PPT - Rotary Lebanon

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The Rotary Foundation
Programs - Grants
Funding & Recognition
Farid Gebran
DG 2007-2008
Rotary Coordinator 2010-2013 /Zone 20B
DRF Chair 2010-2013
The Rotary Foundation
1
Future Vision Pilot: Purposes
Rotarian
Perspective
Stewardship /
Compliance
Vision and
Success
Operational
Efficiency
Quality & Fit
of Grant
Proposals
Cycle Time
2
Overview…
Why Plan
 Preparing for The Rotary Foundation
Centennial
 Immense Growth
 Relevance in philanthropic world
 Evolving organization
 Rotarian feedback
 Sustainability, significance, simplification
3
Future Vision Plan
Goals
 Simplify programs and processes.
 Focus Rotarian service efforts to increase global
impact.
 Support global and local efforts.
 Increase sense of ownership at the district and club
levels.
 Enhance Rotary’s public image.
4
CALENDAR
a. Preparing DISTRICT for TRF Grants
• July-December:
Identify and appoint Chairs for DRF Subcommittees.
• 1st October:
Initiate District Qualification Process 2013-14.
• 31st October:
District Grant application available for qualified
Districts.
• January 2013:
Global Grant and Packaged Grant applications open.
• Feb-June 2013:
Continue training and qualifying Clubs.
• April 2013:
-
Qualified Clubs & Districts can begin applying for
2013-2014 TRF online.
Submit reports for all TRF Grants & Programs
5
CALENDAR
b. Preparing CLUBS for TRF Grants
• July-December:
-
Attend DRF Seminar.
Appoint a Club RFCC.
• October-June:
-
Attend Grant Management Seminar.
Submit project proposals for District Grant.
• January 2013:
Global Grant and Packaged Grant applications open to
qualified Clubs & Districts.
• Feb-June 2013:
-
• April 2013:
Qualified Clubs & Districts begin submitting
applications for RF Grants online.
Submit applications for M.G.
Submit reports for all TRF Grants & Programs.
Prepare to apply for 2013-14 RF Global & Packaged
Grants.
6
What kind of Project would you like to
Organize?
It could be:
1- Scholarship?
2- Vocational Training Team?
3- Humanitarian Project?
7
Vocational Trainning
The International exchange of young
non-Rotarian professionals
 District Grants (from DDF)
 Global Grants: min 3 members, max up to
us(minumum 30.000 usd project for two teams)
 Package Grants:Aga Khan Universities, Mercy
Ships
8
Scholarship Programs
To Support a Student’s Education
 District Grants (from DDF)
 Global Grants: minumum 30.000 usd for a
student.
 Package Grants: Unesco IHE
9
Humanitarian Programs
To Support Humanitarian Projects
 District Grants (from DDF):Small projects
 Global Grants: Minumum 30.000 usd for a
project.
 Package Grants: Oikocredit microcredit finance
10
Let’s Choose Global Grant to Organize
*Scholarship
*Vocational Training
*Humanitarian Projects
We Use the Same Method for All!!!
11
Six Areas of Focus
Purpose and Goals Statements
12
Introduction
With respect to the areas of focus policy statements, TRF notes that:
1. The goals of Future Vision are to increase efficiency in grant
processing and ensure quality of funded projects;
2. The content of each policy statement is intended to represent
eligible and ineligible activities;
3. Eligible activities reflect those that Rotary clubs and districts have
most often implemented;
4. Project planning is a bottom‐up and host club/district‐driven
process;
5. All grant requests must comply with the policy statements related
to each area of focus.
13
Peace and Conflict
Prevention/ Resolution
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to promote the practice of peace and conflict
prevention/ resolution by:
1. Training leaders, including potential youth leaders, to prevent
and mediate conflict;
2. Supporting peace‐building in communities and regions affected
by conflict;
3. 3. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals related
to peace and conflict prevention/resolution.
14
Peace and Conflict
Prevention/ Resolution
II. Parameters of Eligibility 1/3
1. Community activities targeting non‐Rotarian participants,
including conferences, trainings, and camps, in support of
nonviolence, peace‐building, and human rights;
2. Facilitated conflict resolution workshops related to topics
addressing community needs;
3. Supporting initiatives addressing psychological effects of
conflict;
4. Educating youth on preventive measures to avoid conflict;
15
Peace and Conflict
Prevention/ Resolution
II. Parameters of Eligibility 2/3
5. Training programs or campaigns to address negative social
dynamics in a community;
6. Communication and arbitration among parties previously
engaged in direct conflict;
7. Vocational training teams
8. Scholarships for graduate‐level
16
Peace and Conflict
Prevention/ Resolution
II. Parameters of Eligibility 3/3
Are NOT Eligible:
1. Peace conferences targeting Rotarian participants;
2. Enrollment at a Rotary Peace Center partner university in the
same, or similar,
academic program as those pursued by Rotary Peace Fellows.
