Principle of Buoyancy & Lift Bags Powerpoint Presentation - Fend-Air

advertisement

The principal states that
the upward buoyant
force that acts upon a
body partially or
completely submerged is
equal to the weight of
the fluid that is displaced
› Sea Water = 64

 3
› Fresh Water = 63

 3
Gases
Air
36

 3
Liquids
Helium
5
Water


 3
64  3
Solids
Concrete

150  3
Steel

490  3
Fuel
Fuel
Oil
Oil

45  3
Underwater
Weight
=
Dry
Weight
-
Weight of the
Displaced Liquid







Quad Bags
›
›
›
›
Light duty open bottom
25 – 200 lbs.
Roll up and carry
Good for small recoveries.
›
›
›
Heavy duty
Open bottom lift bags with plunger dump valve.
Less portable but rugged from 100 - 500 lbs.
›
›
›
Heavy duty open bottom lift bags
From 1,000 – 70,000 lbs.
For larger recoveries and salvage
›
›
›
Heavy duty enclosed “ Pillow Shape”
lift bags from 200 - 6,000 lbs.
Good for vessel salvage, shallow water, towing.
›
›
›
Heavy duty enclosed cylindrical shape lift bags
from 1,000 - 70,000 lbs.
For larger salvage, construction, shallow water and towing.
›
›
VRS 2000 – Vehicle Recovery System
Mark V ORCA – Underwater ordnance disposal system, bomb recovery systems
›
rigging, slings, shackles, cable, inflation, valving, packaging, etc.
Commercial Lift Bags
Professional Lift Bags
Enclosed Flotation Bags
Salvage Pontoons
Specialty Flotation Systems
Accessories
Subsalve USA Corporate Headquarters and Manufacturing Facility
6946 Post Road
North Kingstown, RI 02852
Quad bag 100 raising Amphora from 200 B.C.
Roman ship wreck Kizilburin, Turkey.
Salvage of a 40 ft. lobster boat using EFB 2000 and
EFB 4000 lift bags
116 ft. Azimut salvage using EFB 6000s.
Salvage of 55 ft. fishing boat using Professional
2000 and 4000 lift bags in Nova Scotia where the
30 ft. tide made it easy to perform the repairs.
Commercial lift bags being used for training by NASA
astronauts at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab.
Rhode Island State Police recovering a submerged
vehicle using VRS 2000.
Salvage Pontoons (SP-6000) used in pipe installation in
Saudi Arabia!
Enclosed lift bags and Salvage Pontoons rigged
low on the hull to allow dewatering.
100’ sailing yacht raised with Professional 12,000’s in
Bora Bora.
PF 20,000,PF 50,000 and PF 70,000 used to roll over
the capsized freighter the Spiegel Grove
SP-90000 used to raise the Russian K-77 Juliette
class submarine from the Providence River, RI
EFB-2000 used for the James Cameron Deepsea
Challenger mission to the bottom of the Mariana
Trench
EFB-4000 used to salvage a heliocopter
SP-40000 and SP-70000 used for draft reduction
1.
Before and after each dive lift bags and components must be carefully inspected for
any damage. Any damage or wear must be recorded as well as any action taken.
Every use must be recorded. (See repair instructions if repairs are required)
2.
Always thoroughly wash all components as well as lift bag bodies with fresh water and
allow to dry before storing. Lubricate relief valves with O-ring grease and spray with
silicon spray. Tighten set screws in cap as necessary. Lubricate ball valve and quick
disconnect with marine lubricant spray or WD-40.
3.
Place a tag on the lift bag clearly identifying the Date, Condition, and Recorders
Name when the bag was stored. Store in a dry location not to exceed 100 °F. Store in
hanging position if possible, roll or fold with fewest folds.
4.
Once the job or task is determined, several steps must be taken to properly rig the lift
bag(s). It is extremely important to carefully plan each phase of the job, as well as
having all of the necessary equipment; i.e.: rigging, air, hose, boat, manpower, etc.,
not to mention good weather and sea conditions. Proper planning is the first and most
important phase of any project, in addition to carefully and safely executing the plan.
Determine dry weight and displacement of object being raised. Consider the total
buoyancy required with a safety factor. Consider bottom conditions, silting, suction,
etc.
PLAN AND EXECUTE THE SALVAGE PLAN
