfwenberg
Photo: Magnus Skoglöf
Daniel Rams, of Rams Food and Gastronomy in Stockholm, the Swedish Cooking
Champion.

49
fine di n i n g
 Awards
The first quarter of every year is set aside the to honor all the deserving profiles, who
each in his or her own way have contributed to the top gastronomy of Culinary Sweden
This year’s Golden Dragons
Photo: Catarina Offe
Dagens Nyheter´s (national broadsheet newspaper) Gold Dragon Award in the
luxury restaurant category has gone to Frantzen / Lindeberg, to Ekstedt in the
intermediate category and in the budget Gold Dragon category to Speceriet. A
special prize to Gastro Logic last year´s luxury winner and the Bargain prize went
to Esperanto. This year´s bar prize went to Tjoget as well as AA Gill’s guest dragon
for best restaurant for foreign visitors went to Frantzen / Lindeberg.
Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
The ICA Book Publishing Co won the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards with a first
place and a bronze placement.
In the category ”Scandinavian Cuisine” Scandinavia Best Food by Katja Palmdahl and
Viola Adamson was nominated for Best in the World. Third place in the category ”Television Europe” was won by My Kitchen - with Jens Dolk and celebrity chef Tommy
Myllymäki
Photo: Catarina Offe
Brasserie Le Rouge´s Cookbook won the silver.. The Swedish Food Magazine’s Englishlanguage version was named the world’s best Foodie Magazine. Restaurant Equipment & Co’s book ”More than a cookbook was rewarded with a silver. In the French
class” the Swedish book” The French Baker written by Sebastien Boudet, won the
gold. In The Health Category Matfrisk, (foods that prevent cancer), ”by Lars Beckman,
Lars Frantzen and Fredric Andersson, was rewarded with a silver.
In ”Charity-Fund raising, category Europe” ”Gods give birth” by Anna-Sofia Winroth
won gold and was named the best book in the Europe class. In the television class
Richard Julin and the Champagne Club were mentioned.
Source Foodnet.se
Michelin Guide 2013
Mathias Dahlgren´s Matsal and Frantzen / Lindeberg
Have been honored again with 2 stars. Mathias Dahlgren´s Matbaren, Esperanto, Rauhankatu 12, Gastro Logic, Lux Stockholm
and Ekstedt in Stockholm. In Gothenburg, Kock & Vin, Thörnströms Kitchen, 28 +, Fond and Sjömagasinet all receive a single
star.
Nine restaurants receive the Michelin Bib Gourmand award. A Bib Gourmand is an indication that a restaurant is serving
delicious food at a reasonable price. In Stockholm the Brasserie Bobonne, Provisioning, Rolf’s Kitchen, The Gyldene Freden,
Pubologi, Ulla Winbladh, Seaweeds and EAT and the Gothenburg Family have all received their Bibs.

50
fine di n i n g
 Awards
The first quarter of every year is set aside the to honor all the deserving profiles, who
each in his or her own way have contributed to the top gastronomy of Culinary Sweden
The White Guide and LRF compile a list of the best restaurants focusing upon original Swedish Cuisine.
A total of 68 restaurants have fulfilled lived the requirements. Today’s diners are becoming more demanding and more and
more restaurants realize the importance of clearly stating origin of their raw produce. Local farming and breeding fosters
unique flavors and thanks to our northern climate with it dramatic seasonal changes. Swedish farmers have a long tradition
of good, reliable food, high standards of animal welfare and stringent environmental regulations. This list helps make the
diner to conscious choices that also favors local producers.
The list is available on www.lrf.se/svenskmat
The M. Sandahls Foundation special prize
Photo: Grand Hôtel
”La Dance 2013”
Grand Hôtel´s restaurateur Mary Muruska –incidentally the first woman to receive it was awarded the prestigious M. Sandahls Foundation Honorary Award On March 16, for Outstanding
Culinary Skills.
Swedish Meat Restaurant 2013
Restaurant AG retains its winning position for the second year running.
Photo: Joel Wåreus
In second place we have Djuret (The Animal) followed by The Vassa Eggen, Svartengrens
and Meet. The Swedish Meat Restaurant awards are presented annually by the American
Wine house Beringer. ”It was very brave to choose the same winner for two consecutive
years,” says a delighted John Jureskog
The well-qualified jury for Sweden’s Meat restaurant up of champion trencherman, Hakan
Fallman, food and beverage profile, Michel Jamais and the wine merchant and former star
chef, Bjorn Svensson.

51
fine di n i n g
 Awards
The first quarter of every year is set aside the to honor all the deserving profiles, who
each in his or her own way have contributed to the top gastronomy of Culinary Sweden
White´s Guide
At this year’s White Guide Gala twelve winners were chosen in the following categories.
* This year’s Best Restaurant: Esperanto, Stockholm
* This year’s Dining experience: Daniel Berlin Krog, in Skåne-Tranås
* This year’s Shooting Stars: Bhoga, Gothenburg
* This Year Service Experience: Esperanto, Stockholm
* This year local Gastronomy: Gastro Logic, Stockholm
* This years’ Worth a Trip: Krakas Krog in Katthammarsvik
* This year’s Inn with a heart : Frank, Västerås
* This year’s wine experience: 19 Glass, Stockholm
* Year Beer experience: English Taste, Gothenburg
* This year’s Coffee Experience: Agatons Restaurant & Bar, Ramundberget
* This year´s Four Footed Gastronomy: Bhoga, Gothenburg
* This year’s Marina Gastronomy: F12, Stockholm
* This year’s Sustainable Gastronomy: PM& Friends, Växjö
This year’s Swedish gastronomic celebration went to Thomas Drejing for Long & Significant Gastronomic Deed
White Guide´s Global Gastronomy Award went to Gastón Acurio, from Peru, for his futuristic local gastronomy.
This year’s Rising Star went to Frida Ronge, Nook, Gothenburg
52
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