USCCB Statement on Preaching - United States Conference of

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Rev. W. Shawn McKnight, S.T.D.
Executive Director
Secretariat of Clergy, Consecrated Life
and Vocations
Power Point Available @
www.usccb.org/priestlyformation

Pope Benedict XVI calls for improved homilies
Sacramentum Caritatis
 Verbum Domini


Expands upon Fulfilled in Your Hearing
Explicit encouragement for doctrinal & catechetical
preaching
 Addresses challenges for the homily in the New
Evangelization


Directed to priests, deacons & those involved with the initial
and ongoing formation of clergy



Draft submitted by CCLV to USCCB
Administrative Committee, with the support of
Divine Worship, Doctrine, Cultural Diversity,
Ecumenism, Evangelization & Catechesis,
Canonical Affairs, and Communications
Approval granted for consideration by the
bishops at the November 2012 Plenary
Assembly
If approved by the bishops, publication in
January in English/Spanish; implementation in
fall 2013

CCLV Workshop for teachers of homiletics


June 24-25, 2013
Notre Dame
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Youth involvement in Church is critical for
vocations;
Low encouragement reported from
youth/young adult/ campus ministers;
Underrepresentation of Hispanic/Latinos and
strong representation of Asians.
Trending younger still; average 34.6, median 31
27% have college debt; average $21,125, median
$18,000
CONSIDERATION OF A VOCATION TO
PRIESTHOOD AND RELIGIOUS LIFE
AMONG NEVER-MARRIED
U.S. CATHOLICS
--CARA SURVEY REPORT
October
2012
FSSD
REV. SHAWN MCKNIGHT, S.T.D.
E X E C U T I V E D I R E C TOR
U S C C B S E C R E TA RI AT O F C L E RGY, C O N S E C RAT E D L I F E & VO C AT I O N S
FUNDING
WHY THIS SURVEY?
Annual Surveys of the
Newly Ordained
Annual Surveys of
Perpetually Professed
ANNUAL SURVEYS OF NEW
PRIESTS (2012) /RELIGIOUS (2011)
2012
2011 National
Caucasian / White
71%
66%
58%
15%
10%
34%
9%
African / African American
3%
17%
4%
4%
3%
Hispanic / Latino
Asian / Pacific Islander
COUNTRY OF BIRTH OF ORDINANDS
United States
Vietnam
Columbia
Mexico
Poland
Philippines
El Salvador
Other
71%
5%
5%
4%
3%
2%
1%
9%
Total Hispanics /
Latinos: 15%
U.S. Born Hispanics /
Latinos:
<5%
FUTURE ORDINATION CLASSES
(SEMINARIANS 2011)
PERCENTAGE OF HISPANICS
BY GENERATION
VOCATION SURVEY CHARACTERISTICS
 Self-administered, national online sur vey, conducted in May and
June 201 2
 Scientific, probability -based sample of 1 ,428 never -married
Catholics ages 14 and older [R: 14-35]
Males (average age 26):
 Six in ten are adults (1 8 or older)
 36% Non-Hispanic white adults, 20% non -Hispanic white teens
 19% Hispanic adults, 16% Hispanic teens
 4% Other race adults, 5% other race teens
Females (average age 28):
 Seven in ten are adults (1 8 or older)
 40% Non-Hispanic white adults, 15% non-Hispanic white teens
 22% Hispanic adults, 13% Hispanic teens
 7% Other race adults, 3% other race teens
KEY SUBGROUPS
MOST LIKELY TO HAVE CONSIDERED A VOCATION
Most impor tant:
 Those who attended Catholic educational institutions at any level
 Those who were encouraged to consider a vocation by any type of
person
 Those who per sonally know priests and men and women religious
 Those involved in parish youth and young adult groups
SUBGROUP: CATHOLIC EDUCATION
Catholic Educational Enrollment
All respondents
Non-Hispanic
white teen
Hispanic teen
Other race teen
Non-Hispanic
white adult
Hispanic adult
Other race adult
None
64%
Primary Secondary
only
only
16%
4%
Primary &
secondary
10%
Primary
& college
1%
College
only
2%
Primary,
secondary,
and college
4%
63
76
64
17
13
16
6
1
10
10
7
3
0
0
0
2
0
2
1
4
5
54
80
43
20
7
29
2
3
8
15
2
18
1
1
0
3
4
1
6
3
1
Minority student enrollment in Catholic schools has been hit hard by the recession. In
2005-06 NCEA reported that 27% of students in U.S. Catholic schools were something
other than Non-Hispanic white. This dropped to 19% in the 2011-12 school year
(currently 14% of students are Hispanic).
SUBGROUP: ENCOURAGEMENT (MALE)
Were you ever encouraged to consider a vocation as
a priest or religious brother by any of these people?
Never-married male Catholic teens and adults responding “Yes”:
Parish Priest/Priest Chaplain
Mother
Grandmother
Other family members
Father
Parishioner from the church you
attend
Teacher/Catechist
Religious Sister
Religious Brother
Grandfather
Deacon
Youth Minister
Friend or co-worker
Campus Minister
Military Chaplain
Bishop
Non-Hispanic
white
14%
10
9
6
5
Hispanic
3%
5
5
10
5
Other race
9%
8
14
3
6
5
5
5
4
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
2
6
1
2
3
1
0
1
8
5
2
2
2
0
6
2
0
2
0
SUBGROUP: ENCOURAGEMENT (FEMALE)
Were you ever encouraged to consider a vocation as
a religious sister by any of these people?
Never-married female Catholic teens and adults responding “Yes”:
Religious Sister
Parish Priest/Priest Chaplain
Teacher/Catechist
Mother
Grandmother
Other family members
Father
Parishioner from the church you
attend
Deacon
Youth Minister
Grandfather
Friend or co-worker
Bishop
Religious Brother
Campus Minister
Military Chaplain
Non-Hispanic
white
9%
8
6
4
4
3
2
Hispanic
4%
2
6
5
6
4
4
Other race
5%
14
11
6
12
5
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
<1
<1
0
1
<1
3
1
<1
0
1
0
0
2
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
OTHER KEY SUBGROUPS
Also Important:
• Weekly Mass attenders (now and in high school)
• Those who lived in households where parents talked to them about
religion at least once a week
• Participants in prayer and devotional activities, groups, or programs (e.g.,
Bible study, Eucharistic adoration, retreats, and prayer groups)
• Those belonging to a group that encourages devotion to Mary
• Those who regularly read the Bible or pray with Scripture
• Participants in World Youth Day or a National Catholic Youth Conference
HISPANIC CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES
 Institutionally they are less connected to the Church
 However, Latinos have some unique cultural supports for
religious participation.
 While Hispanics are no different than others in regular Mass
attendance, they are much more likely to participate in prayer and
devotional practices in the home, and to attend Marian feast day
Masses.
 Spiritual talk at home rates higher among Latina respondents,
particularly during high school.
 Higher participation rates in World Youth Day, and higher
participation in NCYC for Hispanic adults.
A KEY CHALLENGE: LEVEL OF EDUCATION
Highest Level of Education among Adult Respondents
Less than
high school
Male adults
Non-Hispanic white
Hispanic
Other race
Female adults
Non-Hispanic white
Hispanic
Other race
High
school
Some
college
Bachelor's
degree or more
4%
26
0
32%
38
26
35%
17
32
29%
19
42
2%
18
2
32%
42
17
37%
24
31
29%
17
50
For further
information
UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF CATHOLIC BISHOPS
SECRETARIAT OF
CLERGY, CONSECRATED LIFE AND VOCATIONS
USCCB.ORG/VOCATIONS
EMAIL: [email protected]
CENTER FOR APPLIED RESEARCH IN THE APOSTOLATE
cara.georgetown.edu
email: [email protected]

Consultation held at the USCCB in June 2011


15 psychologists, seminary & diocesan officials,
canon & civil lawyers
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: Use of Psychology in Admissions
Chapter 3: The Process of Admissions
Chapter 4: Record Retention & Other Legal Concerns
Glossary: Definition of Terms


First chapter on the use of psychology in the
admissions process under review
Chapters on the process for admissions,
canonical and legal concerns, and glossary of
terms still to come.


Program of Priestly Formation, 5th edition, expires
December 2015
Consultation has begun with key constituencies

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
NCDVD
NACS
MATS
FSSD
Rectors
Preliminary review of the PPF as an organization




Request for FSSD to review the current PPF
Identify norms that need improvement [134]
Fall 2013, work on new language
Fall 2014, CCLV Committee considers proposals
www.usccb.org/priestlyformation
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