17
Disease Prevention
& Treatment
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to prevent disease and promote health by:
1. Improving the capacity of local health care professionals;
2. Promoting disease prevention programs;
3. Enhancing the health infrastructure of local communities;
4. Educating and mobilizing communities to help prevent the
spread of major diseases;
5. Preventing physical disability resulting from disease or injury;
6. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals
18
Disease Prevention
& Treatment
II. Parameters of Eligibility 1/2
1. Testing with counseling and referrals/admission to treatment;
2. Education on preventing transmission of disease
3. Providing mobile technology equipment & vehicles to monitor
& treat patients;
4. Equipment supported by the local health infrastructure
5. Provision of prevention programs;
6. Providing technical platform and training;
7. Treatment of diseases that includes a training of health service
professionals, or provide public health education.
19
Disease Prevention
& Treatment
II. Parameters of Eligibility 2/2
8. Scholarships for graduate‐level study in programs related to
disease prevention and treatment;
9. Vocational training teams that focus on educational
components related to activities outlined above.
Are NOT Eligible:
1. Projects that consist exclusively of an equipment purchase, unless
supported by the local health infrastructure that includes
appropriate operational and maintenance plans;
2. Medical missions/surgical team trips that do not provide educational
outreach programs or significant capacity building in the project
20
country.
Water and Sanitation
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to ensure that people have sustainable access to water
and sanitation by:
1. Providing equitable community access to safe water, improved
sanitation and hygiene.
2. Strengthening the ability of communities to develop, fund and
maintain sustainable water and sanitation systems;
3. Supporting programs that enhance communities’ awareness of
the benefits of safe water, sanitation and hygiene;
4. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals related to
water and sanitation.
21
Water and Sanitation
II. Parameters for Eligibility
1. Access to safe drinking water;
2. Access to improved sanitation;
3. Improved hygiene;
4. Community development and management of systems for
sustainability;
5. Watershed management and food security plans that depend on
adequate water supply;
6. Water for production;
7. Vocational training teams supporting the above activities;
8. Scholarships for graduate‐level study in programs related to water
and sanitation.
22
Maternal and child Health
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to improve the health of mothers and their children by:
1. Reducing the mortality and morbidity rate for children under
the age of five;
2. Reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity rate;
3. Improving access to essential medical services, trained
community health leaders and health care providers for mothers
and their children;
4. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals related to
maternal and child health.
23
Maternal and child Health
II. Parameters for Eligibility 1/4
1. Prenatal care for pregnant women;
2. Labor and delivery services for pregnant women;
3. Providing medical equipment to underserved clinics and
hospital maternity wards, when provided in conjunction with
prenatal care educational activities;
4. Training and/or “train the trainer” initiatives for maternal and
child health professionals and leaders
24
Maternal and child Health
II. Parameters for Eligibility 2/4
5. Training and/or “train the trainer” initiatives for skilled birth
attendants;
6. Prenatal and child care educational activities for parents and
families;
7. Initiatives that build upon and/or improve capacity of existing
community initiatives and/or local women’s groups pertaining
to maternal and child health;
8. Education about and access to birth control, family planning
and/or disease prevention and reduction initiatives, inclusive of
HIV/AIDS and human papillomavirus1 (HPV);
25
Maternal and child Health
II. Parameters for Eligibility 3/4
9.
Education and training on sexual health, particularly for adolescent
girls;
10. Vocational training teams that focus on educational components related
to activities outlined above, whether intended for the public, traditional
health leaders or health professionals in the recipient community;
11. Scholarships for graduate‐level study in programs related to maternal
and child health;
12. Relevant immunization for children under five;
13. Relevant immunizations for women and adolescent girls;
14. Interventions to combat pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria, and/or measles
for mothers and children under five;
26
Maternal and child Health
II. Parameters for Eligibility 4/4
15. Interventions to reduce the impact of sexually transmitted disease in
women, e.g., HIV/AIDS, cancer of the cervix, gonorrhea and syphilis, etc.