PLAN AND EXECUTE THE DIVE PLAN
1.
Positioning of the lift bag(s): Always place bags where lift is best balanced and the best
leverage is attained, over the object being lifted. Try to determine the center of mass of
the object being lifted (Engine(s) size, cabin location, additional deck equipment, cargo,
etc.). Always place the lift bags externally and KEEP THE CENTER OF BOUYANCY ABOVE
THE CENTER OF MASS.
2.
Always attach lifting lines, straps, or cables completely around the object being lifted.
When possible, secure additional lines directly to the object. Make sure that lifting
straps/lines are at least rated equal to the lift capacity of the lift bag. When possible,
attach to structural lifting points (shafts, struts, rudder posts, through scuppers) Do not
position straps/lines or lift bags where extreme chafing can cause damage to them.
3.
Always attach control lines and tow lines prior to lift.
4.
Attach lift bags to rigging with shackles rated at least equal to the lift capacity of the lift
bag. ALWAYS ATTACH TO ALL RECOMMENDED LIFT POINTS FOR EACH DESIGN LIFT BAG
(i.e.: open bottom, enclosed, or pontoon.)
Continued…
5.
When using multiple lift bags, distribute the lift over the entire length or width of the object
being lifted. Always balance lift bags evenly, using bags of equal lift capacity on each
side of the object. ALWAYS USE MULTIPLE BAGS TO DISTRIBUTE THE LOAD AND DISTRIBUTE
THE RISK. When possible, manifold all air lines to fill lift bags simultaneously, for even lift.
6.
When inflating lift bags, insert air line or regulator into the bottom of the lift bag, or attach
an air line directly on to the inflation valve. Always partially inflate each lift bag to insure
proper rigging, location and clearance. ALWAYS INFLATE FRON THE CENTER OF MASS
OUTWARD. As the bag and object begin to rise, stand clear and out of the lifting path.
Do not stay directly under or over the object during lift, or when lift is completed. Make
sure the surface is clear over the object prior to lift.
7.
To dump air from a lift bag for any reason, either pull the lanyard or open the ball valve
to allow enough air to escape to bring the bag down to the desired level. Then release
the lanyard or shut the valve.
8.
Once the object has been successfully lifted to the surface, secure additional lines if
being towed. If being lifted into a boat or out of the water, secure additional lines to the
object and LIFT THE OBJECT - NOT THE BAG DIRECTLY.
1.
The use of SUBSALVE USA lift bags is at the user's own risk; thus ALWAYS exercise
extreme caution using lift bags.
2.
Plan the lifting job thoroughly, i.e., necessary air, lines, hardware, weather
forecasts, towing and lifting procedures, etc. Always carry an adequate air
supply (compressor or scuba cylinders), and an additional air supply for divers
to fill the lift bags.
3.
CONSIDER WATER DEPTH (REFER TO AIR INFLATION CHART FOR TOTAL AIR
REQUIRED)
4.
When rigging air and lift lines be careful not to entangle divers or diving
apparatus.
5.
Use rigging of first quality, using rated hardware and slings - rated for lifts
intended.
Summary of Lift Bag Use
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Be aware of the DANGERS when using lift bags
Have experienced Lift Bag personnel on site
Carry out full calculations on the item to be lifted or supported.
Ensure that you have the appropriate combination of bags and which ones
to use.
Ensure that you have plenty of support equipment: i.e., shackles, ropes,
straps, chain, marine ply, canvas, compressed air, hoses, etc..
Check the strength of the lifting points on the item you are lifting or
supporting.
Use Parachute Bags for lifting. Use Enclosed Bags for surface flotation,
especially when towing.
Be aware of the sea conditions, including sea state, currents, tides and
monitor the weather forecast.
Take you time, and remove any thing that can damage the bags, i.e.,
barnacles, jagged metal, etc..
And finally…….
Be prepared for the unexpected!
Hot Air Gun Procedure









