Mary Musgrove Interactive PowerPoint

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Mary Musgrove
By Lindsay Esterline
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Childhood
In the 1690’s a girl named
Coosaponakeesa (KOO sah poe nah
KEE sah) was born in the Creek
village of Coweta (Kuh WEE tah).
Her mother was a Creek Indian with
important Creek leaders in her
family. Her father was an English
trader named Edward Griffin from
the South Carolina colony.
Life with the English
When Coosaponakeesa was about
ten, she went to live with her
father’s family in an English
settlement near Charles Town,
South Carolina. The English settlers
gave her an English name—Mary.
Mary learned the customs of the
settlers and how to speak English in
an English school. After about five
years, Mary returned to her Creek
family.
Young Woman
In 1711 Mary married John Musgrove.
Mary and her husband set up a
trading post on the Savannah River.
Mary used her bilingual skills to be an
interpreter between the Indian people
and English settlers in order for them
and Now:
toThen
make
trades. In 1734, the
Musgroves went to England with
Back then people would trade things in
James
Oglethorpe in order to translate
order to get what they needed. How do we
for King George II and Tomochichi.
get what we need now?
The
Musgroves where granted some
land four miles from the Savannah
settlement where they built a trading
post. In 1735 John Musgrove died, and
Mary moved to the trading post.
Bringing People Together
By now Mary was a well-known
businesswoman in the Savannah
area. James Oglethorpe and a group
ofThen
English
settlers planned to start a
and Now:
new English colony called Georgia.
Back then people who needed to
Oglethorpe
asked Musgrove to help
communicate to someone that spoke a
him
communicate
witha translator.
the Creek
different
language needed
Do we still
need
translators
now?
Indians.
She
helped
him
talk to and
make friends with Tomochichi, the
leader of the Yamacraw Creek.
Richest Woman in
Georgia
By 1735, Musgrove was the richest
woman in Georgia. After marrying
her second husband, she opened
another trading post on the
Altamaha River. After her husband
died she became the largest
landowner in the colony. Musgrove
worked to keep peace between the
Creek and English settlers. When
English and Spanish settlers began
to fight, she got the Creek to join
the English side.
Later Years
In about 1742, Musgrove
married her third husband,
Reverend Thomas
Bosomworth.
Bosomworth's status and
Musgrove's skills as a
translator and peacekeeper
formed a powerful
combination.
Together they traveled into Creek villages
with messages from Oglethorpe and the
English king, and brought back speeches
from various Creek leaders. Musgrove died
sometime around 1763, but she is
remembered for all the important work she
did in the founding of Georgia.
Childhood
Charles
. Town
Coosaponakeesa’s
Creek village was near
present-day Macon,
GA
Her father, Edward
Griffin, was from the
South Carolina colony.
Colony—a group of
settlers ruled by people
in another country
BACK
The English
Settlement—a place where people just arrived
from to a new land, and plan to stay
permanently.
Custom—a way of doing things that is shared by
a group of people. For example, it was
customary for Indians to have a community
farm, but it was an English custom that farms
are owed by individual families.
BACK
Young Woman
Trading Post—a place people go to trade
things they have for other things
Interpreter/translator—a person that
explains words from one language in
another language
BACK
Bringing People Together
Communicate—to share information
Tomochichi was the chief of
the Yamacraw Indians. He was
an important mediator
between the native people
and the new English settlers
during the first years of
settlement. He was important
in keeping peaceful relations
between the two groups.
Mediator—a person who works with both
sides in a problem to try and help them to
reach an agreement
James Oglethorpe was an
English gentleman that got
King George II to agree to
start a colony in America. He
was important in founding
the Georgia colony and
keeping peace between the
Indians and the English.
BACK
Creek Life
Creek villages were built around main
squares where people held meetings
and played games. In the summer, the
houses had no walls to stay cool. In the
winter, houses had walls made from
clay and wood. The roofs of both
houses would be mad of grass or bark.
In Creek villages everyone helped
gather food from the community
gardens. The women grew the crops
such as corn, beans, and squash. The
men hunted deer, turkeys, rabbits
and caught fish in the rivers.
The Creek used deerskin for
clothing. Deerskin is soft,
warm, and doesn’t tear
easily. After trade with the
English, they began to wear
brightly colored fabrics and
beads.
More about Creek Indians
BACK
Status
Status—rank within a group of
people
A reverend (priest or pastor) was
considered to have a higher status
or rank than a trader. Musgrove had
married traders before, but she
moved up in status when she
married a reverend. The reverend
had more respect than a trader
among the colonists.
BACK
Early 1700s Trade
Traded by the
Creek
Deerskin
Food
BACK
Traded by the
English
Metal tools/pots
Cloth
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