16. Preventing mother‐to‐child transmission of HIV;
17. Promotion of breastfeeding and other interventions to fight malnutrition;
18. Surgical repair of fistula;
19. Surgeries/procedures to correct cleft palates;
20. Lifesaving surgeries and surgeries to address congenital problems
provided they are supported by the local health infrastructure and include
appropriate follow-up care.
Are NOT Eligible: Medical missions/surgical team trips that do not provide
significant capacity building in the project country.
27
Basic Education and Literacy
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to ensure that all people have sustainable access to
education and literacy by:
1. Involving the community to support programs that strengthen
the capacity of communities to provide basic education and
literacy to all;
2. Increasing adult literacy in communities;
3. Working to reduce gender disparity in education;
4. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals related to
basic education and literacy.
28
Basic Education and Literacy
II. Parameters for Eligibility 1/2
1. Access to quality basic primary and secondary education;
2. Educating adults in literacy;
3. Providing training in teaching literacy, curriculum
development and school administration;
4. Strengthening educational experience through improved
materials and facilities;
5. Community management of education systems;
6. Vocational training teams supporting the above activities;
7. Scholarships for graduate‐level study in programs related to
basic education and literacy.
29
Basic Education and Literacy
II. Parameters for Eligibility 2/2
Are NOT Eligible:
1. Projects that consist exclusively of equipment purchases;
2. Projects that provide tuition or school supplies without the
means for the community to provide these in the future.
30
Economic & Community
Development
I. Areas of Focus Statement of Purpose & Goals
TRF enables Rotarians to invest in people by creating sustainable, measurable
and long term economic improvements in their communities and livelihoods by:
1. Building the capacity of entrepreneurs, community leaders, local
organizations, and community networks to support economic
development in impoverished communities;
2. Developing opportunities for productive work;
3. Reducing poverty in underserved communities;
4. Supporting studies for career‐minded professionals related to
economic and community development.
31
Economic & Community
Development
II. Parameters for Eligibility 1/2
1. Access to financial services for the poor, which may include but are not
limited to microcredit, savings, or insurance;
2. Training related to economic and community development including but
not limited to entrepreneurship, community leadership, vocational, and
financial literacy;
3. Small business/cooperative/social enterprise development and income
generating activities for the poor;
4. Agricultural development for subsistence and small farmers;
5. Community‐led and coordinated adopt‐a‐village or comprehensive
community development activities;
6. Vocational training teams supporting the above activities;
7. Scholarships for graduate‐level study in programs related to grass‐roots
economic development
32
Economic & Community
Development
II. Parameters for Eligibility 2/2
Are NOT Eligible:
1. Community infrastructure projects, if they are not part of a
larger income generating activity;
2. Community beautification projects;
3. Construction or rehabilitation of community centers.
33
V- POLIO PLUS
Promotion & Education
Fundraising- Donations- Club Contributions- DDF
Polio Plus Grants
a. Applications can be submitted only by:
- Partner Agencies or
- National Polio Plus Committees
b. Applications:
- Reviewed by F. International Polio Plus Committee
- Considered by the Trustees
34
Elements of Successful
Projects
Global Grants are:
1. Sustainable – communities are able to address their needs
after the Rotary club/district has completed its work;
2. Measurable – sponsors can select standard measures for their
area of focus from the Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit or use
their own measures to show the good results of their work;
3. Community driven – global grants are designed by the host
community based upon the needs they have identified;
4. Aligned with an area of focus – as defined in the policy
documents.
35
Districts & Clubs
QUALIFICATIONS
36
I- DISTRICT Qualifications 1/2
37
I- DISTRICT Qualifications 2/2
District Officer Responsibilities
District Officers are: DG- DGE- DRFCC. Their Responsibilities include:
38
Online Process
for district qualification
2012 Governors-elect Training Seminar
39
Online Process
for district qualification
1-District Governor
2-District Governor Elect
3-Rotary Foundation Chair
2012 Governors-elect Training Seminar
40
District Qualification
41
District Qualification
42
District Qualification
43
District Qualification
44
District Qualification
45
District Qualification
46
District Qualification
47
District Qualification
48
District Qualification
49
District Qualification
50
II. CLUB Qualification
51
Questions
II- Club Qualifications
1. Why must a club be qualified to apply for Rotary
Foundation Grants?
2. How does a club be qualified?
3. Who sign the club MOU?
4. When should the grant management seminar take
place?
5. Can the grant management seminar be conducted
via webinar or other virtual medium?
52
Questions
II- Club Qualifications
6. Can clubs attend training in another district?
7. Who attends the grant management seminar?
8. Can the district add requirements to club
qualification?