Lay out air bag in clean, dry and well lit conditions
Select or cut a patch from the material supplied in the repair kit. To make an effective repair
the patch should overlap by a minimum of 3 inches (80mm) around the damaged area.
Adjust the heat setting on the base of the hot air gun and switch on. Allow the gun to heat up
thoroughly. The recommended setting for the heavy fabric is between 7 and 9.
Do some test welds to fine tune the heat setting. When pulling apart, one layer of PVC should
pull off leaving the polyester weave un-covered.
Clean the area to be patched as thoroughly as possibly. A general cleaning solvent should be
used.
First, position the roller in the center of the patch. Lift one edge and slide gun between patch
and bag surface up to position of roller. Maintaining a firm and even pressure on the roller,
draw the gun carefully to the edge of patch while steadily following with the roller. Work this
principle until the whole patch has been welded, always working from the center to the edge.
Care should be taken not to allow the nozzle to come in contact with the bag. Localized
burning will result.
The repair on the outside of the bag is generally found to be adequate; however, where the
patching area is restricted on the outside of the bag, a second patch inside is essential.
The hot air gun can be used for any splits/holes up to 8” or 200mm long, larger damage should
be referred back to the manufacturer, especially where tears or cuts sever or partially sever
any main seam or where the size of the patch is restricted by valves, etc.
Hot air gun patches should extend no less than 3 inches (80mm) all the way around a repair for
maximum strength.
Adhesive Bonding Instructions
For punctures, holes, slices, and abrasions apply a patch that covers at least 1 1/2” outside the
damaged area on the INTERIOR of the lift bag.
1. Clean the area to be repaired thoroughly
2. Cut the patch to fit the area
3. Buff the damaged area and patch with the abrasive paper
4. Clean with M.E.K. or acetone.
5. Apply two coats of adhesive to EACH surface allowing at least 10 minutes for drying
between coats.
6. Allow three to five hours for drying. For best results wait 24 hours before using lift bag.
For a complete and guaranteed patch repeat the above steps with another patch on the
EXTERIOR of the lifting bag on the damaged area.
Professional 50,000 lb lift bag rocketing 150 ft. into
the air after rigging failure on (Spiegel Grove).
Load testing and certification of a Professional 70,000 lb lift bag where
the load cell reached 80,400 lbs
Lift Capacity (lbs.)
Depth (feet)
Surface
33’
66’
99’
132’
165’
198’
231’
264’
297’
330’
Ambient
Press
14.7
29.4
44.1
58.8
73.5
88.2
102.9
117.6
132.3
147.0
161.7
50 lbs.
0.8
1.6
2.4
3.2
4.0
4.8
5.6
6.4
7.2
8.0
8.8
100 lbs.
1.6
3.2
4.8
6.4
8.0
9.6
11.2
12.8
14.4
16.0
17.6
200 lbs.
3.2
6.4
9.6
12.8
16.0
19.2
22.4
25.6
28.8
32.0
35.2
500 lbs.
6.4
15.8
23.7
31.6
39.5
47.4
55.3
63.2
71.7
79.0
86.9
1000 lbs.
15.8
31.6
47.4
63.2
79.0
94.8
110.6
126.4
142.2
158.0
173.8
2000 lbs.
31.6
63.2
94.8
126.4
158.0
189.6
221.2
252.8
284.4
316.0
347.6
3000 lbs.
47.5
95.0
142.5
190.0
237.5
285.0
332.5
380.0
427.5
475.0
522.5
6000 lbs.
95.1
190.2
285.3
380.4
475.5
570.6
665.7
760.8
885.9
951.0
1046.1
12000 lbs.
190.2
380.4
570.6
760.8
951.0
1141.2
1331.4
1521.6
1711.8
1902.0
2092.2
20000 lbs.
317
634
951
1268
1585
1902
2219
2536
2853
3170
3487
When all else fails… add more bags!
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards