IB Works in Translation Power Point Presentation July

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Works in translation essay
NOTES AND TIPS FOR STUDENTS
General Overview:
Works in Translation (WiT)

 This part of the course is a literary study of works in
translation, based on close reading of the works
themselves. Students are encouraged to appreciate
the different perspectives of people from other
cultures and to consider the role that culture plays in
making sense of literary works.
 Part 1, (WiT) of the course aims to deepen students’
understanding of works as being products of a time
and place. Artistic, philosophical, sociological,
historical and biographical considerations are
possible areas of study to enhance understanding of
the works.
 Number of works studied: Two at SL, three at HL.
 This essay constitutes 25% of your English grade.
This Presentation:

 The following pages remind you of the marking
criteria, and each criterium is followed by some
practical ideas and suggestions on how to best
succeed in each of the individual criteria.
 Attached are also two examples of WiT papers.
These examples were written by previous RISS
studetns, and while not perfect, should give you an
indication of what you should strive for.
Criterion A: Fulfilling the requirements of the reflective
statement
To what extent does the student show how his or her understanding of cultural and contextual
elements was developed through the interactive oral?
Note: The word limit for the reflective statement is 300–400 words. If the word limit is exceeded, 1 mark will be
deducted.
Marks
Level descriptor

0
The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors
below.
1
Reflection on the interactive oral shows superficial development of
the student’s understanding of cultural and contextual elements.
2
Reflection on the interactive oral shows some development of the
student’s understanding of cultural and contextual elements.
3
Reflection on the interactive oral shows development of the student’s
understanding of cultural and contextual elements.
Teachers’ Tips for Reflective
Statement

 Do not re-tell your interactive oral, rather demonstrate your
understanding of the cultural and contextual elements of the work.
 You are encouraged to use the first person pronoun (‘During the
interactive oral, I discovered how important the gods (Antigone) or
religion (Chronicle o/a DF) are to appreciating the work’ or ‘My
perception of time was altered after the discussion in class when
Shukov describes one day of his imprisonment . . .’ ; or ‘My
understanding of the aspect of family honour was deepened when . . . ‘
 You are also allowed to indicate whether or not you need to reconsider
a certain aspect of the work as long as you indicate clearly what that
aspect is and why it is something you need to reconsider.
 The RS is the place to make your voice/appreciation of the cultural
and contextual aspects be heard.
 See attached example of a successful RS with teacher comment
Format of Reflective Statement

 RS should precede the actual WiT Essay in you final
essay.
 The following question must be written at the top of
the page.
“How was your understanding of cultural and
contextual considerations of the work developed
through the interactive oral?”
 Indicate in some way (in the opening sentences)
which work you are reflecting on.
 Use paragraphs!
 Indicate the word count at the bottom of the page.
(300 – 400 words, maximum!)
Criterion B: Knowledge and understanding
How effectively has the student used the topic and the essay to show
knowledge and understanding of the chosen work?

Marks
Level descriptor
0
The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors
below.
1–2
The essay shows some knowledge but little understanding of the
work used for the assignment.
3–4
The essay shows knowledge and understanding of, and some
insight into, the work used for the assignment.
5–6
The essay shows detailed knowledge and understanding of, and
perceptive insight into, the work used for the assignment.
Teachers’ Tips on Knowledge
and Understanding.

 Show thorough knowledge of the text by using original
quotations, and not only the obvious ones.
 Take a risk in your analysis – dare to make a statement
which has the reader sit up and take notice of what you
are saying.
 There should be no factual mistakes in your work. ( e.g.
names of characters, plot misunderstood)
 Do not retell the plot, but select only the important
aspects to substantiate your argument.

 Construct an argument, and develop it logically; do not
just narrate or retell the plot.
 Provide evidence from the work to make your argument
clear.
 Do not even attempt to write an essay without again rereading the work carefully and critically with your own
topic in mind.
 Constantly connect your arguments and examples
(quotations from the work) to the topic of your paper,
making it clear how you connect what you are saying
with your understanding of the topic itself.
Criterion C: Appreciation of the writer’s choices
To what extent does the student appreciate how the writer’s choices of language,
structure, technique and style shape meaning?

Marks
Level descriptor
0
The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors
below.
1–2
There is some mention, but little appreciation, of the ways in which
language, structure, technique and style shape meaning.
3–4
There is adequate appreciation of the ways in which language,
structure, technique and style shape meaning.
5–6
There is excellent appreciation of the ways in which language,
structure, technique and style shape meaning.
Teachers’ Tips on Writer’s
Choices

 Focus here is not solely on the content, but how the work is






presented.
Know your literary techniques, but do not just identify them,
rather analyse their effect on the work.
Literary techniques also include sentence structure.
Discuss and consider word connotations (the emotive
implications of language used in the work).
Look at the language – is it simple, old fashioned or formal?
Think of the tools the writer has used, and the effect it has on
the reading of the text.
Include at least one mention of the writer’s technique per
paragraph – tone, setting etc.
Criterion D: Organization and development
How effectively have the ideas been organized, and how well are references to the
works integrated into the development of the ideas
Marks
Level descriptor

0
The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors
below.
1
There is some attempt to organize ideas, but little use of examples
from the works used.
2
Ideas are superficially organized and developed, with some
integrated examples from the works used.
3
Ideas are adequately organized and developed, with appropriately
integrated examples from the works used.
4
Ideas are effectively organized and developed, with well-integrated
examples from the works used.
5
Ideas are persuasively organized and developed, with effectively
integrated examples from the works used.
Teachers’ Tips on
Organization and Structure

Stick to the word limit.
Mention the work and author in your
introduction.
Include your thesis statement in the
introduction.
Use paragraphs – one main idea per paragraph.
Connect paragraphs with linking words as this
helps to logically build up your argument.

 The argument should be presented logically; take the
reader by the hand and make sure everything you
mention is clear and helps to develop your
argument.
 You must use quotes and integrate them seamlessly
into your writing – see attached example (How to use
quotations effectively from Teachit.)
 Avoid large chunks of quoted text. Short integrated
quotes show your skill in writing essays
The Conclusion

 Your conclusion is not a summing up or just
restating of your essay.
 Your conclusion should refer to your essay question
and take it to a more philosophical level without
adding any new ideas.
 Try to make an impact on the reader.
 You should have come “full circle”: address your
initial thesis statement in an original and profound
way.
Criterion E: Language
How clear, varied and accurate is the language?
How appropriate is the choice of register, style and terminology? (“Register” refers,
in this context, to the student’s use of elements such as vocabulary, tone, sentence
structure and terminology appropriate to the task.)
Marks
Level descriptor

0
The work does not reach a standard described by the descriptors below.
1
Language is rarely clear and appropriate; there are many errors in grammar, vocabulary and
sentence construction, and little sense of register and style.
2
Language is sometimes clear and carefully chosen; grammar, vocabulary and sentence
construction are fairly accurate, although errors and inconsistencies are apparent; the
register and style are to some extent appropriate to the task.
3
Language is clear and carefully chosen, with an adequate degree of accuracy in grammar,
vocabulary and sentence construction despite some lapses; register and style are mostly
appropriate to the task.
4
Language is clear and carefully chosen, with a good degree of accuracy in grammar,
vocabulary and sentence construction; register and style are consistently appropriate to the
task.
5
Language is very clear, effective, carefully chosen and precise, with a high degree of
accuracy in grammar, vocabulary and sentence construction; register and style are effective
and appropriate to the task.
Teacher’s Tips on Language

 Do not try and write too formally – the language
should be precise and not full of verbosity. ( Big
words used to only for the sake of being big words.)
 Use the correct choice of literary language for the
genre – novel or drama. (e.g. work not book, plot not
story, audience not reader.)
 Be careful of sweeping statements or statements that
do not say anything (e.g. The writer’s word choice is
effective – be specific.)
 Do not praise or criticize the work without clear
evidence. ( e.g. This is the most important work of
Sophocles)

 Always use present tense when discussing literature.
 Do not use any contractions.
 The title of the work (novel or play) is in italics.
 (Antigone is a character in Antigone)
 Your language should be formal in the sense that you
avoid informal expressions (e.g. not kids but children.)
 Spell check is there for a reason.
 Do use appropriate literary language such as
protagonist, audience, setting, climax and conflict, etc.
Format of Assignment

 Cover page: assignment title in middle of page.
 Student’s name, candidate number, date, teacher’s
name on bottom right hand side.
 Use 12pt
 Use an unobtrusive font: Times Roman
 Use double spacing.
 Put the school exam number and candidate number
in the footer on every page
 Our school number is 000627
Format of Assignment

 Indicate the word count at the bottom of the final
page. (1200 – 1500 words, maximum!)
 Please be truthful about your word count.
 The word count does not include the word count of
the reflective essay.
 The word count does not include the bibliography.
Format of Assignment

 Use a Bibliography – essential
 Use MLA style – Owl in Purdue is an excellent
resource: see online writing lab for details
 Bibliography: - an example:
 Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. Chronicle of a Death
Foretold. Trans. Gregory Rabassa. London:
Penguin Books, 2007. Print.
 Acknowledge all sources you have used in the
essay.
Finally:

 Let your work “rest“ for a day or two and approach it
again with a fresh and objective mind.
 RE-READ YOUR WORK CAREFULLY !!
 Give the work to a peer or parent (someone who does not
know the work) to read and check for
 Clarity of argument
 Grammar and sentence construction
 Logical build up of your argument
 Spelling
Submitting

 You have to hand in two printed copies of your WiT
essay to your lovely teachers on or before the due
date.
 You will be given a coversheet at a later stage to fill
in, and to indicate that the work is all your own.
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