9. What extra requirements can a district have?
10. How should a district handle requests for district
grant funds from nonqualified clubs?
11. Who is responsible for club qualification?
53
TRF GRANTS
A.
1.
2.
3.
54
1. District Grants
a. Grant Planning
- One DG annually
- Up to 50% of DDF
- District Administration
- Clubs submit funding requests to the District for
the following projects:
• Service Projects
• Scholarships
• Vocational Training
b. District Spending Plan
- DG- DRFCC- DGSC create the District Grant
Spending Plan.
55
1. District Grants .. continued
c. Business Cycle
- DG, DRFCC, DGSC submit and authorize applications online
through Member Access
- Application may be submitted at anytime:
• Before 1st July
• After 1st July
Payment after 1st July
Payment within 10 business days approx.
-
Funds issued once the spending plan is approved and all prepayment requirements have been met.
-
Deadline for 2013-14 is 15th May, 2014.
56
1. District Grants .. continued
d. Payment
- One block payment
- Can be made from 1st July to 15th May
- All previous D.G. must be closed before new payment.
- Districts must be current on reporting
57
1. District Grants .. continued
e. Reporting
- Final report 12 months of payment once they have fully
distributed DG funds to individual projects.
- Must include final list using the same format as the D.
spending plan
- Any changes must be noted.
- Clubs projects do not need to be complete before district
report.
- It is the District’s responsibility.
- Districts are required to report use of DDF to Clubs.
58
1. District Grants .. continued
f. Benefits of District Grants
59
2. Global Grants
a. Terms & Conditions
60
2. Global Grants … continued
a. Terms & Conditions
- Global Grants offer a minimum World Fund Award of $ 15,000 for
a minimum project of $30,000.
- World Fund Award based on:
• 100% match of DDF
• 50% match of cash contributions
- G.G must have 2 primary sponsors (clubs or districts)
- Both sponsors must be qualified
- Additional partners do not have to be qualified
- G.G. may support:
• Scholars for a term of 1 to 4 years, covering tuition, room and
board, other expenses (different from Ambassadorial Scholarships).
• Vocational Training: each team at least 1 Rotarian Team Leader
and 3 non Rotarian Team Members.
61
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle
Global Grants first step: List of questions will be asked in the
application must be answered.
Following these steps will help your club or district develop an
eligible global grant project or activity:
1. Assess needs
2. Choose area of focus.
3. Select goals.
4. Determine sustainability.
5. Complete your proposal.
6. Submit your application.
62
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Steps)
1. Your needs assessment should help you determine the
scope of your project/ activity.
2. Next, consider how community needs and member
interests fit one or more of the areas of focus.
3. The next step in developing a global grant is to choose
an area of focus and specific goals that your project/
activity will target.
63
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Submit your Proposal)
4. Once you know the needs of the community and have
identified the areas of focus that align with that need,
begin to plan your project/ activity. Be sure to include
strategies for the project/ activity to continue after the
grant funds are expended.
5. You will need to explain how your proposed project or
activity will be funded. This includes an itemized
budget, description of community involvement, and
legal authorization.
64
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Submit your Application)
Rotary Foundation staff review your grant proposal. If it
meets minimum requirements, you’ll be asked to submit
the application online for an in-depth review. The
application should provide detailed project information
and the authorizations of the DRFC and DG.
65
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Application Process)
- Club qualifies.
- Club submits club-developed global grant proposal online.
- TRF reviews proposal for initial approval.
- Club submits global grant application.
- District approves online.
- TRF reviews for final approval.
66
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Payment)
67
2. Global Grants … continued
b. Business Cycle (Reporting)
• Progress report submitted 12 months after
funds received.
• Every 12 months until project is complete.
• Final report submitted within 2 months of
project completion.
68
3. Packaged Grants
- Provide opportunities for districts & clubs to
work with RF Strategic Partners.
- Activities funded from the World Fund.
- Projects support the Areas of Focus and can
include scholarships, humanitarian projects
& vocational training.
69
Supporting The Rotary Foundation
PolioPlus Fund
End Polio Now
Annual Programs Fund
For Support Today
Permanent Fund
To Secure Tomorrow
15
70
Our Rotary Foundation Is Unique
 The Rotary Foundation is your Foundation
 Addresses the greatest needs
 World reach greater than the United Nations
 We can go where politicians and religious
groups cannot
14
71
Foundation Funding
Contributions
SHARE
System
8
72
The SHARE System
 Divides Annual Programs Fund into
– District Designated Fund (DDF)
– World Fund
 Transforms contributions into grants and more
 Allows clubs to determine how district
contributions are spent
9
73
Annual Programs Fund
 Supports grants and programs through the
SHARE system
 Contributions credited to donor’s club and
applied to club’s per capita goal
17
74
Annual Programs Fund Contributions
At the end of Rotary year, Annual Programs
Fund contributions split evenly:
 50% to the World Fund
 50% credited to the district’s DDF
10
75
76
Permanent Fund Earnings
The Trustees determine the spendable percentage
of earnings. If a district has contributions
designated to Permanent Fund-SHARE, the
earnings are split:
 50% to the World Fund
 50% credited to the district’s DDF
11
77
Two Funds
 District Designated
Fund
– District controlled
– Used by Rotarians in
the district
– Spent on Foundation
grants and programs
 World Fund
– Trustees control
– Used by Rotarians
worldwide
– Spent on Foundation
grants and programs
12
78
Who is involved in planning?
 District governor
 District governor-elect
 District Rotary Foundation
committee chair
 District Rotary Foundation
subcommittee chairs
13
79
TRF
Financial Position 1
80
TRF
Financial Position 2
81
TRF
Statement of Activities 2012
1
2012
82
TRF
Statement of Activities 2012
2
83
TRF
Statement of Activities 2011
1
2011
84
85
TRF
Statement of Activities 2011
2
TRF
Statement of Functional Expenses 2012
Program
Award
Expenses
Total
Education
16,904
5,265
22,169
Humanitarian
48,415
6,772
55,187
PolioPlus
102,774
2,227
105,001
Global Grants
10,580
3,816
14,396
District Grants
5,094
---
5,094
Other Programs
1,924
268
2,192
185,691
18,348
204,039
91%
9%
100%
86
TRF
Statement of Functional Expenses 2011
Program
Award
Expenses
Total
Education
16,592
5,202
21,794
Humanitarian
40,547
6,925
47,472
PolioPlus
75,620
2,250
77,870
Global Grants
9,310
3,516
12,826
District Grants
6,064
231
6,295
Other Programs
2,114
270
2,384
150,247
18,394
168,641
89%
11%
100%
87
Annual Programs Fund
100% Member Participation
US$100 per capita
16
88
TRF Sustaining Member
Contributes at least US$100 every year to
the Annual Programs Fund
2009-2010
18
89
Paul Harris Fellow
Rotarian who contributes US$1,000 or in
whose name $1,000 is contributed
19
90
Paul Harris Society Member
Contributes US$1,000 each year to the Annual
Programs Fund-SHARE, PolioPlus, or
approved grants
20
91
Club Banner Recognition
Top Three
Per Capita Giving Clubs
100% Paul Harris
Fellow Club
21
92
Club Banner Recognition
100% Rotary
Foundation Sustaining
Member Club
Every Rotarian,
Every Year Club
22
93
Permanent Fund
 Rotary’s endowment fund
 Contributions invested in
perpetuity
 Only earnings are spent
23
94
Endowed Naming
Opportunities
 $25,000: earnings support SHARE or World
Fund
 $50,000: general support to Rotary Peace
Centers
24
95
Endowed Naming
Opportunities
 $100,000: general support of an area of focus
 $250,000: support donor’s district participation
in global grants, or endow a Rotary Peace
Fellow (certificate program)
25
96
Endowed Naming
Opportunities
 $500,000: specify area of focus and
geographic preference, or endow a Rotary
Peace Fellow (two-year master’s program)
 $1,000,000: individually crafted with increase
in specificity
26
97
Rotary Peace Centers
Rotary Peace Centers
Major Gift Initiative
 Seeks to fully endow
program
 Goal of US$95 million
by 2015
 Major Gift focus
27
98
Benefactor
 A provision in estate plan to gift a minimum of
US$1,000 to The Rotary Foundation
 An outright gift of $1,000 to
Permanent Fund
28
99
Bequest Society
 A provision in an estate plan totaling US$10,000
or more to the Foundation
 Examples: living will, life insurance policy
29
100
Major Donor
 Personal outright or cumulative gifts of
US$10,000 or more to the Foundation
 Cash, life income agreements, bequests, real
estate, or securities
30
101
Arch C. Klumph Society
 Trustees Circle US$250,000 to 499,999.99
 Chair’s Circle US$500,000 to 999,999.99
 Foundation Circle US$1 million and above
31
102
THANK YOU!
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